Archive for the ‘Featured Articles’ Category


By David Mayen Ayarbior, Juba, South Sudan

(R-L) Presidents Yoweri Museveni, Uhuru Kenyatta, Paul Kagame and South Sudan Defence Minister Kuol Manyang Juuk at the 10th Summit of Heads of State of the Northern Corridor.

(R-L) Presidents Yoweri Museveni, Uhuru Kenyatta, Paul Kagame and South Sudan Defence Minister Kuol Manyang Juuk at the 10th Summit of Heads of State of the Northern Corridor.

August 5, 2015 (SSB) — In the previous two articles we have seen outlines of the main issues South Sudan’s accession to the EAC is likely to entail. Part-2 considered structural and institutional areas that could be seen to be the concerns of the camp against joining the regional block. These include questions of giving up some features of national sovereignty to the block in promotion of a bigger dream of regional and, ultimately, continental unity.

We may now flip the debate over to the benefits South Sudan is expected to reap from accession. These benefits are essentially economic in nature because countries worldwide create inter-state relations with enhancing their citizens’ welfare as an overall objective.

One of the main issues to be analyzed is refuting the argument that income repatriation will have negative effects. This holds that, since it might take a decade or so for it to reach halve the level of industrial output found in the other EAC countries, South Sudan’s status of exclusive importer means a sizable part of its oil revenue shall be “lost” to buying commodities from neighboring countries. However, this contention might be somewhat misleading and unreasonably antagonistic towards joining EAC.

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While the international community propped up kleptocratic generals, South Sudan’s social entrepreneurs took matters into their own hands. The future of the country belongs to them.

By Christopher W. Douglas, USA

South Sudan must be weaned off war

South Sudan must be weaned off war

August 5, 2015 (SSB)  —  It’s cruel and dishonest to call South Sudan a “failed state” whose people have “little to celebrate” on their fourth Independence Day, which passed by earlier this July. The failure is one of state building — and of building the wrong state.

After years of bitter internecine conflict in the country, those same international governments and agencies pronouncing South Sudan kaput share responsibility for this failure with South Sudan’s current government.

The United States and other countries sent immense resources to South Sudan’s generals-turned-statesmen, seeking to prevent another war with Sudan or, worse yet, a Somalia-like environment for terrorists. They couldn’t or wouldn’t see that many of those generals, possessed of a lust for power, were still at war with Sudan-sponsored militias. Soldiers in the South Sudanese army, meanwhile, were becoming ever more impatient for the peace and prosperity promised after decades of bloodletting.

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South Sudan’ Statewide Demonstrations are the Clearest Indication that IGAD-Plus Compromise Peace Proposal has been Rubbished in front of American Threats with her Cronies

Marial Mabor Turic, Rumbek, South Sudan

Demonstration in Juba against the peace proposal of Nyagat (IGAD)

Demonstration in Juba against the peace proposal of Nyagat (IGAD)

August 4, 2015 (SSB)  —-  As a south Sudanese, not a Dinka, Nuer, nor any other tribe in South Sudan, I believe Junubi is our definition that fits on any south Sudanese’ well-wisher. The political climate in this country has been taken advantage of by many individuals who would want to benefit from the mess.

Just a countdown to the sixth day of August 2015, for SPLM-G and the opposition to resume the talk after the last failed agreement in Ethiopia.

The two sides are expected to return to the table with adequate-quarried data from the concern entities on both sides. Notwithstanding, there have been commotions within and outside the country, not sooner the compromised peace proposal was released.

Statewide demonstrations are some of the indication not only IGAD-PLUS, but also international community should re-consider and re-integrate in working out a durable peace for the people of south Sudan, instead of creeping for a fragile one!

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By Majok Mabior, Juba, South Sudan

August 4, 2015 (SSB) — The government of South Sudan and its development partners appear to be heavily focused on state building and less so on nation building: the question of how to turn the young state into a nation in which all South Sudanese can see themselves represented and forgetting that tribalism will take it part in the nation. The insecurity in south Sudan today is as result of misappropriation and high percentage of national resources that was used for the procurement of military hardware and maintenance of large military forces in the hope of promoting physical security at the expense of quality of living for the citizens. Governance and security go hand-in-hand and as such the welfare and well being of the people rest solely on the government.

