Posts Tagged ‘juba sudan’


March 29, 2012 (KHARTOUM/JUBA)

Sudan’s foreign minister Ali Ahmed Karti reaffirmed that talks are the only choice Juba has to settle the disputed issues between the two countries but warned that being peaceful neighbours involves stopping any support to rebel groups operating in Sudan.

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Ali Karti, Sudan’s Foreign Minister.

Karti’s statements follow a speech by Sudanese president Omer al-Bashir at the Arab summit in Bagdad where he said that his government is firmly committed to achieve peace and build good relations with Juba as well as to avoid a return to war. He also denounced foreign conspiracies aiming to obstruct peace between the two countries.

The Sudanese army repulsed an attack on Monday 26 March on Heglig oil field, which produces 60,000 barrel per day, around the half of Sudan’s production. Khartoum said the assault was carried out by the South Sudanese army and Sudanese rebels. On Monday South Sudan’s president, Salva Kiir, claimed his country’s army was responsible for the attack.

Different sources in Juba told Sudan Tribune that the announcement of the attack by Kiir had caused consternation among ministers and members of the government because the cabinet, in an extraordinary meeting earlier on Monday, had decided to work with Khartoum for a negotiated settlement over the pending issues and to support the efforts of the chief negotiator, Pagan Amum.

South Sudan’s security services are being accused of mounting the attack on Heglig with the Sudanese rebels who were annoyed by the recent deals reached by the negotiating teams of the two countries in Addis Ababa and the announced visit of the Sudanese president to Juba.

Speaking after the return of the Sudanese delegation from Bagdad, the Sudan’s foreign minister Ali Karti told reporters in Khartoum that “the only way available to the government of the South Sudan is a return to the negotiating table.” Pointing out that the attack on Heglig contradicts with the message brought by its delegation led by Pagan Amum, last week.

Karti went to say that the attack on Heglig reveals “the deep divisions in the ranks of the Government of South Sudan and indicates that there are parties who do not want the voice of peace to prevail.”

The minister stressed further that the will of those who came to Khartoum to invite Bashir to visit Juba was overshadowed by others who wanted to stop the rapprochement between the two countries.

He pointed out that President Salva Kiir committed a big mistake “when he went overjoyed to announce during a public meeting saying ’We have got what we want to be reached through negotiations’, even without checking and make sure that the attackers have controlled or not Heglig effectively.”

On Monday 26 March Kiir said his government contests Sudan’s sovereignty over Heglig and wanted to discuss the issue peacefully with Khartoum but the South Sudanese army repulsed an attack by the Sudanese army and now control the Heglig.

Karti further said the Sudanese army “repelled the attack and is ready for dialogue if the other party is serious.” He stressed that what happened was an attempt by the rebels to pressure Juba’s government.

Regarding the Sudanese rebel groups, the minister said Juba harbours Darfur and South Kordofan rebels and this represents “clear intentions of aggression”.

Referring to the efforts carried out by the African Union in Addis Ababa, Karti said the technical committees meeting there should focus on the security issue before to go through the other files.

In Juba, reliable sources said the SPLM Secretary General and top negotiator was one of those who reacted negatively against the reports by intelligence services about the attack and its circumstances.

The issue shows that the Sudanese rebels can impact on the South Sudan government, said a Western diplomat. The added that Juba’s leaders should not believe it can use their former comrades who fought together with them against Bashir’s government without such risk.

He further warned that the “card of regime change” played by Juba might discredit its leadership before the international community which seeks to bring peace and stability in the region.

“This is why we endorsed the South Sudanese will for an independent nation several months ago,” he said.

(ST)

http://www.sudantribune.com/Sudan-says-cessation-of-support-to,42078


South Sudan
 welcomes IGAD capacity building initiative

Sudan Tribune
March 29, 2012 (JUBA) – As newly independent South Sudan embarks on post-war recovery efforts, East African regional body IGAD has launched an initiative aimed at strengthening capacity building in the country’s public service.
Where is the Foundation of Academics?
AllAfrica.com
By Dhieu Abraham Machar, 30 March 2012 I was shocked on the 19th, March when the fearful students of the Republic of South Sudan sat for the foreign National Examination of the Sudan-the politically deserted brotherhood whose education is Islamic based 
Japan Oil Imports for Power Surge as South Sudan Supply Is Lost
BusinessWeek
By Jacob Adelman on March 30, 2012 Japan lost oil supplies from South Sudan, even as its total crude purchases for generating power surged because of the need to replace electricity from idle atomic reactors. The country imported 1.75 million 

Japan Oil Imports for Power Surge as South Sudan Supply Is Lost
Bloomberg
Japan lost oil supplies from South Sudan, even as its total crude purchases for generating power surged because of the need to replace electricity from idle atomic reactors. The country imported 1.75 million kiloliters of oil, or about 369000 barrels a 
South Sudanese delegation ends visit to Angola
AngolaPress
Luanda – A delegation of South Sudan Government, headed by the minister of Cabinet Affairs of the President of the Republic, Deng Alor Koul, ended Friday its three-day visit to the country, which was considered positive due to the objectives achieved.
Recovering From the Lord’s Resistance Army
AllAfrica.com
Yambio, South Sudan — It happened three years ago, but Anna* remembers it vividly. “They attacked our village on a Wednesday,” she says. It was the school holidays and Anna, then 19, was visiting her parents in Gbado village in northern Democratic 

Sudan, South Sudan vow no war after border battles

Posted: March 28, 2012 by PaanLuel Wël in Junub Sudan
Tags:

JUBA  – Sudan and South Sudan vowed Wednesday to step back from the brink of all out war after three days of border violence including airstrikes and tank battles prompted international concern of a wider conflict.

Fighting on the ground had reportedly ceased on both sides of the undemarcated border but dead bodies and destroyed tanks lay strewn in Sudan’s contested oil centre of Heglig, the site of bloody battles that began Monday. Both Juba and Khartoum said senior envoys would meet in the Ethiopian capital Thursday in a bid to stave off further violence.

“What we expect to achieve is the cessation of hostilities,” South Sudan’s top negotiator Pagan Amum said. “We will stop the fighting that is there, and ensure that this does not erupt into war between the two countries.”

Sudanese foreign affairs official Rahamatalla Mohamed Osman, said Khartoum did not want a war with the South.

, but warned “if they want to accelerate, we will defend ourselves.”

Sudanese warplanes on Monday launched air raids on newly independent South Sudan, while the rival armies clashed in heavy battles.

Both sides claim the other started the fighting, the worst since South Sudan declared independence from Khartoum last July after decades of civil war.

The African Union, UN Security Council and European Union have called for an end to the violence, while US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said Khartoum bore the responsibility for the renewed hostilities.

The pan-African body said Wednesday it was deeply concerned at an “escalating security situation” on the border between the former civil war foes, and called for troops to pull back 10 kilometres (6 miles) either side of the border.

The unrest jeopardises AU-led efforts to resolve contentious border and oil disputes that have ratcheted up tensions between Juba and Khartoum.

The last round of AU-mediated talks in Addis Ababa closed this month with an agreement on nationality and border issues, which was hailed as a major breakthrough in dragging negotiations, but the mood has soured since.

Juba said northern bombers and troops had struck first on Monday, moving into Unity State before Southern troops fought back and took the Heglig oil field, parts of which are claimed by both countries.

Sudan later retook the field.

“Heglig and all around it is completely secure,” Bashir Meki, the Sudanese local army commander, told an AFP reporter who visited the region with Sudan’s Oil Minister Awad Ahmad al-Jaz.

A large contingent of Misseriya nomads from the paramilitary Popular Defence Force (PDF), a key battle force for the Sudanese military, patrolled the Heglig area with rifles and motorcycles, but without uniforms.

“We will fight for this border even without the government’s permission, to protect our land,” said Ismail Hamdien, a Misseriya leader who travelled to the battle scene to assess the situation.

Rebel forces that both Juba and Khartoum accuse are backed by the other were also reported to have joined in the fighting, and AU Commission chief Jean Ping called for a “halting of any support to rebel forces.”

Oil operations in Heglig are run by the Greater Nile Petroleum Operating Company (GNPOC), a consortium led by China’s state oil giant CNPC.

“There is serious concern among us,” one Chinese oil worker said. “How can we work in this situation? We want the government to protect us because we are working for the people of Sudan.”

