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Attack on UNMISS Compound: What Happened in Bor?

Posted: April 18, 2014 by PaanLuel Wël in Junub Sudan

Gunmen kill at least 20 in attack on South Sudan UN base: US envoy

Gunmen have killed at least 20 people and wounded 70 others when they stormed a United Nations base in South Sudan, the US envoy to the world body said.

Ambassador Samantha Power strongly condemned the “brazen, inhuman attack on unarmed civilians” in the war-ravaged town of Bor.

The United Nations (UN) had previously said dozens of civilians from a rival tribe had been wounded in the “unprovoked” attack before peacekeepers fought them off.

Almost 5,000 civilians are sheltering inside the fortified base of the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS), one of the most bitterly contested regions in the four-month-long conflict splitting the country.

“The United States strongly condemns the recent attacks by armed groups in South Sudan that have purposefully targeted civilians as well as UN Mission in South Sudan sites and personnel,” Ms Power said.

She called the latest attack “particularly egregious,” noting that the heavily armed group of attackers used rocket-propelled grenades to breach the compound and fire on the people inside.

“This latest outrage against the people of South Sudan is an affront to the international community and violates fundamental principles of civilian protection,” Ms Power said, adding that UNMISS sites should be considered “inviolable”.

The United States, she said, will collaborate with its allies to determine who was responsible for the “horrific attack” and bring its perpetrators to justice.

Ms Power also urged countries that have committed additional forces to UNMISS to speed up their deployment.

“The people of South Sudan deserve the opportunity to begin rebuilding their country, and to develop the national and local institutions they need to put South Sudan back on a path toward stability and democracy,” she added.

“But that process can only begin in earnest when all parties to the conflict adhere to the January 23 Cessation of Hostilities agreement, lay down their weapons, and engage constructively in inclusive political negotiations led by the Intergovernmental Authority on Development.”

Ms Power urged the country’s leaders to “put the safety and wellbeing of their fellow citizens above their own short-sighted political and economic interests, or risk the future of their country, the welfare of their people and strong international consequences”.

UNMISS said its forces returned fire – first firing warning shots and then taking part in a ferocious gun battle – before the fighters retreated.

The gunmen had initially approached the camp “under the guise of peaceful demonstrators” intending to present a petition to the UN, before opening fire and breaching the compound, according to the mission.

The civilians had fled into the base weeks ago amid brutal ethnic massacres in the world’s newest nation.

AFP

President Kiir Should Learn From the Past

Posted: April 18, 2014 by PaanLuel Wël in Featured Articles, Simon Yel

By Simon Yel

President Kiir will not learn from the past until he heard in SSTV or miraya FM that ” president Kiir was ousted some few hours ago” in the way he did not learn the plan of disgruntled group when they had conducted their press release on Decc.6.2013 and boycotted the NLC meeting not until the bullet missed him in December 15th.

President Kiir will not will discover the plan of UN chief Hilde Johnson until he is arrested by UN soldiers like Laurent Gbagbo of Ivory Coast in the same way he didn’t discover how Riek and Taban managed to escape Juba .

President Kiir will not learn that UN is supplying weapons to the rebels and equipping her troops to fight the gov’t until UN start capturing Lakes,Wau and Warrap . The recently intercepted UNIMISS vehicles in Lakes state full of munitions and lethal weapons should have been a great lesson for him to learn from though he always refuses to listen to NS reports, I didn’t know that he will also refuse to use his own eyes to learn what the hell Halide is doing behind the scene of keeping peace but it became the same ” as ears as eyes”. Yesterday(16.4.2014) during the launch of Food Security Council and the Agriculture Season 2014 , he ordered the security organs not to search again the UN vehicles and other related humanitarian organisations but in the same day evening , the three(3) UN ferries were caught on river Nile near Bor( Bor port) heading to Bentiu full of ammunition and lethal weapons.

President Kiir will not learn operations of United State foreign policy of regime change until he is killed like Mamuar Gaddafi of Libya or he is in dock at ICC like Charles Taylor of Liberia or until Pentagon release another press confirming their support to the regime change like what they did in south Vietnam “For the military coup d’etat against president Ngo Dinh Diem of south Vietnam , the U.S. must accept its full share of responsibility,”says Secretary of Defense Robert McNamara in 1963.

President Kiir will not learn the interest of EU and USA diplomats nor even learn from president Putin’s speech during the crisis of Ukraine and I quoted ” our western partners have come to believe in their exclusivity and exceptionalism, that they can decide the destinies of the world, that only they can ever be right. They act as they please: here and there, they use force against sovereign states, building coalitions based on the principle “If you are not with us, you are against us.” To make this aggression look legitimate, they force the necessary resolutions on the UN Security Council and the UN”, until John Kerry and William Hague call for military action against his gov’t and say ” he is a man who has killed thousands of innocents civilians on tribal line and he has across the red line and hence lost his legitimacy” . I though what is happening in Syria and Ukraine should have great lesson for Kiir to learn who exactly the western nations are .

President Kiir will not learn about how many gov’ts did US overthrow until he reads the newspaper while in prison that USA had overthrown 24 gov’ts eg ,Syria, Guatemala, Indonesia , Cuba, DRC, Dominican Republic, South Vietnam,, Brazil, Argentina, Angola, Turkey, Philippines, Iran, Libya , Somalia, Venezuela, Afghanistan, Chile , Poland and recently south Sudan .

President Kiir will not learn that the UN has a record of overthrowing one gov’t on her own , the gov’t of Ivory coast which UN had claimed that “Gbagbo made mistake after mistake and in the end he lost everything ,We intervened to prevent a disaster” until Halide Johnson says ” Kiir made decree after decree and he lost the legitimacy’’ and ordered UN to clear his stronghold like Aweil, Rumbek and Warrap like what UN had done in Ivory cost clearing Yopougon the stronghold of Laurent .

How History is made?

Posted: April 18, 2014 by PaanLuel Wël in David Aoloch, Poems.

