Archive for the ‘Featured Articles’ Category


By David Mayen Ayarbior, Juba, South Sudan

President Kiir signs the IGAD peace deal in Juba, South Sudan, on 26 August 2015

President Kiir signs the IGAD peace deal in Juba, South Sudan, on 26 August 2015

August 29, 2015 (SSB) — Soon after presenting reservations on certain aspects of the IGAD-Plus Compromise Peace Agreement, the United Nations gave the government of South Sudan up to 1st September to withdraw them. Few, if any, may have a recollection of any case of international law where the UN decided to force a government to withdraw its reservations over an agreement it has actually signed. Indeed, the current case of South Sudan could be an awkward precedent that may, ironically, most likely be later overridden by the International Court of Justice as a bad precedent and an illegal one.

If the CPA’s hitherto unresolved just cases of Abyei, Blue Nile, and the Nuba Mountains could serve as the most recent involving IGAD-Plus, UN Security Council and South Sudan, then these organizations should learn not to go around reservations as a means of stamping agreements they broker as sealed. Usually, when conflict popped up again, the west has been no way to be seen at best, or hurling condemnations on the aggrieved parties. Ida refugee camps and accusing South Sudan of interfering in “internal affairs” of a sovereign state stand as testaments.

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By Peter Costa Marial Manyiel, Tasmania, Australia

in the company of Dr. John Garang: once upon a time, we were united.

August 29, 2015 (SSB) — Why the Southern Sudanese elite always wants to be known as an obstacle creator? Rather than obstacles removal?

There is this illusion of fake heroism bravery that those elite had been lured to believe they too could be like that if they listen blindly to neighbours countries of the north and south of South Sudan.

Similar fake bravery is in the message of SPLA/M in opposition propaganda on online medium about their victories after they signed the Peace Agreement document on Eastern Equatoria State, county of Magwi and other areas in the past few days.

Instead it should prepare itself to sell the modified negotiated peace deal to its defected generals in Khartoum as the new deals has bigger cake in other seven states not previously included in the power sharing.

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NOW THAT PRESIDENT SALVA KIIR AND REBEL LEADER RIEK MACHAR HAVE SIGNED PEACE, WILL THE CHRONIC STUPIDITY OF NYAMILEPEDIA, SUDAN TRIBUNE AND RADIO TAMAZUJ CHEAP EDITORS COME TO AN END?

By Ayuel Madut Chan, Nairobi, Kenya

hate speechAugust 29, 2015 (SSB)  —  In as far as naïve and careless editors inCHEAP of the Nyamilepedia, Sudan tribune and Radiotamazuj do not take responsibility to evaluate and analyze what they feed public with on their public domains; peace is a runaway cloud of July weather in the Republic of South Sudan.

First, let me ask them simple questions, are they really trained journalists? Is nationalism and patriotism part and parcel in them in as far as the Republic of South Sudan is concerned or in simple term do they love South Sudan as a nation/country? Is preaching tribal hatred what make a nation? Do they need spiritual cleansing? Are they insane…?

Many people in South Sudan may agree with me that the above mentioned cronies and news blow-aviators have brought down South Sudan to its knees with their unnecessary severe damaging news based on tribal utterances full of fabricated lies that end up building house of empty make-ups. They are never entertaining news and if they do, then Lucifer is in the making in them. Please make a mature U-turn to correct the damage you cause to individuals and our country as a whole.

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By Malith Alier Ajok, Juba, South Sudan

President Kiir signs the IGAD peace deal in Juba, South Sudan, on 26 August 2015

President Kiir signs the IGAD peace deal in Juba, South Sudan, on 26 August 2015

August 28, 2015 (SSB) —  The decision by the president to sign the Compromise Peace Agreement CPA) on August 26 is indeed a commendable one. The notion that, the new nation of South Sudan itself borne out of war remaining in perpetual conflicts is unsustainable both in the short and long terms. There are people, internal and external who supported continuation of the war in the country for their own gains.

In every conflict, there are war spoils. The above categories of people tend to have somewhat benefited from these war spoils. This explains why some people are resisting calls for peace. Do not sign bad peace they claimed. Nevertheless, the president went ahead and signed it to the relief of great majority of citizens.

