Posts Tagged ‘juba south sudan’



by Wanjohi Kabukuru

Everyone wants a piece of the pie that is Juba, South Sudan.

Almost a year before the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) was signed in Nairobi Kenya intense lobbying had begun. The signing of the CPA on 9th January 2005 unleashed a frenzied scramble for Juba’s resources.

While the CPA is widely acknowledged as having initiated a new dawn in the Sudan, it also triggered off an economically hewn interest attracting both the developed and the developing nations.

The successful South Sudan secession referendum in January 2011 and eventual independence celebration cooled the frayed nerves of many who had adopted a wait-and-see attitude over South Sudan.

However it is instructive to note that since 2005 USA, China, India, Norway, Ethiopia, Malaysia, Turkey, Kenya, Uganda and South Africa and their respective private sectors have been in the forefront seeking to secure business concessions with the new nation. To make this easier and faster all these nations have embassies and consulates in both Juba and Khartoum. Southern Sudan’s massive oil boom, tourism concessions, logging, lucrative mining and infrastructure tenders, medical supplies, education, financial services, agriculture, defense contracts and commodities supplies are a glee to many triggering what is now politically referred to as “land grab”.

The Norwegian People’s Aid (NPA) commissioned investigations on the alleged “land grab” in South Sudan which culminated into a 48-page dossier dubbed “The New Frontier”. The dossier reveals that in the period 2007 to 2010 “foreign interests sought or acquired a total of 2.64 million hectares of land (6.52 million acres) in the agriculture, forestry and biofuel sectors alone.”

According to the report’s author David Kuol Mading “That is a larger land area than the entire country of Rwanda,” said the report’s author, David Kuol Mading. “If domestic investments, tourism and conservation are added, the figure rises to 5.74 million hectares (14.17 million acres), or nine percent of Southern Sudan’s total land area.”.

“With the nascent state of government, a society still reeling from years of conflict, and the legal ambiguity of the transitional period, there is also a danger that this influx of investment, if left unchecked, may serve to undermine livelihoods,” the report says.

Foreign interests into the South Sudan pie have managed to secure some 5.74 million hectares of land for agribusiness concerns namely agriculture, forestry, biofuels, eco-tourism and carbon trading.

Exactly two years after the signing of the CPA, the well known wildlife lobby Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) conducted an aerial survey which revealed thriving wildlife in large hordes, along the South Sudan Savannah and sudland. In comparison WCS compared the South Sudan savannah wildlife to the ones found in Tanzania’s Serengeti plains. This revelation debunked the myth that South Sudan had no wildlife and at the same gave rise to new investments interests on tourism and conservation.

Indeed the largest land deal detailed in the report is primarily hinged on wildlife conservation and tourism. It is the leasing of 2,280,000 hectares (5,631,600 acres) in Boma National Park which is situated in Jonglei state to an Emirati company Al Ain Wildlife. Under the agreement, Al Ain National Wildlife will construct high-end class hotels and tented resort camps within the park. In this stake the Government of South Sudan (GOSS) is said to have a concession of only 35%. Incidentally, public consultations and local community involvement were not factored in when this deal was struck.

This is followed by US firms Nile Trading and Development and Jarch Management, which have leased 600,000 hectares (1,482,000 acres) in Central Equatoria state and 400,000 hectares (988,000 acres) in oil-rich Unity state for agricultural investments. The latter scheme results from a controversial deal which was signed two years ago between Jarch, a New York-based investment house, and former warlord turned deputy commander of the SPLA General Paulino Matip.

Prince Budr Bin Sultan of Saudi Arabia has been granted a 25 year lease on some 105,000ha in Gwit for agricultural purposes. According to the dossier others involved in seeking large scale land based investments in South Sudan include Central Equatoria Teak Company (UK/Finland), Madhvani (Uganda), Green Resources (Norwegian) and its South Sudan subsidiary TreeFarms, Blue Lakes (Kenyan), MAJ Foundation (Indian), Fenno Caledonian (Finnish), Citadel Group (Egyptian), and the Australian outfit Concorde Agriculture.

China National Oil Petroleum Corporation, Malaysian oil giant Petronas, Moldovian oil Company Ascom Group, India’s Oil and Natural Gas Corporation (ONGC) Videsh and Sweden’s Lundin are exploring and exploiting oil in Jonglei state. According to Minority Rights Group International, French oil giant Total also holds massive oil concessions in Jonglei.

In the name of assisting the new nation come into being, the reality however showcases personal, national interest and little to do with philanthropy. Putting all these in perspective, tales of large scale bribery, underhand dealings and official malfeasance denotes the real ‘scramble for the South Sudan’. Accusations of corrupt ministers continue to dog President Salva Kiir’s new cabinet.

Widow of the liberation hero John Garang, Rebecca Nyandeng de Mabior has found herself on hot soup for criticizing Kiir’s government and condemning corruption in cabinet. She was first demoted from her roads and transport cabinet portfolio and appointed to a less glamorous post of Special Adviser on Gender and human rights.

In more ways than one all these factors not only affect the economies of all these countries involved but also shape their foreign policies and realign their international relations and obligations. In other words there has been a radical paradigm shift within South Sudan, largely driven by the profit motive.

Interestingly the scramble for business in Juba has seen strong African entrepreneurs pushing the limits off the savvy and more monied US, UAE, China, EU and Indian firms. Leading African nations entrenching their businesses in South Sudan include South Africa, Sudan, Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia and Egypt.

South Sudan is Uganda’s main export market, importing goods worth $184.6 million in 2009, according to the Uganda Exports Promotions Board. Kenyan exports to South Sudan were worth $157.7 million the same year. Apart from Nairobi, Khartoum, Cairo, Kampala and Addis Ababa the other major African player in Juba is Pretoria.

South African interests in Juba kicked off in earnest in 2004 when Mechem a subsidiary of Denel (the South African arms parastatal) began its demining operations in Southern Sudan. Mechem which is known globally for its mines removal and battle grounds clearance is still undertaking its operations in Southern Sudan today. As of last year it had cleared 9050km of road removing 3237 anti personnel, unexploded ordinances (UXO), anti tank land mines. This is only a tip of the ice-berg of SA’s involvement in South Sudan. South Sudan is said to purchase much of its weaponry from Denel and even training of its key security personnel is conducted by the South African Defense Forces (SADF).

Lately South African Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) and Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) have intensified their engagement with Southern Sudan paving way for an influx of South African businesses making inroads in Juba. In February 2009 a Breakfast Roundtable hosted by the DFA bringing together, South African business magnates and Government of Southern Sudan (GOSS) ministers opened the floodgates of the scramble for the South Sudan pie not just by private South African firms but also government parastatals. In July 2009 under the DTI led some 20 South African public and private sector companies on a trade and investment mission to South Sudan. The 20 companies covered, telecommunications, agriculture, forestry, water purification, timber, financial services, infrastructure development, energy and minerals, SAB Miller has invested over R354 million in the South Sudan Beverages Limited. PetroSA has oil concession rights and Global Engineering Consortium SA signed a $21 million contract with Sudan Railway Corporation. New Kush Exploration Company registered in both South Africa and UK has been awarded several exploration rights for gold and uranium in South Sudan.

At the heart of these business deals is the South African-Sudanese Joint Business Council. Spoornet, Denel, Arivia, Safcol, SAB Miller, Mechem among other South African entities have all dipped their fingers on Southern Sudan’s pie of timber, technology, infrastructure and defense contracts. Intensive South African interests in the Sudan are said to have nosedived during the tenure of President Thabo Mbeki. To this day Mbeki, is deeply involved in the peace process of the Sudan. He is still the chairperson of the African Union High Level Implementation Panel for Sudan.

With the emergence of a new republic, the scramble has just reached fever pitch and Pretoria, Washington, Mumbai, Beijing, Nairobi, Kampala, Addis Ababa, Bangkok, Istanbul are upping their game. These are among the key issues that ascertain the deep involvement of foreign nations in Juba.

Some foreign entities in South Sudan:
Kenya Commercial Bank – Kenya
Equity Bank – Kenya ,
UAP Insurance – South Africa
SAB Miller – South Africa
Mechem – South Africa
Commercial Bank of Ethiopia – Ethiopia
Itsalat International – Saudi Arabia
Petronas – Malaysia
Byblos Bank – Lebanon
China National Petroleum – China
RAK Ceramics – UAE
Barwa Real Estate – Qatar
Total – France
Arab Swiss Engineering Co (ASEC) – Egypt
Qatar National bank – Qatar
Delta Industries – Egypt
Emirates Bio Fertilizer – UAE
The Lundin Group – Sweden/Switzerland
ONGC-Videsh – India
ASCOM Group -Moldova

AUTHOR: Wanjohi Kabukuru
URL: http://www.africasia.com/
E-MAIL: wanjohi [at] positiveoutcomes.org

http://farmlandgrab.org/post/view/19544

South Sudan seeks food and farmland investments

ReutersBy Ulf Laessing | Reuters

JUBA (Reuters) - South Sudan hopes to attract investors from Gulf Arab states, Israel, China and fellow African countries to boost production of basic food items, a government official said on Thursday.

Created in July after a 2005 peace agreement with Khartoum, Africa’s newest nation faces food shortages and grave economic challenges such as annual inflation at almost 80 percent in November.

Around 2.7 million South Sudanese will need food aid from next year as widespread violence and crop failures have hit hard farm production, according to the United Nations’ food programme.

South Sudan has held talks with investors from Gulf Arab states, Israel, China, Uganda and the Netherlands to invite them to invest into agricultural production, said Elizabeth Manoa Majok, undersecretary in the ministry of commerce, industry and investment.

“The government has made food production the top priority…80 percent of South Sudan depend on agriculture,” Majok said in an interview in the capital Juba.

“No serious commitment has been made so far….(but) interest of investors is big,” she said.

South Sudan wants with the help of investors to increase production of basic food items such as sugar, rice, cereals and oilseeds, livestock as well as cotton, she said.

“We import everything, even tomatoes. We should produce this ourselves,” Majok said. “We have the farmland, the resources.”

The government was preparing tenders to invite investors to revamp food factories damaged during the civil war and was also open to other partnerships such as farmland investments, she said without giving details.

Desert Gulf Arab countries have been trying to buy or lease farmland in Africa and Asia to secure food supplies but local famers have opposed such investments in some countries.

EAST AFRICA TRADE

Civil war waged for all but a few years since 1955 has left South Sudan with an almost complete lack of infrastructure and industry, aside from oil. The country has few paved roads outside Juba and large parts become inaccessible by ground transport during the rainy season.

Often described as one of the world’s least-developed nations, it has high levels of poverty, illiteracy and maternal mortality rates. Hospitals and schools are scarce.

South Sudan is also under pressure to diversify its economy away from oil generating 98 percent of state revenues. Oil reserves will halve by 2020 if no new finds are made, according to the International Monetary Funds (IMF).

To facilitate trade with East African countries such as Uganda and Kenya the government is considering setting up free trade zones in border areas, Majok said.

“Consultants are doing a study on free zones. We haven’t announced it yet,” she said.

Landlocked South Sudan depends for most of its needs on imports which are driving up inflation. Roads to Uganda and Kenya are poor and tensions with Khartoum have disrupted supplies from the north.

“Their loss is bigger than ours because we are a big market,” Majok said of tensions with Khartoum hitting bilateral trade.

Majok also said the government had passed new investment laws and was about to approve another package of bills to improve legal security for foreign firms.

http://news.yahoo.com/sudan-seeks-food-farmland-investments-060639569.html

South Sudan threatened by land grab

Four months before South Sudan becomes an independant nation nine percent of the country has been targeted by investors, a Norwegian People’s Aid report reveals.

Author: Tine Johansen

South Sudan threatened by land grab

The report, The New Frontier, A baseline survey of large-scale investment in Southern-Sudan, is part of a baseline survey of large-scale land-based investment in Southern Sudan prepared for Norwegian People’s Aid (NPA). It presents data on 28 foreign and domestic investments planned or underway across the ten states of Southern Sudan. In just four years, between the start of 2007 and the end of 2010, foreign interests sought or acquired a total of 2.64 million hectares of land (26,400 km2) in the agriculture, forestry and biofuel sectors alone. That is a larger land area than the entire country of Rwanda.

South Sudan threatened by land grab
Jan Ledang, NPA South Sudan Country Director (left)

If one adds domestic investments, some of which date back to the pre-war period, and investments in tourism and conservation, the figure rises to 5.74 million hectares (57,400 km2), or nine percent of Southern Sudan’s total land area. While in theory, this influx of investment could provide development opportunities for rural communities, without the appropriate procedures in place there is a danger that it will serve to undermine livelihoods. Below are a series of recommendations that may help the Government of Southern Sudan (GoSS), its international partners, civil society, companies, investors, and rural communities in Southern Sudan to address the risks and opportunities of largescale land investments moving forward:

1. Adopt a presumption in favor of disclosure for all documents associated with large-scale land-based investments;

2. Develop clear jurisdictional roles for public institutions at all levels, including an appropriate balance between central oversight and state-level flexibility, and providing a role for the legislative branch in approving large-scale land allocations;

3. Consider establishing a graduated land ceiling in which the authorization of successively higher levels of government is required as the size of land allocations increases;

4. Consider a temporary moratorium on all land acquisitions above a certain size in order to allow time for the appropriate procedures to be put in place;

5. Establish a technical committee to review all existing contracts to ensure that they comply with relevant provisions of the 2009 Land Act, the 2009 Local Government Act, and the 2009 Investment Promotion Act;

6. Promote alternative business models that better account for the needs of local populations, such as giving communities an equity stake in the venture or maximizing the links between companies and smallholder producers living on or around the project area;

7. Explore opportunities for constructive engagement with companies that demonstrate a willingness to adhere to regulatory standards and prioritize the development needs of host communities.

Click on the PDF icon below to see the full report

Download high resolution version of the report (7 mb)

http://www.npaid.org/en/News_Archive/?module=Articles;action=Article.publicShow;ID=17086


By Jared Ferrie - Feb 21, 2012 10:40 AM ET

South Sudan Welcomes London Court Ruling on Disputed Oil Cargo

South Sudan welcomed the ruling by a London court to withhold payment for a cargo of crude until ownership of the oil was settled with neighboring Sudan.

The ruling was a “positive thing” because it means that Sudan will not receive a share of the proceeds from the sale of oil “stolen” by the Sudanese government, South Sudan government spokesman Barnaba Marial Benjamin said today by phone from Juba, South Sudan’s capital. “We are satisfied as long as it doesn’t go to Khartoum.”

South Sudan declared independence in July, taking control of oil fields that produced about 75 percent of Sudan’s crude output of 490,000 barrels of a day.

Talks have so far failed to yield an agreement on how much landlocked South Sudan should pay to transport its oil through a pipeline across Sudan. South Sudan halted output last month after Sudan confiscated southern crude, saying it was taking it to make up for unpaid fees.