By David Aoloch Bion

—–

History is not stolen at midnight

By cunning

Not robbed at noon

By might

But a honour confer upon the wise

Who sacrifice to allow those deny

Free right of sunshine by unjust cloud

Of human wickedness to see the sun

—–

Never open history

And you don’t find your name there

And you become rabid

Start to kill people

Where were you

When they were writing the history?

Is their blame?

—–

Never enter library

Find the name of your age mate

Who fought a great battle

Who made a political achievement

And you model yourself after him

Realigning his campaigns and decisions

You can kill as many as Hitler

And you can kill yourself as Hitler too

And never make the history you aspire


By Malith Alier 

Reports coming from Bor, Jonglei State’s capital that people are being killed by UNMISS “protection force” is the first of its kind. Under whatever circumstances, it should never have happened. The UNMISS which has now taken a partisan stand did not use force in Gumuruk and Akobo when about seven members of its staff were killed by attackers from the Counties of Pibor and Akobo respectively.

The latest development is a sign that the current conflict has so far acquired a three notch height. It is advisable for UN mission to note that fact. More than five people dead and many more injured by the UNMISS which is suppose to protect civilians is not a simple matter. Let’s recalled that UNMISS was advised to evacuate those they think are in danger to safer places because its compounds were never meant to be for camps of displaced people. From now on nothing will prevent such occurrences from taking place while this conflict persists.

The people of Bor are not to blame in this situation because of UN and government negligence. This is because there are many unpalatable events that have spelt doom to cooperation among the host community, IDPs and the UNMISS.

First of these is the weapons saga that surfaced in Rumbek early in the year. This has had irreparable damage to the relationship. The same saga surface once again when a boat carrying fuel was discovered to have a hidden cache of weapons and munitions on board. This caused disagreement between the State Governor on the one hand and security and the residents of Bor on the other. The Governor argued that they should be allowed to proceed to Bentiu which is still experiencing fierce battles and also under threat of rebel control citing their clearance from Juba by Ministry of Interior.

Secondly, is the imposition of a Governor on the people of Bor and other scores of Counties whose inhabitants have not rebelled. He himself is seen in the lens of rebellion because his County of Fangak is under rebels’ control. This is evident from the fact that he recently appointed new County Commissioners of Fangak, Uror, Nyirol, Ayod and Akobo replacing the ones who joined Riek Machar conspirators. Note further that he had stones thrown at him with his entourage at the same camp when he went to persuade the IDPs to leave the camp and join the rest of civilians. Therefore, he is neither credible nor reliable in the eyes of the rebels and government supporters. The rebels think of him as a sell-out but the government supporters regarded him as sympathetic to rebels. His appointment of Baba Medan whose County was involved in another devastating rebellion is like adding an insult to injury.

Thirdly, those who shelter in the UNMISS camps are rebel core supporters who celebrate every little victory scored by the rebels either on the battle field or in Addis Ababa on political level. The capture of Bentiu was a major victory they celebrated in such away to annoy the residents of Bor City. There is a saying that says do not abuse the crocodile while you have not crossed the river. The rebels should have known that those who dying on the front line have family members in Bor who do not share their happiness brought about by the fall of Bentiu. Had they celebrated quietly in doors, the results should have been different. What they did was an intolerable height of folly.

Last but not least is the genesis of this entire ongoing and unfortunate hostile environment beginning last December. It has stoked hostilities and drove wedges among communities and between communities and the UN Mission. Riek Machar and President Kiir will have an uphill battle to reunite a country ethnically divided down the middle if either wins the fight for the soul of South Sudan.

The people of Bor are among the most tolerant people in this country. This tolerance was shown the night before the fall of Bor on 18 December 2013. Two brothers close to Nuer camp popularly known as “ci Nuer ben?” in Dinka were mercilessly slaughtered by the rebels who hid in the camp. There was no retaliation despite Dinka being the majority in the town.

The events of 1991 seemed to have been tacitly forgiven however, the 2013 and running conflict where the so-called white army ransacked and killed thousands of innocent people for the second time will take years to heal. The living dead still haunt us in whatever we do. Nobody celebrates death except the IDPs in Bor compound under the watch of UNMISS. This celebration is utterly intolerable and deserves what it gets. Just imagine if it were the other way round. Would they accept it, absolutely no?

The demonstration in Bor is a result of temperature boil over in the heat of towns falling to rebels and the subsequent celebration by the displaced people not knowing that they are in a different territory that is mourning not only the lost of towns but their sons being killed in the battles. People should not offend sensitivities of others particularly in relation to death. It is un African to celebrate death event that of your enemy.

Redefined CPA: Community-Led Peace Agreements

Posted: April 17, 2014 by PaanLuel Wël in Junub Sudan

 It is becoming increasingly clear that the IGAD-led mediation process in Addis Ababa will not lead to a definitive resolution to the conflict in South Sudan in the near future. Three months after the cessation of hostilities agreement, there has been no progress on implementation modalities, tabling of an agenda and declaration of principles. And yet the talks have been adjourned (yet again) to April 31st 2014 ‘to give time for the mediators to consult with the heads of IGAD’. We have fully prioritized this externally driven process of mediation as the sole response to the current crisis. This, despite misgivings about whether those currently at the negotiating table fully represent the needs and fears of the communities affected and impacted by the conflict. Indeed, there have been numerous calls for inclusion of various stakeholders in the Addis Ababa talks, but fewer calls for a parallel mediation process that engages the grassroots. This must change. It will be important to recognize that the victims and perpetrators of this conflict are interchangeable to an extent, numbers involved are huge and in the case of the Nuer, impact entire age-set(s). Conversely, reasons for sustained violence continue to evolve; for some this is retaliation – albeit, seemingly no point at which they are sated – others would like to overthrow government, while for those in Addis, it is about political reform(s). It is presumptuous to believe that all these differing viewpoints will be addressed solely in Addis Ababa. In addition, this conflict has impacted entire communities: over one million persons displaced, there is no valid estimate of the numbers of civilians dead but we do know that they are many and entire towns burned to the ground. This has intensified an environment of distrust amongst communities who will have to continue living side by side. There are also fears that this conflict, if left to escalate further, could lead to splits within the greater Nuer community, and that communities on the sidelines of the conflict will become embroiled in it. We must de-escalate this situation. Community-led processes of dialogue, truth, justice and restitution can potentially tackle outstanding issues including how to re-establish law and order at the grassroots; disarming or rehabilitation of armed youths and processes for the return of the displaced persons – including perhaps compensation. They allow communities to identify their missing and dead, and redress grievances. Community-led peace agreements can inspire a lasting peace, leading perhaps to a new definition of CPA; Community-led Peace Agreements. Numerous examples of community peace-building and conflict resolution processes exist in South Sudan. This article draws lessons from these past efforts (see appendix), in an attempt to offer modalities for engagement at the grassroots.