Southern soldiers were on high alert along the border fearing fresh attacks after pulling out of Heglig, said Southern army spokesman Philip Aguer.

“It is not our policy to attack and occupy, but only to defend ourselves against unwarranted aggression,” said Aguer, adding there had been no ground fighting Wednesday.

“We are monitoring the movement of large SAF (Sudan’s army) convoys near the border … our forces are ready to respond,” he added.

More than two million people died in Sudan’s 1983-2005 civil war between Khartoum and southern rebels before a peace agreement which led to South Sudan’s independence.

http://www.nation.com.pk/pakistan-news-newspaper-daily-english-online/international/29-Mar-2012/sudan-south-sudan-vow-no-war-after-border-battles

Sudan, S Sudan vow no war after battles

Thursday March 29, 2012

Sudan, S Sudan vow no war after battles

Sudan and South Sudan have vowed to step back from the brink after three days of border conflict including air strikes and tank battles prompted international concern of a wider conflict.

Fighting on the ground had reportedly ceased on both sides of the unmarked border but dead bodies and destroyed tanks lay strewn in Sudan’s contested oil centre of Heglig, the site of bloody battles that began on Monday.

Both Juba and Khartoum said senior envoys would meet in the Ethiopian capital on Thursday in a bid to stave off further violence.

‘What we expect to achieve is the cessation of hostilities,’ South Sudan’s top negotiator Pagan Amum said. ‘We will stop the fighting that is there, and ensure that this does not erupt into war between the two countries.’

Sudanese foreign affairs official Rahamatalla Mohamed Osman, who had arrived in Addis Ababa ahead of the talks, said Khartoum did not want a war with the South, but warned ‘if they want to accelerate, we will defend ourselves.’

Sudanese warplanes on Monday launched air raids on newly independent South Sudan, while the rival armies clashed in heavy battles.

Both sides claim the other started the fighting, the worst since South Sudan declared independence from Khartoum last July after decades of civil war.

The African Union, UN Security Council and European Union have called for an end to the violence, while US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said Khartoum bore the responsibility for the renewed hostilities.

The pan-African body said on Wednesday it was deeply concerned at an ‘escalating security situation’ on the border between the former civil war foes, and called for troops to pull back 10 kilometres either side of the border.

The unrest jeopardises AU-led efforts to resolve contentious border and oil disputes that have ratcheted up tensions between Juba and Khartoum.

Juba said northern bombers and troops had struck first on Monday, moving into Unity State before Southern troops fought back and took the Heglig oil field, parts of which are claimed by both countries.

Sudan later retook the field.

‘Heglig and all around it is completely secure,’ Bashir Meki, the Sudanese local army commander, told an AFP reporter who visited the region with Sudan’s Oil Minister Awad Ahmad al-Jaz.

A large contingent of Misseriya nomads from the paramilitary Popular Defence Force (PDF), a key battle force for the Sudanese military, patrolled the Heglig area with rifles and motorcycles, but without uniforms.

‘We will fight for this border even without the government’s permission, to protect our land,’ said Ismail Hamdien, a Misseriya leader who travelled to the battle scene to assess the situation.

Rebel forces that both Juba and Khartoum accuse are backed by the other were also reported to have joined in the fighting, and AU Commission chief Jean Ping called for a ‘halting of any support to rebel forces.’

Oil operations in Heglig are run by the Greater Nile Petroleum Operating Company (GNPOC), a consortium led by China’s state oil giant CNPC.

‘There is serious concern among us,’ one Chinese oil worker said. ‘How can we work in this situation? We want the government to protect us because we are working for the people of Sudan.’

Southern soldiers were on high alert along the border fearing fresh attacks.


South Sudan to export oil by truck, as talks restart
Sudan Tribune
March 7, 2012 (JUBA) – As South Sudan’s oil dispute with Sudan continues Juba announced on Wednesday that it plans to start exporting oil using trucks to transport its oil to ports in Kenya and Djibouti. South Sudan stopped exporting its oil through 

South Sudan rebel leader arrives in Juba
Sudan Tribune
March 7, 2012 (BOR) – The leader for one of South Sudan’s rebel groups, Peter Chol Kuol Awan, arrived in Juba on Tuesday less than a week after the government announced it had reached a peace deal with his South Sudan Democratic Movement (SSDM).

Why South Sudan must revert to unitary system opposed to federalism
Sudan Tribune
By Isaiah Abraham March 7, 2012 — The Republic of South Sudan (RSS) like any other newly created country in any other part of the world is grappling as to what system of governance to adapt and why. Since its independence few months ago, 

UN to construct a new way station for South Sudanese returnees
Sudan Tribune
By Bonifacio Taban Kuich March 7, 2012 (BENTIU) – Humanitarian agencies assessed a proposed way station in Unity State to accommodate an expected influx of South Sudanese returning to the new country after it split from Sudan in July last year…

This year let’s celebrate … the women of Sudan’s Nuba mountains
The Guardian
Today we should be celebrating the women’s rights campaigners in Sudan who have been steadfast in their struggles against the regime’s constant repression. Unfortunately the only achievement was for women in South Sudan, which became a new country this 

South Sudan Cooperation; Will the Cross-Border Trade Hold?
Sudan Vision
It provides the states markets with many commodities in addition to supplying the Republic of South Sudan because it is a border state and a commercial exchange point. East Darfur state is connected to the South by three main roads (Tumsaha – Daein 

JUBA, Sudan—South Sudanese officials say that Sudanese armed forces bombed two oil wells inside South Sudan and Sudanese troops are massing near the disputed border.

The spokesman for South Sudan’s armed forces said Thursday that two Sudanese planes dropped 6 bombs in Pariang county, along the north-south border on Wednesday afternoon. Col. Philip Aguer says at least one well had been damaged and was leaking into the ground, polluting drinking water.

He says Sudan has also been massing ground forces in a nearby town.

Sudanese Foreign Ministry spokesman Al Obeid Merwah did not answer calls for comment.

South Sudan became independent from Sudan in July but many issues remain unresolved, including the demarcation of the border and the sharing of oil revenues.

© Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
Posted Thursday, March 1st, 2012

Officials in South Sudan have accused neighboring Sudan of bombing oil wells, the latest sign of rising tension between the countries.

Several officials, including government spokesman Barnaba Marial Benjamin, say Sudanese warplanes dropped bombs Wednesday in an area of Unity State, about 75 kilometers from the two countries’ contested border.

The officials say the bombardment destroyed two oil wells.

A spokesman for Sudan’s military, Sawarmi Khaled Saad, dismissed the accusations as false.

Marial said the attack violated a non-aggression pact Sudan and South Sudan signed in Ethiopia last month.

“…this is actually a violation of the non-aggression treaty that we signed two weeks ago and with the nature of Sudan’s government, they always don’t respect what they signed with anybody. We are not surprised.”

The south has repeatedly accused the north of violating its territory, and both sides have accused each other of supporting the other’s rebels.

The two countries are locked in a dispute over oil revenues. The south took over three-fourths of Sudanese oil production when it became independent last July but relies on northern pipelines and facilities to send the oil abroad.

The north seized millions of barrels of oil after the south refused to pay what it considered excessive transport fees. The south has reacted by shutting down oil production, a move analysts say is bound to hurt both countries.

The dispute and simmering tensions over the border have raised fears the two Sudans are headed toward war. In the former unified Sudan, the north and south fought a bloody civil war that lasted 21 years.

Marial said Thursday that South Sudan will file a complaint about Sudan with the United Nations Security Council. Sudan filed a complaint about the south with the Security Council on Tuesday.

http://blogs.voanews.com/breaking-news/2012/03/01/south-sudan-accuses-north-of-bombing-oil-wells/

South Sudan accuses Khartoum of air strikesMarch 01, 2012 02:14 PM

Agence France Presse

JUBA: Sudanese fighter jets have bombed oil and water wells deep inside South Sudan and its ground troops have crossed into contested oil-rich border regions, South Sudan officials said Thursday.

“They have flown into our territory 74 kilometres (46 miles) and are violating South Sudanese airspace,” Information Minister Barnaba Marial Benjamin said of the air strikes, which he said took place at noon Wednesday.

Sudanese ground troops had also moved 17 kilometres inside South Sudan’s oil-rich Unity state, army spokesman Philip Aguer said.

Khartoum and Juba dispute areas along the undemarcated border.

