Archive for the ‘Junub Sudan’ Category


US Ambassador to the UN: Why Sanction Should be Imposed on South Sudan
Explanation of Vote by Ambassador Samantha Power, U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations, at the Adoption of Resolution 2206 on South Sudan, March 3, 2015
-
Thank you, Mr. President. For the past fourteen months, the United States has supported the Intergovernmental Authority on Development, IGAD, and the region, in their efforts to facilitate talks between the warring parties in South Sudan to reach a comprehensive and inclusive peace agreement, and to establish a transitional government to oversee a process of reform that addresses the root causes of this conflict.
-
While various papers have been signed, partial agreements entered into, promises made, assurances delivered, the situation has only worsened for the people of the UN’s newest country. The aspirations of the South Sudanese people have time and again been thwarted. Instead of pursuing the well-being of their people, a variety of individuals have chosen to place their own narrow political interests first, rather than making the compromises necessary to get to peace.
-
Today’s resolution supports IGAD’s mediation efforts by laying the framework for targeted sanctions. Under the terms of this resolution, the parties must meet IGAD’s deadlines for the resolution of all outstanding issues of this conflict and to begin the process of establishing a Transitional Government of National Unity. The consequences for not doing so could include the designation of senior individuals for asset freezes and travel bans, or the imposition of an arms embargo. Having this resolution in place – with realistic deadlines based on IGAD’s milestones for resolving the crisis – we hope will improve IGAD’s chances of success in reaching a credible and sustainable peace.
-
We are enhancing IGAD’s leverage in the negotiations by sending a very clear signal to those who continue to choose war over peace: you will be held to account, now, as we urge you to compromise to reach an agreement, and later, when you are considering whether to follow through on its terms.
-
Now some have asked, why vote this resolution now when IGAD is in the midst of another important negotiating round and when an agreement may well be around the corner. The answer is that the parties need to know not only that they will be held to account if they fail to compromise to reach agreement, but also that they would be held accountable on the back end if they do again, as they have done so many times before, which is failing to implement that to which they have signed.
-
Today, because of this conflict, two and a half million people urgently need help with food; more than two million people have been displaced internally and as refugees by the violence. UNMISS – the UN mission that originally deployed to support the world’s newest state – is now itself providing safe shelter to more than 100,000 internally displaced people seeking refuge from violence perpetrated by the government and the armed groups that oppose it. Rape and killing has become rampant.
-
And just a few weeks ago, we heard about the kidnapping of hundreds of young boys in Malakal by armed groups intending to use them as child soldiers. Today in South Sudan, quite literally, a young generation’s future is being held ransom by political actors who – despite all costs – refuse to compromise.
-
This cannot continue, and those who frustrate peace must begin to pay the price. That is why today’s action by this Council is so important. Thank you
———-
—-

UNITED NATIONS — The United Nations Security Council on Tuesday unanimously adopted a resolution to impose sanctions on those who disrupt efforts to restore peace in South Sudan, but it stopped short of barring the warring factions from buying more arms.

The resolution passed as the rival factions faced a Thursday deadline for reaching a deal in peace talks in Ethiopia, and as South Sudan’s army, under mounting pressure, agreed to investigate allegations that a pro-government militia had abducted dozens of children.

Fighting between forces loyal to President Salva Kiir and rebels allied with his former vice president, Riek Machar, plunged South Sudan, the world’s youngest nation, into a civil war in December 2013 that has killed tens of thousands, displaced two million civilians and left a trail of rapes and executions.

The Council’s resolution does not immediately impose sanctions. Rather, it sets up a panel to identify people who are responsible for undermining the peace efforts, including by recruiting child soldiers and committing serious human rights abuses. It proposes travel bans and an asset freeze for those people, and it offers the possibility of an arms embargo further down the road.

The United States drafted the measure. China, which traditionally shies away from punitive measures like sanctions, voted in favor of it. China has significant oil investments in the country.

South Sudan’s ambassador to the United Nations, Francis Deng, criticized the timing of the measure, which he called “counterproductive” at a time when peace negotiations were underway. “What the president and government of South Sudan need is encouragement, not condemnation,” Mr. Deng said.

The Council measure passed just hours after the chief of South Sudan’s army announced an investigation into allegations that a pro-government militia had abducted dozens of schoolchildren. The United Nations Children’s Fund, or Unicef, initially reported that 89 children, some as young as 13, had been abducted from a village in Upper Nile State.