By Reng’o Gyyw Reng’o, Addis Ababa

Just over a month ago, a well placed individual in the system, South Sudan, confided in me and told me the information I did not understand, – Khartoum had been supplying weapons to Juba, during and after the December 2013 crises. The gentleman was very happy. The only question that I asked, was, ” don’t you think Khartoum is doing the same thing to the other side?”. His answer was no. “Why would they?” He asked. I said ” for the same old reasons, wanting to fail South Sudan and now that we are fighting each other, Khartoum might be interested in seeing us annihilating each other!” I was assured Khartoum now needs Jaath [oil] flowing.

While my fears were not addressed, the gentleman sentiments were not isolated. Khartoum’s ambiguous hibernation during the crises, made many regional and international analysts happy. They were praising Khartoum , believing a new era has dawn between Khartoum and Juba. The notorious Islamist Ali Karti, Sudan’s foreign Minister gave concrete assurances of his country’s neutrality in the conflict. He had also taken part in the IGAD’s mission to South Sudan to resolve crises.

However, piecing together number of evidences and occurrences today between South Sudan and Khartoum, it makes me believe that my misgivings then are coming home. First of all, Khartoum was kept out of the countries interfering in South Sudan current conflicts. This is in spite of the fact that it was ferrying weapons to the government in Juba. As long as it was supporting Kiir’s government clandestinely, public relations placard dictates that it was a neutral friend.

You know President Kiir has been accused by his colleagues of flirtation with Beshir, NCP and Khartoum. It was evident in the press release during the December 2013 when the SPLM opposition accused Kiir of wanting to establish a new party that will work the NCP. Only serious minded citizens did not believe that. Otherwise, the gullible groups took the message serious.

There were other developments that were convincing that a new beginning has just arrived in the relationship between Juba and Khartoum. Juba had requested Khartoum to deploy troops in South Sudan to protect oil fields. To effect this, Minister of Defence, Hon. Kuol Manyang Juuk, had to pay a visit to Khartoum just over two weeks ago. Sudan thus has become one of the two neighbouring countries that are seen publicly to be supporting President Kiir. The other being Uganda.

Last week, President Kiir paid a visit to Khartoum to meet President Beshir. It was assumed number of issues were discussed, peace talks, implementation of cooperation agreements, oil protection, etc. However, Abyei, and border demarcation were not mooted. The two issues were not on the table for discussion. Juba read into the mind of Khartoum,-raising these would be a red line. After all, they are “not crucial issues” at the moment.

As soon as President Kiir left Khartoum for Uganda, Sudan’s AirForce bombed Panriang and other areas in Unity State. People were shocked. What was it that Kiir had gone to fetch in Khartoum, “peace or bombs?” I discussed this with my friend Paanluel on the facebook. Below were our exchanged.

P: Khartoum bombing Panrieng county. Kiir was in Khartoum 1-2 ago.
Me: They were welcoming him with bombs.
P: Apparently, yes.
Me: Who might they have targeted? Are there Riek’s rebels in the area, therefore helping Kiir?
P: No. Bombing the civilians.
Me: Hahaha…He has lost it all. That is a message for Kiir to interpret.
P: Bad.
Me: Have they condemned it?, I mean the Kiirs.
P: Aguer Panyang was doing the laundry.
Me: I do not know when Kiir will wake to the reality of politics, and development. He has revejuvanted Beshir to strength and potency, and now Beshir is slapping him incessantly on the face.
P: Yeah and Beshir is consolidating his position. While kiir is fighting everyone in the RSS. Beshir is wooing his political rivals.
Me: That is what I have seen over the media.
p: Consolidation and with consolidation comes the exigency of creating distraction. Possibly a conflict with RSS wud be a perfect one.
Me: A sound politician would that, to consolidate at home? I mean I would do that.
P: And create trouble abroad to keep the consolidation intack, and the public occupied with “cockroaches in Juba.”
Me: Hahaha… Kiir is a toddler when it comes to that politics. I would have done just that, when crises where developing in Juba, to divert the rebels.
P: yep. Beshir [is] doing it, perhaps.
Me: We would be fighting along the border now, while seeking international mediation

Khartoum in its crafty ways, was quick in denying any bombing. That was one negative development.

Just few days ago, Juba announced that its intelligence reported massive movements of the Sudan Armed Forces along the border. The Military Spokesperson Philip Aguer made an alarm. However, Khartoum through its armed forces spokesperson denied the allegation. Yesterday but one, Sudan Tribune website published Khartoum or Sudan’s reservations on IGAD’s mediation, accusing IGAD’s process of being bad. We noticed something that was growing.

On Tuesday 14th April 2014, all of a sudden, Bentiu, Capital of Unity State fell to Riek Machar rebels that were alleged to have come from Sudan. South Sudan Military Spokesperson, Col. Philip Aguer, accused Sudan of not only offering sanctuary to the South Sudan’s rebels but also training and supporting them. Still, Khartoum has denied that accusation as if there is going to be a day they will accept any accusation.

We knew something was developing when rebels went silent. It might be that they have now made another agreement with Khartoum over the oil. I had just raised an alarm the other day, that the Juba’s way of handling Khartoum is wanting in all aspects. That type of foreign policy relations would definately backfire. Juba wake up. I am missing Mading Ngor on that.

Portrait on the Tulip Leaf

Posted: April 16, 2014 by PaanLuel Wël in David Aoloch, Poems.