South Sudan — which declared independence from Khartoum in July — has accused the north of carrying out several recent bombing raids in frontier regions, but the claims were denied by the Sudanese army.

“Two MiG (fighter jets) bombed Panakuat in Pariang county,” Aguer told AFP on Thursday, adding two bombs struck an oil well and a drinking water well.

“Khartoum… have been bombing South Sudan since last year, but thus is the first time MiGs have come,” Aguer said, adding that previous attacks had been far less accurate bombs rolled out the back of Antonov aircraft.

The region borders Sudan’s Southern Kordofan state where rebels — once part of the ex-guerrilla turned official South Sudanese army — are battling the Khartoum government forces.

Border tensions have mounted since South Sudan split from Sudan in July after decades of war to become the world’s newest nation, with each side accusing the other of backing proxy rebel forces against it.

“They say that we are supporting wars in their territory and it’s simply not true,” Benjamin said.

“The government is in a position to protect its citizens and territory, but it will not be dragged back to a senseless war.”

South Sudan took three quarters of Sudan’s oil reserves, but all pipeline and export facilities are controlled by the north.

The South halted oil production in January — stopping the flow of the resource that accounts for 98 percent of government revenue — after Juba accused Khartoum of stealing $815 million worth of crude oil.

Last month the two sides signed a non-aggression pact agreeing to “respect each other’s sovereignty and territorial integrity” and to “refrain from launching any attack, including bombardment.”

Juba accused Khartoum of breaking the accord by bombing border regions just days later.

Last month UN chief Ban Ki-moon warned that tensions between the two nations could escalate if the oil crisis is not resolved.

The South has demanded that any deal includes settlement on the undemarcated border, parts of which cut through oil fields, as well on Abyei, a Lebanon-sized region claimed by both sides but occupied by northern troops

Read more: http://www.dailystar.com.lb/News/Middle-East/2012/Mar-01/165165-south-sudan-accuses-khartoum-of-air-strikes.ashx#ixzz1nt4TlIpG
(The Daily Star :: Lebanon News :: http://www.dailystar.com.lb)


South Sudan: SPLM Urges Locals to Unite, Defend Nation From SAF Invasion
AllAfrica.com
Juba — Sudan People’s Liberation Movement (SPLM) Party has called upon the people of South Sudan Youth, Men and Women to Unite and defend their nation from the National Congress Party (NCP) of Sudan. The calls followed an attack by the Sudan Army (SAF

Analysis: Land deals “threaten South Sudan’s development”
IRINnews.org
JUBA, 12 December 2011 (IRIN) – Land deals done in newly-independent South Sudan “threaten to undermine the land rights of rural communities, increase food insecurity, entrench poverty, and skew development patterns” in the resource-rich but poor

Sudan: Why South Sudanese Will Triumph Over Sudan Army Which Is Forcibly Recruited
AllAfrica.com
This is a total contrast with South Sudanese who had willingly joined the Anya-Nya movement which had no guns but traditional weapons such as arrows and bows and a few ancient guns from the First World War class of weapons like the ‘tasi’ rifle which

South Sudan: Corruption Cases Pending in Justice Ministry Says Anti-Corruption
AllAfrica.com
The Commemoration which was celebrated in the Ten States of South Sudan and organized by CES Government in Juba was under the themes “zero Tolerance to Corruption in the Republic of South Sudan“Following the declaration of the President,

South Sudan: Luo Nuer-Murle Peace Conference Kicks Off On Monday
AllAfrica.com
Juba — The Archbishop of Episcopal Church Daniel Deng Bul said Luo Nuer- Murle peace conference will take place on Monday 12 – 15th of this month as scheduled. He said the aim of the conference is to bring the two warring communities together so as to

Land Deals Threaten South Sudan’s Development – Analysis

Eurasia Review -
Land deals done in newly-independent South Sudan “threaten to undermine the land rights of rural communities, increase food insecurity, entrench poverty, and skew development patterns” in the resource-rich but poor nation, a new report says.
Sudan Tribune – ‎
December 11, 2011 (KHARTOUM) – A Sudanese official has expressed the pleasure of his country’s government with the series of uprisings that swept the Arab world in 2011, saying it ended the isolation of the Islamic rule in Sudan.
News24 -
This colourful guide contains concise information on 234 reef fish and 36 coral species found along… Now R153.95 Juba – Eleven people have been killed in new attacks in South Sudan’s troubled Jonglei state, where nearly 40 people died in tribal
AFP – ‎
JUBA, South Sudan — Eleven people have been killed in new attacks in South Sudan’s troubled Jonglei state, where nearly 40 people died in tribal violence last week, the state’s governor said on Monday. Suspected rebels under the command of renegade
Borglobe – ‎
Since the signing of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) in 2005 up to the independence of South Sudan in July of 2011, Jonglei state has been a battlefield with little attention from the government of South
AllAfrica.com – ‎‎
Juba — The Archbishop of Episcopal Church Daniel Deng Bul said Luo Nuer- Murle peace conference will take place on Monday 12 – 15th of this month as scheduled. He said the aim of the conference is to bring the two warring communities together so as to
Oye! Times – ‎
Hilde F. JohnsonHilde F. Johnson, Special Representative of the United Nations Secretary General to South Sudan, has called on the Government of South Sudan and traditional leaders to stop vicious violence acts in Jonglei State. In a press release,
Sudan Tribune – ‎
December 11, 2011 (JUBA) – George Athor Deng, leader of a South Sudanese rebel group, on Sunday threatened to capture Bor, the capital of Jonglei state if an agreement is not reached with the Sudan People Liberation Movement (SPLM) before the end of
Borglobe – ‎
What is the primary responsibility of the Government of the South Sudan? Is Goss competent to provide indispensable thing called security to people or even protect its territories?
News24 – ‎
Khartoum – Heavy fighting between the Sudanese army and southern-aligned rebels in the embattled state of South Kordofan has killed at least 19 government troops, a rebel spokesperson said on Monday. “There was heavy fighting on Saturday in Warni,
Ahram Online – ‎‎
“There was heavy fighting on Saturday in Warni, in the far east of Talodi locality. The SPLA repelled an attack by the army. They left 19 bodies on the ground,” rebel spokesman, Arnu Ngutulu Lodi told AFP on Monday. The Sudanese army spokesman could
Sudan Vision – ‎
Khartoum – Spokesman of the Sudanese Armed Forces (SAF), Colonel Al-Sawarmi Khaled Saad revealed that the army cut off the supply from the Sudanese Peoples Liberation Army (SPLA) by controlling Bohairat Abiad and Al-Atmour, so as to prevent the supply
Sudan Vision – ‎
It was first the Americans who wanted an oil deal between the two countries of Sudan and South Sudan before the end of July even if it was an interim one as proposed by Special Envoy Princeton Lyman. July had already passed and four months later
Radio Dabanga – ‎
Mireille Girard, the deputy representative of the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) in southern Sudan, told the UN news agency IRIN that since early July 2011, 20000 refugees had fled from South Kordofan, whilst another 30000 had fled from Blue

Editorial :Sudan and South Sudan .. Are They Ready to Reunite?
Sudan Vision
We never heard before that a new born state in the globe did what the Government of South Sudan (GoSS) is doing since its independence. Gaining their independence, the serious nations move immediately to build its homeland and future.

Juet Massacre: Genocide in Jonglei, South Sudan
Borglobe
By Michael Ayuen Kuany, USA (Borglobe) Since the signing of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) in 2005 up to the independence of South Sudan in July of 2011, Jonglei state has been a battlefield with little attention from the government of South

Refugees in South Sudan Determined to Stay
Voice of America
December 12, 2011 Refugees in South Sudan Determined to Stay Michael Onyiego | Yida, South Sudan Next to the storehouse in Yida’s village square, refugees line up for food rations meant to last their families the rest of the week.


Biography of the Late Dr. John Garang de-Mabior

June 23, 1945 – July 30, 2005

Founding President

The late Dr. John Garang De Mabior Atem is a founder of the Sudan People Liberation Movement (SPLM) and the Sudan Liberation Army (SPLA) and eventually became the President of the Government of the Southern Sudan after he signed one of Africa longest war with Khartoum based government. John Garang lost his life of the plane crush as he was coming from Uganda to his base in Southern Sudan; barely after two weeks in the office.