The disputed oil includes 600,000 barrels of Nile Blend that Sudan loaded onto the oil tanker Ratna Shradha on Jan. 19. Oil trader Trafigura Beheer BV, confirmed yesterday that the court ruled that all proceeds from the shipment, which it bought from Sudan and sold to Tokyo-based JX Nippon Oil & Energy Corp, remain with the court until ownership is legally established.

Sudan Foreign Ministry Spokesman al-Obeid Murawih didn’t answer his phone when Bloomberg called seeking comment.

To contact the reporter on this story: Jared Ferrie in Juba, South Sudan atjferrie1@bloomberg.net

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-02-21/south-sudan-welcomes-london-court-ruling-on-disputed-oil-cargo.html

Disputed Sudan Oil Can Unload After Court Ruling, Trafigura Says

February 21, 2012, 12:43 AM EST

By Jared Ferrie

Feb. 20 (Bloomberg) — A crude oil cargo that’s been stranded at sea because of a dispute between Sudan and South Sudan can unload in Japan after a court ruling in London, oil trader Trafigura Beheer BV said.

“We can confirm that the English court has ordered that the delivery can be made,” Trafigura, which bought the disputed cargo, said in a statement. “The court will hold all proceeds related to the cargo until ownership is legally established.”

South Sudan declared independence in July, taking control of fields producing of about 75 percent of Sudan’s 490,000 barrels a day of crude output. The division of oil resources has become a subject of contention between the two countries as South Sudan claims the Sudanese government in Khartoum is illegally selling the crude.

The oil tanker Ratna Shradha has been sitting off the coast of southern Japan since Feb. 14 and hasn’t docked, according to AISLive data compiled by Bloomberg. The ship loaded about 600,000 barrels of Nile Blend in Sudan on Jan. 19.

The tanker’s owner asked the court to rule on the matter because ownership of the cargo is disputed, said Pagan Amum, South Sudan’s chief negotiator in talks with Sudan.

“We will leave no stone unturned to recover the value of oil stolen by the government of Sudan,” Amum said. “We are encouraged by the steps taken by owners of the ship taken in the English court.”

An employee of Chambal Fertiliser and Chemicals Ltd., the Indian company that owns the ship, who answered the phone today, said nobody was available to comment. JX Nippon Oil and Energy, scheduled to take delivery of the oil, also declined to comment.

Ordered Shutdown

South Sudan ordered a shutdown of crude production after accusing Sudan of diverting fuel to its refinery, forcing companies to load oil onto ships it controlled, and blockading other shipments. Sudan said it confiscated crude to cover unpaid fees it’s owed for allowing the landlocked country to transport oil via a pipeline to Port Sudan on the Red Sea.

Sudan’s foreign ministry spokesman, al-Obeid Murawih, dismissed the dispute over Trafigura’s purchase.

“Whether we sold the oil or we not, consumed it or not, the buyers are willing to buy or rejecting — all these don’t help solving the core problem, which is reaching an oil deal between two countries,” he said by phone yesterday from Khartoum.

Dar Blend

Sudan put 1.9 million barrels of Dar Blend onto three tankers, comprised of 650,000 barrels on the Sea Sky, 750,000 barrels on the Al Nouf and 600,000 barrels on the ETC Isis, according to letters from oil companies that were provided by Amum. Sudan also loaded 600,000 barrels of Nile Blend onto the Ratna Sharada, the documents showed.

The Sea Sky and Al Nouf remain in the Fujairah area, on the coast of Sudan, according to AISLive data. The ETC Isis is located off Singapore.

The U.K. court decision for the sale to take place with the funds kept in escrow is “significant,” said Marc Mercer, an Africa associate with the Eurasia Group in London.

“The Trafigura experience makes the north’s sale of southern oil even more difficult to other such companies,” he said today in an e-mailed response to questions. “Litigation in court as well as the possibility of further proceedings should the oil be determined as stolen will be costly for all sides — financially and reputation wise.”

Sudan and South Sudan are scheduled to meet in the coming weeks in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, for the next round of negotiations on issues outstanding since the south separated. These include determining the status of the region of Abyei and disputed sections of the border, as well as agreeing on an oil revenue sharing arrangement.

Amum told reporters Feb. 15 that South Sudan will not begin pumping oil again until a comprehensive agreement is reached, which includes Sudan paying for southern oil it has confiscated.

–With assistance from Salma El Wardany in Khartoum. Editors: Raj Rajendran, Randall Hackley.

To contact the reporter on this story: Jared Ferrie in Juba, South Sudan at jferrie1@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Will Kennedy at wkennedy3@bloomberg.net

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2012-02-21/disputed-sudan-oil-can-unload-after-court-ruling-trafigura-says.html

Disputed Sudanese oil cargo yet to unload in Japan

Tuesday, 21 February 2012

Sudan has confiscated more than 6 million barrels of South Sudan’s oil since December due to the row over oil transit fees, a South Sudanese official said last week. (File photo)

Sudan has confiscated more than 6 million barrels of South Sudan’s oil since December due to the row over oil transit fees, a South Sudanese official said last week. (File photo)
By REUTERS 

SINGAPORE

A ship carrying disputed Sudanese crude remained anchored off southwest Japan on Tuesday, despite a British court ruling giving the tanker permission to unload, three shipping sources said.

The Ratna Shradha, which is owned by India Steamship, is holding 600,000 barrels of crude oil that South Sudan says was seized by neighboring Sudan last month and which sold it at deep discount to a North Asian trader, the sources said.

The tanker has yet to receive permission to dock from JX Nippon Oil & Energy, operator of the Kiire terminal, a source familiar with the matter said.

“The ship was scheduled to discharge at the terminal, but so far we have not received any news from JX Nippon,” the source said.

The tanker has remained off the terminal since Feb. 14, according to Reuters shipping data. The docking schedule for this week does not show the Ratna Shradha unloading, a second shipping source said.

At least two traders said the cargo had been bought by JX Nippon Oil and Energy.

India Steamship, a unit of Chambal Fertilizers and Chemicals Ltd., and JX Nippon Oil, both declined to comment.

Chambal Fertilizers submitted the case to a British commercial court on Feb. 15, a court official told Reuters, after questions over the legal ownership of the crude emerged.

The defendants in the case are listed as the Republic of Sudan, the Republic of South Sudan and Union de Banques Arabes et Francaises, the official added.

Geneva-based Trafigura, the world’s third largest oil trader, bought oil which the South Sudanese government claims was seized by its northern neighbour Sudan.

Landlocked, war-ravaged South Sudan must pump oil to the Red Sea via a pipeline across its northern neighbor to Port Sudan. Oil revenues account for 98 percent of the seven-month-old country’s income.

The Ratna Shradha is one of at least three tankers that are part of some $815 million in oil revenues that South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir accused Sudan of “looting” and which the government in Khartoum said provided compensation for unpaid transit fees.

It is not yet clear if the other disputed cargoes have been sold.

Sudan has confiscated more than 6 million barrels of South Sudan’s oil since December due to the row over oil transit fees, a South Sudanese official said last week.

http://english.alarabiya.net/articles/2012/02/21/196101.html


South Sudan halves spending after oil shutdown row

By Hannah McNeish (AFP) 

JUBA — South Sudan slashed non-salary government spending by half, weeks after halting the oil production that forms 98 percent of its budget in a bitter row with former foes in north Sudan, officials said Sunday.

But the government of the oil-rich but impoverished nation said salaries would not be touched by the austerity measures despite a bloated civil service and massive military.

“These are swift and deep cuts, but no layoffs of civil servants, organised forces personal, and SPLA (army),” Kosti Manibe, Minister of Finance said in a statement. “Everyone?s pay check is being maintained.”

Non-salary spending will be cut “by an average of 50 percent” as well as reductions in “unconditional monthly grants” to the world’s newest nation’s 10 states.

The finance ministry said it also planned to triple tax revenue within six months by enforcing a 2009 tax law on income, businesses, and customs.

“The cutbacks are effective immediately, and will ensure that the necessary funds are available for the continued operation of the government and security forces,” the statement added.

South Sudan?s first budget, after splitting from the north in July with around three quarters of the crude oil, allocated over 40 percent of around $2 billion spending on salaries this year.

After decades of war left the country in ruins, South Sudan is tasked with building a new nation from scratch, but it took the drastic step of shutting down oil production in late January in a furious dispute with Sudan over transit fees.

South Sudan vowed to halt oil production of around 350,000 barrels per day until Sudan repaid 2.4 million barrels of southern crude it “stole” from pipelines running through the north to its Red Sea port.

The latest round of African Union-mediated talks foundered last week after South Sudan accused the north of “stealing” another 2.6 million barrels of crude.

The next round of AU talks in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa are slated to start on Wednesday.

In October, the government pledged to weed out up to 65 percent of rogue employees in a civil service plagued by nepotism, fraud and ghost workers, but the Minister of Labour resigned weeks later and the unpopular plan was shelved.

Around 300,000 people from the ex-rebel force that secured South Sudan?s independence are thought to make up its security forces, including police.

While opposition leaders and aid agencies have urged South Sudan to reduce military spending, analysts fear that widespread cuts could spark revolt and an increase in rebel militia groups still threatening the new nation?s stability.

South Sudan is already reeling from multiple crises, including hundreds of thousands fleeing an explosion of ethnic violence and rebel attacks, as well as tens of thousands of refugees fleeing civil war in the rump state of Sudan.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5i1928kZLG9KvjMihNs-CY74ItRCA?docId=CNG.6ef3ef0f8ff2b7a81306fd0c8cadcac4.4a1

South Sudan slashes spending after halting oil output

South Sudanese citizens hold banners expressing solidarity as President Salva Kiir declared a halt on all oil operations in South Sudan
Leaving the oil in the ground has been a popular move in South Sudan.

South Sudan has halved spending on everything but salaries to compensate for the loss of revenue following an oil shutdown due to a row with Sudan.

Oil makes up 98% of its budget, after it split from the north last year.

There will be no job losses and government wages will still be paid, the finance ministry stressed.

President Salva Kiir said his nation would rather struggle for a bit than continue to hand over its oil revenues to the old enemies in Khartoum.

The pipelines run from South Sudan through its northern neighbour, with which it fought a bitter civil war for decades, leading to the deaths of some 1.5 million people.

But the two countries have never reached an agreement over how much the south must pay.

In January, South Sudan shut down its entire oil production of 350,000 barrels a day after Sudan started seizing southern oil to compensate for what it called unpaid transit fees.

After the new country shut down its oil production, Sudan’s President Omar al-Bashir responded by saying war was now closer than peace.

Each country accuses the other of backing rebel groups and there have been clashes along the new border.

‘Swift and deep’

The austerity measures are immediate.

“These are swift and deep cuts, but no layoffs of civil servants, organized forces personnel and [army] SPLA,” Finance Minister Kosti Manibe said in a statement on Sunday.

“Everyone’s paycheck is being maintained,” he said.

Vice-President Riek Machar: “We will definitely freeze our activities on development”

The BBC’s James Copnall in Khartoum says this is good news for South Sudan’s hundreds of thousands of civil servants and men and women in uniform.

South Sudan’s first budget allocated over 40% of $2bn (£1.2bn) to salaries, the AFP news agency reports.

Our correspondent says leaving the oil in the ground has been a popular move in South Sudan – many people see it as the moment the country finally became truly free.

Tax collection

The amount transferred to each of South Sudan’s 10 states will also be lowered, though the reduction will be “minimal” according to the statement.

The government says it will also triple tax revenue within six months through better tax enforcement.

Our correspondent says detailed figures are not available, but it seems unlikely these measures will fully compensate for the loss of the oil revenue since no significant economy exists outside of oil.

Vice-President Riek Machar told the BBC last week that the loss of oil revenues would mean development would have to be put on hold for several years, but basic services would not suffer.

“For a period of 30 months we will definitely freeze our activities on development, but we’ll provide basic services: Health; education; water and even some infrastructure projects will go on,” he said.

New talks to try to resolve the oil impasse between South Sudan and Khartoum are due in the next few days in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-17098350

South Sudan cuts non-salary spending by 50 pct

Mon Feb 20, 2012 5:21am GMT

JUBA (Reuters) – South Sudan said on Sunday it would cut non-salary spending by around 50 percent as part of austerity measures to compensate for the loss of oil revenues due to a row with Khartoum.

In January, South Sudan shut down its entire oil production of 350,000 barrels a day after Sudan started seizing southern oil to compensate for what it calls unpaid fees.

A newly-independent but landlocked country, South Sudan must export its oil through Sudan. Both sides have failed to reach an agreement over fees.

Oil makes up 98 percent of South Sudan’s state income.

South Sudan’s Finance Ministry said in a statement non-salary spending will be cut by an average of 50 percent, adding that transfers to the country’s ten states would also be slightly reduced.

“These are swift and deep cuts, but no layoffs of civil servants, organized forces personnel and (army) SPLA. Everyone’s paycheck is being maintained,” Finance Minister Kosti Manibe said in a statement.

It gave no figures, but added that non-oil revenues would triple within six months through better tax enforcement.

No public data exists for South Sudan’s foreign currency reserves or detailed 2012 budget projections.

Diplomats say the South is unlikely to survive longer than several months without new oil revenues as the war-torn country is one of the most underdeveloped places in the world. No significant economy exists outside the oil industry.

South Sudan is locked in a conflict with Sudan over oil payments. The nation took three-quarters of Sudan’s oil production when it became independent in July 2011, but needs to export crude through a northern pipeline and a Red Sea port.

Both states have failed to agree on the fee Juba needs to pay, prompting Khartoum last month to seize at least three southern oil shipments at the Red Sea terminal.

Chinese-Malaysian oil consortium Petrodar, which provided 230,000 bpd of South Sudan’s output, said it could take at least 40 days up to six months or longer to resume production after pipes were flushed with water.

“Petrodar is currently assessing the impact of the shutdown to the wells and facilities,” it said in a statement.

Petrodar operates oil fields in Upper Nile state and also an export pipeline to the Red Sea.

South Sudan is due to resume oil talks sponsored by the African Union in Addis Ababa on Thursday, but diplomats see no breakthrough as positions are wide apart.

Sudan wants $1 billion in back payments plus $36 a barrel, while South Sudan has said it is willing to pay around $1 a barrel.

Sudan’s President Omar Hassan al-Bashir has warned the conflict could lead to war. North and south fought for decades in a civil war that killed an estimated 2 million people.

http://af.reuters.com/article/topNews/idAFJOE81J00E20120220?sp=true

South Sudan halves spending on oil shutdown

Monday February 20, 2012

South Sudan slashed non-salary government spending by half, weeks after halting the oil production that forms 98 per cent of its budget in a bitter row with former foes in north Sudan, officials said Sunday.

But the government of the oil-rich but impoverished nation said salaries would not be touched by the austerity measures despite a bloated civil service and massive military.

‘These are swift and deep cuts, but no layoffs of civil servants, organised forces personal, and SPLA (army),’ Kosti Manibe, Minister of Finance said in a statement. ‘Everyone’s pay cheque is being maintained.’

Non-salary spending will be cut ‘by an average of 50 per cent’ as well as reductions in ‘unconditional monthly grants’ to the world’s newest nation’s 10 states.