From Karach Deng: Sparkle in Crowd

——– 

By David Aoloch Bion

 ———

God created three unchanging beauties

Sun in the sky,

Cherub in the Heaven

Love on the Earth

I drew my Love on Tulip leaf

I love the painting. I obsess about…

The leaf dried, wind blew it off

——-

She left me with hallucination

In day, she appears, I cuddle the bosom

But, in my hands illusion

At night, she appears, I fondle waist

But, abreast a dream

She disturbs me grimacing

But “I am not sorry”

The Love that do not cause pain

To it author is nothing but shadow of…

——

Men come to world with nothing

But “crying”

Men leave with nothing

But “silence”

I will go to soil with nothing

But screaming “Karach”

In eternity I will recite infinitely

Her name,

—–

Karach Deng: Sparkle in Crowd is the title of unpublished collection of poems about love, beauty, courage, faith …etc

 

The Mystique Nile River (Part-I)

Posted: April 16, 2014 by PaanLuel Wël in Featured Articles, Malith Alier

By Malith Alier

 Stand on the banks of the River one lovely evening like this and watch the River flow north in one style, progressively determined for its destination. The cadet blue water takes after the River valley silts. The Riverbanks are lush with evergreen grasses that drink from the River day and night at no cost. Huge green trees parade calmly morning and evening along the course of the River. They play with the mighty wind during the day in contrast to the morning and evening posture.

Stand on the banks and watch the shadow of the trees cross to the other side of the River during sunrise and sunset. The sun mysteriously throws plant shadows across to commune with one another on the divide in a spiritual union.

The River attracts every creature, insects, birds, reptiles, amphibians and above all people who develop inseparable association for millions of years with the River. The River is their life and their life is the River.

Crocodiles, hippos, fish and insects dominate the second longest River in the world. The crocodiles are the strongest of the reptiles. They police the Nile down to the bottom. They are master swimmers and live longer than any other creatures in the Nile. Their teeth grow continuously. The new ones push the old ones out in gradual replacement. They must have the strongest jaws in the world to support the long teeth that are in perpetual growth.

Walk on the Nile one evening and notice amazing scenery, the nature’s gift of water that nourishes flora and fauna. The water swirls on the deepest spot as it moves with speed like a dancing crane. This is one of the latent powers that enable the water to redefine the River course. The water has the power to carry away soil and vegetation in its passage. It soaks hard ground and dissolves it despite resistance. The rocks underneath are laid bare by the same power that dissolves and erodes the less compacted soils.

The Nile feeds and keeps alive the Mediterranean Sea in Arabian Egypt. The people of Egypt who demand exclusive use of water also regard it as a give from the almighty. This false entitlement perception is a result of the Anglo Egyptian treaties of 1929 and 1959. These not only deprived the upstream peoples of their natural accession but also set a dangerous course for the future generations to contend with.

River Nile is like a great serpent moving from highlands to lowlands. It dug a trench million years ago where water collects from the mountains through the valleys and eventually to the sea. It waters the fields that feed mankind.

Lake Victoria joins the countries of East Africa of Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania. This is thought to be the important source of the Nile. The city of Jinja is the first exit point of the River. The River meanders through Uganda, DRC, South Sudan, Sudan and finally Egypt. Egypt is the self-appointed mother or father of the Nile River who has never been.

The total length the River is approximately 3,700km or 2,300 miles from the city of Jinja to the delta.

The Nile is given names in sections from the Lake to the sea. From Lake Victoria to Lake Albert is Victoria Nile. Albert Nile is after Lake Albert in Uganda. Bahr El Jabal is from Nimule to where it is joined by Bahr el Ghazal River and that section becomes White Nile. It eventually becomes River Nile from Khartoum where it is joined by Blue Nile, which emanates from Ethiopian highlands.

The Busoga People in Jinja continuously collect water hyacinth (Eichhonia Crassipes) barred by a dam immediately after the River exit. This is one way of keeping the Lifeline River from pollution this strange weeds whose native abode is South America. A few metres upstream after the bridge are Bujagali Falls. This is where Uganda generates much of its electricity supply. The water holds back, collects and superimposes on the rock forcing its way and creating incredible energy as it falls. Man has realized that this can be harnessed to generate power for lighting and industry usage.

The other waterfalls on the way from Uganda to south Sudan are Karuma falls, Murchison falls and the lesser Fulla rapids. Water features like these are not only for power generation but are also tourist attractions. Towns or cities with waterfalls serve as tourist attraction sites. The incredible sights and thrill or sport are difficult to erase in the memory of those who witnessed them forever.

Listen to water roars as you approach Murchison or Karuma falls. The mountain devils unleash wails for help as water splash mercilessly between the rocks. This is a rite of passage with force even the mountains cannot deny. The Nile creatures dare not to be careless on the falls for their lives may be in danger. The canoe people and the swimmers exercise extra care over the falls. And then there is the Murchison Falls National Park. Uganda is blessed with plenty of animals in the wild. These animals are threatened by urbanization, pollution and poaching. It has become a habit for all countries to provide protection to these wild creatures in game Reserves and Parks. This is the age of harnessing nature in modernity. Waterfalls are for sports and generation of energy and wild life generates income through tourism. Poaching is the killing of endangered wildlife for meat or parts like tusks for sale. This is illegal in most countries including Uganda.

The Nile associated vegetation are in form of papyrus, tall bamboo like grasses, reed mace (Typha Latifolia), water lettuce (Pistia Stratiotes) and water hyacinth (Eichhonia Crassipes). Large fruit tree like mangoes are a feature of the River valley.

River Nile is not the only source for fresh water, fish fruit trees but it also used in other beneficial ways. Watch the people mould bricks on the banks in Juba. Young men build huge hillocks of moulded earth, which is burnt to increase strength for construction of shelters. This is an important source of income in Juba in particular. Young people who are unemployed successfully engage in brick molding which in turn make them useful contributors in the development of their country. Self-employment is the word.