Dr. Garang was born John Garang to Mabior Atem and his wife Gak Malwal Kuol on June 23, 1945 at Buk village, Nyuak Payam (Twich East County), Bor area in Jonglei State. He was the sixth of the family’s ten children comprising seven boys and three girls. Dr. John was a disciplined but inquisitive child who grew respecting his parents and the community. His parents were strict Christians hence the discipline with which they brought up their children.

Young John began his education at Tonj and Buseri primary and intermediate schools. Upon completing primary education, he joined Rumbek Secondary School. However, his stay there was short-lived. He was expelled after taking part in a strike. He went to Tanzania where he joined Magamba Secondary School from where he completed his studies having passed with flying colours. Thereafter, he joined the University of Dar es Salaam where he was a classmate to President Yoweri Museveni of Uganda. John also received a scholarship to Grinnel College in the USA where he was awarded BA in Economics. Due to his quest for knowledge, he pursued further studies in the USA and was awarded a PhD in Economics by Iowa State University in 1981. His love for his country and the dream of its development was epitomed in his doctoral thesis was entitled: Aspects for Development in Southern Sudan.

Dr. John was first recruited into the liberation army when he was 17 during the Anyanya I revolt but he dropped out after a short stint to go back to school. It is reported that the commanders saw his intellectual prowess and urged him to complete his education first. No wonder he rejoined Anyanya I army soon after he came back to Sudan in 1971. His military organization skills was recognized fast and he was soon dispatched for a company commanders’ course in the American Military Academy where he graduated in the top three positions. He remained in the army until he left the country for his doctoral studies. He returned in 1982 and rose to the level of Colonel and was based at Khartoum as a military planner. On May 16, 1983, a group of army officers based at Bor mutinied. Dr. Garang was sent by the Nimeiri’s government to quell the mutiny. Converse to the government’s expectations, Dr. Garang joined that mutiny than fight his own people. Due to his leadership qualities he became the leader of this group and set up a command base on the Sudan-Ethiopia border. This is how SPLM/A was born.


Dr John Garang’s grave in Juba.

Dr. Garang married Rebecca Nyandeng on December 19, 1976. They were blessed with seven children of whom one died in infancy. The surviving children are Mabior, Chuol, Gak, Akwal, Nyankuir and Atong.

Dr. John was a well travelled person and a Pan-African for that matter. For instance, he lived in Kibera in Kenya’s capital in the early 1960s. He even taught at Gatung’ang’a secondary school in Nyeri between 1965 and 1966; just before he flew to Iowa on a scholarship.


A towering statue of Dr John Garang at the SPLA Headquarters [Photo by Joseph Garang Deng]

This article was updated on Jul 13, 2011
Further Resources on Dr John Garang

Books:

Shimanyula, J.B. (2005). John Garang and the SPLA. Nairobi: Jomo Kenyatta Foundation

http://www.goss-online.org/magnoliaPublic/en/president/FormerPresedent.html

 A Brief Biography of the Late Dr. John Garang De Mabior

The late Dr. John Garang de Mabior was born on June 23, 1945 (with five brothers and two sisters) to parents Mabior Atem Aruei (of Aulian Tribe) and Gak Malual Kuol (of Kongoor Tribe) in Buk Village, Nyuak Payam, Tuic East County of Jong’lei State. The late Dr. John Garang was a very dynamic human being who wore many hats and accomplished many great feats. His biography can be written in volumes, however for the purposes of this manual, the focus shall be on his education.

           The late Dr. John (as he was fondly known) started his education in Tonj Primary School in 1952, after being taken there by his uncle Athethei Aruei, who had to plead with his family to release him. This was a time in the history when most tribal societies in Southern Sudan had negative attitudes towards education. The parents of Dr. John where of the view that the numerical strength of families in the village where important than education of their children; however, his uncle pleaded with the family until they relented. Athethei Aruei had travelled widely in Sudan, and had been exposed to urban life, hence predicted to his family of a time in the future when education would become central to the survival of families in the village. It could therefore be said had it not been the visionary (family) leadership of Uncle Athethei, the history of the Sudan would have been much different.

                  In 1956, Dr. John graduated from primary and enrolled in Buseri Intermediate School in Wau. In 1960 he was accepted in Rumbek Senior Secondary School, from where he was recruited (with many of his colleagues) into the Anyanya I Rebel Army. The leaders of Anyanya, particularly the late hero Deng Nhial, suggested that the young John Garang should go and continue his studies as the revolution would soon need educated young men. This took the young John to East Africa, where he visited and stayed in Uganda, and also taught in a high school in Nyeri, Kenya. From Kenya, he went to Tanzania where he first lived in Bushoto Refugee Camp, before going to the University of Dar es salaam where he became an assistant to Professor Walter Rodney.

                      The University of Dar-e salam is also where he met with current President Yoweri Museveni, and together formed a student organization called the University Students African Revolutionary Front (USARF). Through the help of missionary organizations, the late Dr. John was able to sit for and pass an international examination that awarded him a scholarship to Grinnell College in Iowa, USA. After completing his Bachelors of Arts Degree, he was offered a scholarship to University of California at Buckley; however, he chose to go back to Tanzania where he studied East African Agricultural Economics. In 1968 he rejoined the Anyanya Army fighting for the Independence of Southern Sudan.  In 1972 when the Addis Ababa Agreement was signed between the Government of Sudan (GoS) and the Anyanya, Dr. Johnhad attained the rank of Captain the Sudanese army and he was sent to Fort Benning in Georgia, USA, where he received a Masters in Military Science.

           He returned to Sudan and in 1976 married his beautiful wife, Mama Rebecca Nyandeng. Thereafter, Dr. John together with his wife, returned to America where he completed his PhD in Agricultural Economics from Iowa State University. He then returned to Sudan and worked briefly as the Deputy Director of Production at the General Head Quarters of the Sudan Armed Forces. He also taught at the University of Khartoum, Faculty of Agriculture. In 1983 when the Addis Ababa Agreement was violated and Sharia Law was decreed, the whole country was thrown in to turmoil.

            It was in the midst of this chaos that the late Dr. John emerged as a leader of the Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA), which then created the current Sudan Liberation Movement (SPLM).The Dr. John Garang International School is thus among the pioneer custodians of this legacy and is committed to training young Scholars that shall follow on the heels of this great man.

     DR.JOHN GARANG INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL (to be referred to as institution) DR.JOHN GARANG INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL is an institution founded in remembrance of the late DR. JOHN GARANG DEMABIOR.

http://www.drjohngaranginternationalschool.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=36&Itemid=37

Biography of the Late Dr. John Garang de-Mabior
June 23, 1945 – July 30, 2005


Date of Birth: June 23, 1945 (One of the 7 (Seven) siblings {5 brothers and 2 sisters} and Dr. Garang was the child # 6.

Place of Birth: Ajakgiet (Wagkulei Village) Jongley.

Parents of Dr. John Garang:
– Father: Mabior Atem Aroy
– Mother: Gag Maluwal Kwal: (From Knogor)

Education:
– 1952 Tonj Primary School.
– 1956 Buseri Intermediate School (Wau).
– 1960 Rumbek Senior Secondary School (Did not complete)
– 1962 Left for Uganda then Tanzania and sat for overseas
examination, after that he was granted a scholarship at Grinnell College in Iowa (USA) where he received a B. A. in economics in 1968. He was well known there for his bookishness. John Garang was offered another scholarship to pursue graduate studies at University of California at Barkley but chose to return to Tanzania and studied “East African Agricultural Economics” in Dar El-Salaam University were he met the current president of Uganda (Yoweri Kaguta Museveni) and became close friends.

- 1968 / 1969 Joined the Anya Nya One rebel movement which was led by General Joseph Lagu Yanga.

- 1972 After the Addis Ababa agreement, John Garang was absorbed in the Sudanese Army as a junior officer (Rank of Captain).

- 1973 John Garang went back to Tanzania and then to USA where he pursued his studies at the Iowa State University and received a master’s degree in Agricultural Economics.

- 1976 John Garang was married to his lovely wife Madam Rebecca Nyandeng in Juba, Sudan, but traditionally the marriage arrangements were done in their village.

- 1978 John Garang and his wife Madam Rebbeca Nyandeng came to the United States and John Garang continued with further studies and received a Ph. D. in economics in 1980 at Iowa State University, Iowa.