The finance ministry said it also planned to triple tax revenue within six months by enforcing a 2009 tax law on income, businesses, and customs.

‘The cutbacks are effective immediately, and will ensure that the necessary funds are available for the continued operation of the government and security forces,’ the statement added.

South Sudan’s first budget, after splitting from the north in July with around three quarters of the crude oil, allocated over 40 per cent of around $2 billion spending on salaries this year.

After decades of war left the country in ruins, South Sudan is tasked with building a new nation from scratch, but it took the drastic step of shutting down oil production in late January in a furious dispute with Sudan over transit fees.

South Sudan vowed to halt oil production of around 350,000 barrels per day until Sudan repaid 2.4 million barrels of southern crude it ‘stole’ from pipelines running through the north to its Red Sea port.

The latest round of African Union-mediated talks foundered last week after South Sudan accused the north of ‘stealing’ another 2.6 million barrels of crude.

The next round of AU talks in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa are slated to start on Wednesday.

In October, the government pledged to weed out up to 65 per cent of rogue employees in a civil service plagued by nepotism, fraud and ghost workers, but the Minister of Labour resigned weeks later and the unpopular plan was shelved.

Around 300,000 people from the ex-rebel force that secured South Sudan’s independence are thought to make up its security forces, including police.

While opposition leaders and aid agencies have urged South Sudan to reduce military spending, analysts fear that widespread cuts could spark revolt and an increase in rebel militia groups still threatening the new nation’s stability.

South Sudan is already reeling from multiple crises, including hundreds of thousands fleeing an explosion of ethnic violence and rebel attacks, as well as tens of thousands of refugees fleeing civil war in the rump state of Sudan.

http://www.skynews.com.au/world/article.aspx?id=720343&vId=

South Sudan slashes spending after halting oil output
The Standard
South Sudan has halved spending on everything but salaries to compensate for the loss of revenue following an oil shutdown due to a row with Sudan. Oil makes up 98% of its budget, after it split from the north last year. There will be no job losses and 

South Sudan Approves Austerity
Wall Street Journal
By NICHOLAS BARIYO KAMPALA, Uganda—South Sudan has approved austerity measures as it seeks to address the loss of oil revenues following last month’s decision to halt crude shipments amid a bitter spat over fees with its northern neighbor, Sudan, 

South Sudan, don’t be scared by Bashir’s threats!
Sudan Tribune
February 19, 2012 — Most people with some knowledge about warfare would be the first to tell you that the republic of the Sudan’s not in any position to engage in a war with the republic of South Sudan, (RSS) at least for a foreseeable future!…

South Sudan triggers domestic outcry in Beijing
Financial Times
By Katrina Manson in Juba Lu Zhifang’s mother was horrified at the prospect of her leaving China for the first time to take up a job in South Sudan, and she tried to stop her getting a passport. So when 29 Chinese workers were kidnapped north of the 
South Sudan: 9000 Kenyans Register in Juba
AllAfrica.com
By Lagu Joseph Jackson, 19 February 2012 Juba — At least about nine thousand Kenyans living in Juba the capital of South Sudan were registered following last month’s order from the Ministry of Interior that all foreigners should register with their 
Disputed Sudan Oil Can Unload After Court Ruling, Trafigura Says
BusinessWeek
20 (Bloomberg) — A crude oil cargo that’s been stranded at sea because of a dispute between Sudan and South Sudan can unload in Japan after a court ruling in London, oil trader Trafigura Beheer BV said. “We can confirm that the English court has 
South Sudan halves spending after oil shutdown row
AFP
JUBA — South Sudan slashed non-salary government spending by half, weeks after halting the oil production that forms 98 percent of its budget in a bitter row with former foes in north Sudan, officials said Sunday. But the government of the oil-rich 

AFP
Kenyans gunned down in South Sudan
The Standard
By OSINDE OBARE Three Kenyans have been killed and three others seriously injured in a bandit attack in South Sudan. The trio were shot dead when bandits ambushed them as they were being driven to a building site in Kapoeta County.
South Sudan, Ethiopia and Kenya to share cost of Lamu oil pipeline project
New Sudan Vision
To minimise financial difficulties, the LAPSSET master plan report proposes that Kenya, South Sudan and Ethiopia share part of the cost, even as they seek donor funding. The plan report also acknowledges that some of the projects might not be completed 

Sudan: Access Denied to Foreign NGOs in Blue Nile, South Kordofan
Sudan Vision
Khartoum – Sudan will not allow international NGOs access to South Kordofan and Blue Nile regions, the government reiterated Sunday saying it will not allow the creation of a Darfur-like situation. This came during the meeting between Sudanese Foreign 
South Sudan road projects to start in April: GSDF
Borglobe
JUBA — A peacekeeping representative dispatched last month to South Sudan to join a UN mission said Saturday road construction in the capital, Juba, should begin in early April. Col. Toru Namatame, 45, a member of an advance group for the Ground 


Borglobe
Tanzania railway to link EA states, South Sudan
East African Business Week
The Tanzania minister for transport, Dr. Omari Nundu, said a formal agreement had been reached between Uganda, Burundi and Rwanda to construct a multi-billion dollar railway network, which would also serve the newly born nation of South Sudan.
South Sudan: Health Ministry Declares Nation Meningitis Free
AllAfrica.com
By Julius N. Uma, 19 February 2012 Juba — The health ministry on Friday declared South Sudanmeningitis free and denied media reports that an outbreak of the disease had occurred in parts of the country, which reportedly lies in the “meningitis belt.

South Sudan Anti-corruption Commission issues assets declaration forms in Jonglei
Sudan Tribune
February 19, 2012 (BOR) – The South Sudan Anti-Corruption Commission (SSACC) has released forms in Jonglei state, asking government officials to declare their assets within the next two weeks. This is the South Sudan government’s latest attempt to stem 

Sudan’s ruling party rejects calls to remove South Kordofan governor
Sudan Tribune
Abdel-Rasoul al-Nur, a tribal leader of the Misseryia tribe called on Saturday to dismiss Haroun and to appoint a military governor in the South Kordofan where the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement – North (SPLM-N) is fighting against the government’s 
South Sudan Approves Austerity
Wall Street Journal
By NICHOLAS BARIYO KAMPALA, Uganda—South Sudan has approved austerity measures as it seeks to address the loss of oil revenues following last month’s decision to halt crude shipments amid a bitter spat over fees with its northern neighbor, Sudan, 

South Sudan, don’t be scared by Bashir’s threats!
Sudan Tribune
February 19, 2012 — Most people with some knowledge about warfare would be the first to tell you that the republic of the Sudan’s not in any position to engage in a war with the republic of South Sudan, (RSS) at least for a foreseeable future!

Sudan to include foreign groups in assessing South Kordofan’s humanitarian 
Sudan Tribune
February 19, 2012 (KHARTOUM) – The Sudanese government has decided to involve international organizations in an operation to assess humanitarian needs in the country’s war-torn region of SouthKordofan, an official announced on Sunday, drawing approval 

Sudan oil dispute keeps tanker from Japan port
Reuters
The Ratna Shradha, which is owned by India Steamship, is holding 600000 barrels of crude oil thatSouth Sudan says was seized by neighbouring Sudan last month and which sold it at deep discount to a North Asian trader, industry sources said.
Attacks, clashes increase on Sudan-South Sudan border to shut down road, rebel 
Minneapolis Star Tribune
Attacks by the Sudanese Armed Forces have been focused along the road leading out of Southern Kordofan, Sudan, into Yida, South Sudan, said Arnu Loddi, a spokesman for the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North, a rebel group inside Sudan.

SOUTH SUDAN: Worsening food crisis
IRINnews.org
JUBA, 20 February 2012 (IRIN) – An already dire food situation in South Sudan could deteriorate amid growing economic problems, food shortages and a mass influx of people fleeing Sudan in the next two months, agencies warn. The UN World Food Programme 

South Sudan slashes spending after halting oil output
The Standard
South Sudan has halved spending on everything but salaries to compensate for the loss of revenue following an oil shutdown due to a row with Sudan. Oil makes up 98% of its budget, after it split from the north last year. There will be no job losses and 

South Sudan calls on Kenya to help end minerals conflict with Sudan
Mining Review
COM — 20 February 2012 – The government of South Sudan has appealed to Kenya to assist it in ending the conflict between South Sudan and Sudan over mineral resources. “Our government is calling on Kenya, as one of the peaceful countries in the region 

Sven Torfinn for The New York Times

Mary Nyekueh Ley, who lost a husband to war and two children to disease, at her hut in Omdurman, on the north side of the border that divides the two Sudans.

By JEFFREY GETTLEMAN

Published: February 19, 2012

The New York Times

Hundreds of thousands of Sudanese straddle two worlds.

“My life’s a curse,” she said

Her first husband was wounded in battle and died in her arms. Her second husband beat her.

Two of her children perished from one of the most curable diseases — diarrhea.

And now she is a southerner in a northern land, a conspicuous dark-skinned outsider, with traditional swirling scars all over her face, trying to raise two sons and two daughters. Worse still, the only marketable skill she has is cooking up homebrewed alcohol, a serious crime in Islamist Sudan that has landed her in jail more than 10 times and earned her dozens of lashes.

“See,” she said, pointing to the ribbons of shiny white scars up and down her shins. “The police.”

Mrs. Ley’s situation is extreme, no doubt. But it is not unique. Hundreds of thousands of Southern Sudanese who have spent most of their lives in the north now find themselves straddling two worlds, their lives upended by a tumultuous border that recently split the country in half.

In July, after decades of an underdog guerrilla struggle, South Sudan broke off from Sudan and formed its own nation. Most Southern Sudanese were ecstatic. The partying in Juba, South Sudan’s capital, did not stop for days.

But for southerners living north of the border, like Mrs. Ley, whose stooped back and cracked, calloused hands tell their own story of suffering and toil, the south’s joyous independence compounded their misery.

Because of the enmity between Sudan and South Sudan — the two have been massing troops on the border, bracing for another major conflict that could ripple across this entire region — there will not be any dual citizenship for southerners living in the north, and it is not clear what the status will be for northerners living in the south.

The Sudanese government says it is going to strip all southerners of their citizenship starting in April. If they want to remain in Sudan, they must apply for a visa, work permit, residency papers and the like, all of which will be extremely difficult, if not impossible, to get for impoverished, illiterate people like Mrs. Ley who often have no documents showing when or where they were born. She thinks she is around 45 years old.

Even if someone was born in the north, like Mrs. Ley’s 9-year-old son, Georgie, the restrictions are the same. If the person belongs to an ethnic group that is from the south — including Mrs. Ley’s, the Nuer — then that person is considered a southerner.

Facing all this, more than 350,000 southerners have recently relocated, by bus and by barge, from the north to the south, part of a huge migration facilitated by the United Nations and the South Sudanese government. Many others are in line to go.

“I’m just waiting for my pension papers,” said Palegido Malong, an elderly southern man who worked as a guard at a government hospital in Khartoum, Sudan’s capital. “I’ll die where I’m supposed to die.”

And as Mrs. Ley soon discovered, a lot of people are dying in the south right now.

It was around December 2010 — Mrs. Ley says with a laugh that she is not strong on dates — that she and her children boarded a bus back to her ancestral home, a place called Mankien, just south of the north-south border. She said she was excited to participate in the south’s referendum for independence, held in January 2011, and was all set to move back with her people.

But one morning, a rogue militia stormed into Mankien, part of a wave of communal violence and insurrections that recently have been sweeping the south. Southern Sudanese soldiers rushed to confront them. The fighting raged for two days, and when Mrs. Ley emerged from her hut, she said, she had to step over dozens of bodies in the grass — men, boys, girls.

“We were all about to be killed,” she said.

She was also disturbed by the lack of development in the south — and it is not as if she were ensconced in modernity here in Omdurman, which is just across the Nile from Khartoum. She lives in a mud-walled house with paper pictures of Jesus taped above the bed. But in Mankien, there are no paved roads or electricity, few wells and few schools. South Sudan is one of the poorest countries on earth, where 83 percent of the population lives in thatched-roofed huts and a 15-year-old girl has a better chance of dying in childbirth than of finishing school.

A few months after arriving in Mankien, Mrs. Ley and her children decided to take a bus back to Omdurman, choosing the lesser of two evils.

They did not receive a warm welcome. Her 14-year-old daughter, Nyapay, said her toes were crunched in the market one day by an Arab man who intentionally stepped on them. Mrs. Ley said people kept giving her nasty looks and saying things like, “Why are you still here if you have separated?” She had always felt like a second-class citizen in the north. Now, it was official.

Mrs. Ley struggles to feed her children anything beyond wal wal, a tasteless dish of sorghum and water. She does not have any relatives nearby who can help. Her first husband, a tall, skinny man named Walkat, was a guerrilla fighter, and when he was killed, she was handed over to Walkat’s brother, who regularly beat her children and punched her in the face.

She fled to Khartoum about 20 years ago and has been brewing and selling illegal alcohol ever since.

“It’s all I know how to do,” Mrs. Ley said, as she stared listlessly at the tools of her trade — a big blue plastic jug and a set of dented plastic soda bottles.

She once spent six months in prison and cannot count all the times the police have whipped her with leather straps, as dictated by Sudanese Islamic law.

Mrs. Ley adores her children, and on a recent afternoon, she poured Georgie a cool glass of water and beamed at him as he tipped it back. But her eyes dropped straight to the dirt floor when the subject of school fees came up.

“I’m out,” she said.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/20/world/africa/for-south-sudan-woman-misery-on-both-sides-of-the-border.html?_r=1


South Sudan's decision to shut off its oil wells in a dispute with Sudan has sparked fears of economic hardship and war.A policeman has patrol duty at Petrodar, a consortium responsible for oil production in South Sudan. The South Sudanese government has shut off its oil wells in a dispute with Sudan. (Hannah McNeish, AFP/Getty Images /February 16, 2012
The move stems from a dispute over Sudan’s oil transit fees. South Sudanese say they are prepared for hardship, but outsiders warn it could mean another war.
By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles TimesFebruary 16, 2012,
Reporting from Juba, South Sudan— 
To outsiders, the move appears suicidal, a recipe for ruining the economy and possibly returning to war.But on the streets of Juba, the capital of South Sudan, the decision to turn off the flow from oil wells that produce 98% of the government’s revenue has triggered bursts of defiance and national pride.”The oil was shut down because it’s our oil. We need our rights,” said truck driver Nimeiry Thomas, 30, his face dripping with sweat in Juba’s Konyo Konyo market.One of the world’s poorest countries, South Sudan made the move last month in an escalating dispute with northern neighbor Sudan, from which it seceded in July. South Sudan took with it about three-quarters of the former country’s oil reserves, but the only route to market is a pipeline that runs across Sudan.Since the secession, the two countries have continued to quarrel over issues that include borders and the transit fees Sudan charges to get the South’s oil to market. South Sudan’s decision to shut off the oil seriously damages both countries’ economies and has stirred fear of renewed fighting. Both presidents talk openly of war.None of that appears to have damped the mood in Juba. Among government ministers, citizens and soldiers, the talk is of a willingness to endure what it takes to break the hated economic lifeline through Sudan. They survived a 22-year civil war with the north, they say, and they are prepared to suffer again for what they see as their rightful share of the oil wealth.”Every time people dismissed us, every single battle, we have won,” declared Pagan Amum, the country’s chief negotiator on the oil dispute, his eyes flashing.