Stand on the Nile and look at the fishermen traversing the River in canoes morning and evening. These are called “atooc” in Dinka. They have special skills in dealing with the River. They hollowed logs for use as canoes. They are usually seen rowing canoes with small oars or bamboo, which is lowered down to push the canoe forward in shallow sections close to the banks. This is also the case in rocky and shallow sections in the middle of the River. The catches include tilapia, Nile perch and other variety.

In South Sudan, the nomads depend on the River like no one else. Crossing to either side seasonally is like a sport. This usually is motivated by the search of green pasture during dry season. The cattle owners envy the greens on the western side of the River known as “toc” the night before the crossing is a colorful night. Certain rituals are performed like those of the Israelites when they crossed the Red sea. This is usually to avert disasters like the refusal of a herd to successfully cross all in one accord. Someone volunteers to kill a cow. Others perform prayers, usually someone whose ancestors were the ones who led such activity. In this way, crocodiles and other animals that have potential to destroy the epic journey are put to rest that day.


The leader of South Sudan’s rebels has vowed to attack the capital Juba and target crucial oil fields, warning in an exclusive interview with AFP that the civil war will not end until the country’s president is removed from power.

Former vice president turned rebel chief Riek Machar branded his arch rival, President Salva Kiir a “dictator” and said he saw “no reason for power sharing”.

The comments came as the conflict in the world’s youngest nation enters its fifth month, and amid warnings of looming famine and floundering peace talks.

READ: UNSC warns of famine in South Sudan

“If we are to remove the dictator, Juba is a target, oil fields are a target,” Machar said late Monday in a secret location in Upper Nile state, one of South Sudan’s key oil producing regions.

“We are only resisting a regime that wants to destroy us,” Machar said, adding he still hoped a moribund ceasefire deal signed in Ethiopia in January “will be respected by both parties.”

The conflict in South Sudan has left thousands dead and forced around a million people to flee their homes since fighting broke out on December 15 in the capital Juba, before spreading to other states in the oil-rich nation.

READ: Refugee conditions worsen in the Sudans

The fighting is between soldiers loyal to Kiir against mutinous troops who sided with Machar, who was dismissed as vice-president in 2013. The conflict has also taken on an ethnic dimension, pitting Kiir’s Dinka tribe against Machar’s Nuer people.

Seated in a plastic chair in his basic camp — a dozen mud huts on flat grasslands — the 62-year-old Machar said he was willing to hold face-to-face talks with Kiir, but also that he saw little point.

“What would we discuss? You are a discredited leader, you have committed massacres, I hope he accepts that,” Machar said.


By Amer Mayen Dhieu

I apologize. I might end up with a different interpretation of your beautiful poem. Forgive. But as simple as you have stated, all you need is a village girl: somebody in the village. Indeed, you describe some reasonable attributes you love to see in your future village-girl-wife.

That has triggered a burning question ringing on my mind. Are you indeed looking for the actual village girl or a particular type of woman with your desired-attributes? Are you aware that a village may just be a place to live, which might have minor influence on individuals?

Good on you, you really know the type of woman you want to marry. But I suppose you failed to state clearly the actual type of woman you need. Let’s squeeze it between two warring terms: “village and modern girl”. You have chosen a village girl but the attributes you have stated are not for a village girl but for a reasonable and well educated modern girl.

Your description is that of someone who knows how to operate a bank a/c and know how to save your money; of someone who can read and write and who can appreciate and enhance your ambitious way of writing; of someone that can be devoted to your ideas since you are too devoted to them too. This is not a village girl but a well-educated modern girl. That’s the one you need.

Modernity judging on its parlance has been mis/overused. I guess this is what makes you abhorrence to the term itself. But I assure you that those who like to bend their loves one like their belts are not the modern one.

The modern ones are those who aim to push their husbands to the limit; those who encourage them to be who they are; those who support them to reach their potentials and possibilities; those who value and appreciate differences and partnership of teamwork on the family level; a woman that can lead you through your learning journey.

Do not shy away from the truth. With what I read from your point of view, you do not need a village girl. You need a girl with the above-mentioned experiences; a woman with compassion to provide you with understanding and empathy; to bring you hope and inspiration.

If I am not wrong, if I am not ending up with a different interpretation of your beautiful poem, then this is the woman you describe but might have been given a wrong name of a “village girl”.

She’s not a village girl. It’s a girl that got banking experience to save your money. She’s a girl who have read, “person centred care approach” from the academic books to let you rises to your ambitious way of thinking. She is the modern girl, not the village girl.

AMER@2014


By Mama Junub

Oh my God! It is sickening. How some grown up and well educated adults struggle with self-insecurities. I never struggle to understand what services SBS DINKA and other South Sudanese News sites are giving back to the society. I found nothing but an amazing, commendable job in what they are doing. How do you feel when someone makes you a bed and invite you to have a rest on it? Do you hate that person for giving you free space to lie down and have a rest?

Come on people; let us be honest with ourselves. These guys are giving you and I a space to share our points of view, debate our own issues, express ourselves and our views through articles and letters and press releases. Again it is free of charge. We read and listen to this program and other news sites for new ideas. What is really the issue with people attacking individuals behind these great services? Something I completely do not understand.

So many direct attacks have been made publicly toward individuals working behind these services. Did you ever ask yourself what is it that you are really attacking them for? They are not the one who only expresses their views. The only prepare ground for people to come and communicate their views and opinions. If you think they are not doing well by allowing those you do not like to come and participate in the program or blog. Fair enough go and established your own program or blog to help you choose the people you want to share ideas with.

I do not want to go deep, but I think you are struggling with your own insecurities, if you hate what they are doing then do not turn that radio channel on or do not open the webpage. Easy brezy! There is no point of giving them negative feelings when we all know that they are doing a great job to our community and us. Why do we really care whether what SBS DINKA is doing is part of the role in its contract? Why do you want to know all that anyway? It’s a good service so enjoy it; if not, then do not be bothered and just stay away baby.

Remember no one ever promise us that views opinions are always the same. They are not. You come with yours and I come with mine. This will give us all a bigger picture to look at thing in hand in an inclusive manner. If I didn’t say what’s in your heart, that didn’t give you a right to hate. You are not against each other; it’s that you have different opinions on given topics.