- 1980 Dr. John Garang went to Sudan and was a lecturer at the University of Khartoum, Faculty of Agriculture in “Shambat” (Khartoum), by then was also a colonel in the Sudanese Armed Forces.

- 1983 Dr. John Garang was sent by field marshal president Jafaar Mohammed Nimeri to crash a mutiny in Bor (His Home Town) of 500 southern Sudanese government soldiers known as Anya Nya Two, but he decided to join his colleagues (Samuel Gai Tut, William Nyuon and Keribino Kuanyin Bol) and then the name Anya Nya Two was changed to Sudan People’s Liberation Movement (SPLM) “Political Wing” and Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) “Military Wing” and that was in May 16, 1983 in Bilpaam. Dr. John Garang was welcomed and selected to lead the movement and became it’s chairman of SPLM and commander in chief of SPLA.- May 16, 1983 to January 8, 2005 Dr. John Garang waged a successful war against the Islamic Government of Sudan for almost 22 Years.- January 9, 2005 SPLM/A, And National Congress Party permanently signed Comprehensive Peace Agreement ending 21 years of war.

- July 9, 2005 Dr. John Garang was sworn in as the First southerner to hold the position of the first Vice President of the Republic of Sudan and at the same time the President of the government of southern Sudan (Dr. John Garang was appointed to these two positions by president Omer Hassan Ahmed El-Beshir according to the Comprehensive Peace Agreement “CPA”).

- July 30, 2005 Dr. John Garang passed away in a helicopter crash at the mountains ranch of Imatong in a place called Himan south of Lotukei in “Eastern Equaoria”.
Late Dr. Garang is survived with six children (2 Boys and 4 Girls).

Southern Sudan and indeed the whole of Sudan have lost its beloved son, Dr John Garang De Mabior.

Early Life

John Garang de Mabior (June 23, 1945 – July 30, 2005).

A member of the Dinka ethnic group, Garang was born into a poor family in Wanglei village in Bor, Sudan, in the upper Nile region of Sudan (currently Jonglei State). An orphan by the age of ten, he had his fees for school paid by a relative, going to schools in Wau and then Rumbek. In 1962 he joined the first Sudanese civil war, but because he was so young, the leaders encouraged him and others his age to seek an education. Because of the ongoing fighting, Garang was forced to attend his secondary education  in  Tanzania. After winning a scholarship, he went on to earn a B.A.  in  economics in 1969 from Grinnell College in Iowa, USA. He was known there for his bookishness. He was offered another scholarship to pursue graduate studies at the University of California, Berkeley. But chose to return to Tanzania and study East African agricultural economics as a Thomas J. Watson Fellow at the University of Dar es Salaam (UDSM). At UDSM, he was a member of the University Students’ African Revolutionary Front. However, Garang soon decided to return to Sudan and join the rebels. There is much erroneous reporting that Garang met and befriended Yoweri Museveni, future president ofUganda, at this time; while both Garang and Museveni were students at UDSM in the 1960s, they did not attend at the same time.

The civil war ended with the Addis Ababa agreement of 1972 and Garang, like many rebels, was absorbed into the Sudanese military. For eleven years, he was a career soldier and rose from the rank of captain to colonel after taking the Infantry Officers Advanced Course at Fort Benning, Georgia. During this period he took four years academic leave and received a master’s degree in agricultural economics and aPh.D. in economics at Iowa State University, after writing a thesis on the agricultural development of Southern Sudan. By 1983, Col. Garang was serving as senior instructor in the military academy in Wadi Sayedna 21 km from the centre of ( Omdurman )where he instructed the cadets for more than 4 years and later he nominated to serve in the military researchs department in the Army HQ in Khartoum.

Rebel Leader

In 1983, Garang went to Bor ostensibly to mediate with about 500 southern government soldiers in battalion 105 who were resisting being rotated to posts in the north. However, Garang was already part of a conspiracy among some officers in the Southern Command arranging for the defection of battalion 105 to the anti-government rebels. When the government attacked Bor in May and the battalion pulled out, Garang went by an alternate route to join them in the rebel stronghold in Ethiopia. By the end of July, Garang had brought over 3000 rebel soldiers under his control through the newly-created Sudan People’s Liberation Army/Movement (SPLA/M), which was opposed to military rule and Islamic dominance of the country, and encouraged other army garrisons to mutiny against the Islamic Law imposed on the country by the government. This action marked the commonly agreed upon beginning of the Second Sudanese Civil War, which resulted in one and half million deaths over twenty years of conflict. Although Garang was Christian and most of southern Sudan is non-Muslim (mostly animist), he did not initially focus on the religious aspects of the war.

The SPLA gained the backing of Libya, Uganda and Ethiopia. Garang and his army controlled a large part of the southern regions of the country, named New Sudan. He claimed his troops’ courage comes from “the conviction that we are fighting a just cause. That is something North Sudan and its people don’t have.” Critics suggested financial motivations to his rebellion, noting that much of Sudan’s oil wealth lies in the south of the country.

Garang refused to participate in the 1985 interim government or 1986 elections, remaining a rebel leader. However, the SPLA and government signed a peace agreement on 9 January 2005 in Nairobi, Kenya. On 9 July 2005, he was sworn in as vice-president, the second most powerful person in the country, following a ceremony in which he and President Omar al-Bashir signed a power-sharing constitution. He also became the administrative head of a southern Sudan with limited autonomy for the six years before a scheduled referendum of possible secession. No Christian or southerner had ever held such a high government post. Commenting after the ceremony, Garang stated, “I congratulate the Sudanese people, this is not my peace or the peace of al-Bashir, it is the peace of the Sudanese people.”

As a leader, John Garangs’ democratic credentials were often questioned. For example, according to Gill Lusk “John Garang did not tolerate dissent and anyone who disagreed with him was either imprisoned or killed”. Under his leadership, the SPLA was accused of human rights abuses.

The ideological profile of SPLA was as shadowy as Mr Garang himself. He varied from Marxism to drawingsupport from Christian fundamentalists in the US.

The United States State Department argued that Garang’s presence in the government would have helped solve the Darfur conflict in western Sudan, but others consider these claims “excessively optimistic”

Death

In late July 2005, Garang died after the Ugandan presidential Mi-172 helicopter he was flying in crashed. He had been returning from a meeting in Rwakitura with long-time ally President Yoweri Museveni of Uganda. He did not tell the Sudanese government that he was going to this meeting and so did not take the presidential plane. To this day nobody knows with whom Garang had met. Sudanese state television initially reported that Garang’s craft had landed safely, but Abdel Basset Sabdarat, the country’s Information Minister, went on TV hours later to deny the report. Actually, it was Yasir Arman, the SPLA/M spokesman who told the government that Garang plane had landed safely. His intention was to save time for internal arrangements in SPLA before Garang’s death was known. Garang’s plane crashed on a Friday and so remained missing for the following Saturday. During this time the government believed he was in Southern Sudan.

Soon afterwards, a statement released by the office of Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir confirmed that a Ugandan presidential helicopter crashed into “a mountain range in southern Sudan because of poor visibility and this resulted in the death of Dr. John Garang DeMabior, six of his colleagues and seven Ugandan crew members.” His body was flown to New Site, a southern Sudanese settlement near the scene of the crash, where former rebel fighters and civilian supporters gathered to pay their respects to Garang. Garang’s funeral took place on August 3 in Juba. His widow Rebecca Nyandeng de Mabior  promised to continue his work stating “In our culture we say, if you kill the lion, you see what the lioness will do.”

Both the Sudanese government and the head of the SPLA blamed the weather for the accident. There are, however, doubts as to the truth of this, especially amongst the rank-and-file of the SPLA. Yoweri Museveni, the Ugandan president, claims that the possibility of “external factors” having played a role could not be eliminated.

Considered instrumental in ending the Civil War, the effect of Garang’s death upon the peace deal is uncertain. The government declared three days of national mourning, which did not stop large scale rioting in Khartoum which killed at least 24 as youths from southern Sudan attacked northern Sudanese and clashed with security forces. After three days of violence, the death toll had risen to 84. Unrest was also reported in other parts of the country. Leading members of the SPLM, including Garang’s successor Salva Kiir Mayardit, stated that the peace process would continue. Analysts suggested that the death could result in anything from a new democratic openness in the SPLA, which some have criticized for being overly dominated by Garang, to an outbreak of open warfare between the various southern factions that Garang had brought together.