The small number of people who resists peace will now be lesser and will eventually join in the CPA implementation. This is true because everyone realises that peace comes handy with numerous benefits particularly to the common people. It was observed that women and children bear the consequences of any conflict the most. This is true of the 20 months civil war raging in the country.

Now is the dawn of lasting peace in South Sudan. It is time that peace dividends reach the remotest of the country. This has already started in the capital, Juba the following day after presidential signing of the peace accord.

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By Santino Ayuel Longar, Canada

President Kiir signs the IGAD peace deal in Juba, South Sudan, on 26 August 2015

President Kiir signs the IGAD peace deal in Juba, South Sudan, on 26 August 2015

August 27, 2015 (SSB)  —  Further to my comments earlier in the day, the comments below show why the so-called CPA-2 could be a loose cannon:

  1. First, the President has signed it with strong reservations. Reservations are official statements made by a state when signing, ratifying or acceding to an international treaty stating that certain provisions of that treaty or covenant will not have legal effect within its jurisdiction, hence inapplicable to that state. Reservations, therefore, do not apply to a domestic agreement. If Kiir insists on those reservations, then the agreement is as good as rejected. Should the international community impose sanctions as a result of these reservations, then both the rebels and government are likely to harden their positions. In the end, a weakened government suggests that every South Sudanese could ultimately resign to their ethnic bastions for security reasons, a Somalization, in other words. This could mean the taking over of South Sudan by the United Nations (something which, in no uncertain terms, would infringe the UN Charter Article 78). If that happens, what else could transpire thereafter is anyone’s intelligent guess. What is far from unclear is that a UN trusteeship is a powder keg on several levels (not discussed here). In fact, we should expect, as a consequence, clarion calls for separation from South Sudan by certain regions or communities. Such calls may ultimately breed balkanizing effects across our land.
  2. Second, this agreement was unarguably imposed, meaning that the warring parties did not reach it as a result of mutual compromises. What the international community has been oblivious to in so doing is that, a peace process is not just a legal documentation of good intentions. There must be an open dialogue wherein parties amicably build mutual trust and rapport. An existence of mutual trust and good intentions between parties to a conflict upon signing of a peace pact ensures that the former belligerents transition from “enemies” to compatriots. This important component is lacking in this agreement, making the agreement, in all important and practical respects, void ab initio (from the get go). That is, mutual trust, or pacto sunt servanda (the idea that parties freely intend to implement the contract in good faith) is very important, especially for the purposes of implementation.
  3. Third, perhaps the biggest impediment to the implementation of this agreement can be found in the “Unification of Forces Clause.” What this Clause implies is that there is not a single recognized standing army of South Sudan. This further suggests that a standing army will have to be re-constituted in the form of the suggested South Sudan Deference Force (SSDF). This is no small victory for the rebels but correspondingly a losing streak to the govt forces, the SPLA. Over all, when this Clause implemented, it could mean that equal units from both sides, Riek has argued, will be put together to constitute various military units from scratch. Already, the government is reportedly unhappy with that Clause, principally because, it tacitly means the resulting national army will be more than 50% one ethnic group, since the government forces are composed of all the 64 SS’s ethnic groups while the rebels is more than 90% one ethnic group. In this scenario, the rebels are likely to insist that if the govt takes the position of the Chief of Staff, then they are entitled, by right, to take up the deputy position, etc. In addition, the rebel officers who have reportedly inflated their ranks could also outnumber the SPLA in the officer corp. Unless the military leaders on both sides handle this with utmost caution, it is likely to tear this agreement asunder.
  4. Forth, if my opinion were consulted, a solution to the nagging problem in (3) could easily be found. That is, based on each of the 10 states’ population, each state should contribute a proportional percentage to the re-constitution of the SPLA as follows:

(1) Aweil State, 16%;

(2) Warrap State (including Abyei) 15%;

(3) Jonglei State (including GPAA), 16%;

(4) CE State, 10%;

(5) WE State, 8%;

(6) Lakes State, 8%;

(7) Upper Nile, 8%;

(8 WUN (Unity) State, 7%;

(9) Wau, 5%;

(10) EE State, 7%;

  1. Finally, assuming that this agreement holds–and we pray it does—my pearl of wisdom, if I have one, is that it is important for freewheeling political operatives to refrain from making irresponsible statements to the media, for bombastic comments of that nature could further exacerbate tensions leading to yet another bout of violence. We know what such ulterior statements (written or aired) did after December 15, 2013.

