Posts Tagged ‘sudan’

Oil begins to flow again in 14 days

Posted: November 3, 2012 by PaanLuel Wël in Economy
Tags: , ,

KHARTOUM — South Sudan will resume the exportation of oil production within two weeks, a Sudanese official said following a series of meetings in Juba with government officials and petroleum companies.
Sudanese undersecretary general of Petroleum Ministry, Awad Abdel Fatah, agreed with South Sudanese oil deputy minister Elizabeth James Bol to resume oil production within 14 days, according to Khartoum based Al-Sudani daily newspaper.
The two officials agreed in Juba on Wednesday to meet again in the Sudanese capital within ten days to finalise the arrangements related the resumption of oil exportation through the pipeline.
The Sudanese official further said that oil operators were informed of the decision.
Last October South Sudanese oil minister Dhieu Dau announced that he ordered oil companies to restart oil production, adding the crude will reach the international markets within 3 months.
He however cautioned that technical preparations will determine the export schedule.
Sudan and South Sudan signed formally on 27 September an agreement on oil fees transportation. In accordance with the deal, Juba will pay Khartoum pay $9.10 and $11.00 per barrel respectively for the oil produced in Upper Nile and Unity states during three and a half years.
The two countries have to meet soon to resume talks over the remaining issues particularly Abyei and disputed areas on the common border. Also a joint security committee is to meet during the upcoming days to discuss troops redeployment from the buffer zone and its operationalisation.
It is not clear how many barrels will be produced per day. However, Dar Petroleum Company operating in Upper Nile state pledged following Addis Ababa deal to increase its production to 180.000 bpd.
Dar, which is a consortium including Chinese, Malaysian and South Sudanese oil companies, produce usually between 203,000 and 250,000 bpd.

 


Press Release
28th September 2012

Sudan and South Sudan’s new oil deal fails to guarantee citizens the basic information they need to hold their governments accountable for the vast amounts of money involved, said Global Witness today.

After several years of negotiations, Sudan and South Sudan yesterday signed a series of landmark agreements, including one on the terms under which South Sudan will export its crude oil via Sudan’s pipelines and port. [1] Both countries are heavily reliant on oil revenues and have previously fought for control of oil fields either side of their common border. While the new agreement establishes mechanisms for internal information sharing and auditing, it includes no requirements for transit and financial data or audit reports to be made public. This lack of public accountability is particularly concerning given the allegations of high-level corruption that both governments are facing.

“Sudan and South Sudan’s citizens are the ultimate owners of their countries’ natural resources,” said Global Witness campaigner Dana Wilkins. “Yet they have been totally cut out of this new oil deal, with no way to verify the amount of oil and money that will be transferred between their governments.”

The fees paid by South Sudan for use of Sudan’s processing facilities, pipelines, and port will range between US$9.10 and US$11 per barrel, depending on the route by which the crude oil is piped out. Juba has also agreed to transfer an additional US$3 billion to help Khartoum fill the gap in its finances caused by the loss of oil reserves now controlled by South Sudan.

The new oil deal establishes a Petroleum Monitoring Committee including representatives from both governments and an independent chairperson appointed by the African Union. This Committee will be responsible for monitoring the operational and financial implementation of the arrangement. [2]  Sudan and South Sudan also agreed to appoint an independent auditor to report on the operating companies and identify any problems.

Though the Committee and the independent auditor are potentially very useful mechanisms for building trust between the governments, neither is required to publish anything. Unless their reports and the relevant production and payment data are publicly disclosed, it will be impossible for citizens even to check whether these oversight mechanisms are working.

The new agreement also includes an article on transparency. However, this only requires that the Sudanese and South Sudanese governments be ‘mutually transparent’; each sharing relevant information with the other.