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THE POSITION OF THE JCE ON THE IGAD-PLUS PROPOSED COMPROMISE AGREEMENT

Dinka elder?

Dinka council of elder in the making?

The Republic of South Sudan
Jieng Council of Elders (JCE)
Friday, July 31st, 2015

August 4, 2015 (SSB)  —  The Jieng Council of Elders, as a body that is greatly concerned about suffering of the people of South Sudan and yearns for an expeditious end to the on-going violent conflict in the country, wishes to express publicly it views on the latest Intergovernmental Authority on Developments (IGAD)-Plus “Proposed Compromise Agreement on the Resolution of the Conflict in the Republic of South Sudan”. Though the proposal is an attempt to resolve the on-going conflict in the country, it is our opinion that the proposal inherently creates more serious problems than it solves. It actually makes the achievement of peace very difficult for four reasons. First, the proposed agreement is intrinsically a strategy for the international actors to take-over the country. It is essentially born out of the recommendations of the African Union Commission Report, which recommended foreign personalities to run the country during the transitional period. Second, the proposal creates a more divisive future for the country that is likely to breed a much bitter war, considering the proposal to handover Upper Nile region to the opposition.

Thirdly, it does not address in a meaningful way the root causes of the conflict, though it may succeed in temporary halting the fighting, it does not entirely provide any guarantees to stop its resumption in the very near future. Lastly, the agreement is crafted particularly in favor of Riek Machar and helps him achieve his coup objectives, albeit diplomatically. The agreement makes Riek Machar co-president, not just a vice president and the agreement essentially renders the sitting president powerless and more ceremonial. This glaring appeasement of hell-bend coup plotters actually provides incentives for violent usurpation of power.

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By Malith Alier, Juba, South Sudan

August 3, 2015 (SSB)  —  No one exactly knows the origins of the so-called gay rights. In fact the word gay used to mean being merry before it was corrupted to mean somebody who is attracted to another person of the same sex.

Perhaps the starting point may be the ancient Sodom as told in the bible. According to the bible, the ancient people of the above land led depravedly immoral life that displeased the creator and were burnt all to death except Lot with his family Genesis Chapters 18 and 19. This is where the term sodomy originates and it means sexual relationship between man and animals or man to man.

These days, America and the rest of the white world are now the champions of all the human rights including gay rights.  They think that it’s their moral duty to sell those rights to the rest of the world with pomp and fanfare.

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By David Mayen Ayarbior, Juba, South Sudan

Do Not Confuse a Camouflaged Call for Confederation for Call Federalism

Do Not Confuse a Camouflaged Call for Confederation for Call Federalism

August 2, 2015 (SSB) — On Friday 31 July 2015 the Center for Peace and Development at the University of Juba organized a public lecture on federalism in relation to South Sudan. Panelists eloquently presented their conception of why federalism was a good system for South Sudan. I was humbled when one of the panelists, comrade Acuil Malith, glanced over the purpose of my book “House of War: Civil War and State Failure in Africa,” (2012) which exposes the impracticality of excessive centralization of political power in sub-Saharan Africa.

The presenters’ insights into the concept of federalism highlighted various dimensions from which the debate on this gratuitously controversial topic could be rationally examined by all literate and semi-literate politicians and compatriots. The concept is wide-ranging and elastic such that different analysts could examine it from various angles and individual countries could shape and reshape it for serving their peculiar purposes.

Like all social science debates, federalism remains a concept that is detached from its application until its framework is built and implementation modalities agreed upon by all its constituent units. For that reason, there is no ground whatsoever for a country to fear federalism, since it is essentially a framework structure with a positive spirit until such times when society shapes its elements. In other words, because of the concept’s undeniable positive outlook, countries have always positively responded to federalism and embraced it when tabled.

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