The country is united, he said. “The South Sudanese will rally around their government. South Sudan is going to emerge as a strong nation in this region with a strong economy.”

Outside experts are not so sure. They warn that once the shutoff begins to bite, life will get even worse in a country where half the people live in poverty and three-quarters are illiterate. There is concern that parents will no longer be able to afford school fees for the trickle of uniformed children plying the dirt roads on their way to class. Food and medicine will be harder to come by.

Alex Vines, an analyst with the London-based think tank Chatham House, said north and south have peered into the abyss and eventually will strike a deal. “But there is a danger that the brinkmanship could result in unintended hostilities,” he said.

The African Union, as well as countries such as Britain and energy-hungry China, which gets about 6% of its oil from South Sudan, are trying to broker a settlement. The focus is on setting an agreed transit price for shipping the oil out of South Sudan through the north’s pipeline.

So far, they are not even close. Talks foundered last month after Khartoum took over ships loaded with South Sudan oil, seizing $850 million worth, to cover its claim for a $36-a-barrel transit fee. South Sudan, willing to pay $1 a barrel (which is close to the global norm), called the seizures theft.

The two countries signed a nonaggression agreement Feb. 10 that is supposed to keep the peace until a broader solution is found. But the pact was broken within hours.

Estimates of how long the government’s monetary reserves will last vary wildly, from a few months to perhaps half a year. Government officials promise to give priority to health, education and the army with the 2% of its revenue that remains.

And the government says it has ambitious long-term plans to overcome the crisis: build an alternative pipeline through Djibouti or Kenya (estimated to cost at least $3 billion and take several years), build its own refineries, develop agriculture, mine other resources, cut government waste, reduce the civil service and collect more taxes.

Riek Reath, a 26-year-old soldier, bristles with the defiance that characterizes the country. He became a bush fighter against the northerners when he was 10; he now has a crisp new uniform, boots that display barely a speck of dust and a private’s salary of $215 a month.

“I’d keep working for nothing, even if we don’t get our salary,” he said. “I’ll live like I did when I started, when I didn’t have money.

“People can still eat. People can still survive. We can share with people.”

One Western observer in Juba questioned how deep that sense of solidarity actually goes.

“It’s one thing to say with a lot of bravado that ‘We have gone without in the past,’” the observer said. “In the past, they lived off the people and if the people didn’t give willingly, they took it.”

The long civil war killed more than 2 million people, traumatized survivors and left much of South Sudan in ruins. A peace agreement reached in 2005 set the country on the road to independence, but many questions went unresolved. Still, it held a referendum on independence in January 2011 and seceded months later.

The new country relies on aid organizations to run clinics and its few schools. The United States contributed $400 million last year. An international trust fund has disbursed $500 million of a promised $2 billion. Its main economic hope is oil, most of it lying near the dividing line between the two rivals.

Analysts in Juba say that the African Union, Sudan and others underestimated South Sudan’s anger over Khartoum’s oil seizures and the fledgling country’s determination to end long-term interdependence with a hostile northern neighbor, even at a cost of several years of pain.

The country was nursing other grievances, as well: Juba had watched Khartoum occupy the disputed oil-rich border region of Abyei, ignoring a 2009 arbitration ruling that divided the land. South Sudan also accuses Khartoum of cheating during the five years after the peace agreement, when they were supposed to share oil revenue. Only when it shut down the wells last month did South Sudan realize there were many more pumping oil than Khartoum had said there were.

The World Bank says South Sudan’s shutdown will hurt both sides.

Alex de Waal, who advises the African Union mediation team, wrote that the move had set an “economic doomsday machine” in motion, and that the conflict could reignite the civil war.

South Sudan’s president, Salva Kiir, warned recently that if the conflict over the border and other issues are not settled along with the oil dispute, a new war could break out. Sudanese President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir told state television, “The climate now is closer to a climate of war than one of peace.”

South Sudanese journalist Mayom Nyok expressed fear that the north would send militia groups to occupy the oil fields.

Welder Stephen Jada, sitting outside his metal shop as dusk fell and motorcycles buzzed by like mosquitoes, is concerned that with the country’s oil income drying up, no one will buy the bed frames he has stacked for sale.

A year ago, on the cusp of independence, he had grand hopes. Now he worries about how he will pay school fees, or anything else. “Who will buy these things?” he asked, gesturing at his inventory.

Yet the decision to shut down production is surprisingly popular.

“We’ll have to go back to agriculture to survive,” said Sandia Martin, 30, an accounting student and market stall owner. “The people of South Sudan were not really benefiting from the oil, so it’s better to shut it down.”

robyn.dixon@latimes.com

Crude Prices Push Higher
Wall Street Journal
By DAVID BIRD NEW YORK—US crude-oil futures settled at a seven-week high, while North Sea Brent traded near an eight-month high as buyers scrambled to line up alternative supplies amid outages in Yemen, South Sudan and worries about near-term flows 
South Sudan struggles to keep promises to citizens
Vatican Radio
Sudan said it would resume talks over oil transit fees with South Sudan in the next two weeks after the two sides failed to reach a deal in the latest round of negotiations. The African Union’s security council yesterday appealed to the two nations to 
In South Sudan, oil shutoff is a matter of national pride
Los Angeles Times
The move stems from a dispute over Sudan’s oil transit fees. South Sudanese say they are prepared for hardship, but outsiders warn it could mean another war. A policeman has patrol duty at Petrodar, a consortium responsible for oil production in South 
South Sudan anti-corruption investigation drive is on track but
Sudan Tribune
By Isaiah Abraham February 15, 2012 — There have been reports in the media about corruption allegations and counter allegations against senior South Sudan politicians. This came about whenSouth Sudan Auditor’s General Report for 2005-2006 qualified 
UNICEF, Gender ministry to develop child protection strategy
Sudan Tribune
By Julius N. Uma February 16, 2012 (JUBA) — South Sudan’s ministry of gender, child and social welfare in collaboration with United Nations Children Fund (UNICEF) on Thursday resolved to develop a framework for strategic plans on child protection in 
Residents Warned On Sudan-Uganda Bombs
AllAfrica.com
By Alex Otto, 15 February 2012 Lamo — The Danish Demining Group in Uganda and Mine Action inSouth Sudan have revealed that the two countries’ border areas are still unsafe for human settlement and other activities as they harbour unexploded ordnances.
From Fargo to Africa: Gathering supplies to help girls in Sudan go to school
In-Forum
FARGO – Deb Dawson’s life would have been much easier if she’d never traveled to South Sudanin 2007 and seen the needs of the people there. In subsequent trips to the area, one concern in particular haunted her: how the orphaned Sudanese girls quit 
Amnesty International calls for humanitarian access to South Kordofan and Blue 
Sudan Tribune
The UN estimates that since the conflict started in Blue Nile in early September 2011 26400 refugees from South Kordofan moved to South Sudan’s Unity State, 78605 from Blue Nile moved to Upper Nile state, and 25256 Sudanese refugees have arrived in 
South Sudan Faces 470000-Ton Grain Deficit, Food Insecurity
Bloomberg
South Sudan faces a grain shortfall of 470000 metric tons this year, close to half the country’s total consumption, that will make more people food insecure, the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization forecast. Cereal output in 2011 fell 19 
South Sudan mired in tribal conflict
France 24
Last July, the world’s youngest country, South Sudan, peacefully seceded from Sudan. Today, women and children are being killed and thousands of cattle stolen as the new country falls prey to inter-ethnic violence. In December, between 6000 and 8000 
South Sudan wants Kenya to mediate in Abiyei
The Star
South Sudan government wants Kenya to mediate in the conflict between South Sudan and its northern neighbour Sudan over Abiyei and Kadugli border areas. Chief South Sudan Presidential Advisor Joseph Lagu said that Kenya being one of the leading African 

AllAfrica.com
London — Amnesty International (AI) has welcomed the UN Security Council’s (UNSC) call forSudanese government and rebels from Sudan People Liberation Movement North (SPLM-N) to allow humanitarian groups access to the border states of South Kordofan ..

Fear and Hunger in Border Region Between Sudans
AllAfrica.com
By Arne Doornebal, 17 February 2012 Refugees who fled Sudan for 
South Sudan have been moved dozens of kilometres further from the border, after four bombs fell near a refugee camp in El Foj last month. The refugees are lacking food while there are 

Brent holds above $118 as supply trumps Euro zone woes

Reuters
By Jessica Jaganathan | SINGAPORE (Reuters) – Brent crude held above $118 on Wednesday as supply concerns in the Middle East sparked by tensions over Iran and disruptions in South Sudantrumped a worrisome outlook for Greece, which could face a messy 

Attack on South Sudan reporter sparks critical debate
CPJ Press Freedom Online (blog)
By Tom Rhodes/CPJ East Africa Consultant February is the hottest month in Juba, the capital of South Sudan, and Mading Ngor, a reporter and presenter for the Catholic-owned Bakhita FM, trudged his way through the heat to cover parliament proceedings

SG at KPMG Summit; Sudan/South Sudan; Advancement of Women; Madagascar; and more
UN Dispatch
Sudan/S. Sudan: The UN Security Council on Tuesday called on Sudan and rebels in areas borderingSouth Sudan to grant immediate access for UN aid workers to the turbulent region, expressing “deep and growing alarm” at rising hunger levels…

South Sudan accuses Sudan of breaking peace pact
The Associated Press
JUBA, South Sudan (AP) — South Sudan on Tuesday accused its northern neighbor Sudan of bombing a border town, violating a non-aggression agreement between the two nations just hours after it was signed. South Sudanese military officials said Sudan 
South Sudan accuses Sudan of breaking peace pact
U-T San Diego
The establishment of the DRA is part of the Doha Document for Peace in Darfur, signed by the Government of Sudan and the Liberation and Justice Movement. (AP Photo/UNAMID, Albert Gonzalez Farran) — AP JUBA, South Sudan — South Sudan on Tuesday 
South Sudan in dire need of unity
The Citizen Daily
You need JavaScript enabled to view it In a short article entitled ‘the Myth of South Sudan‘, published in Pambazuka News, Issue No. 569 of February 2012, Makol Bona Malwal has the following to say: “Most South Sudanese have little idea what the 
IOM says Sudanese deal struck over resettlement
CBS News
(AP) GENEVA — A half-million South Sudanese people living in Sudan will have the choice to go home after a new deal was struck between the two countries, but a fast-approaching deadline leaves little time to make the difficult journey, an 
Israel’s Spacecom looks to boost South Sudan telecommunications
Bikya Masr
CAIRO: Israel’s leading communications satellite company Spacecom, which operates the AMOS satellites across the world, hopes that recent discussions with South Sudan will help boost its role in the young country’s communications and telecommunications 
Attack on South Sudan reporter sparks critical debateBy Tom Rhodes/CPJ East Africa Consultant

February is the hottest month in Juba, the capital of South Sudan, and Mading Ngor, a reporter and presenter for the Catholic-owned Bakhita FM, trudged his way through the heat to cover parliament proceedings last week — only to be thrown unceremoniously out of the assembly. “Before I had time to argue, four security guards pinned me to the ground and dragged me across the floor, tearing up my trousers” Ngor, a hard-hitting, critical journalist, told me.

Continue reading.

Link: http://www.cpj.org/blog/2012/02/attack-on-south-sudan-reporter-sparks-critical-deb.php

Press Freedom at Risk in World’s Newest Nation

By: Scott Griffen, IPI Associate

South Sudanese President Salva Kiir (C) addresses a rally in Juba supporting the decision to stop exporting oil through northern Sudan, 23 Janury 2012. EPA/STR.

VIENNA, 7 Feb, 2012 – A South Sudanese journalist covering a session of the country’s National Assembly yesterday was removed and later allegedly assaulted by security guards, according to news reports.

The incident is but the latest in a series of aggressive acts against journalists in South Sudan — raising doubts about the newly independent state’s commitment to press freedom.

Mading Ngor of Bakhita Radio in Juba told the Sudan Tribune yesterday: “I entered the chamber of the assembly, got out my recorder and started recording proceedings. Moments later, an unidentified man walks up to me, asks why I was seated there and I explained to him. He could not listen to me. Instead he ordered four security officials to throw me out of the assembly.”

Multiple eyewitnesses, including other journalists, said the security guards followed Ngor outside, violently throwing him down to the floor and tearing his clothes. According to the Tribune, the assault ended only after a legislator intervened.

MP Joy Kwaje, chair of the Assembly’s Information Committee, apologised for the security guards’ action and promised to investigate the matter further, news reports said.

The motive for the removal and attack remained unclear. The South Sudanese Assembly’s official Regulation of Sittings states: “The Assembly shall be open to the public, press, and visitors, unless the Speaker decides otherwise.”

In December 2011, a group of journalists covering a legislative debate on unrest in Juba, South Sudan’s capital, were forced from the assembly on the orders of the deputy speaker, Daniel Awet Akot, the Tribune said. According to the Assembly’s official procedures, the deputy speaker may exercise the duties of the speaker — and thus close the assembly to the press — at the latter’s request. It was not known whether the speaker or deputy speaker was involved in yesterday’s incident.

IPI Press Freedom Manager Anthony Mills said: “This was an unacceptable act of physical violence against a journalist who was simply doing his job. We continue to be troubled by the threats to press freedom in South Sudan. We call upon the South Sudanese government to respect the rights of all journalists.”

As IPI previously reported, South Sudanese authorities last November arrested two editors, Ngor Garang and Dengdit Ayok, who had been working for the now-banned Destiny newspaper. The two were held for 18 days before charges were dropped. They had reportedly been detained in connection with an op-ed published in Destiny’s first issue, in which the author criticised South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir for having allowed his daughter to marry a foreigner.

http://www.freemedia.at/index.php?id=288&tx_ttnews%5Btt_news%5D=6001&cHash=27b9c1f2f2

Sudan Oil Dispute Raises War Rhetoric
Voice of America
February 07, 2012 Sudan Oil Dispute Raises War Rhetoric Gabe Joselow | Juba, South Sudan A deepening oil dispute between South Sudan and Sudan has raised hostility to a point where leaders of both countries have suggested there is the strong 
South Sudanese Journalist Assaulted in Parliament
International Press Institute (press release)
South Sudanese President Salva Kiir (C) addresses a rally in Juba supporting the decision to stop exporting oil through northern Sudan, 23 Janury 2012. EPA/STR. VIENNA, 7 Feb, 2012 – A South Sudanese journalist covering a session of the country’s 
South Sudan struggles to help ethnic violence victims
Press TV
These are the situations of the almost ninety thousand people whose lives were devastated by the recent intercommunal violence in South Sudan’s fragile Jonglei state. The violence, which has led to the death of over three thousand people, 

Press TV
South Sudan, India Signs Pan African E-Network Project MoU
Oye! Times
“The MoU will open other avenues on telemedicine, e-education and rural access of latest technology in South Sudan. I know we have been referring patients from South Sudan to other hospitals in the Diaspora. Now doctors in Juba Teaching Hospital can 

By Jared Ferrie

Feb. 3 (Bloomberg) — A United Nations official was wounded while trying to mediate an end to fighting between two ethnic groups in South Sudan’s Warrap state that killed 78 people, mostly women and children, and wounded 72, the UN said.