The agency later revised the figure and said hundreds might have been taken and forced to join a pro-government militia led by Johnson Oloni. It appealed to the government to gain their released.

In a statement Tuesday, Col. Philip Aguer, the spokesman for South Sudan’s army, known as the Sudanese People’s Liberation Army, said his forces were committed to being “child free” and would look into the allegations.

Unicef said it believed that more than 12,000 South Sudanese children had been recruited into armed groups since the conflict began.

Those who conscript children to fight could face targeted sanctions, according to the Council’s resolution. The American ambassador to the United Nations, Samantha Power, described the measure as a way to press the rival leaders to make a deal. Directing her remarks to the South Sudanese factions, she said, “You will be held to account now, as we urge you to compromise to reach an agreement, and later, when you are considering whether to follow through on its terms.”

The Chinese envoy, Liu Jieyi, called on the two sides to “stop fighting immediately.” Beijing has sent the first of what is to be a full infantry battalion for the United Nations peacekeeping mission in South Sudan.

The monitoring group Human Rights Watch said an arms embargo should have been included in the resolution. “Those who are responsible for serious human rights violations should now be named and slapped with a travel ban and asset freeze, and countries or corporations that arm them should be exposed,” said Philippe Bolopion, the group’s United Nations director.

——-

UNITED NATIONS — The United States may have midwifed the birth of South Sudan, the world’s youngest nation. But China has quickly become among its most important patrons, building its roads and pumping its oil.

Now, more than a year after South Sudan’s leaders plunged their country into a nasty civil war, the nation has become something of a test of diplomacy between the United States and China, raising the question: Can Washington and Beijing turn their mutual interests in South Sudan into a shared strategy to stop the bloodshed?

To pressure the warring sides toward peace, the United States has circulated a draft Security Council resolution, dangling the threat of sanctions and setting up the possibility of an arms embargo somewhere down the road. The measure could come up for a vote as early as Tuesday.

China, which has long espoused a policy of not interfering in its partners’ domestic affairs, has not revealed its hand. The Chinese foreign minister, Wang Yi, signaled to diplomats here last week that his government could be persuaded to back appropriate punitive measures against South Sudan. The Chinese ambassador to the United Nations, Liu Jieyi, then publicly questioned the “logic” of proposing sanctions while the two sides are talking. China could abstain from voting on Tuesday and let the measure pass.

Peace talks — funded by both Beijing and Washington — are underway in Ethiopia this week between factions loyal to President Salva Kiir and his rival, former Vice President Riek Machar. Yet prospects for a breakthrough by a Thursday deadline set by the mediators appear slim. Mr. Kiir, for his part, has refused to show up.

So far, neither Washington nor Beijing has advanced a comprehensive strategy to stop the civil war. Both nations have been hesitant to substantially defang the kingpins of the war, including imposing an arms embargo or limiting how oil revenues might be used to fund the conflict. Both measures are among the recommendations of a recent International Crisis Group report on South Sudan.

“The ability of the United States and China to work toward a common strategy for peace in South Sudan is a test case for their ability to work together on the continent and beyond,” said Casie Copeland, the Crisis Group’s South Sudan expert. She described both countries as “sort of walking in a circle.”

That is not for a lack of interest — or even because of opposing interests.

Although China and the United States have stubbornly been on opposing sides of the issue of Darfur, the long-suffering Sudanese region, the two superpowers share a lot of common ground on South Sudan.

China has strong economic stakes in the country; the United States is heavily invested politically. They both have an interest in restoring stability to the country and avoiding disruptions to its oil flow. Both capitals have also opted to go slowly.

Obama administration officials have deep emotional ties to South Sudan, and so far they have resisted taking any steps, like an arms embargo, that would weaken the government in Juba. As the administration’s former South Sudan envoy, Princeton Lyman, put it this week, “The position is hardening in the administration, but it has taken a while.”

All the while, fighting between forces loyal to Mr. Kiir, an ethnic Dinka, and Mr. Machar, an ethnic Nuer, has killed tens of thousands, displaced two million people, brought the country to brink of famine and left a trail of rape and killing. The United Nations children’s agency last week said school children had been conscripted by a militia loyal to Mr. Kiir’s forces.