Please let’s us all be courageous and appreciative of each other. Let your heart admits that they are doing these things for us. All in all I love my PaanLuel Wël and that’s all I care.

MAMAJUNUB@2014


By Deng Simon and PaanLuel Wel

———————

By Elijah Deng Simon

Instead of incriminating Emmanuel Jal, Jok Madut, Ajak Chiengkou or Deng Elijah, we should be incriminating the system. It is this system that instructs us to do what we are doing; sorting the truth from different perspectives.

It is the system that creates and exploits these perspectives to turns Mabior against Dau , Puljang against Koang, Olony against Ogat, Wanni against Lado, tribes against tribes and regions against regions because the system is reaping these [regionalism, tribalism, nepotism, corruption, and divide and rule] for its own gains; to reign for 100 or 1000s years as long as we remain in our narrowed comfort zones.

Your incriminations and selective praises nurture the crippled system while reaping your intelligence and respect. A bad system would reduce you to believe that Ajak is your hero and Jal is your enemy and vice versa, when there is no profound ground to prove that the two can’t work together for a collective interest instead of your interest! 

–Way forward —

Since the coup allegation has collapsed, divide and rule has failed, regionalism as well, and war won’t bring a sustainable solution. Instead of defending “status quo” we should defend the nation and to defend the nation the perpetrators must be held accountable. It is unreasonable to end a presidential term prematurely but it is highly irresponsible and illegitimate that over 4 millions people re in a food shortage, over 1 million displaced and over 10,000 (well above 30,000) people died. So there must be a trade off and the best trade off is to teach the upcoming leaders that they will be forced to step down prematurely should they imitate Salva Kiir and his crooks.

Our lives as citizens can’t be traded off for any other gain(s). The short term solution is for Kiir to step aside and the long term solution would be to elect a patriotic and visionary citizen to reconcile and rebuild the nation after this interim government. Dr. Riek has a constitutional right but does not have to lead South Sudan as a president, however, the country has to be transformed and reconciled for the next generations to enjoy freedom,justice and equality!

———————

By PaanLuel Wel (Response to Deng Simon)

Elijah Deng SimonI absolutely concur with you that “Instead of incriminating Emmanuel Jal, Jok Madut, Ajak Chiengkou or Deng Elijah, we should be incriminating the system” because, as you rightly pointed out, “It is the system that creates and exploits these perspectives to turns Mabior against Dau, Puljang against Koang, Olony against Ogat, Wanni against Lado, tribes against tribes and regions against regions…” But while you may take the system to be President Kiir and his henchmen who seem to know nothing about what is going on in the country, some people would go further and say that the system in question includes not just the President, but Dr. Riek Machar (who had been no. 2 in that very system for 9 years) as well as the 11+ political detainees who are currently presenting themselves as better alternatives to the bloodied hands of President Kiir and Dr. Riek Machar.

Therefore, if indeed the system is the stumbling block to the realization of long lasting peace and political stability in South Sudan, and there is no reason whatsoever to doubt that postulation, it entails that the best way forward is not just to get rid of President Kiir, but rather the whole system which include, in addition to the President, Dr. Riek Machar and the 11+ political detainees. Bearing in mind that there was no coup in Juba and that the 11+ political detainees are already out of power, the next people to go from power are President Kiir and Dr. Riek Machar. The logic is simple: neither President Kiir nor Dr. Riek has been able to decisively defeat the other notwithstanding over 4-month of continuous fighting. Therefore, to paraphrase your statement, the short term solution is for President Kiir and Dr. Riek Machar to step aside from their respective power bases and the long term solution would be to elect a patriotic and visionary citizen (say Dr. Marial Benjamin or Wani Igga, for example) to reconcile and rebuild the nation after this interim government.

Whereas it is certainly true that President Kiir and Dr. Riek have constitutional rights to contest the ‘next election’, they should not necessarily be part of the interim government if fighting has to stop in South Sudan. Of course, such course of actions in which both President Kiir and Dr. Riek would be barred from being part of a transitional government is an anathema to their respective supporters, and few avenues abound, barring international military intervention, to bring about such course of event as they are the ones wielding Kalashnikov in the entire country. Of course, the government of President Kiir is wishing for a swift military victory over the rebels, akin to the decisive defeat of the Tamil Tiger rebels in Sri Lanka. On the other hand, the rebels under Dr. Riek Machar are entertaining the thought that they would ride into Juba like Paul Kagame in the 1990s while Presient Kiir is taken to the ICC for killing the Nuer in Juba.

Well, both are wishful thinking, for the government will never completely defeat the rebellion even if they were lucky enough to kill or capture Riek Machar, and neither will the Rebels realize their conjured up triumphant march to Juba for the best the rebel can achieve is a Somalization of South Sudan.

–Way forward —

But for us South Sudanese to have meaningful, serious and constructive dialogues, the best and only way forward other than an outright military victory as wished by the government and as dreamed up by the rebel is two-fold: (1) Going back to the status quo–an interim government with both President Kiir and Dr. Riek Machar, in their respective pre-July 23rd positions and seniority or (2) charting a new course–a transitional government without President Kiir and Dr. Riek Machar, back by international military forces. But of course, my pro-rebels friends Deng Simon and Jesus Deng Mading-chuai would prefer an interim government without President Kiir while my pro-government friends Simon Yel and Gordon Buay would want nothing more than the blood-dripping head of Dr. Riek Machar.

And thus, stalemate–political and military–set in and Addis Ababa talks are treated as a necessarily evil to be tolerated but never taken seriously. The government is wishing, and the rebels are dreaming, for a decisive military victory!! The conversation is yet to commence because there are no genuine conversationalists, only Kiirists and Machariists rule the air, the web and the field!!

Till then, the present carnage in Bentiu might soon get replicated in Bor and Malakal and over again as it has been the case. President Kiir is majestically unperturbed, Dr. Riek is boyishly excited and their supporters are marching, cheering on and wishing and dreaming while the DREAM “for the next generations to enjoy freedom, justice and equality!” is being stymied!