A team of UN officials had to be evacuated after they came under fire during the meeting on Feb. 1 in the adjacent Unity state, Lise Grande, the UN’s humanitarian coordinator for South Sudan, told reporters yesterday from the capital, Juba.

The wounded UN official is “fine,” Grande said, adding that the UN will continue to support reconciliation efforts in the wake of the attack.

More than 70,000 head of cattle were stolen during the attack last week, leaving about 40,000 people without a livelihood, Rupert Colville, a spokesman for the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, said today in an e-mailed statement from Geneva.

–Editors: Karl Maier, Ben Holland

To contact the reporter on this story: Jared Ferrie in Juba, South Sudan at jferrie1@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Antony Sguazzin at asguazzin@bloomberg.net

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2012-02-03/un-official-wounded-at-meeting-to-reconcile-south-sudan-tribes.html

Dozens dead in shootout at South Sudan peace meeting

By Hannah McNeish (AFP) –

JUBA — Dozens of people were killed in South Sudan in a shootout at a peace meeting to resolve disputes about stolen cattle, with some reports claiming as many as 37 deaths, officials said Friday.

“These guys just started shooting everywhere,” said Gideon Gatpan Thoar, Unity state information minister, giving the figure of 37 people killed in Wednesday’s gunfight.

Local officials from Unity and neighbouring Lakes and Warrap states had been taken by the UN for talks to the remote town of Mayendit in Unity after a spate of cattle raids, including a brutal attack last week that killed 79 people.

“The fight just started there and no one knew the cause,” said Lakes state governor Chol Tong Mayay, after gathering accounts from witnesses. “People were just shooting at each other, without knowing whose police and army they were.”

Gunmen, reportedly including rival bodyguards, policemen, soldiers and armed government wildlife officers, sprayed the meeting room with bullets in the battle.

What exactly prompted the fight was not known, but United Nations peacekeepers said it erupted after one official interrupted the meeting and shouted at a counterpart.

Mayay said 22 people from Lakes state were killed and 24 wounded, but he did not know how many were killed from the two other states.

“Four pick-up trucks carrying armed men believed to be SPLA (army) and SSPS (police) then appeared and started shooting indiscriminately at the Mayendit County Commissioner’s compound,” the UN said, without giving a toll.

At least 15 people with gunshot wounds had been taken to a clinic in Unity state run by Doctors Without Borders, the medical aid agency said.

A staff member with the UN peacekeeping mission was wounded in the crossfire, while a wildlife service office was later torched in Lakes state, local officials said.

South Sudan — which declared independence from Sudan, its former civil war enemy to the north, in July — is reeling from multiple crises, including ethnic clashes, violent cattle raids and rebel attacks.

UN humanitarian chief Valerie Amos on Thursday voiced concern at the scale of violence after visiting war-wracked regions.

Last month, a militia army of up to 8,000 armed youths attacked a rival ethnic group in Jonglei state, with aid workers reporting horrific massacres, including babies beaten against trees and women hacked by machetes.

Juba is also embroiled in a furious row over oil pipeline transit and shipping fees with Khartoum.

South Sudan has said it has completed a shutdown of its oil production — the fledgling nation’s top revenue source — after it accused Sudan of stealing $815 million of its oil and African Union-mediated talks stalled.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5ipRbEa5yUW3I-QjDD9drdkI0aYNg?docId=CNG.f03258a555ad0b502ab78983c9d5df6d.7b1

South Sudan shoot-out kills 37, wounds UN policeman
Reuters
JUBA (Reuters) – A shoot-out among South Sudanese security forces using truck-mounted machineguns killed 37 people and injured a United Nations policeman Wednesday, UN and government officials said Friday. The government in South Sudan - formed in July 

U.N. mediates in South Sudan violence
Dalje.com
JUBA, South Sudan, Feb. 3 (UPI) — More than 37 people were fatally shot during a meeting intended to end violent conflict between ethnic factions in South Sudan, UN officials said. After a week of violent inter-ethnic clashes, Valerie Amos, 

37 Killed in South Sudan ‘Peace Talks’
Antiwar.com
by Jason Ditz, February 03, 2012 According to the UN’s account, four pick-up trucks full of men from the SPLA, the military for South Sudan, showed up at the meeting at the Mayendit County Commissioner’s compound and “started shooting indiscriminately… 
South Sudan shoot-out at Unity state peace talks
BBC News
At least 37 people have been killed in South Sudan during a shoot-out at a peace meeting aimed at ending recent violence, officials said. Officials from three states and the UN had met for talks in the remote town of Mayendit in Unity state in an 

BBC News
Sudan’s president warns of possible war with south
The Seattle Times
Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir has warned of a war between Khartoum and South Sudanbecause their failure to settle a dispute over an oil export deal. The Associated Press No comments have been posted to this article.

By JOHN HEILPRIN Associated Press

GENEVA February 3, 2012 (AP)

A U.N. staff member was shot during a clash that broke out as officials met to discuss a weekend cattle raid massacre that left 78 people dead, including many women and children, U.N. officials said Friday.

The Wednesday meeting between U.N. and local officials to discuss the incident was broken up when armed men believed to be members of the South Sudanese Army and the South Sudan Police Service “started shooting indiscriminately,” Kouider Zerrouk, the spokesman for the U.N. peacekeeping mission in Sudan, said.

The staff member wounded in the incident was evacuated along with seven other personnel and is in stable condition in Juba.

There are conflicting reports of the toll of the clash. Lakes state Governor Chol Tong Mayay said 21 security personnel and 3 civilians from Lakes state were killed in the attack. Mayay said an investigation would be launched into the incident.

South Sudan broke away from Sudan in July and is struggling to contain internal violence that has plagued the region for years.

The Saturday attack targeting a cattle camp in Warrap state also wounded 72 people and left nine missing, the U.N.’s High Commissioner for Human Rights said Friday. Most of the killing appeared to have been inflicted by machetes and about three quarters of the dead were reportedly women and children, spokesman Robert Colville said.

The attackers massacre have not yet been identified but crossed over from Unity state, apparently targeting another tribe, Colville said. The area’s remoteness and insecurity make it “very hard to investigate” such incidents, he said.

The Warrap attack was the latest in a series of cattle raids since December. Ongoing raids between Nuer, Murle and Dinka communities have killed hundreds and the United Nations estimates over 120,000 people have been affected in Jonglei state alone.

————

Michael Onyiego contributed to this report from Juba, South Sudan.

http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/cattle-raiding-south-sudan-massacre-15507027

UN Says Cattle Raiding Behind South Sudan Massacre
ABC News
The Wednesday meeting between UN and local officials to discuss the incident was broken up when armed men believed to be members of the South Sudanese Army and the South Sudan Police Service “started shooting indiscriminately,” Kouider Zerrouk,

Dozens dead in shootout at South Sudan peace meeting
AFP
JUBA — Dozens of people were killed in South Sudan in a shootout at a peace meeting to resolve disputes about stolen cattle, with some reports claiming as many as 37 deaths, officials said Friday. “These guys just started shooting everywhere,” said

Food for South Sudan refugees runs scarce
Al Jazeera
Recent tribal fighting in South Sudan has left thousands of people with little to no source of food and the UN says the situation appears to be getting worse. Aid organisations have warned donors that the country is facing a humanitarian emergency.

Total Plans to Resume Exploration in South Sudan’s Block B
BusinessWeek
3 (Bloomberg) — Total SA, France’s biggest oil company, said it plans to resume exploration work in South Sudan’s Block B. The company, based in Paris, will submit a “preparatory work program” to South Sudanese authorities for their approval,

Aid Groups ask US to Consider Cross-Border Aid Effort in Sudan
Voice of America
“First and foremost, it urges the US government to continue to engage the government of Sudan in trying to get [it to] allow international humanitarian aid workers and aid assistance into South Kordofan and Blue Nile. Second, and most importantly,

S.Sudan oil shutdown to increase food aid dependence-UN
Reuters
* Oil revenues make up 98 percent of South Sudan’s income * UN warns of “longer season of hunger” in 2012 By Hereward Holland PIBOR, South Sudan, Feb 3 (Reuters) – South Sudan’s decision to shut down its oil output will make many more people dependent

Dozens dead in shootout at South Sudan peace meeting
AFP
JUBA — Dozens of people were killed in South Sudan in a shootout at a peace meeting to resolve disputes about stolen cattle, with some reports claiming as many as 37 deaths, officials said Friday. “These guys just started shooting everywhere,” said

Top of the Morning: Security Council Possibly Watering Down Syria Resolution
UN Dispatch
(VOA http://bit.ly/wVdQvM) The OCHA chief is in South Sudan and she does not like what she sees. “Valerie Amos told a news conference in Juba, the capital, that South Sudan’s recent threat to shut down all oil production would spell a more severe

AlterNet
Dozens of people were killed in South Sudan in a shootout at a peace meeting to resolve disputes about stolen cattle, with some reports claiming as many as 37 deaths, officials said Friday. A herdsman from the Nuer tribe stands among his cattle at a


Kiir explains South Sudan’s refusal to sign oil deal with Khartoum

Sudan Tribune
February 1, 2012 (JUBA)- South Sudan president, Salva Kiir Mayradit, on Tuesday told fellow heads of state at the (AU) summit that his country refused to sign a proposed deal on oil with neighboring Sudan because the deal failed to comprehensively 

Bombs hit evangelical Bible school in Sudan, group says
CNN
By the CNN Wire Staff (CNN) — A Christian evangelical group said Thursday that a Bible school — backed by American evangelist Franklin Graham — was destroyed in the latest bombing raid to hitSouth Kordofan, an oil-rich Sudanese province that 

From Seattle area to Sudan: Doc tends to flood of refugees
The Seattle Times
A Seattle-area doctor who traveled to South Sudan in November on a relief mission found himself the only physician for some 5000 refugees. By Lark Turner Women and their children wait in mid-November for an opportunity to be examined by Dr. Alan Kelley 

UN official warns that crises in new nation of South Sudan will need more than 
Washington Post
JUBA, South Sudan — A top UN official says South Sudan may need more than the $760 million the agency predicted they would need to cope with the new country’s myriad humanitarian crises. UN Undersecretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs Valerie Amos 

CNN
 said Thursday that a Bible school — backed by American evangelist Franklin Graham — was destroyed in the latest bombing raid to hit South Kordofan, an oil-rich Sudanese province that borders the newly created independent country of South Sudan.


China’s Diplomacy Tested in Sudan Kidnap Drama

Wall Street Journal
The Chinese government has approached newly created South Sudan to help negotiate the release of Chinese captives held by rebels in neighboring Sudan, said a South Sudan official, an unusual diplomatic move that risks complicating China’s ties with two 
South Sudan: UN relief chief sees ‘terrible situation’ in troubled Jonglei state
UN News Centre
WFP truck approaches Boma in South Sudan’s Jonglei state, where ethnic violence has displaced thousands of people. Photo: WFP/Rehan Zahid The United Nations relief chief today visited areas in South Sudan hit by recent ethnic violence and met some of 

PHOTO: Eleven-year-old Kakayo recovers from wounds suffered during a recent round of violent tribal clashes in South Sudan
Eleven-year-old Kakayo recovers from wounds suffered during a recent round of violent tribal clashes in South Sudan (ABC News)
By ALEX PENA
JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN, January 25, 2012

Before the red dust could settle in South Sudan’s most recent tribal clashes, 11-year-old Kakayo had lost her father, and she has no idea where her mother and two siblings are.

“When the attackers came, we ran into the bushes,” said Kakayo, as she lay idly on the floor in the back room of a dirty hospital ward in Juba, the capital of the newly independent South Sudan.

“That’s when they started shooting at us.”

Kakayo, whose family are members of the Murle tribe, is recovering from two bullet wounds, one in the knee, another in her foot. She has no bed, just a simple cloth to cover herself; thick bandages are wrapped around her frail legs.

Still, in this recent round of violence Kakayo is considered one of the lucky ones. She escaped, and she is one of the few who are receiving treatment at the hospital. “I was injured, but some of the others who survived took me with them,” she said of her escape from her village in Jonglei state.

The violent attacks Kakayo was caught up in began around the start of the new year and have affected 120,000 people, according to the U.N.

For Kakayo, the “they” who “started shooting at us” refers to the youth fighters of the Lou Nuer tribe. Clashes over cattle in the barren region are nothing new, and for a time were put on hold as a show of unity before the referendum that granted South Sudan independence a little over six months ago after two decades of civil war. Now they’ve resumed with a fury, and on a larger scale, partly fueled by weapons left over from the civil war.

At the opposite end of the hospital compound in Juba, separated by a weak chain-link fence, sits a field hospital tent where young men from the Lou Nuer, who attacked Kakayo’s tribe, had congregated, when ABC News visited the hospital early one recent morning.

“We think we have to go and destroy them,” said a youth fighter, seemingly the spokesman for the 20 or so fighters recovering from injuries.

“They kill our wives, our children, and they’ve taken our cows,” he said, with determination and conviction, the voices around him escalating, of the retaliation attacks initiated by the Murle people early last week that killed over 100 of the Lou Nuer.

He says he and the other fighters will return to the villages once they’ve recovered, and continue to attack and abduct more children in retaliation.

Child Abduction on the Rise

The fight begins over cattle, but the byproduct of these raids has always been murder and child abduction.

UNICEF says child abductions have been on the rise for the past two years in Jonglei state, one of South Sudan’s most remote tribal regions.

In the past, abductions were few. “Five children, two children, three children,” said Fatuma Ibrahim, Chief of Child Protection at UNICEF. She says it’s likely hundreds of children have been abducted in these most recent raids.

Ibrahim has been at the forefront of registering and recovering the missing children for UNICEF in South Sudan. So far, they have recovered 117 unaccompanied children in Jonglei, but they know the number will rise. She is also concerned with how violent these attacks and abductions have become.

New weaponry and military style raids in the area have increased the number of children abducted during these cattle raids.

“Before, even the abduction process itself was not violent,” she said. “Now, what brings a lot of protection concerns is the violence that is associated with the process…. They are using guns,” she said.

In late December, the Lou Nuer attacked Kakayo’s village. Local officials and members of the Murle say that 3,000 were killed, but the UN says the number is more likely in the hundreds.

Just weeks later, fighters from the Murle tribe launched attacks on the Lou Nuer in different towns, killing over a hundred people. This is why the fighters whom ABC News spoke with in the hospital in Juba want to retaliate.