“The absence of real transparency—meaning full public disclosure—in this new deal could have long-term consequences for democracy and stability in both countries,” added Wilkins. “South Sudan has included many strong public reporting and accounting requirements in its new legal framework. It is now all the more important that these are implemented without further delay.  For its part, Khartoum should put in place public disclosure laws that enable Sudanese citizens to see how their leaders are spending their country’s share of the oil wealth.”

http://www.globalwitness.org/library/public-accountability-absent-new-sudan-and-south-sudan-oil-deal

Bashir says Sudan, South Sudan need peace: Mbeki

Posted: May 19, 2012 by PaanLuel Wël in Junub Sudan
Tags: ,

Sudan says receives “large amount” of hard currency
Reuters
Sudan’s economy has been battered since the country lost three-quarters of its oil production toSouth Sudan when the latter became independent in July. The loss of oil revenues, the main source of state income and dollar inflows, has hit the pound 
South Sudan Cautioned On Heavy Borrowing
Oye! Times
An oil field in Unity State, South Sudan [File photo | Gurtong]An international movement, the Global Witness has issues the alert following the shutdown of oil production in the country early this year. According to a report released Friday, 
Bashir says SudanSouth need peace: Mbeki
AFP
By Abdelmoneim Abu Edris Ali (AFP) – 56 minutes ago KHARTOUM, Sudan — Sudan and South Sudan need peace and Khartoum is committed to all security agreements it has signed, African Union mediator Thabo Mbeki on Saturday quoted the Sudanese leader as
Sudanese Authorities Close Christian Offices in South Darfur
The Cypress Times
by Dan Wooding SOUTH DARFUR, SUDAN – (ANS) – Compass Direct News (CDN) is reporting that security agents in Sudan’s South Darfur state have closed down the Nyala offices of the SudanCouncil of Churches (SCC) and relief group Sudan Aid, sources said.
Reuters Canada – ‎
KHARTOUM (Reuters) – Sudan’s President Omar Hassan al-Bashir said Sudan wants a lasting peace with South Sudan but Juba needs to end support for rebels in Sudan’s border land, state news agency SUNA said on Saturday. Oil, security and frontier disputes 
AFP – ‎
By Abdelmoneim Abu Edris Ali (AFP) – 1 hour ago KHARTOUM, Sudan — Sudan and South Sudan need peace and Khartoum is committed to all security agreements it has signed, African Union mediator Thabo Mbeki on Saturday quoted the Sudanese leader as saying 
Capital FM Kenya -
CAIRO, May 19 – Arab League chief Nabil al-Arabi will travel to Sudan on Sunday, following a request from Khartoum for help over South Sudan’s invasion of the Heglig oilfield, Arabi’s deputy said. Arabi will hold talks with President Omar al-Bashir and 
Ahram Online -
Sudan will allow foreign exchange bureaux and banks to trade dollars at a level close to the black market rate, effectively devaluing the pound, a senior banking official said on Friday. Sudan’s economy has been battered since the country lost 
AngolaPress -
JUBA – The United Nations should impose sanctions on Sudan for failing to obey a Security Council resolution calling for an end to hostilities and renewed negotiations with South Sudan over oil and border disputes, South Sudan’s negotiator said on 
Gulf Daily News -
KHARTOUM: Sudan, hit by an economic crisis since losing crucial oil revenues, will effectively devalue the pound by allowing foreign exchange bureaux to trade dollars at a level away from the official rate. Sudan’s economy has been battered since the 
The Hindu – ‎May 18, 2012‎
An unexploded bomb sticks out of the earth. Foxholes have been dug by aid workers fearing more air strikes from Sudan. Streams of hungry refugees are pouring in. The Yida camp near the militarised Sudan-South Sudan border now holds 31000 Nuba refugees 
CNN – ‎May 18, 2012‎
A Sudanese soldier stands atop a destroyed tank for Sudan People’s Liberation Army of South Sudan in Heglig on April 23, 2012. See more on the interview with Kenya’s prime minister Raila Odinga and the conflict in Sudan on Market Place Africa today at 
AngolaPress – ‎May 18, 2012‎
KHARTOUM – African Union mediator Thabo Mbeki arrived in Khartoum on Thursday to help push Sudan and South Sudan back to talks, which were suspended after border fighting last month, an AFP reporter said. Mbeki left the VIP terminal at Khartoum’s 
Haaretz – ‎May 18, 2012‎
Developments so far in South Sudan point to a country plagued by tribalism, government authoritarianism and disastrous economic policies. By Aymenn Jawad Al-Tamimi | May.18, 2012 | 2:38 AM When the state of South Sudan came into existence last July, 
Voice of America (blog) – ‎May 17, 2012‎
The United Nations Security Council is demanding Sudan withdraw its troops from the disputed region of Abyei and that it reach an agreement with South Sudan on the status of the oil-rich border region. The council on Thursday extended the UN security 
Reuters Africa – ‎May 17, 2012‎
By Michelle Nichols UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) – The UN Security Council demanded on Thursday that Sudan immediately and unconditionally withdraw troops from the disputed Abyei border region but Khartoum pledged only to do so after a joint military 