Source

Garang, John 1987 John Garang Speaks. M. Khalid, ed. London: Kegan Paul International.

Wikipedia (2005). “John Garang”  Wikipedia, the online encyclopedia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Garang

Accessed September 15, 2010.

The First Vice President of the Republic of Sudan and the President of South Sudan was on official visit to Uganda during the period 29th – 30th July 2005 when the helicopter he was traveling in crashed near New Kush on his return last Saturday.

John Garang de Mabior (June 23, 1945 – July 30, 2005).  By the time of his birth, his parents were looking for shelter…. Dr. Mabior. Born in Wagkulei, Bor, Sudan. One of 7 siblings. Attended Tonj Primary School, 1952. Buseri Intermediate School, 1956. Rumbek Senior Secondary School, 1960. In 1962, went to Uganda then Tanzania. Took overseas examinations and granted a scholarship at Crinnel College in Iowa, USA. Receved a B.A in Economics, 1968. Granted another scholarship for graduate studies at University of California but chose to return to Tanzania. Continued studying Economics. Met current Uganda President Yoweri Kaguta Museveni. Became close friends with Yoweri Kaguta Museveni. Went to South Sudan. Joined Anya Nya One rebel movement, 1968-1969. Became Junior Officer (Captain), 1972. Returned to Tanzania, 1973, and then to the US. Economics in Iowa State University. Received a master’s degree in Agricultural Economics. Went back to Juba, Sudan. Got Married to Rebecca Nyandeng, 1976. Went to the US. Continued studies at Iowa State University. Recieved Ph. D. in Economics, 1980. Returned to Sudan, Khartoum. Worked as a Lecturer at the University of Khartoum. Dr. John Garang was then sent to Bor by Presiden Jafaar Nimeri to crash a mutiny of 500 Southern Sudanese known as Anya Nya Two. When in Bor, he decided to join the 500 Southerners. Shortly after, the name was changed from Anya Nya Two, to Sudan People’s Liberation Movement (SPLM) “Plitical Wing” and Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) “Military Wing,” 1983. Again, shortly after, Dr. John Garang was selected to lead the movement. He was the Chairman of SPLM and the Commander in Chief of SPLA, 1983. SPLM/A, with the leadership of Dr. Mabior, brought about the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) in 2005 – after a two-decade civil war. After the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, Dr. Mabior was sworn in as the First Vice President of Sudan. He was also the President of South Sudan. Six months into his Presidency. Dr. Mabior meets with his long-time ally Yoweri, the Presidend of Uganda. After the meeting, the President’s Mi-172 helicopter attempts to take Dr. Mabior back. The helicopter is reported missing. The helicopter is reported to have landed safely. Then again the helicopter is reported missing. Dr. John Garang de Mabior’s death is announced. Chaos! ….By the time of his death, he was the President.

PAN-AFRICAN POSTCARD

Killing of John Garang: Who did it?

Tajudeen Abdul-Raheem

2007-06-28,

“When my husband died, I did not come out openly and say he was killed because I knew the consequences. At the back of my mind, I knew my husband had been assassinated”

Those were the chilling words of Mrs. Rebecca Garang, the widow of the late Liberation fighter, Dr (Col) John Garang de Mabior, leader of the SPLA/M who was killed on July 30 2005 in a helicopter crash on the borders of Uganda, Kenya and Sudan. The helicopter he was traveling in belonged to President Yoweri Museveni, Dr Garang’s closest ally and comrade.

I was one of many people who refused to accept the immediate conclusion then that it was an accident. Not because we missed Garang too much and found it impossible to let go which we did but because the explanation was too obvious.

If anyone wanted to kill Garang (and there were many forces) there was no better cover for an almost perfect crime than for him to be traveling unofficially in the helicopter of his closest ally. Since Khartoum did not officially know that he was leaving the capital anyone of the many vested interests who felt threatened by Garang’s messianic entry into Khartoum early in July that trip provided your best opportunity.

Mrs. Garang has now thrown open widely what many had been suspecting. All the inquiries so far have ‘concluded’ that it is pilot error, bad weather, and other technical conclusions but the dearth was political.

So who could have done it?

My first suspect was and remains the extremist wing of the government and Northern hegemonists in the security and intelligence of the country. Their heart must have shook and their desperation further heightened by the tumultuous welcome from all Sudanese commitment to creating a New Sudan when he arrived in Khartoum to be sworn in July 9 2005. They must have seen their world collapsing before their eyes. A Black prophet arising from the South must seem like end of the world for them. Garang was not the first Black Sudanese to have been made Vice President. Khartoum has had a succession of Black poodles willing to be tools of misrule against their people and the whole of Sudan. But in John Garang, a formidable personality who had distinguished himself both militarily and politically the hegemonists shook at what would happen to their rule were Garang to have the opportunity to reshape the country because Garang could be no one’s errand boy. For Sudanese democrats he was a bridge of hope with the potential of turning the country into a genuinely democratic environment where Sudanese might, in the Martin Luther King hope , ‘ be judged not by the color of their skin but by the content of their character ‘ . The enemies of hope had to act and act quickly before goodness broke out in a country that has been in conflict for most of its post independence (1956) existence.

Khartoum is not the only suspect in Garang’s death. Chief amongst other suspects could be extremist wing of Southern Nationalists whose agenda was to secede from Sudan and may have great fears that Dr John’s commitment to creating a New Sudan uniting the North and the South was a betrayal. Plausible but not probable. They needed Garang and backed him in the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) which gave them the option of full independence by referendum in the course of the 6 year term of the agreement.

Mrs. Garang is herself a believer in Southern Sudan Independence, and between her and her husband they agree to disagree on this issue therefore it is highly unlikely that Southern nationalists killed Dr John.

Mrs. Garang made her public disclosure at an award ceremony by the Jaramogi Oginga Odinga Foundation (JOOF) in Nairobi, Kenya. The late John Garang had been honored with a posthumous Uhuru Award for his contribution to the liberation struggles of Africa. Prof. Dani Wadada Nabudere was the guest speaker on the theme of CONFLICT AS A CATALYST FOR CHANGE.

It was not just about her husband’s death that Mrs. Garang spoke. Her speech also touched on a number of sensitive issues across Africa. One of them is how we treat. Partners of our heroes. Often they are not seen as persons in their own right. They may have been married to heroes but some of them have a place in the struggle in their own rights. Mrs. Garang spoke from the heart but not as a grieving widow rather as a combatant. She disclosed the embarrassing fact that that award by the JOOF was the first time that Dr John was being honored by an African organization. What doe this tells us about the way in which we treat our heroes and heroines. Garang was the recipient of many awards from all kinds of people in Europe ands North America but his first ward from Africa is posthumous and even then from an Independent foundation. Is this yet another case of a prophet having honor but not in his village or not in his life time?

* Tajudeen Abdul-Raheem is the deputy director of the UN Millennium Campaign in Africa, based in Nairobi, Kenya. He writes this article in his personal capacity as a concerned pan-Africanist.

Tribute to Garang death: http://www.videosurf.com/video/tribute-to-dr-john-garang-de-mabior-9610909?vlt=

http://www.videosurf.com/video/tribute-to-dr-john-garang-de-mabior-9610909?vlt=

http://www.videosurf.com/video/dr-john-garang-new-sudan-speech-part-1-4-120450816?vlt=

SPLM/A Leadership Biography

The line of succession was already detemined by each individual’s senior in the POLITICO- MILITARY HIGH COMMAND. Below is the list according to their seniority
1. Cdr Dr John Garang,
2. Cdr Kerubino Kuanyin Bol
3. Cdr Wlliam Nyuon Bany
4. Cdr Salva Kiir Mayardit
5. Cdr Arok Thon Arok
6 Cdr Nyacigak Nyaculuk
7. Cdr John Kualng
8. Cdr Dr Reik Machar Teny
9. Cdr Dr Lam Akol Ajawin
10 Cdr Yusif Kwa Mekki
11. Cdr James Wani Igga
12.Cdr Daniel Awet Akot
13. Cdr Kuol Manyang Juk
14. Cdr Martin Manyiel Ayuel
15. Cdr Lual Diing Wol
16. Cdr Gelario M

Salva Kiir Mayardit 

 

First Vice President of the Sudan

President of South Sudan

“SPLM/A will remain united and strive to faithfully implement the comprehensive peace agreement.”Yoweri Kaguta Museveni.