The U.N. has reported that the number of people affected by the violence has doubled: first it was thought to be 60,000; now it’s more like 120,000. The U.N. has engaged a “massive emergency” response to get food and water to them.

A Culture of Cattle Raids and Child Abduction

While Ibrahim and other child protection agencies worry about the level of violence and the massive numbers of children becoming displaced, the Lou Nuer and the Murle people have thrived off these cattle raids and abductions.

In some cases, the children can be used for ransom payments and seen as a commodity to be exchanged for more cattle.

A 2010 Rift Valley Institute report for the U.N. documenting child abductions in Jonglei stated, “We learned that the youth abduct the children and then give them to the chiefs. The chiefs then sell out the children and give a portion of the sale in cattle to the youth.”

Abduction has become so engrained in the daily lives of these tribes, that Ibrahim says the children are often treated well by the “new” families who have bought the children.

“Even though they are sold, they are treated like children of the family. This is one of the reasons that there are not many children escaping,” she said.

Returning Home, But Possibility of Recapture

In rare occasions, the children can be recovered by South Sudan’s military, but mostly the children are reported missing and/or escape by themselves. Both government and other child protection services then have to sort out the legalities of returning the children back to their families.

“Right now there is a case of one child where 15 parents are claiming that this is their child,” said Ibrahim. “This happens when the child is abducted very young.”

Local officials in the town of Bor, Jonglei’s capital, have made attempts at bringing the tribe’s chiefs together to negotiate the return of children, but mostly it is coordinated through NGO programs.

When the children do return home, it is no guarantee of safety. Some children have escaped, only to be recaptured again.

Kakayo may have escaped the raid, but she has a long journey to recovery, and an even longer journey home. Doctors are unsure when she will be able to leave the hospital; they’re predicting months. But lying on her rug on the tile floor, not knowing if her mother and siblings are even alive, Kakayo tells the doctor in no uncertain terms that when she is well, she will go home to find them.

http://abcnews.go.com/International/south-sudan-country-torn-conflicts/story?id=15430706&page=3

Briefing on Issues of Ongoing Concern in Sudan and South Sudan
US Department of State (press release)
I wanted to just bring everybody up to date on a number of issues that we’re following very closely related to Sudan and South Sudan. So let me discuss them briefly and then happy to take your questions about them. One of the issues that we are

Sudan: South Darfur IDP Camps Suffering Acute Water Shortages
AllAfrica.com
South Darfur — The internally displaced persons camps in South Darfur are facing an acute shortage of drinking water. A camp resident said to Radio Dabanga, the shortage has emerged from the government reducing its share of fuel from seven barrels a

South Sudan signs pipeline deal with Kenya
Mail & Guardian Online
South Sudan signed an agreement with Kenya to build an oil pipeline to a Kenyan port, potentially freeing it from reliance on its northern neighbour Sudan, officials said on Wednesday. A memorandum of understanding was signed by Kenya and South Sudan

SOUTH SUDAN: Building a blood bank
IRINnews.org
JUBA, 25 January 2012 (IRIN) – A small fridge in the corner of Juba Teaching Hospital’s laboratory is the only blood bank in South Sudan, the world’s newest nation with some of the worst health statistics in the world. Health workers say a lack of

Sudan: South Darfur State witness protests against new governor
Sudan Tribune
January 24, 2012 (KHARTOUM) – Protests erupted on Tuesday in Nyala, the capital of South Darfur State, as its newly appointed governor arrived to assume his duties. Eye witnesses told Sudan Tribune that the protestors were demonstrating against the

South Sudan: UNHCR Alarmed At Air Raid On Vulnerable Refugees in Nation
AllAfrica.com
Juba — The UN refugee agency on Tuesday condemned an air attack earlier this week that left at least one Sudanese boy injured and 14 other refugees missing in South Sudan. “Bombing of civilian areas must be condemned in the strongest terms,” Mireille

South Sudan: New Country Torn By Old Conflicts
ABC News
Before the red dust could settle in South Sudan’s most recent tribal clashes, 11-year-old Kakayo had lost her father, and she has no idea where her mother and two siblings are. “When the attackers came, we ran into the bushes,” said Kakayo,

South Sudan: Police in Black Uniform Shut Down the Citizen for a Day
AllAfrica.com
South Sudan Police in black uniform detained the chief technician, printer and electrician of The Citizen while they were coming to the printing press Monday night. The police unit of twelve men commanded by a second lieutenant intercepted the three

South Sudan: SPLM-DC Criticizes Government Closure of Pipeline
AllAfrica.com
Juba — The main opposition party in the National Assembly, Sudan People’s Liberation Movement for Democratic Change, SPLM-DC yesterday criticized the Council of Ministers resolution shutting down the oil pipeline describing it as a grave and unwise

UNHCR condemns air raid on refugees in South Sudan’s Upper Nile state
Sudan Tribune
January 24, 2012 (JUBA) – The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) on Tuesday strongly condemned an air raid which reportedly occurred in South Sudan’s Upper Nile state on Monday. UNHCR said that it is believed that at least one boy

South Sudan: Germany Hails Kiir’s Commitment to Seek Negotiated Solutions
AllAfrica.com
Juba — The Federal Republic of Germany has welcomed the commitment of the government of the Republic of South Sudan to seek negotiated solutions to the outstanding issues with the Khartoum government in the framework of African Union High

South Sudan: MPs Reject Payment of $5.4 Billion to Sudan, Hail Pipeline Closure
AllAfrica.com
Juba — Members of Parliament in the National Legislative Assembly including those in the Council of States have rejected any free payment of money to Sudan Government as financial assistance after South Sudan separate with all its resources.

South Sudan, Kenya Sign Agreement to Build Oil Pipeline to Port of Lamu
Bloomberg
South Sudan and Kenya signed a memorandum of understanding to build an oil pipeline to the Kenyan port of Lamu, said Barnaba Marial Benjamin, a spokesman for South Sudan’s government. Construction of the pipeline will begin “as soon as sources of

Brent steady above $110 on Iran, better demand outlook
Reuters
SUPPLY, DEMAND OUTLOOK Apart from Iran, markets are also supported by supply concerns from Africa after South Sudan blamed an air strike on a refugee camp on Sudan. The blame followed South Sudan accusing its former civil war foe of seizing $815

W. Equatoria supports shutdown of Sudan’s oil pipeline
Sudan Tribune
January 24, 2012 (YAMBIO) – The government of Western Equatoria State announced its support to the South Sudan’s cabinet to stop the flow of crude oil through the Sudan. Last Friday the South Sudanese government in its weekly cabinet meeting decided to

South Sudanese should settle situation before April 8
Press TV
Sudan government declared that the 8th of April 2012 is the last day for South Sudanese to reconcile their situations in Sudan. After this deadline, South Sudanese will be treated as foreigners according to the laws regulating the foreign presence in

Latest attacks in Jonglei, South Sudan, perpetuate a pattern of extreme
News-Medical.net
In the state of Jonglei in South Sudan, civilians continue to bear the brunt of inter-communal fighting. Wounded patients are still arriving at the Médecins Sans Frontières hospital in Pibor, three weeks after the violent attack on the town and

Tribal violence runs amok in South Sudan
Globe and Mail
The shocking reports from witnesses and aid workers are still trickling out of remote districts of South Sudan after a wave of reprisal attacks and inter-ethnic clashes over the past few weeks. The survivors, many with severe injuries,

SG briefing; Security Council; Syria; South Sudan; and more
UN Dispatch
South Sudan: The United Nations says it is alarmed by air attacks on a South Sudan refugee camp holding about 5000 people who had fled violence in neighboring Sudan. The UN refugee agency says Tuesday the raid took place in the Upper Nile state town of

Reuters
The move followed expressions of concern by Russian diplomats over security in South Sudan, including attacks on helicopters operated by Russia’s military. But Varvara Paal, spokeswoman for Russian President Dmitry Medvedev’s Africa envoy Mikhail

Sudan Open to Mediation, Willing to Reach Deal with South Sudan on Oil
Sudan Vision
Khartoum – The Sudan government has accepted mediation in the oil dispute with South Sudan and is looking forward to reaching a deal, the National Congress Party (NCP) affirmed Tuesday. “We are for reaching an agreement with the Government of the South

Russia to pull helicopters from South Sudan
Reuters Africa
By Steve Gutterman MOSCOW, Jan 24 (Reuters) – Russia will withdraw its helicopters and personnel servicing the United Nations peacekeeping force in South Sudan, the Kremlin said on Tuesday, a move that will cause problems for the stretched mission.

 

 


Juba, South Sudan:

The Republic of Sudan has suddenly blocked the transportation of South Sudan’s crude oil to the international market. On Christmas Eve all loaded cargo was prevented from leaving, while other cargo was not allowed to load.

Speaking to the press on Tuesday, Minister of Petroleum and Mining Stephen Dhieu Dau said two ships carrying 1.6 million barrels of Dar Blend originating from South Sudan were stopped from leaving the port, and an additional 0.6 million Barrels of Dar Blend were prevented from loading. Yet another two more other ships were prevented from landing at Port Sudan to take possession of 1.2 million barrels of Nile Blend purchased from South Sudan. He strongly condemned the act of preventing loaded ships from leaving the port. “This is unlawful and a violation of international laws and norms.”

The Under Secretary of the Ministry of Information Garang says the blockage has caused the Government of South Sudan to lose a huge sum of money. “At the cost of $118 per barrel, the 1.6 million barrels of Nile Blend would have fetched a huge amount, while each barrel of Dar Blend would secure us $165 million,” he said.

Minister Stephen Dhieu Dau further accused the Government of Sudan of trying to steal the oil resources of South Sudan. The government in Khartoum ordered the foreign oil companies to divert all of South Sudan’s Nile Blend crude oil entitlements for December to the Khartoum and El Obeid refineries. They also ordered 550,000 barrels of Dar Blends Crude oil entitlement for December to be delivered to a Sudan buyer.

“What right have they got to take our oil to sell it to others? Where does this happen in the world?” asked Marial Benjamin the Minister of Information and Broadcasting.

It was also reported that the Government of Sudan also intends to divert 13 percent of Dar Blend oil through its new tie-in pipeline they started constructing between the Petrodar pipeline and the Khartoum refinery.

“Any diversion of South Sudan’s oil without our consent is theft”, said Stephen Stephen Dhieu Dau. “And what right do they have to divert our oil to their refineries”? Marial Benjamin questioned.

To this day, it is not yet clear as to what dishonest plans the Government of Sudan had for the oil it had ordered for diversion to its domestic refineries. There are speculations that Sudan planned to sell South Sudan’s oil to a third party or attempted to “launder” the stolen oil by redirecting it to its own refinery and instead selling its own crude on the world market.

The Government of South Sudan vows to take legal actions against anyone who purchases Sudan’s crude while South Sudan’s oil is being stolen at the same time. “Such illegal acquisitions will find no refuge from South Sudan’s legal authorities and will enjoy no future business with South Sudan,” Stephen Dhieu Dau said.

“We are two different states and each state has got sovereignty over its own resources,” said Marial Benjamin the official spokesman of the government of South Sudan. “There is nowhere in the whole world where a country can interfere and decide on the resources of another country. [For example,] Iraq tried to invade Kuwait and take its oil. The resultant effect of which was clearly seen. If our brothers in Khartoum are thinking that they have another Kuwait which is South Sudan, then they have missed the point.”

By. Yobu Annet

Copyright 2006-2010 The Diplomatic Courier™. All rights reserved. 

http://oilprice.com/Energy/Crude-Oil/Khartoum-Breaks-International-Laws-by-Blocking-South-Sudans-Crude-Oil.html


We have no guarantee that oil flowing through the Republic of Sudan will reach its intended destination.  We cannot allow assets which clearly belong to the Republic of South Sudan to be subject to further diversion, says President Kiir

[Juba, South Sudan] – By Larco Lomayat      January 23, 2012

While addressing remembers of the South Sudan National Legislative Assembly as well as South Sudanese citizens in Juba on Monday on the Government of South Sudan (GOSS) decision to stop the oil flow through the pipelines on the territory of the Republic of Sudan, the Oresident of the Republic of South Sudan, Gen. Salva Kiir says “During the second Council of Ministers of 2012 meeting on January 20, we unanimously decided that all oil operations in South Sudan should be halted with immediate effect and no crude oil belonging to South Sudan shall flow through the pipelines on the territory of the Republic of Sudan.  

 

The government stands ready to handle this situation; however, we are mindful that it cannot be done without the collective support of this august house.  We have reached this point only after exhausting all avenues including my sending envoys to Kenya, Uganda, and Ethiopia last week.  The presidents of those countries reached out to President Bashir to ask him to stop taking unilateral decisions regarding our oil.

Description: C:\Users\LOMAYAT\Desktop\100MSDCF\DSC03891.JPG
President Kiir Addressing Members of the
South Sudan Legislative Assembly
Photos by Larco Lomayat,
January 23, 2012
Below is the Full Message of President Kiir:
scan.pdf scan.pdf
1069K   View   Download

Statement by H.E. Salva Kiir Mayardit, President of the Republic of South Sudan
to the National Legislature on the current oil crisis

January 23, 2012

 

Right Honorable Speaker and

Honorable Members of the National Legislature

I am here today to brief this august house about the current crisis in our oil industry. The crisis has reached a stage that is unacceptable. On the 6th of December  2011, the Minister of Finance of the Republic of Sudan informed our Minister of Petroleum that based on their Petroleum Transit and Service Fees Act of 2011, as from 25 December 2011, all shipments will be allowed to leave Port Sudan only after paying fees amounting to 32.2 dollars per barrel.

Description: C:\Users\LOMAYAT\Desktop\100MSDCF\DSC03898.JPG

Immediately following this warning, they proceeded to block four ships with 3.5 million barrels of Dar blend from sailing out of Port Sudan.  They have further prevented four other ships from docking at Port Sudan. These ships have purchased 2.8 million barrels of Nile and Dar blends but are unable to collect their purchases.  To date, these eight vessels remain under the control of the Government of Sudan with oil worth 630 million dollars.

Description: C:\Users\LOMAYAT\Desktop\100MSDCF\DSC03900.JPG

In addition to that, they have forcibly taken another 185 million dollars’ worth of oil.  In total, the revenue that the Government of Sudan has looted since December amounts to approximately 815 million dollars.  Furthermore, they have completed constructing a tie-in pipeline designed to permanently divert 120,000 barrels per day f South Sudan oil, which is almost 75 percent of our daily entitlements, to their refineries in Khartoum.

Description: C:\Users\LOMAYAT\Desktop\100MSDCF\DSC03902.JPG

Your Excellences

The diversion of South Sudan crude oil has disrupted revenues that are vital to the security and welfare of the people of South Sudan. At this time, we have no guarantee that oil flowing through the Republic of Sudan will reach its intended destination.  We cannot allow assets which clearly belong to the Republic of South Sudan to be subject to further diversion.

Therefore, during the second Council of Ministers of 2012 meeting on January 20, we unanimously decided that all oil operations in South Sudan should be halted with immediate effect and no crude oil belonging to South Sudan shall flow through the pipelines on the territory of the Republic of Sudan.