New York Times – ‎May 17, 2012‎
The United Nations Security Council on Thursday called on Sudan and South Sudan to reach an agreement on the status of the disputed, oil-rich Abyei border region and extended the United Nations security force’s mission there by six months.
News24 – ‎May 17, 2012‎
Sudan has stepped up harassment of journalists and increased censorship in the wake of fighting with South Sudan, Human Rights Watch says. Khartoum – Sudan has stepped up harassment of journalists and increased censorship in the wake of fighting with 
New Vision – ‎May 17, 2012‎
By Joyce Namutebi Parliament will send a delegation to Khartoum and to Juba in a bid to find a solution to the tension between the two neighbours. The deputy Speaker, Jacob Oulanyah, made the disclosure during a meeting with a delegation of MPs from 
Zee News – ‎May 17, 2012‎
New York: The Security Council called for an agreement between Sudan and South Sudan on the status of the disputed, oil-rich border region of Abyei and extended the UN security force’s mission there by six months. Calling the situation along the 
San Francisco Chronicle – ‎May 17, 2012‎
Yida, South Sudan — First they ate leaves. Then they ate roots, soaked for five days and boiled until they were just edible. Now many have eaten the planting seed – and their future with it. There is no food left in the Nuba Mountains, so the stream 
BBC News – ‎May 17, 2012‎
Former South African President Thabo Mbeki has arrived in Khartoum to attempt to restart negotiations between Sudan and South Sudan. The African Union’s mediator is due to meet Sudan’s President Omar al-Bashir to try to set out an agenda and timetable 
NPR – ‎May 17, 2012‎
by Ofeibea Quist-Arcton Nyachieng Nguot Teng, 25, lost her left leg and her 7-month-old son suffered a fractured leg when a Sudanese bomb fell on her hut in Lalat, South Sudan, on May 5. The United Nations is trying to prevent the recent fighting 
Newsday – ‎May 17, 2012‎
Nation Newsday > News > Nation Print Aa Flood of Nuba refugees hits camp near Sudan border Originally published: May 17, 2012 12:34 PM Updated: May 17, 2012 5:08 PM By The Associated Press JASON STRAZIUSO (Associated Press) YIDA, South Sudan – (AP) 
Los Angeles Times – ‎May 17, 2012‎
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa — African Union mediator Thabo Mbeki flew to Khartoum on Thursday after Sudan and South Sudan missed a UN Security Council deadline to resume peace talks. Mbeki, the former South African president, is expected to spend two 
Jewish Telegraphic Agency – ‎May 17, 2012‎
By Armin Rosen · May 17, 2012 JUBA, South Sudan (JTA) – This city in the world’s newest country is not your typical Arabic-speaking capital. For one thing, most of the city’s inhabitants are Christian. For another, the Israeli flag is ubiquitous here.
Voice of America – ‎May 17, 2012‎
South Sudan produces most of the oil in the two countries, but Sudan has the infrastructure to transport, refine, and export the oil. The deadline for Sudan and South Sudan to return to the negotiating table in Ethiopia came and went Wednesday without 
Voice of America – ‎May 17, 2012‎
PANAKUAC, South Sudan – The border between South Sudan and Sudan is quiet, but tense after weeks of fighting in contested areas – which sparked fears of all-out war. South Sudanese troops are at a standstill as they await talks on a UN Security 
AFP – ‎May 17, 2012‎
KHARTOUM — Sudan has stepped up harassment of journalists and increased censorship in the wake of fighting with South Sudan, Human Rights Watch said on Thursday. In one high-profile case, Faisal Mohammed Salih, a political columnist for a Khartoum 
Al-Arabiya – ‎May 17, 2012‎
The UN Security Council has welcomed South Sudan’s move to pull its forces from Abyei. (File photo) By AFP The UN Security Council on Thursday made a new demand that Sudan “immediately” withdraw all troops from the territory of Abyei that it disputes 
Independent Online – ‎May 17, 2012‎
African Union mediator Thabo Mbeki was expected in the Sudanese capital on Thursday night to help push Sudan and South Sudan back to talks, which were suspended after border fighting last month. African Union mediator Thabo Mbeki was expected in the 
News24 – ‎May 17, 2012‎
Khartoum – African Union mediator Thabo Mbeki was expected in the Sudanese capital on Thursday night to help push Sudan and South Sudan back to talks, which were suspended after border fighting last month. The two countries did not comply with a United 
Xinhua – ‎May 17, 2012‎
KHARTOUM, May 17 (Xinhua) — Head of the African Union High- Level Implementation Panel on Sudan, Thabo Mbeki, seems to be struggling with time to persuade Sudan and South Sudan to resume negotiations on their outstanding issues, after the deadline set 
The Guardian – ‎May 17, 2012‎
The Greater Nile pipeline is the only way to get oil to market from South Sudan. It is a lifeline: 98% of the country’s revenue is from oil but, since January, no South Sudanese oil has flowed through it. The pipe, 1600km (994 miles) long, 