Junub Thudan in the hands of the same monkeys in different forest!

Letter: Dear Mother

Posted: April 15, 2014 by PaanLuel Wël in Junub Sudan

Originally posted on Nyamilepedia:

By Puk Goar,

Dearmotherscoolafp300

Former child soldiers attending  primary school after the peace returned to the area.(Photo: AFP)

April 14, 2014(Nyamilepedia) — This morning I will be leaving for Paloch a key oil-filed [oil field] in the very heart of Upper Nile. Machar told us that closing down the oil will force kiir to stop bringing more Uganda that fuel the war. And maybe we shall realize peace in our nation.

However, I know you are already gone and my two sisters in Juba. So I am not fighting for Machar but for the freedom of your daughter in Kakuma camp who have been there since independence. If you were not killed and my uncles in Juba today I could be doing my final exams in Ethiopia by the end of this year. Something I wish you could be proud of, but now you are gone.

This will be my third…

View original 195 more words


The State of Fear

Posted: April 14, 2014 by PaanLuel Wël in David Aoloch, Poems.

By David Aoloch Bion

———–

The big man fear to punishes political crime like

Corruption, threat to use violence, embezzlement, treason…etc

Because he foresees himself being punished after he leaves

Because he is wrong somewhere too

If I were him, I must discipline them now

And then they do to me what they like later

After all I have the Excellency title, wealth, happy family

What hell should I fear of?

———-

The legislators fear to raise independent, political motion in the House

Because they fear House being dissolved,

Lost their jobs and they starved of hunger on street

If I were them, I would pass laws that are best interests of million voiceless

That will prevent dictatorship of any kind and

That will put me in limelight of history

Then I died of hunger on my bed

After all I have Honourable title, wife and children

What hell should I fear of?

———–

Aoloch@2014 


EVERY so often someone asks me: “What’s your favorite country, other than your own?” I’ve always had the same answer: Taiwan. “Taiwan? Why Taiwan?” people ask. Very simple: Because Taiwan is a barren rock in a typhoon-laden sea with no natural resources to live off of — it even has to import sand and gravel from China for construction — yet it has the fourth-largest financial reserves in the world. Because rather than digging in the ground and mining whatever comes up, Taiwan has mined its 23 million people, their talent, energy and intelligence — men and women. I always tell my friends in Taiwan: “You’re the luckiest people in the world. How did you get so lucky? You have no oil, no iron ore, no forests, no diamonds, no gold, just a few small deposits of coal and natural gas — and because of that you developed the habits and culture of honing your people’s skills, which turns out to be the most valuable and only truly renewable resource in the world today. How did you get so lucky?”

The village Girl

Posted: April 14, 2014 by PaanLuel Wël in Poems.

By Matiop Alier

I think my cousins were correct after all,
What I need is a woman I love, a girl from my people.
A wife is all I need out of this turbulent world.
A woman whom we can look after each other,
A charismatic woman, who can keep me at home,
A daughter of a good man, who can save money for me,
A woman, who’ll bear me children,
A rudimentary woman who can make,
A respectable person in society out of me,
A woman, who‘ll have a great stabilizing influence on me.
So, help me, Lord!

Not many married people would lose their jobs after all,
Not many married people would do the stupid things,
Not many married people would go to clubs these days.
A marriage gives a man some kind of extra wisdom,
A better way of judgment,
A more rational approach to human problems.
So, help me, Lord

I know the kind of girl I want,
But I don’t know where to find her from.
I want a woman, who’ll listen to me.
A woman, who’ll rise— to my ambitious way of thinking.
A woman, who doesn’t know many personalities.
A woman, whose clothes are not that short,
A woman, who doesn’t fill her tummy with beers—any time of the day.
So, help me, Lord!

After all, those modern girls would get married one day,
But be sure I’ll not be there.
Not me.
I ‘m too tough,
Too arrogant,
Too selfish,
And too devoted to my own ideas.
On the contrary,
These modern girls want a boy they can control like a hosepipe,
A boy they can bend like their belts, an easy target,
A boy who would do what they want.
I want a woman, who’ll rid me,
Of my buffoonery and flirtatiousness once and for all.
So, help me, Lord!

After all, I need a village girl,
‘I couldn’t care less for modern civilization.
’I won’t mind getting married to a village girl,
A woman of Eve’s generation,
As long as she wears more than a leaf of tree in public,
I want a village girl,
Because she’s all this and more.
After all, what I need is a woman I love,
A woman who can bear me children,
Look after the family,
A daughter of my Dinka tribe, a sister from my people!
And this is the only girl I feel I can get married to.
So, help me, Lord!

Place: Juba (Custom), South Sudan.
~Metabolic@2014

 

US announces sanctions in South Sudan conflict

Posted: April 11, 2014 by PaanLuel Wël in Junub Sudan

The United States, which backed the independence of South Sudan, will take targeted sanctions against those involved in the conflict which has ravaging the young nation for the past four months, the State Department said. Secretary of State John Kerry met Thursday with the South Sudanese Minister in the Office of the President, Awan Riak, the department said in a statement. This comes as the country which gained independence in July 2011 is torn by a civil war between the army of President Salva Kiir and rebel fores loyal to former vice president Riek Machar. President Barack Obama signed a decree April 3 authorizing punitive sanctions, such as seizure of assets and visa bans, against anyone in South Sudan deemed to be threatening peace efforts, targeting UN peacekeeping forces and violating human rights. The sanctions “can and will be used against those who contribute to conflict by undermining democratic processes or institutions or by obstructing the peace process and against those who commit human rights abuses in South Sudan,” the State Department statement said. The US “will not stand by while the hopes of a nation are held hostage to short-sighted and destructive actors,” the statement said, without specifying who would be targeted by the sanctions nor when they would be imposed.


In the heat of the South Sudan heat, forces allied to President Salvar Kiir Mayardit and his former deputy Dr Riek Machar are locked in mortal combat for political power with fears that the world’s youngest nation could disintegrate. But in far off Nairobi and London, noisy battles are boiling in the house of General Kiir with a woman purporting to be his wife hurling ‘missiles’ at his elder daughter, Christina Adut Nardes.