The United States and China have vastly different histories there. The United States championed its independence from Sudan, whose president, Omar al-Bashir, it loathed, and whom it referred to the International Criminal Court on charges of genocide in Darfur.

China, by contrast, was one of Mr. Bashir’s most important allies — and still is. But when South Sudan split off, it took vast amounts of oil with it, so China soon courted the new government in Juba and kept its stake in the oil fields.

That helps explains why China has taken an unusually active role, considering its traditional policy of noninterference.

It has dispatched its own soldiers to the United Nations peacekeeping mission there and persuaded the Security Council to include a most unusual mandate for the mission: Peacekeepers there are tasked with protecting not just civilians, but also the country’s oil installations, which have been attacked. China has also stopped shipping arms to the government in Juba.

The American-drafted resolution would impose travel bans and asset freezes on individuals who threaten the peace and security of South Sudan, including those who are accused of committing serious rights abuses, using child soldiers, and attacking United Nations personnel. It would set up a committee to evaluate who should fall on the sanctions list. The measure would raise the possibility of an arms embargo further in the future.

Crucial to the effectiveness of these measures are South Sudan’s neighbors, including Uganda and Ethiopia, which have ties to the rival parties. Only if the countries in the region agree to punitive measures, like sanctions and an arms embargo, Mr. Lyman pointed out, will China give its consent on the Council.

Asked why it has taken so long to propose a draft resolution on the Security Council, an American official said: “There are a lot of actors in this situation. We’ve been waiting for the right moment.”

The official spoke on the condition of anonymity because of diplomatic protocol. “Everyone is sort of rowing in the same direction,” he added.

A wild card is what to do about the potential war crimes committed by both sides in the conflict. The African Union has completed its own investigation into human rights abuses, but refused to make it public while peace talks are continuing. The United Nations secretary general, Ban Ki-moon, has urged the organization to release it.

United Nations investigators have chronicled a litany of horrors since fighting broke out in December 2013. “In Juba, I met people whose whole families have been executed, primarily due to their ethnicity, and women and girls who were taken as sex slaves after their husbands were killed,” the United Nations assistant secretary general for human rights, Ivan Simonovic, told the Council last week, urging the panel to ensure accountability for the victims.

The next question will be whether China or the United States agrees to send its friends to the dock.


By Dennis Hodges

Jangjuol has “energized all music lovers and ethnicities and nations” since he been making music and his basement in 2006, but he is much more than just a basement sensation. Janguol was forced into war as a child solider at the age 7.  He, and many other South Sudanese child solider escape, but many of them died on the long journey to find refugee camp.

Sadly but true Jangjuol stop at nothing to reach a safe place for him and his fellow Sudanese brothers. While In the refugee camp Jangjuol received a blessing from an angle sponsorship. He later moved to the United State of America. It was there he found the passion and outlet for his past, through music.

Now after releasing his first album Tears of Freedom, Jangjuol is ready for a breakthrough. He doesn’t want just any breakthrough – he want a breakthrough as being himself, that’s singing in his native tongue (Nuer) and being a South Sudanese artist. He want to reach everyone in the South Sudanese, African community and around the globe.

He believe his music has a place in today’s African industry. “Why can’t a South Sudanese artist be a house hold name,” stated Jangjuol.  If there’s a place for an ex child solider from Sudan, Jangjuol want to be that person.

More Fact about him:

Jangjuol opened up for South Sudan’s most known artist Emmanuel Jal for his We want Peace tour, back in 2014, Salt Lake City, Utah. Janguol also performed for Salt Lake City World Refugee Day in 2014, where over 300 plus people came out to enjoy the event.

  Media Outlets;

Jangjuol has been in Atlanta’s own BEmagazine (Hip Hop, Urban and Style), where he was mention as the international artist of the month, in 2014.

He also traveled to Mpls. Mn, for an interview – where he reached and broke the record of most listeners.

 WHERE CAN YOU STAY CONNECTED? Below are the social media pages-

Instagram- Jangjuolofficial 

Facebook- Jangjuol 

YouTube- Jangjuol 

Link from his latest video http://youtu.be/Kib2mn0anvE

More info: 

Jangjuol stay in Salt Lake City, Utah.

He’s working on new album and videos.