The Two Sudans on the Brink

Posted: May 4, 2012 by PaanLuel Wël in Reports
Tags: , ,

By Richard Downie

There are fears that Sudan and South Sudan are edging closer to all-out war. The latest crisis has been precipitated by a dispute over oil, which propels the economies of both countries. South Sudan broke away from Sudan to become an independent nation in July 2011 but has been unable to agree on terms for using the North’s oil pipeline, its only route to selling its oil. The dispute escalated in January, when South Sudan shut off production entirely rather than pay what it said were exorbitant fees to transport its oil through Sudan. A military confrontation quickly ensued, which culminated in the seizure by South Sudan’s army of the main oil field controlled by the North, Heglig, on April 10. In a speech to party supporters, President Omar al-Bashir of Sudan said that efforts to retake Heglig would “not be the end, but the beginning.” He pledged to “liberate” South Sudan from its government.

Q1: What explains the latest fighting?

A1: The failure of both countries to agree on the terms of their separation is at the heart of this dispute. Although South Sudan reached independence peacefully last year, the outcome was achieved by putting off negotiations on a long list of contentious issues. They included demarcating the common border and establishing citizenship rights for Southerners living in the North and vice versa. But top of the list was how to jointly manage the oil industry, which accounts for 98 percent of revenue in the South and is the main source of income in the North. When negotiations resumed last fall, both sides adopted intransigent positions, and the talks quickly broke down. Exasperated by the failure to reach a deal and moves by Khartoum to confiscate some of its oil before it could be exported, the government of South Sudan (GoSS) took the fateful decision to shut down production entirely.

Layered on top of the diplomatic impasse was a deteriorating security situation on both sides of the border. GoSS blamed Khartoum for fomenting a succession of damaging rebellions within its borders. Meanwhile in the North, a series of conflicts have quickly gotten out of control, mostly in border regions populated by groups whose sympathies lie with the South. In keeping with previous patterns of behavior, the regime in Khartoum has reacted with indiscriminate force, killing civilians and displacing communities. This response has only served to motivate the rebels. Worryingly for the regime, disparate groups in Southern Kordofan, Blue Nile, and Darfur are beginning to coordinate their operations. Last November they announced the formation of the Sudan Revolutionary Front and declared their intention to topple President Bashir from power. Khartoum has long suspected, with some justification, that the Sudan Peoples’ Liberation Movement (SPLM) government in South Sudan is assisting these rebels. This rising tide of mutual hostility, combined with the punishing economic costs of the oil shutdown and the aggressive posturing of two ill-disciplined armies, made a military confrontation more likely. Nevertheless, the decision by Southern forces from the Sudan Peoples’ Liberation Army (SPLA) to occupy an oil field that is widely regarded as lying within Northern territory was a major escalation. South Sudan now finds itself in the unusual position of being painted as the aggressor, while Sudan’s demand that Southern forces immediately withdraw from Heglig has been backed by the international community, including the United States.

Q2: What are the prospects for ending the fighting in the near term?