Description: C:\Users\LOMAYAT\Desktop\100MSDCF\DSC03895.JPG

The government stands ready to handle this situation; however, we are mindful that it cannot be done without the collective support of this august house.  We have reached this point only after exhausting all avenues including my sending envoys to Kenya, Uganda, and Ethiopia last week.  The presidents of those countries reached out to President Bashir to ask him to stop taking unilateral decisions regarding our oil.

The response from Bashir is that he will not stop taking oil until we pay the exorbitant amount of 32.2 dollars per barrel, something that is completely out of international norms and a precedence that we are unwilling to set.

Description: C:\Users\LOMAYAT\Desktop\100MSDCF\DSC03896.JPG

Insomuch as the duration of revenue disruption is unknown and to ensure the continued operation of our national government and to provide services for our people, we will need to find other sources of funding.

In doing so, I have already instructed the Ministry of Finance to initiate contingency plans for revenue collection and allocation. This will accelerate the increase in collections of non-oil revenues. It also will prioritize the allocation of existing revenue, allowing us to make the most of what we have.   The Ministry of Finance will also look into other options for replacing the lost revenue.  On existing cash reserves, rest assured that the government can operate for the immediate future, depending on which cuts are made.

Your Excellences

The safety, security and health of our citizens remain our priorities. Whatever austerity measures are required, we are confident that we can continue to meet critical obligations for national security and public welfare.

Meanwhile, we will continue to do everything possible to resolve the impasse with Sudan and to restore the flow of South Sudan crude oil. We remain in intensive discussions, in coordination with the African Union and our allies, to arrive at an agreement that is fair to both parties.

To date, however, the Sudanese government has refused to negotiate in good faith. Given our history with the administration of President Bashir, we realize that, unfortunately, we must prepare for a disruption of revenue that could last many months. However, I want to assure the people of South Sudan that all measures will be taken to ensure that any disruption is minimal.

 

Your Excellences

This crisis comes at a period that we have internal challenges, particular the recent tribal conflict in Jonglei State.    It is our collective responsibility to manage this situation with patience and perseverance. This is a time when we as South Sudanese need to speak with one collective voice and avoid inciting statements which will further fuel the situation.

For this reason, I call upon this august house to support the decision of the Council of Ministers to stop the flow of oil and search for alternative sources of funding to manage government projects.  I have no doubt that this august house will seriously and critically consider all available options and make the appropriate resolutions in the best interest of the Republic of South Sudan immediately.

Together, as South Sudanese, we will endure this hardship. We are a nation built on resilience, vigilance and pride.  Through discipline and focus, I am confident that our young nation will emerge stronger and more united.

Thank you and God bless you all. 

Description: C:\Users\LOMAYAT\Desktop\100MSDCF\DSC03904.JPG
Description: C:\Users\LOMAYAT\Desktop\100MSDCF\DSC03903.JPG
Description: C:\Users\LOMAYAT\Desktop\100MSDCF\DSC03905.JPG
Description: C:\Users\LOMAYAT\Desktop\100MSDCF\DSC03907.JPG
Description: C:\Users\LOMAYAT\Desktop\100MSDCF\DSC03908.JPG
Description: C:\Users\LOMAYAT\Desktop\100MSDCF\DSC03910.JPG
__._,_.___

Stop Dealing with Thieves, Say the People of South Sudan

[Juba, South Sudan] – By Larco Lomayat    Monday, January 23, 2012

During a Peaceful Procession on Monday from Juba University to the South Sudan National Legislative Assembly in Support of the Government of South Sudan (GOSS) resolution to stop oil flow through the Republic of Sudan, the people of South Sudan chanted “Stop Dealing with Thieves.

Description: C:\Users\LOMAYAT\Desktop\100MSDCF\DSC03960.JPG
President Kiir Addressing the People of South Sudan in front of
the South Sudan National Legislative Assembly
Photos By Larco Lomayat
January 23, 2012

Here below are some of pictures taken during the Procession and while the President is addressing the people of South Sudan in Juba.

Description: C:\Users\LOMAYAT\Desktop\100MSDCF\DSC03953.JPG
Description: C:\Users\LOMAYAT\Desktop\100MSDCF\DSC03974.JPG
Description: C:\Users\LOMAYAT\Desktop\100MSDCF\DSC04001.JPG
Description: C:\Users\LOMAYAT\Desktop\100MSDCF\DSC03942.JPG
Description: C:\Users\LOMAYAT\Desktop\100MSDCF\DSC03933.JPG
Description: C:\Users\LOMAYAT\Desktop\100MSDCF\DSC03937.JPG
Description: C:\Users\LOMAYAT\Desktop\100MSDCF\DSC03945.JPG
Description: C:\Users\LOMAYAT\Desktop\100MSDCF\DSC03938.JPG
Description: C:\Users\LOMAYAT\Desktop\100MSDCF\DSC04029.JPG
Description: C:\Users\LOMAYAT\Desktop\100MSDCF\DSC03991.JPG
Description: C:\Users\LOMAYAT\Desktop\100MSDCF\DSC03995.JPG
__._,_.___

South Sudan to halt oil production over dispute with Sudan
MiamiHerald.com
By ALAN BOSWELL NAIROBI, Kenya – South Sudan moved Friday to shut down its oil production, the latest development in an epic game of double-dare that threatens not only South Sudan’seconomy but also that of its neighbor and antagonist, Sudan, 

South Sudan: Death Toll Rises to 83 in Duk County of Jonglei
AllAfrica.com
Juba — A new report from the ground confirms that the death toll has increased to 83 people in Duk Padiet payam of Duk County in Jonglei State after the attack by alleged Murle armed youth and deserted military persons on Monday. 

South Sudan Ethnic Violence Pushes 120000 In Need Of Aid, UN Says
Huffington Post
MICHAEL ONYIEGO 01/20/12 12:41 PM ET AP JUBA, South Sudan — More than 120000 people need humanitarian aid because of a wave of ethnic clashes in a remote and volatile region of South Sudan, the United Nations said Friday, underscoring the challenges ..

South Sudan plans to shut oil production within 2 weeks
Chicago Tribune
JUBA (Reuters) - South Sudan said on Friday it was working out a plan to shut down oil production within two weeks after Sudan said it had started seizing southern oil to compensate for what it said were unpaid transit fees. South Sudan seceded last 

UN says 120000 in South Sudan need aid after fighting
Reuters
JUBA (Reuters) – Tribal fighting in South Sudan has left 120000 people in need of emergency food aid, twice the previous estimate, the United Nations said on Friday. The organization was in a race against time to reach people displaced by fighting 


JUBA, South Sudan — Tribal clashes and cattle raiding attacks that have displaced tens of thousands of people in South Sudan will not affect the development of the oil industry, a top official said.Pagan Amum said Sunday that the situation in Jonglei state — the site of large tribe-on-tribe attacks over the last several weeks — would not affect the planned exploitation of the state’s oil fields.

South Sudan — the world’s newest country — gets nearly all of its government revenue from oil fields. The people of South Sudan are among the poorest in the world. South Sudan split off from Sudan last July.Last week South Sudan signed its first post-independence oil deals with the state petroleum companies of China, India and Malaysia for oil-producing concessions in Unity and Upper Nile states. The agreements replaced exploration and production agreements made previously with the Sudanese government in Khartoum.

Amum, the secretary-general of South Sudan’s ruling political party, urged French oil giant Total and other investors in the region to sign similar agreements and resume their operations in Jonglei.

The United Nations estimates that more than 60,000 people in Jonglei have been affected by recent waves of violence, which began on Dec. 23 between the Murle and Lou Nuer ethnic groups. Last week, state officials said 57 Lou Nuer — mostly women and children — were killed in retaliatory attacks by the Murle in Akobo county.

Jonglei is home to Concession Block B, one of the largest oil blocks in South Sudan. Total holds a 32.5 percent stake in Block B and is responsible for the exploration and development of the area’s oil. Total acquired the stake in 1980 when the south was still part of Sudan, but suspended operations in 1985 due to the country’s civil war.

On Tuesday in Ethiopia, South Sudan will resume talks with Sudan over the separation of the two countries’ once-unified oil industry.

All southern oil must be pumped through pipelines in Sudan, but the two countries greatly disagree over the amount the south should pay for the use of the pipelines.

The general atmosphere between the sides is tense. In a statement Saturday, South Sudan’s petroleum minister accused Khartoum of stealing 650,000 barrels of the south’s oil at Port Sudan. Amum, who serves as South Sudan’s chief negotiator in the talks, said South Sudan would not accept such “state piracy.”

Amum said the south would develop alternative means of extracting its oil if Khartoum did not conduct its business fairly.

“We have a company like Toyota Tsusho of Japan which is almost completing a feasibility study and have lined up financing to build an alternative pipeline through Kenya,” he said. Toyota Tsusho is part of the Japanese manufacturing giant Toyota Group.

Amum said South Sudan is already in discussions with Kenya and Toyota on the possible pipeline and is planning “trilateral talks.”

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/south-sudan-encourages-oil-development-despite-waves-of-internal-violence/2012/01/16/gIQAFPo52P_story.html

South Sudan: Can We Make 2012 a Year of Plenty in Term of Food?
AllAfrica.com
Early rains in most parts of Republic of South Sudan usually come in March which is less than two months away. It is with rains that cultivation in this new nation is closely related because our new ministry of electricity and dams have not yet 

South Sudan encourages oil development despite waves of internal violence
The Republic
AP JUBA, South Sudan — A top official in South Sudan says that tribal clashes and cattle raiding attacks that have displaced tens of thousands of people in the nation will not affect the development of the oil industry. South Sudan — the world’s 

South-bound but stranded in Sudan
UNHCR (press release)
After waiting for over a year to go to South Sudan, some southerners have set up home in abandoned train carriages at Khartoum’s Shajara railway station. KHARTOUM, Sudan, January 16 (UNHCR) – At first glance it looks like a junkyard, strewn with piles 

UNHCR Declares Massive Humanitarian Disaster In South Sudan
Oye! Times
“I want to make a very strong appeal to the international community for massive humanitarian solidarity for the people of South Sudan at the moment. South Sudan is a new born State still facing enormous challenge from humanitarian perspective. 

Washington Post
JUBA, South Sudan — Tribal clashes and cattle raiding attacks that have displaced tens of thousands of people in South Sudan will not affect the development of the oil industry, a top official said. Pagan Amum said Sunday that the situation in Jonglei Violence mocks the hope of South Sudan’s independence
OneNewsNow
South Sudan (MNN) ― They dared to hope. On July 09, 2011, the Republic of South Sudandeclared itself independent from Sudan (north) under the terms of a 2005 peace agreement that ended decades of civil war. The new nation was feted and gifted with 

Global Deal: Petronas Signs South Sudan Deal to Continue Existing Operations
Wall Street Journal (blog)
By Jason Ng of Dow Jones Newswires KUALA LUMPUR – Petroliam Nasional Bhd., or Petronas, said it has signed an agreement with the government of South Sudan that allows it to continue operations it began prior to the country’s 2011 independence from 

Malaysia’s Petronas signs transition agreement for South Sudan blocks
Platts
Malaysia’s state-owned Petronas and its partners have signed a transition agreement with the government of the Republic of South Sudan that enables them to continue operating in upstream blocks in South Sudan previously awarded by the government of the 

Egypt Pledges to Cooperate With Nation
AllAfrica.com
Juba — A delegation from the Republic of Egypt headed by the Minister of Foreign Affairs Mohamed Al-Khalil Amri reaffirmed the commitment of the Egyptian Government to support South Sudan in developmental sectors as part of bridging their relations 


South Sudan offers crude oil despite export woes
Reuters Africa
SINGAPORE (Reuters) – South Sudan is offering more than 6 million barrels of crude oil on the spot market even though it cannot guarantee vessels will be able to load the cargoes at the Sudanese port, traders and shipbrokers said on Thursday.

US military officers to join UN in South Sudan
Sudan Tribune
January 11, 2012 (KHARTOUM) – Five US military officers will be dispatched to join the UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) as it struggles with the fallout of recent violence in the new state. The White House on Tuesday announced that the officers would

South Sudan accuses Sudan of stealing oil
UPI.com
JUBA, South Sudan, Jan. 11 (UPI) — South Sudan’s oil minister charged north Sudan was stealing its country’s crude oil and threatened to sue any country or company that bought the oil. Stephen Dhieu Dau, minister of petroleum and mining, said Sudan
South Sudan signs MoU with UAE Investment Company
Sudan Tribune
January 11, 2012 (ABU DHABI) – As part of the ongoing efforts to mobilise foreign investment South Sudan has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Abu Dhabi Investment Company of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in order to invest in various
In South Sudan, Russian Pilots Weren’t Under Contract to Fly to Pibor Conflict
Inner City Press
By Matthew Russell Lee, Exclusive UNITED NATIONS, January 11 — In the wake of the mass killings in Pibor in South Sudan, still not counted by the UN Mission there, behind closed doors a new reason for the failure to protect civilians is being offered
UNMISS says has returned to W. Bahr El Ghazal after cross border raids
Sudan Tribune
January 11, 2012 (RUMBEK) – The United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) said on Wednesday that Raja County in Western Bahr El Ghazal state had returned to normal after a cross border bombing from North Sudan in December.

JUBA, South Sudan — South Sudan said Tuesday that Sudan, its northern neighbor that controls the region’s pipelines, has blocked the movement of 3.4 million barrels of oil belonging to the south since December.

After breaking away from Sudan in July to become the world’s newest country, South Sudan gained control of nearly three quarters of the formerly unified country’s oil fields, which produce around 500,000 barrels per day.

The loss of the oil has cost Khartoum around half of its yearly revenue, and the two countries are currently negotiating revenue sharing and pipeline fees to help the north meet that budget shortfall.

But the South Sudan’s Minister of Petroleum and Mining Stephen Dhieu Dau told a news conference on Tuesday that the north has prevented 3.4 million barrels from reaching the market, and said Sudan ordered 550,000 barrels belonging to the south to be delivered to one of Khartoum’s buyers.

“They want to steal, to loot the resources of South Sudan,” Dau said.

Dau said that one ship carrying 1 million barrels of southern oil was blocked from leaving Port Sudan on Dec. 31, while a second carrying 600,000 barrels was stopped Jan. 3. A third ship entered port on Jan. 6 but has not been allowed to collect its 600,000-barrel cargo. The minister said two more ships scheduled to receive a total of 1.2 million barrels of southern oil have not been allowed to enter the northern port.

“They are still waiting now in international waters on the Red Sea since the 22nd of December,” said Dau.

South Sudan has called the blockade a theft of their natural resources in violation of international law.

Two spokesmen for Sudan’s government did not answer calls seeking comment.

Officials in Khartoum, Sudan’s capital, have proposed a fee of about $36 per barrel for the use of the two pipelines. But the south says the fee amounts to extortion and has instead offered an average of 70 cents per barrel in addition to an aid package totaling $2.6 billion over four years.