Interview with President Salva Kiir by The East Africa News Media

“I believe that [the Arusha Accord] laid the foundation people can work from, if all of us are sincere about the well being of South Sudan. But that is not what Dr Machar wants. He wants by all means to be the president and if he cannot get it on the negotiating table, then he has the military option to defeat the government and take over government…Well, I don’t believe in a military option because I have been fighting for many years and I know the difficulties of war. When we were fighting the Sudan government, Dr Machar was in Khartoum after rebelling against Dr John Garang in 1991 — just like he did in 2013. Slaughtering innocent civilians and later on enjoying the support of Khartoum and he was fighting us as the militia of Sudan. But all the same, he was hoping that Khartoum would defeat us, which did not happen. So he decided to surrender fully, signed an agreement with Khartoum and became number four in the hierarchy of the National Congress Party. So he does not understand the dynamics of the war.” President Kiir’s revealing interview with The East Africa Standard

South Sudan President Salva Kiir and rebel leader Riek Machar exchange copies of a peace pact they signed on February 1, 2015 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

As the president of South Sudan, why do you think your country is facing an internal war only three years after Independence?

The conflict came as a result of personal ambitions of individuals who wanted to take power by illegal means because they were afraid that they would not be elected if they went to the people. They opted for a military coup; when they failed; they transformed themselves into a guerrilla insurgency.

Your close associates have categorically said that Dr Riek Machar can never be your number two. Are you ready to work with Dr Machar without reservation or retribution?

Well, my personal position and that of my party is that Dr Machar should not be the First Vice President. He can come in as number three like what was agreed on in Addis Ababa last August. He wanted the position of prime minster and I accepted despite the fact that we don’t have it in the Constitution.

But when the proposed government structure was put forward by the mediators, they put president, vice president, prime minister, two deputies and then the council of ministers. Dr Machar rejected it because he wanted to be an executive prime minister who will exercise all the powers in the country and the president becomes ceremonial. He was told ‘no, because this was an elected executive president.

If you want to be an executive prime minister or president, then you wait for elections and keep out of this government.’ He wanted to share executive powers with the president and yet these powers were given by the people.

The Arusha Accord of January 21, talked about reforms within SPLM as a way forward. Do you think the fighting could have been avoided if SPLM had initiated internal reforms earlier as had been demanded by Dr Machar’s group?

Talks of internal reforms are not new because we have been talking about reforms in the SPLM even when we were fighting Khartoum. But the problem is that many of the people who are now spearheading the rebellion were not part of the movement and were co-operating with Khartoum. So they know less about SPLM than those of us who stayed.

Do you believe that this final session of the Addis Ababa peace talks will bring a lasting peace?

The Intergovernmental Authority on Development [Igad] can only bring the conflict to an end if it can differentiate between coup plotters and normal conflict. The problem is that Igad is treating the coup plotters as innocent people who simply protested against the government, yet there was nothing wrong with the government.

We did not differ on our objectives or any issue. We were discussing internal issues within the ruling Sudan’s People Liberation Movement (SPLM). So the group which was not contented with whatever was happening in government, because they found themselves out of the government, resorted to violence. But the mediators in Addis Ababa are not taking these issues into account.

Are you saying the issues of the coup and rebellion should be highlighted and not mixed up with the need to stop the fighting and people’s suffering?

The situation in South Sudan is different, for instance, from what happened in Kenya in 2007/2008 where violence was caused by the results of the elections. That is why the region came in to talk about power-sharing between Mwai Kibaki and Raila Odinga. This was definitely a conflict over the results of the elections but in our case, it was a coup.

Where in the world is somebody who planned a coup brought in to share power that he wanted to take wholly for himself?

———-

Govt and rebels adopt hard-line stance as March 5 deadline looms

Report from East African

By FRED OLUOCH

IN SUMMARY

Chronology

  • President Slavar Kiir sacked then vice president Riek Machar and the Cabinet in July 2013. An alleged coup attempt on December 15, 2013, led to an open conflict with a faction of SPLM led by Machar accused of instigating the coup.
  • Igad called for consultative meetings in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, in January 2014, to find a peaceful solution to the conflict. The protagonists sent representatives.
  • A meeting in Arusha in 2014 came up with what is called the Arusha Accord in an effort to reunite the three factions of the SPLM.
  • On February 1, 2015, the Addis Ababa meeting came up with an agreement calling for the creation of the position of First Vice President, whose nominee will be from SPLM-in-Opposition.

South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir has ruled out any possibility of sharing executive power with Dr Riek Machar, his former deputy who leads the SPLA faction that rebelled against his government.