President of Uganda. 

Long-time ally and friend

“Possibility of external factors having played a role could not be eliminated.” President Muserveni on the death of Dr. Mabior.

Peter Moszynski, a Sudan specialist who covered the war for many years. 25 years’ experience in Sudan.

 August 3, 2005

“Becoming Vice President after 22 years, leading a guerrilla army in the bushes, John Garang was an expert in survival: someone who knew how to bend with the wind yet maintain his political objectives, someone who knew how to seem all things to all men.”

George W Bush 

President of the United States of America

White House

August 1, 2005

 “I was deeply saddened to learn of the death of Sudanese First Vice President Dr. John Garang de Mabior. He was a visionary leader and peacemaker who helped bring about the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, which is a beacon of hope for all Sudanese.”

Rebeca de Mabior

The widow of Dr. John Garang de Mabior.

Currently one of the advisors of the President of SS.

 

   “Wh

o killed my 

husband?”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hope Page Picture

The First Vice President of the Republic of Sudan and the President of South Sudan was on official visit to Uganda during the period 29th – 30th July 2005 when the helicopter he was traveling in crashed near New Kush on his return last Saturday.

Dr. Mabior’s Death

Garang’s death was a blow to the people of Sudan and to those in northern Uganda who would have benefited from his promised clamp down on the murderous Lord’s Resistance Army that terrorized the region.

I have to wonder whether or not Garang’s death an accident? He somehow survived a 21-year civil war but, when peace came, died in an aircraft mishap? I’m suspicious. And, so are others.

Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni for the first time has publicly stated that the “accident” may not be what it seems. “Some people say accident, it may be an accident, it may be something else,” he told Garang mourners.

But I assure you that if the investigation finds that it was a result of foul play, the perpetrators will pay,” Museveni was quoted as saying in another report. He said SPLA, Ugandan, US, Russian and Kenyan investigators visited the crash site, inspected the bodies and recovered the black box. He said former army commander Maj. Gen. James Kazini oversees the Ugandan team.

Museveni also announced the formation of a panel of three experts to probe the accident that claimed Garang’s life. “We have also approached a certain foreign government to rule out any form of sabotage or terrorism,” he said.

Ironically, although Museveni was reportedly a long-time friend and ally of Garang, some suggest that negligence on his part and other Ugandan official contributed to Garang’s tragic demise. Ugandan parliamentarian Aggrey Awori told reporter William Eagle that the Ugandan government does not seem to have followed proper procedures with regard to the doomed flight.

They took off after hours, definitely. According to CAA regulations, no rotor aircraft, [like a] helicopter, can take off after 5 pm for any destination lasting more than one hour,”he explained. And Awori said Museveni should have advised his Garang to stay in Kampala, or to cut short their mid-afternoon meeting so Mr. Garang could arrive home before nightfall.

Museveni also shut down a popular FM radio station after it aired a program discussing theories about the crash, including some that blamed the Ugandan government.

Sudan authority Eric Reeves in an interview with Adnkronos International (AKI) stated there may be more to the story than meets the eye. “There’s a clear possibility that sabotage was involved,” Reeves said, noting how the SPLA wants a full investigation on Saturday’s crash before making any announcement on the allegations.

UPI reported that a senior ai\de to Garang is requesting an investigation.

Deng Alor, a senior member of Garang`s rebel movement, the Sudan People`s Liberation Army/Movement, refused to say if the plane crash was accidental or the result of a sabotage.

“We do not rule out any possibility, and that is why we are asking for an investigation,” Alor told UPI in a telephone interview from southern Sudan.

CNS News notes the potential link and subsequent speculation regarding the LRA:

Although no reports have suggested foul play in the crash, speculation will likely arise in the days ahead that a notorious Ugandan rebel group, the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), may have shot down the helicopter.

Operating from bases in southern Sudan — allegedly with past support from Khartoum — the LRA has for some 18 years been fighting to overthrow the Ugandan government. It is notorious for vicious tactics including the abduction of thousands of children forced to become soldiers or concubines for rebels.

A joint commission between the northern Sudanese government and Garang’s Sudan People  Liberation Movement (SPLM) was formed to investigate the causes of the crash and officials have said they welcome any input from the U.N. or other international experts. Considering that northern Sudan has a terrible track record full of human rights violations and would certainly welcome the demise of the SPLM, it is incumbent upon those overseeing the peace process to provide “input” and, even better, accountability.

In addition, there are also powerful international forces vying for influence in this oil rich country of Sudan.

While there exists speculation tied to the vested interest of certain governments and groups to silence Garang the reality is that no evidence has been reported to the outside world that would substantiate any claim of foul play. As I mentioned, I’m suspicious but only because of the unusual timing of the crash, the inherent corruption of the Sudanese government and the numerous individuals and groups who had motivation to assasinate Garang.

Eric Reeve Writes,

The NIF will continue to sustain genocide by attrition in Darfur, even as it welcomes the destabilizing possibilities presented by the death of John Garang. The new leader of the SPLM, Salva Kiir Mayardit, will face severe testing, with all too many possible venues in the south and in Khartoum for such trial. As the authoritative “Africa Confidential” observes in its August 5, 2005 edition:

“The [NIF] regime may not have caused the crash [that killed Garang] but could not have wished for more. It will redouble its efforts to deepen Southern divisions, convinced that Garang’s successors won’t withstand its mixture of military attack, disinformation, and financial inducements.” (“Africa Confidential,” Vol 46, No 16, August 5, 2005).

There were also signs, prior to Garang’s death, that the National Congress Party [the ruling faction of the National Islamic Front] was seeking to undercut implementation of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement through its uses of the militias (the South Sudan Defense Forces), bribery, and through the tactics of divide and rule. [ICG, July 25, 2005]

Biography of the Late Dr. John Garang de-Mabior
June 23, 1945 – July 30, 2005



Date of Birth: June 23, 1945 (One of the 7 (Seven) siblings {5 brothers and 2 sisters} and Dr. Garang was the child # 6.

Place of Birth: Ajakgiet (Wagkulei Village) Jongley.

Parents of Dr. John Garang:
– Father: Mabior Atem Aroy
– Mother: Gag Maluwal Kwal: (From Knogor)

Education:
– 1952 Tonj Primary School.
– 1956 Buseri Intermediate School (Wau).
– 1960 Rumbek Senior Secondary School (Did not complete)
– 1962 Left for Uganda then Tanzania and sat for overseas
examination, after that he was granted a scholarship at Grinnell College in Iowa (USA) where he received a B. A. in economics in 1968. He was well known there for his bookishness. John Garang was offered another scholarship to pursue graduate studies at University of California at Barkley but chose to return to Tanzania and studied “East African Agricultural Economics” in Dar El-Salaam University were he met the current president of Uganda (Yoweri Kaguta Museveni) and became close friends.

- 1968 / 1969 Joined the Anya Nya One rebel movement which was led by General Joseph Lagu Yanga.

- 1972 After the Addis Ababa agreement, John Garang was absorbed in the Sudanese Army as a junior officer (Rank of Captain).

- 1973 John Garang went back to Tanzania and then to USA where he pursued his studies at the Iowa State University and received a master’s degree in Agricultural Economics.

- 1976 John Garang was married to his lovely wife Madam Rebecca Nyandeng in Juba, Sudan, but traditionally the marriage arrangements were done in their village.

- 1978 John Garang and his wife Madam Rebbeca Nyandeng came to the United States and John Garang continued with further studies and received a Ph. D. in economics in 1980 at Iowa State University, Iowa.

- 1980 Dr. John Garang went to Sudan and was a lecturer at the University of Khartoum, Faculty of Agriculture in “Shambat” (Khartoum), by then was also a colonel in the Sudanese Armed Forces.

- 1983 Dr. John Garang was sent by field marshal president Jafaar Mohammed Nimeri to crash a mutiny in Bor (His Home Town) of 500 southern Sudanese government soldiers known as Anya Nya Two, but he decided to join his colleagues (Samuel Gai Tut, William Nyuon and Keribino Kuanyin Bol) and then the name Anya Nya Two was changed to Sudan People’s Liberation Movement (SPLM) “Political Wing” and Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) “Military Wing” and that was in May 16, 1983 in Bilpaam. Dr. John Garang was welcomed and selected to lead the movement and became it’s chairman of SPLM and commander in chief of SPLA.