Conclusion: South Sudan can undoubtedly pull this off, for nothing is impossible to a willing heart. That is why all and sundry, whether one is a politician or a commoner, has been called upon to plant the tree so that the next generation gets the shade. So let’s take safety measures at this trying moment than be sorry tomorrow.

Peace and best of luck to the people of South Sudan.

Santino Ayuel Longar @2015

The opinion expressed here is solely the view of the writer. The veracity of any claim made are the responsibility of the author, not PaanLuel Wël: South Sudanese Bloggers (SSB) website. If you want to submit an opinion article or news analysis, please email it to paanluel2011@gmail.com. SSB do reserve the right to edit material before publication. Please include your full name, email address and the country you are writing from.


Amer Mayen Dhieu, Brisbane, Australia

Amer Mayen Dhieu, the author

Amer Mayen Dhieu, the author

 

August 26, 2015 (SSB) — The two last weeks of July 2015 were critical in my life. After I learnt with deep sadness about my grandfather’s sickness, Grandpa Mading Agok, I found it hard to go to sleep. I remembered staying up one whole night thinking of what my world would be if I didn’t get to see him on time, at least to get to ask him some of the burning questions I have always love to know about my family background as well as himself, his past and his current world.

One week later, I managed to get hold of my traveling documents and approval of compassionate leave at my workplace. After two days thereafter, I got the ticket and packed for my first home flight to Juba through Entebbe. It was a life-changing trip that shocked, overwhelmed, challenged and inspired me for the better person.

I left Brisbane International Airport at 9:35 pm on the 9th of August and arrived at Abu Dhabi at 6:am the following morning. On the plane, I was excited for many things. Seeing my grandfather was one besides many numerous others. But there was one more thing my soul was grateful to experience: seeing my ancestral homeland for the first time after many decades away from my land of birth since the 1991 destruction and displacement of my people from Duk, Twic East and Bor counties by Riek Machar.

Amer Mayen Dhieu with Grandpa Mading Agok

Amer Mayen Dhieu with Grandpa Mading Agok

As a child who was born, and grew up, in war, such abrupt homebound trips triggered lot of emotional flashbacks about all the heartbreaks and tragedies we have been through during the war as people of South Sudan. I was excited to see Juba too because it was my first time to be in Juba since birth.

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By David Mayen Ayarbior, Juba, South Sudan

Tribute to Isaiah Abraham: The Dark Ages of South Sudan Liberation

Tribute to Isaiah Abraham: The Dark Ages of South Sudan Liberation

August 26, 2015 (SSB)  —  As usual, a sizable number of readers might, without reading further, infer from the title of this article that it is calling for the “un-known gunmen” who have been attacking police stations across South Sudan and laying ambushes along highways not to be apprehended. Of course, the viewpoint here is that all agencies concerned should work day and night to apprehend and rehabilitate these young men before they unknowingly turn South Sudan into another Mexico or Colombia.

Of course, South Sudan has not yet reached that level, but we must be cognizant of the fact that for insecurity to set base in a country and entrench its presence it takes less time than most of us would think. As a country, we are evidently well into that path since the time when a few militaristic politicians decided to “challenge” the government in which they had been part and parcel until a couple of months before staging a violent attempt to overthrow it, for lack of a politically correct and less partisan description.

Sensible to where our country is today, many pundits have correctly indicated that a miserable state of “to be or not to be” could be seen and smelled on the near horizon. Indeed, the most optimistic or chauvinistic of us confessed that we have been brought to the brink of a situation that might spiral out of control, sooner than later. This is all because of the current man-made environment of mutual hatred that is consuming every bit of what makes us citizens of one country who were supposed to work together for its prosperity, no matter what.

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