In a stern letter seen exclusively by The Nairobian, Aluel William Nyuon Bany, who claims to be Kiir’s wife sternly warns Adut to steer clear of her marriage and threatens unspecified consequences if she persists. Reminding Adut that “I didn’t choose a relationship with your dad” since “it has been happening for at least 10 years”, Nyuon Bany nostalgically narrates the scene of her traditional wedding. “The Payun clan and a great many happy witnesses attended my wedding. It was so beautiful. The bulls that were sacrificed were of…the highest order,” she recalls. “I was undressed as the daughter of William Nyuon and was clothed and accepted as the wife of Kiir Marial-dit. They took me as a Nuer, as a hero’s daughter; (I became) the love of his life and his wife but I DO NOT (emphasis hers) need to be your stepmother”.

Aluel is the daughter of the late Sudan People Liberation Army (SPLA) leader William Nyuon Bany who alongside Dr John Garang, Salvar Kiir and Arok Thon Arok were the top four generals of the movement in its early days. He died in 1996, leaving several children, most of who live in the United States today. She made headlines in 2011 after she went missing in Juba where it was later alleged that powerful people with connections in government had kidnapped her. Explaining that she already has a powerful surname, Aluel firmly dictates her position by exhausting events surrounding the president’s family. “Try as you will, if and when I leave your dad, it will because I chose to do so. I’m Ethiopian by birth, South Sudanese by descent and a naturalised Briton. Please feel free to choose the jurisdiction where you seek your legal redress,” Aluel dares Nardes. “Stop meddling with my marriage and deal with your own marital problems…let your dad be with the woman he loves…allow us our choice. Consider this a written warning.”

Talking to The Nairobian on phone from Juba, an official from the South Sudanese government warned that the media should stay clear of matters of the first family. “These are matters that are very sensitive and should not be published,” the source who chose to remain anonymous said. “Whatever is happening between this lady and Nardes should not go to the media at the moment. This is a criminal since the President has only one wife, Mama Mary Ayen Mayardit. She is a criminal who should be arrested,” he warned. Joseph Lual, head of security at the South Sudan Embassy in Nairobi, called the newsroom to echo the same sentiments, saying what he knows is that Aluel lives in London.

This latest scuffle comes in the wake of another incidence last month when President Kiir’s son Manut Salvar Kiir was arrested by police officers from Muthangari Police Station for allegedly assaulting his sister Winnie Aguem while drunk at their Manyani East Road house in Lavington. Although Manut was released later, the South Sudanese leader is said to have convened a family meeting in Juba where he warned members against misbehaving in public. “I have always told you to behave in a way that would not create inconveniences to other people, because the way you conduct yourself would be interpreted to mean different things by different people,” Kiir was quoted by the Sudan Tribune. “You have to understand that you would never be alone wherever you go. So be careful with whatever you do. The real issue would be twisted and politicised.”

The incident led to political critics in Juba drawing the parallels between the incident and the president’s political life. “If you cannot manage your own family, it follows automatically that it won’t be possible managing millions of people with different family members from different ethnic groups,” the same paper quoted an anonymous source saying.

An editor was arrested and the English version of The New Sudan Vision banned after it published an opinion alleging that President Kiir’s daughter Adut had eloped with an Ethiopian immigrant, then considered a symbol of national shame. The said immigrant, Nardes Gebeyehu Alemneh, is now Adut’s husband after a high profile wedding in Juba where the president officially handed her over to her husband.

Aluel notes the fact that the country was generally against the wedding to the son of an Ethiopian elite when she tells Adut “allow us our choice. Just like the whole country grudgingly allowed your choice”.

Read more at: http://www.standardmedia.co.ke/entertainment/thenairobian/article/4998/battles-rock-salva-kiir-family-in-nairobi

Report from Gordon Buay on James Koang Chol

Posted: April 11, 2014 by PaanLuel Wël in Junub Sudan

RENEGADE GEN. JAMES KOANG CHOL (CDR) WOUNDED IN PARIENG

Report from Gordon Buay

Today, the renegade Gen. James Koang Chol, popularly known as CDR, was wounded in a fight with the youth of Parieng loyal to the government of South Sudan.

It has to be recalled that Maj. Gen. James Koang ran to Karassana in March and joined Brig. Gen. Makaal Kuol, who commanded 450 terrorists who were chased out of Bentiu town in January by Maj. Gen. Mathews Puljang Top.

Today, the armed youth of Parieng attacked him and his forces in their hideout around Karassana area. The rebels lost 10 soldiers and left behind 15 AK-47s and two RPGs. Renegade James Koang was wounded in the leg but managed to escape towards Sudan border.

Before his defection, Maj. Gen. James Koang was highly respected SPLA officer who never joined any militia group against the SPLM/A Movement. After Riek Machar’s first coup of 1991, he remained with Dr. John Garang and was credited for liberating Western Equatoria from Jalaba. It was John Garang who nicknamed him “CDR” because of his zeal to fight against the enemy.

He condemned Riek Machar in 1991 and continued liberating the South under the leadership of John Garang. When he declared his defection in January this year, a lot of South Sudan patriots and nationalists were shocked because nobody could believe that CDR would join a tribal warlord like Riek Machar that he condemned in 1991. President Kiir was not convinced and he believed that CDR was a hostage of Nuer extremists who surrounded him.

Up to now, we don’t believe that CDR is free because he was surrounded by dangerous tribalists who might have killed him if he refused to listen to them. Based on his contribution to the liberation of South Sudan, he is the only rebel that our government can pardon and return him to the national army.

CDR is the only rebel we cannot kill if captured because he might have been forced to rebel by Nuer extremists. Because of his contribution to the liberation of South Sudan, we wish him quick recovery and return to Juba.

We would like to tell Gen. James Koang that President Kiir still loves you as his brother. Nobody would believe that CDR could rebel to fight his own comrades. We will pray for your quick return to Juba. CDR, you are a hero on the wrong side. Riek Machar is a terrorist that cannot be followed by nationalists like James Koang.