This could stall the ongoing peace talks in Addis Ababa, mediated by regional leaders under the Intergovernmental Authority on Development, Igad, as Dr Machar’s group has declared it will accept nothing short of the First Vice President position

In an exclusive interview with The EastAfrican at State House in Juba, President Kiir said the talks would not succeed if Igad insisted that Dr Machar becomes the First Vice President.

The talks were called to negotiate an agreement after fighting broke out in the country in December 2013. The last agreement signed on February 1, 2015, in Addis Ababa, allowed President Kiir to remain at the helm but created the position of First Vice President, to be occupied by the SPLM-in-Opposition nominee and the Second Vice President slot, to be given to the incumbent Vice President James Wani Iga.

President Kiir also wants Dr Machar’s faction labelled “coup plotters” and treated as such.

“The problem is that Igad is treating the coup plotters as innocent people who simply protested against the government, and yet they are people who wanted power through illegal means,” said President Kiir in reference to the last agreement.

“My personal position and the position of my party is that Dr Machar should not be the First Vice President, but he can come in as number three or the Second Vice President if he wants. After his proposal of executive prime minister was rejected, Dr Machar now wants to be the First Vice President, which we do not accept,” said President Kiir.

However, the SPLM-in-Opposition representative in Kenya, Adel Sandrai, says his group will not accept anything short of the post of the First Vice President, adding that the last agreement of February 1 was very clear that SPLM-in-Opposition will have the position of First Vice President.

“As far as we know, President Kiir caused the war in the country by resisting internal party reforms and purging those who fought with him from the party hierarchy. He has the responsibility to take the lead towards peace, but if he is not interested, then we will meet in the field,” said Mr Sandrai.

After 21 years of civil war, South Sudan got Independence on July 9, 2011. But the delicate inter-ethnic coexistence started shaking in July 2013 when President Kiir sacked Dr Machar as his deputy, together with the entire Cabinet.

The current hardening of positions is likely to complicate the proposed Transitional Government of National Unity, even as the various peace committees continue with consultations in Addis Ababa for a lasting peace agreement before the March 5, 2015 deadline.

The five peace committees are; Transitional Security Arrangement, Governance, Economy, Justice and Humanitarian Affairs; and Leadership Structure.

But the Addis Ababa mediators are running out of time given that the United Nations Security Council on Thursday this week issued a draft notice for sanctions against those committing human rights abuses and violations of international humanitarian law, including those involved in targeted killings of civilians, ethnically-targeted violence, extrajudicial killings, rape, and other forms of sexual and gender-based violence, recruitment and use of children in conflict.

Signs that the Addis talks may not end well emerged when President Kiir revealed during an interview with The EastAfrican that he was pressured last August to consider the position of the prime minister by three regional leaders — Presidents Uhuru Kenyatta of Kenya and Yoweri Museveni of Uganda and Ethiopia’s Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn — despite the post not being provided for in the Constitution.

President Kiir explained that when he passed through Nairobi on his way to Washington for the US-Africa Summit in August 2014, he was asked by the three leaders to explain what he thought would be the best way to bring the conflict to an end.

“I told them that if there is to be a solution to this problem, the best thing is to appoint two vice presidents, with the First Vice President going to the incumbent and the second going to Dr Machar. But these leaders did not accept my proposal and instead proposed the position of the prime minster,” he said.

On coming back from Washington, the four again met in Juba and President Kiir says he was forced to give in to the position of the prime minster but asked them to give him a job description of a non-executive prime minister because South Sudan has never had one.

“So the special envoys of the region were given the task of finding out what non-executive prime ministers in Uganda and in Tanzania do. When these functions were brought to the table in later negotiations, Dr Machar rejected them and said that if he is not an executive prime minister, he has to be First Vice President,” said President Kiir.

The general mood among top government officials in Juba is that the Arusha Accord of January 21 that seeks to reunite the three wings of SPLM is a good springboard for peaceful negotiations but the Igad proposal offering the First Vice President position to Dr Machar is just a suggestion that must be renegotiated.

The SPLM government is maintaining a delicate balance between finding a solution as demanded by the international community and ensuring that it does not encourage future rebellions.

SPLM’s secretary-general, Dr Ann Itto, says the party realises that there is a need for give and take but giving Dr Machar the position of vice president is setting a bad precedent and is like rewarding rebellion.