- May 16, 1983 to January 8, 2005 Dr. John Garang waged a successful war against the Islamic Government of Sudan for almost 22 Years.

- January 9, 2005 SPLM/A, And National Congress Party permanently signed Comprehensive Peace Agreement ending 21 years of war.

- July 9, 2005 Dr. John Garang was sworn in as the First southerner to hold the position of the first Vice President of the Republic of Sudan and at the same time the President of the government of southern Sudan (Dr. John Garang was appointed to these two positions by president Omer Hassan Ahmed El-Beshir according to the Comprehensive Peace Agreement “CPA”).

- July 30, 2005 Dr. John Garang passed away in a helicopter crash at the mountains ranch of Imatong in a place called Himan south of Lotukei in “Eastern Equaoria”.
Late Dr. Garang is survived with six children (2 Boys and 4 Girls).

Southern Sudan and indeed the whole of Sudan have lost its beloved son, Dr John Garang De Mabior. The First Vice President of the Republic of Sudan and the President of South Sudan was on official visit to Uganda during the period 29th – 30th July 2005 when the helicopter he was traveling in crashed near New Kush on his return last Saturday.

SPLM/A Leadership Biography

The line of succession was already detemined by each individual’s senior in the POLITICO- MILITARY HIGH COMMAND. Below is the list according to their seniority
1. Cdr Dr John Garang,
2. Cdr Kerubino Kuanyin Bol
3. Cdr Wlliam Nyuon Bany
4. Cdr Salva Kiir Mayardit
5. Cdr Arok Thon Arok
6 Cdr Nyacigak Nyaculuk
7. Cdr John Kualng
8. Cdr Dr Reik Machar Teny
9. Cdr Dr Lam Akol Ajawin
10 Cdr Yusif Kwa Mekki
11. Cdr James Wani Igga
12.Cdr Daniel Awet Akot
13. Cdr Kuol Manyang Juk
14. Cdr Martin Manyiel Ayuel
15. Cdr Lual Diing Wol
16. Cdr Gelario M

http://www.gurtong.org/GarangTribute/Biographyof_LateDr.JohnGarangde-Mabior.asp

John Garang de Mabior

Leader and Founder of the Sudan People’s Liberation Army

By , About.com Guide

Colonel John Garang de Mabior was a Sudanese rebel leader, founder of the Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) which fought a 22 year civil war against the northern dominated, Islamist Sudanese Government. Was made vice president of Sudan on the signing of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement in 2005, shortly before his death.

Date of birth: 23 June 1945, Wangkulei, Anglo-Egyptian Sudan
Date of death: 30 July 2005, southern Sudan.

John Garang was born into the Dinka ethnic group, educated in Tanzania and graduated from Grinnell College in Iowa in 1969. He returned to The Sudan and joined the Sudanese army, but left the following year for the south and joined the Anya Nya, a rebel group fighting for the rights of the Christian and animist south, in a country which was dominated by the Islamist north. The rebellion, which was sparked by the decision made by the colonial British to join the two parts of Sudan when independence was granted in 1956, became a full blown civil war in the early 1960s.

1972 Addis Ababa Agreement
In 1972 the Sudanese president, Jaafar Muhammad an-Numeiry, and Joseph Lagu, leader of the Anya Nya, signed the Addis Ababa Agreement which gave autonomy to the south. Rebel fighters, including John Garang, were absorbed into the Sudanese army.

Garang was promoted to Colonel and sent to Fort Benning, Georgia, USA, for training. He also received a doctorate in agricultural economics from Iowa State University in 1981. On his return to The Sudan he was made deputy director of military research and an infantry battalion commander.

Second Sudanese Civil War
By the early 1980s the Sudanese government was becoming increasingly Islamist (introduction of Sharia law throughout Sudan, an imposition of black slavery by northern Arabs, and Arabic being made the official language of instruction), and when Garang was sent south to quell a new uprising by the Anya Nya, he instead swapped sides and formed the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement (SPLM) and their military wing the SPLA.

2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement
In 2002 Garang began peace talks with Sudanese president Omar al-Hasan Ahmad al-Bashir, which culminated in the signing of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement on 9 January 2005. As part of the agreement Garang was made vice president of Sudan. However, only a few months later, on 30 July, a helicopter carrying Garang back from talks with the president of Uganda crashed in the mountains near the border. Although both Al-Bashir’s government and Salva Kiir Mayardit, the new leader of the SPLM, blamed the crash on poor visibility, doubts remain about the crash.

http://africanhistory.about.com/od/biography/a/John-Garang-De-Mabior.htm

Birth of A New Nation

Monday, 11 July 2011 00:00 Editorial Team
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Before the birth of Africa’s 54th newest nation on July 9, 2011, the man who, for over two decades, is credited for unleashing a rebellion for an independent state for Southern Sudan, Dr. John Garang  in one of his interviews with BBC’s Robin White upon being inflicted a massive crushing blow which claimed huge deaths on his SPLA in a battle, and when asked  following such loss of lives, to call  it a day and devise a new method outside the military posture, the late SPLA’s strongman proudly and robustly told Robin White that his  men (rebels) are like fish under the water, no matter how many you kill, they can never finish from under the water.

Finding the expression to become the backbone of the embodiment of the world’s 193rd country on July 9, 2011, and although he was killed in a tragic helicopter crash in 2005 upon signing a ceasefire with his archrival;  and like Paul Coffee (the first free negro who did not realize his dreams as a result of death),  he died  before his plan was realized; yet he remains the shining and indelible imprint at the heart, body, mind and soul of the new country-In short, he stands as the most dominant gene in the DNA structure of the new Southern Sudan nation.

Like any nation on earth that has fought for independence, for the new country, it equally took blood, sweat, tears and deaths to arrive at this point of freedom, independence and self-rule. They too know the bitter and the essence of independence which is all about land; and how did it come about…through bloodshed.

As Malcolm X once said that the essence of independence is land- the landlords vs. the landless, and how did it come about…through bloodshed. The Independence of July 4, 1776 was all about land, and how did it come about, through bloodshed as well as others which stormed Africa and Asia as well as some parts of the world during the terrifying colonial golden era.

Reports simmering from Southern Sudan reflect the presence of over 10,000 people including high profile dignitaries and heads of state who are bracing the freshness of the birth of a new nation with joy and happiness punctuated by mind captivating political and nationalistic speeches with the new  National Anthem thundering all over the place, the struggle of the SLPA and its quest for an independent homeland has become a living dream with the bones of Dr. Garang and other patriots gladly and gallantly turning in their respective graves.

On this auspicious occasion, we hesitate not to caution the revolutionary people of Southern Sudan that the price of independence, freedom and self-rule was not achieved on a silver platter nor was it obtained by sudden flight, and as such, should remain mindful and keep on the red alert to ensure that that vices that ruin the cardinal fabrics of a promising nation do not infest their wisdom, knowledge and sense of belonging to reduce their hard earned and newest sensation to the level of becoming a failed state due to greed, selfishness and autocratic tendencies.

We make it no secret about the daunting problem and task ahead in building the capacity of a trained, professional and vibrant civil servants and in order to make progress in that direction; all those at the helm of authority must embrace and welcome with open arms and hearts those brothers and sisters in the Diaspora who are well schooled in the various crafts and trade in nation building including those who mean well for the genuine growth and development for the new nation.

Treacherous tactics, chicanery and maneuvers designed to frustrate their efforts must be immediately thwarted in the supreme interest and spirit of greater, better and prosperous Southern Sudan that will proudly serve as a beacon of hope and dignity on the continent. A route to that end is the total discouragement and if possible the abolition of a one party state, entertainment of a class system or elitism to dominate and influence the politico-socio-economic and cultural spheres of the society.

Let not the honeymoon of independence continues perpetually; the line must be drawn so that Christmas will only be Christmas and business is business and avoid combining both time after time.  We reiterate our caution, be open-minded and receptive to the accommodation of those in the Diaspora including the experienced professionals and technocrats in order to build the solid foundation of the new nation.

Strive, and make it a must, to end and discourage unsavory practices in both government and business. At this juncture we pause to allow carrying on your celebration of the beauty of independence coupled with its attending kudos. We say bravo and hats off to you all dear brothers and sisters, as we hail the birth of a new nation.