The oil agreement still being negotiated is part of a host of outstanding issues from the region’s 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement, which ended more than 20 years of civil war between the two sides. After talks in Ethiopia broke down in November, the Sudan’s government threatened to take 23 percent of southern oil shipped through its port as an “in kind” payment of fees.

On Tuesday, Dau said Khartoum was in the “final stages” of constructing a pipeline that would permanently divert 13 percent of all oil shipped through the north. According to Dau the consortium which operates the pipeline, Petrodar, has denounced the action as illegal.

In December, South Sudan accused the north of holding 1.6 million barrels of oil meant in part for China, prompting a visit by a Chinese envoy to help break the deadlocked negotiations.

Another round of oil negotiations are expected to begin Jan. 17. South Sudan has invited China to take part in the talks. South Sudan says it will not allow its resources to be interfered with by Khartoum and has threatened legal action if the blockade continues.

Iraq tried to invade Kuwait because they wanted to take the oil of Kuwait,” said South Sudan government spokesman Barnaba Benjamin Marial. “You know what happened to Saddam Hussein.”

South Sudan facing multiple crises
News24
Now R153.95 Juba – South Sudan faces challenges of “huge dimensions” as the world’s newest nation struggles to support hundreds of thousands of people returning home or fleeing violence, the UN refugee chief said on Tuesday. “South Sudan is a newborn

Kenyans trafficked to South Sudan for sex work -report
TrustLaw
REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya By Katy Migiro NAIROBI (TrustLaw) – Kenyan women are being trafficked to new country South Sudan as sex workers, according to a report in Tuesday’s The Star newspaper. There has been an influx of foreign sex workers from Kenya,

South Sudan Accuses Sudan of Blocking Oil Exports
Fox News
AP JUBA, South SudanSouth Sudan said Tuesday that Sudan, its northern neighbor that controls the region’s pipelines, has blocked the movement of 3.4 million barrels of oil belonging to the south since December. After breaking away from Sudan in


Deng in SudanAdam Andre, director of the The Luol Deng Foundation, stands with Luol Deng in July 2011 on a trail through the Jebel Rock mountain range over Juba, South Sudan. (Luol Deng Foundation HANDOUT / January 6, 2012)

Independence of native land has allowed forward’s family to return and has granted him serenity

By K.C. Johnson, Chicago Tribune reporter3:23 p.m. CST, January 7, 2012
The words appeared on Luol Deng‘s Twitter feed at 4:05 p.m. on Nov. 16.Eating outside by the Nile River is so peaceful.

Deng sat there, on the outskirts of Juba, South Sudan, dining with his father, brother and best friend. The sun warmed. The wind calmed. Eventually, his friend, Adam Andre, even jumped in the river. Deng teased him about getting eaten by alligators.

But no. On this day, four months into South Sudan’s remarkable independence, with four of Deng’s eight siblings and his parents having returned home for good, only peaceful moments prevailed.

It’s not unlike the contentment Deng has found in his professional life. Once maligned by Bulls fans for being overpaid and physically and mentally brittle, Deng has become coach Tom Thibodeau‘s indispensable part, as reliable and relentless as the mighty Nile’s current.”He’s relaxed because he knows that everything is cool now,” says Andre, who has known Deng since they attended a New Jersey boarding school together 12 years ago. “There’s peace in South Sudan.”

Deng’s father, Aldo, served as Sudan’s minister of transportation as civil war raged. The family left for Egypt when Luol was 5, eventually landing outsideLondon when England granted Aldo political asylum in 1993.

Deng spent six years in England, left for New Jersey’s Blair Academy at 14 and earned a basketball scholarship at Duke. After one sparkling season, the Bulls acquired his draft rights in a trade with the Sunson June 24, 2004.


AFP) –

JUBA — South Sudan’s army is in “full control” of a flashpoint town, after thousands of villagers fled into the bush to escape a marauding militia army from a rival tribe, officials said Tuesday.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hjjPEESWmXc&feature=endscreen&NR=1

A column of some 6,000 armed youths from the Lou Nuer tribe marched on the remote town of Pibor in troubled Jonglei state, home to the rival Murle people, who they blame for cattle raiding and have vowed to exterminate.

“Pibor is under the full control of the government, and the Lou Nuer have been ordered to return to their homes, and they are starting to do so,” Information Minister Barnaba Marial Benjamin said.

Gunmen burned thatched huts and looted a hospital run by Doctors Without Borders in the worst flare-up in a dispute that has left more than 1,000 dead in recent months and threatened to destabilise the world’s newest country.

The government and the United Nations — which has warned the violence could lead to a “major tragedy” — were beefing up their forces in the area.

Lise Grande, the UN humanitarian coordinator for South Sudan, said “probably well over twenty thousand” people had fled into the bush.

Ethnic violence, cattle raids and reprisal attacks in the vast eastern state left over 1,100 people dead and forced some 63,000 from their homes last year, according to UN reports based on local authorities and assessment teams.

Tit-for-tat cattle raiding is common in a grossly underdeveloped region awash with guns and left in ruins by decades of war with northern Sudanese forces, who fuelled conflict by backing proxy militia forces across the south.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hjjPEESWmXc&feature=endscreen&NR=1

New South Sudan rebels vow to attack Juba within a month

separation

January 3, 2012 (LONDON) – South Sudan’s newest rebel movement has told Sudan Tribune that it plans attack the capital Juba within the month and denies it is backed by Khartoum.

JPEG - 15.1 kb
The distance between Renk, where the new rebels say they are based and South Sudan’s capital Juba is around 800km (Google Maps)

The leader of the South Sudan People Liberation Movement/Army (SSPLM/A), Tong Lual Ayat, claims to have a force of 5,000 soldiers and plans to double that figure with new recruits and defections from the South Sudanese military (SPLA).

Ayat, a former member of South Sudan’s ruling party – the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement (SPLM) – said that he had begun his rebellion because of the corrupt and ineffective way the country is being governed by President Salva Kiir.

South Sudan became independent in July 2011 under Kiir’s leadership, as part of a 2005 peace deal with north Sudan.

Like other rebellions in South Sudan the new group state corruption, bad governance and lack of human rights and freedoms as some of the reasons for their insurgency.

But in a departure from the aims of other rebels the SSPLM/A declared in its manifesto at the end of December that it wanted to South Sudan to revert being governed by Khartoum under a confederation.

However, following the “negative reactions” to the announcement the nascent movement scrapped the idea just days later.

The Unity and Jonglei state-based South Sudan Liberation Army (SSLA), the country’s most active rebel group, shortly after the original announcement said that they opposed confederation.

“The people of South Sudan voted overwhelmingly for separation and nobody can reverse that. The democratic choice of the people of South Sudan has to be respected” the SSLA’s Bapiny Monytuil told Sudan Tribune.

The SSLA warned Ayat that if he did not change his manifesto other southern rebels would not cooperate with him.

The hastily dropped proposal, Ayat said, was for the two Sudan’s to create a European or East African Community type system.

Ayat said that because of these concerns the article had been dropped and replaced with a statement calling for “regime change in Juba.”

“Any inconvenience caused by this article is sincerely regretted”, the group said in a 1 January press release.

In 2009 Ayat left the ruling SPLM and formed the United Democratic Party (UDP) but claims he was arrested for starting the new party and subsequently his party did not join the government after the 2010 elections.

In a email to Sudan Tribune on 1 January, Ayat said that South Sudanese were fed up with the current government and the country needed an alternative. The SSPLM/A’s planned attack on Juba will be called “Rescue South Sudan from Oppressors”, he said.

Ayat says that he has no connection with Khartoum and is trying to form a coalition with other rebel and opposition groups in South Sudan as well as encourage defections from the army.

Juba and Khartoum have routinely accused each other of backing the rebel groups in each others territory.

The new rebels claim to be based in Renk in Upper Nile state near the border with north Sudan.

Renk and Juba are at other ends of the country, with Juba close to the border with Uganda. The SSPLM/A would have to travel around 800km through difficult terrain to reach Juba.

Similar warnings, given by other rebel groups that they were going imminently attack and take control of major towns in South Sudan have, so far, not transpired.

(ST)

South Sudan flashpoint town under government control
AFP
JUBA — South Sudan’s army is in “full control” of a flashpoint town, after thousands of villagers fled into the bush to escape a marauding militia army from a rival tribe, officials said Tuesday. A column of some 6000 armed youths from the Lou Nuer

South Sudan: Communal Wars – Their Causes and Resolution Mechanisms
AllAfrica.com
These wars are currently taking place in many parts of South Sudan, particularly in Warrap, Lakes and Jonglei states. Two questions arise; what are their causes? How can they be resolved? The causes of communal wars can be simply stated: disputes

New South Sudan rebels vow to attack Juba within a month
Sudan Tribune
January 3, 2012 (LONDON) – South Sudan’s newest rebel movement has told Sudan Tribune that it plans attack the capital Juba within the month and denies it is backed by Khartoum. The leader of the South Sudan People Liberation Movement/Army (SSPLM/A),

South Sudan: Civilians Escape Ex-Militia Fire in Mapel
AllAfrica.com
Gadet responded to President Kiir’s amnesty to the South Sudan rebel forces during the country’s declaration of independence on 9th July 2011 and returned to Juba last year in August while sending his forces to SPLA training camp in Mapel for

South Sudan: Jonglei Problem Is Influencing Other Disarmed and Peaceful States
AllAfrica.com
The disputes in Jonglei state seem to be nonstop and have outlaid the marks of setting the whole nation into several conflicts here and there. Some of the states with the disarmed communities are now rebuying guns for protecting themselves and cattle

Sudanese FM Says New Strategy To Be Adopted In Dealings With South Sudan
Bernama
KHARTOUM, Jan 3 (BERNAMA-NNN-SUNA) — Sudanese Foreign Minister Ali Karti says a new strategy will be adopted for dealing with the newly independent South Sudan State and that the policy will be exposed to a number of the state’s organs to agree about

Sudan…On the threshold of a difficult year
Al-Arabiya
The beginning of the year witnessed the division of the country after South Sudan voted to secede, in a referendum stipulated by the terms of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA), signed by the al-Bashir regime and the Sudan People’s Liberation


BY Timothy Walker

8 August 2011

Amid the independence celebrations in Juba, South Sudan, on July 9, many observers might have overlooked the presence of representatives of Somaliland, a territory that hopes to imitate South Sudan’s example soon.

An autonomous self-declared territory that broke away from the Republic of Somalia in 1991, Somaliland recently celebrated twenty years of independence despite not being recognised as a sovereign state by any state or international organisation.

Since the 1990s, many African states have regarded the thought of an independent Somaliland with a marked indifference that in some cases bordered on hostility, despite the territory fulfilling many of the criteria listed in agreements that define statehood, particularly the Montevideo Convention of 1933.

Somaliland emerged in a context of state-level disintegration and inter-clan conflict, but this did not prevent the formation of a government that has proved relatively acceptable and representative of the territory’s inhabitants. It has held two presidential elections: one in 2003 that brought Dahir Riyale Kahin to power and one in 2010 in which incumbent Ahmed Mohamed Silanyo emerged triumphant. International monitors assessed the 2010 elections and observed that they were relatively free and fair, although several problems with the process were identified. The 2010 presidential elections were in fact supposed to have occurred in August 2008. Somaliland has, however, set itself a precedent of a peaceful transfer of power between elected heads of the executive branch of the government.

As an entity that, arguably, has all the trappings of a state and that provides more human security for its inhabitants than many of the recognised states on the continent, the response towards Somaliland appears to make little sense when one regards the welcome accorded to South Sudan. While the African Union (AU), and its predecessor the Organisation of African Unity (OAU), made the inviolability of inherited colonial borders a key principle of pan-African relations, Somaliland’s search for greater self-determination can be justified on the basis that, unlike South Sudan, it has been recognised as an independent state in the past, even if just for three days after it gained its independence from Britain in 1960 and before it chose to unify with the south (a former Italian colony) to form the Somali Republic.

Representatives of Somaliland have been making concerted efforts at increasing their country’s visibility and have increased their political contacts not just at the regional and continental level, but now also at the global level For instance, the recent offer by President Silanyo to host United Nations (UN)-backed prisons for captured pirates has been seriously considered by various countries. Somaliland has attempted to establish international relationships, mostly of an informal nature, but the increase in links on both sub- and supra-state level, particularly in the Horn of Africa region, means that there is a possibility of countries proceeding to unilaterally recognise Somaliland. Moreover, the recent celebrations marking twenty years of independence in Somaliland and among its sizeable diaspora in cities such as London, appear also to have given an added impetus to the attempts at attaining international recognition and aid.

Somaliland’s greatest assets that could help it secure international recognition and support are its strategic location bordering the Red Sea, the Gulf of Aden and the Horn of Africa, and its deep-water port of Berbera. The future prosperity of the country arguably centres on Berbera, and on the industrialisation and development that would occur if regional and international investment increased. A commitment to use the port in combatting piracy or to assist patrols in the Gulf of Aden and Indian Ocean would require supporting facilities, factories, storehouses and infrastructure. Berbera therefore has the potential to become a thriving hub of international trade and a centre for security in the region. Such moves could also interest Ethiopia, which has been landlocked since the 1990s and is reliant on Djibouti for much of its imports and exports. In addition Berbera was used as a naval port during the Cold War. However, Somaliland at present cannot guarantee that it can secure the inland areas through which goods can move cheaply enough to appeal to investors and businesses, meaning that at present the expense and risk involved in investing and utilising this route remain unappealing.

Somalilanders have managed to build their state without access to resources, funding or aid, a task that they have carried out impressively. This contrasts with the Transitional Federal Government (TFG) in Somalia, which is almost totally dependant on foreign support and which has not been assisted by the massive amount of aid in establishing sovereignty over the country. The answer to Somaliland’s isolation must therefore be located in international relations theory – and in the imaginations of those in power in states that could face secessionist claims or the irredentist policies of their neighbours should such a transformation of the African geopolitical map gather momentum. The fear that a successful secession would lead to similar calls across the continent, fracturing tenuous stability and possibly causing internecine conflicts, can also be located in Morocco and Western Sahara, Katanga in the Democratic Republic of Congo, and Cabinda in Angola.

While there is much to admire about Somaliland, there is still need for caution. Its quest for recognition does not warrant unbridled enthusiasm. The region has frequently clashed with its neighbour Puntland, itself a relatively stable territory that also seeks to secede from Somalia. The clashes have revolved around border demarcation and there is a danger of the conflict intensifying. Within Somaliland itself, inhabitants of the Adal state also seek to declare their autonomy.

Broadly looking at the case of South Sudan and Somalia, the criteria for statehood seem to be inconsistently applied. It appears that geopolitical ideas play a much more prominent role than legal principles such as the Montevideo Convention, a situation that blurs legitimate and compelling cases for self-determination such as that of Somaliland. The AU, therefore, needs to critically reflect on the topic of self-determination, particularly that of Somaliland, in order to give its people a fair chance of participating in international and global relations.

Timothy Walker is an intern with the African Conflict Prevention Programme of the ISS.