“Many people are saying that it is okay for SPLM to sign an agreement to bring the rebels and former detainees home. But even if we say as SPLM that we want peace that bad, the same SPLM members are asking, ‘is it possible, for instance, for Joseph Kony to go back to Uganda and be appointed the first vice president?” she asked.

But as the SPLM in Government grapples with the way forward in the peace talks. President Kiir on Tuesday issued a decree of blanket amnesty for all those in exile, and all the anti-government forces within the country under Dr Machar.

He argued that the amnesty is in accordance with the Arusha SPLM Party Reunification Agreement and should be respected by all parties.

—-

President Kiir: Why Machar will not be my Number 2

By NATION REPORTER

South Sudanese President Salva Kiir says he will not accept Dr Riek Machar, who led a rebellion against him, as the first vice-president in the current peace negotiations.

In an exclusive interview with The EastAfrican from State House, Juba, President Kiir said he would only agree to Dr Machar coming in at position three as the second vice-president or non-executive prime minister.

PERSONAL POSITION

“My personal position and the position of my party is that Machar should not be the first-vice president. He can come in as number three as agreed in Addis Ababa in August last year. He wanted the position of prime minister and I accepted, despite the fact that we don’t have it in the Constitution.

“But when the pecking order was put forward by the mediators, they had the president, vice-president, prime minister, two deputies and council of ministers. Machar rejected it because he wanted to be an executive prime minister who will exercise all the powers and the president becomes ceremonial. He was told ‘no’, because this was an elected executive president. If you want to be an executive prime minister or president, then  you wait for elections and keep out of this government. He wanted to share executive powers with the president and yet these powers were given by the people,” Mr Kiir said.

President Kiir added that the Igad talks in Addis Ababa after violence broke out in South Sudan in December 2013, could only end the conflict if the mediators acknowledged that Dr Machar’s men were “coup plotters”.

He also spoke about the pressure from regional leaders and his views on claims that Kenya supports the Machar group.

US Presents UN Draft Resolution on South Sudan Sanctions

Posted: February 26, 2015 by PaanLuel Wël in Junub Sudan

US Presents UN Draft Resolution on South Sudan Sanctions

Published Wednesday, February 25, 2015
The United States on Tuesday presented a UN draft resolution on imposing sanctions in South Sudan, where warring factions have repeatedly failed to abide by agreements to end 14 months of war.

The measure was submitted to the Security Council a day after Ethiopia opened a new round of negotiations between the warring sides that were billed as a final opportunity to reach a sustainable peace deal.

Under the resolution, the Security Council could impose targeted sanctions such as a global travel ban and an assets freeze on individuals who are deemed a threat to the stability of South Sudan.

The draft raised the possibility of imposing an arms embargo on South Sudan, a measure strongly backed by European countries despite concerns that the ban could penalize President Salva Kiir Mayardit’s forces more than the rebel fighters of Riek Machar.

“The political leaders have repeatedly failed to put their narrow political and economic agendas aside in order to find political solutions that could bring a measure of stability,” a US official said.

“In light of that, our goal is to work with our partners to move forward with a sanctions resolution that will lay the groundwork for imposing costs on those who continue to fail to work toward a solution,” said the official who spoke on condition of anonymity.

Seven previous ceasefires have failed to take hold in South Sudan, which exploded into violence in December 2013 after a falling-out between Kiir and his then-Vice President Machar.

UN peacekeeping chief Herve Ladsous told the 15-member Security Council that prospects for a breakthrough were dim.

“The likelihood that either side could soften its stance remains low,” Ladsous said.

Tens of thousands of people have died in the 14-month conflict, 1.5 million have been displaced and 2.5 million are in dire need of food aid in South Sudan, which declared independence from Sudan in 2011.

More than 113,000 civilians have fled to UN bases for protection as government troops and fighters are accused of waging terror campaigns of rape and killing.

Regional negotiators have now set a deadline of March 5 for Kiir and Machar to reach a final peace deal that includes a transitional unity government.

A second deadline of April 1 has been set to launch preparations for the transition that should be completed no later than July 9.

US officials described the two deadlines as “milestones” and said the Security Council would decide at those times whether to move forward and impose sanctions, once the resolution is adopted.

A vote on the US-drafted resolution at the Security Council could take place next week, diplomats said.

The draft resolution threatens sanctions against those involved in recruiting child soldiers or who block deliveries of humanitarian aid as well as leaders who fail to advance peace negotiations.

It provides for a panel of experts to be established and a sanctions committee that will report to the Security Council on the situation in South Sudan.

The United States announced plans in November to present a sanctions resolution, but the measure ran into resistance over the arms embargo provision and shifting positions from African governments in the region.

Over two dozen armed forces — including government soldiers and allied militia backed by Ugandan soldiers on one side, and a range of rebel factions on the other — have been battling it out for the last 14 months.

Fighting has raged this month in the northern Upper Nile state, with the government warning that rebel forces were splintering, making any negotiations increasingly complicated.

In early February, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon accused South Sudan’s leaders of putting their own interests above those of their people after they failed to reach a power-sharing deal.

The warring factions have earned a reputation as slow talkers and hard drinkers, during the latest European Union-funded negotiations in Ethiopia, which cost at least $22 million, according to diplomatic sources.

South Sudan sanctions loom as US presents draft UN resolution

Waning patience over repeated failure of ceasefire agreements prompts US to propose global travel ban and asset freeze
President Salva Kiir and Riek Machar attend a ceasefire ceremony in Addis Ababa last May. After seven unsuccessful attempts to end the civil war in South Sudan, the country could face sanctions.

South Sudan’s warring factions are a step closer to facing sanctions after the US presented a UN draft resolution threatening a global travel ban and assets freeze.

The resolution is a signal the US is losing patience with the repeated failure of the two sides “to put their narrow political and economic agendas aside” and stop fighting.

Similar language emerged from the UN’s peacekeeping chief, who accused both the government and rebels of “a serious failure of leadership that remains focused on its pursuit for power rather than care of its people”.

The US measure, which was submitted to the UN security council on Tuesday, came a day after the latest round of negotiations to end South Sudan’s 14-month civil war began in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa.

Seven ceasefires have failed to take hold in South Sudan, which erupted into violence in December 2013 after President Salva Kiir accused his vice-president, Riek Machar, of plotting a coup.

Tens of thousands are thought to have died in the fighting, which has displaced 1.5 million people internally and forced another 480,000 into neighbouring countries. Although famine was averted last year, the UN estimates 3.9 million people will face food insecurity in South Sudan in 2015, with 2.5 million becoming severely food insecure.

The draft resolution raises the possibility of an arms embargo on the world’s youngest country – a measure strongly backed by European countries despite concerns that the ban would penalise Kiir’s forces more than Machar’s rebels.

“The political leaders have repeatedly failed to put their narrow political and economic agendas aside in order to find political solutions that could bring a measure of stability,” a US official told AFP.
Advertisement

“In light of that, our goal is to work with our partners to move forward with a sanctions resolution that will lay the groundwork for imposing costs on those who continue to fail to work toward a solution.”

Asked why the resolution did not explicitly call for an arms embargo, a US official told Reuters the idea was to take an “incremental approach”, gradually increasing pressure on the warring factions.

Earlier this month, Valerie Amos, the UN under-secretary general for humanitarian affairs and emergency relief coordinator, backed calls for an arms embargo.

“Anything that takes weapons off the streets, out of countries and out of communities will help us because ultimately for us it’s about bringing peace,” she told the Guardian. “If there are no weapons, it’s harder for people to fight, peace will come sooner and we can get more aid to the people who so desperately need it.”

Despite the latest US moves, however, the UN’s peacekeeping chief, Hervé Ladsous, told the security council “the likelihood that either side could soften its stance remains low”.

He said the peace talks had been marred by “a serious failure of leadership that remains focused on its pursuit for power rather than care of its people”, adding: “There is now an urgent need to reinforce the mediation efforts, as well as to impose consequences on the parties if they fail to show willingness to compromise, and continue engaging in a conflict that will result in further loss of innocent lives.”

Regional negotiators have now set a deadline of 5 March for Kiir and Machar to reach a final peace deal that includes a transitional unity government.

A second deadline of 1 April has been set to launch preparations for the transition, which should be completed no later than 9 July.

US officials described the two deadlines as milestones and said the security council would decide at those times whether to move forward and impose sanctions, once the resolution is adopted.

A vote on the US-drafted resolution at the security council could take place next week, diplomats said.

The draft resolution threatens sanctions against those involved in recruiting child soldiers, as well as those who block deliveries of humanitarian aid and leaders who fail to advance peace negotiations.

It provides for a panel of experts to be established along with a sanctions committee that would report to the security council on the situation in South Sudan.

Although the US announced plans in November to present a sanctions resolution, the measure ran into resistance over the arms embargo provision and shifting positions from African governments in the region.

More than two dozen armed forces – including government soldiers and allied militia backed by Ugandan soldiers on one side, and a range of rebel factions on the other – have been battling since December 2013.

Fighting has raged this month in the northern Upper Nile state, with the government warning that rebel forces were splintering, making any negotiations increasingly complicated.

Last week, the UN children’s agency, Unicef, said that at least 89 boys – some as young as 13 – had been kidnapped by gunmen as they were preparing to sit school exams in the town of Wau Shilluk in the north of the country.

Both sides have been accused of using child soldiers. Unicef estimates that at least 12,000 children have been recruited.

South Sudan, which won independence from Sudan in July 2011, is also facing a worsening health crisis. On Tuesday, the World Health Organisation (WHO) appealed for $90m (£580m) of additional funding to provide vital health services to about 3.35 million people in South Sudan. The WHO said the disruption caused by months of fighting had weakened health systems and led to recurrent outbreaks of communicable diseases. It also noted that more than 80% of services are now being provided by international organisations.


Originally posted on Weakleaks!:

INTRO lines by the blogger:

I just got an email from Peter Kuot Ngong, forwarding to me and all of you this pastoral epistle from our ‘Magi from the East’ of Kapoeta.

Having read the letter, I would not just copy and paste it without saying a thank-you intro to our Old Man of God.

My reader, this letter from our leader is not from Nya-Kuron ‘Culture-all Centre’, where a lawyer, who is a teetotaller, can be beaten to death with a broken bottle of beer for stepping on drunko’s toes at night. The letter is from Kuron Peace-cum-Culture Village, where even a toddler can step on a snake and would not be bitten to death even at daytime.

It is from Taposaland where a Paride Taban can be escorted cheerfully to his ‘wise house’ by cattle rustlers, not from Bariland (the political one) where an Alfred Taban can be escorted fearfully to…

View original 1,142 more words

Minister Makwei Lueth: G-10 Members to Rejoin the Government

Posted: February 23, 2015 by PaanLuel Wël in Junub Sudan

SPLM to reinstate some ex-members in 2 weeks

Hellen Achayo, EYE Radio

President Kiir and Madam Nyandeng Garang: Reunion between the gov't and the former political detainees

President Kiir and Madam Nyandeng Garang: Reunion between the gov’t and the former political detainees

Members of the SPLM who were dismissed from the party will be reinstated within two weeks as an implementation of the Arusha Agreement, the Minister of Information has said.

They include Pagan Amum, Majak Agoot, Deng Alor and amongst others.

Michael Makuei says the reinstatement will not include Dr. Riek Machar, Taban Deng Gai and Alfred Lado Gore.

Addressing the media in Addis Ababa, Mr. Makuei said the move is to ensure the legitimacy of the ruling party.

“Anybody who was dismissed in something not connected with the conflict will not benefit from that,” Mr Makuei stated.

“And from the party are three – it is Dr. Riek Machar, it is Taban Deng Gai and Alfred Lado Goro and the rest were not originally dismissed.  Up to now they are still members of the SPLM.

“Some are still members of political bureau; others are members of NLC and so forth.  They will come back to their positions.

“This is what is meant by the revocation of the former decision and it will be implemented by the President within 14 days.”

Last month, President Salva Kiir had said SPLM may reconsider the reinstatement of the members who were dismissed after the December 15th incident.


lulruai

Brig. Gen. Lul Ruai Koang, the former rebel military spokesperson who broke away from Riek Machar’s group yesterday on Wednesday, has arrived at Juba international airport today at 2.15pm.

He was received by top government officials led by chief of general staff, Gen. Malong Awan, among others.

Lul Ruai has accused Riek Machar of orchestrating a failed military coup in December 2013. He blamed Riek for dragging his feet on the ongoing peace talks in Addis Ababa.

Lul has formed his own party, South Sudan Resistance Movement/Army, the SSRM/A, which he said will directly and separately negotiate with the government with the goal to establishing a new state for the Greater Akobo area.

lul

Lul arrived today with David Yau Yau at Juba international airport.