A2: Not good. The hotheads seem to be driving policy on both sides of the border. Emotions are running high, and recent statements, such as the one issued by President Bashir, are throwing kerosene on the flames. For the time being, neither side is showing much inclination to step back from the brink or suggest a realistic basis for negotiations. A spokesman for GoSS, Barnaba Marial Benjamin, said the South will not withdraw its forces from Heglig unless the fighting stops, the African Union acts as guarantor of a cease-fire, Sudanese forces withdraw from the contested border region of Abyei, and an agreement on demarcating the border is reached. It is unlikely these demands will be met in the near term. For its part, Khartoum’s current strategy does not appear to extend beyond winning Heglig back by force.

Q3: What can the United States do to stop the fighting?

A3: The United States, in common with the rest of the international community, is in the frustrating position of having to watch from the sidelines while the peace unravels. Special Envoy Princeton Lyman is engaged in shuttle diplomacy, visiting both Juba and Khartoum this week, but the reality is that the United States has limited capacity to influence events. Long-standing sanctions against the National Congress Party (NCP) regime in Khartoum curtail his ability to engage with the northern leadership, but in any case, NCP has never been inclined to listen to anything the United States has to say. In theory, the United States has more leverage over the South, which it backed during the long years of Sudan’s civil war and which it continues to supply with desperately needed economic and technical support. So it is a matter of considerable frustration and some annoyance to Washington that Juba shows just as little willingness to listen to U.S. appeals as do its counterparts in the North. Nevertheless, U.S. pressure on Juba to moderate its behavior remains the best potential avenue for ending the crisis. Perhaps Washington would have had more traction with its friends in South Sudan if it had previously been more forceful in pushing for responsible governance in return for its economic and diplomatic largesse. China is perhaps one of the few countries that can wield influence on both sides of the border. Its investments in the oil industry mean it has an economic stake in restoring peace. China does not publicize its diplomatic activity, but it would not be a surprise if Beijing were putting pressure on Khartoum and Juba behind the scenes. A planned visit to China by President Salva Kiir of South Sudan later this month may provide an added opportunity.

Q4: Is the fighting likely to have an impact on global oil prices?

A4: Logic would suggest not. As oil producers, the two Sudans are small players in the overall picture. Of the two countries, South Sudan has 70 to 75 percent of the oil. It was pumping 350,000 barrels per day (bpd) before shutting off production in January, a move that barely caused a ripple on world markets. That leaves Sudan, which produces approximately 115,000 bpd. The Southern occupation of Heglig, its largest oil field, has dented output, although to what extent is unclear. Heglig was producing 60,000 bpd before the latest fighting, and officials had previously stated that production stopped entirely following its seizure. But in a statement on April 18, Sudan’s oil minister said production had only fallen by 40,000 bpd overall and that some of Heglig’s oil had been “diverted.” Regardless of the true figures, the disruption of Sudan’s oil production is unlikely to have a global impact, although its effect on the domestic economy is likely to be very serious indeed.

Richard Downie is a fellow and deputy director of the Africa Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C.

http://csis.org/publication/two-sudans-brink

Two New Sudans: A Roadmap Forward

Testimony

Princeton Lyman
Special Envoy for Sudan 
U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee Hearing
Washington, DC
July 15, 2011

Chairman Kerry, Ranking Member Lugar, Members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, thank you for the opportunity to be here to discuss the historic achievement symbolized by South Sudan’s independence and the opportunities and challenges ahead as Sudan and South Sudan seek to define their future relationship with each other and the international community.

I will discuss below the many tasks and challenges that lie ahead. But first we should recall that a fundamental objective of the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement was to provide the people of southern Sudan a choice whether to continue within one country or to separate. The people made that choice in January, voting for separation, and the independence of South Sudan was achieved July 9 without major conflict and with the recognition of the Government of Sudan. All those, in the Congress, among the many public organizations and advocates, the government entities and individuals over two administrations, all those who worked for this over many years should take pride and joy in this achievement.

I was in Juba last Saturday for South Sudan’s independence ceremony. It was a very moving occasion. As President Obama said in his statement recognizing South Sudan, the day reminded us “that after the darkness of war, the light of a new dawn is possible.” Tens of thousands of people endured sweltering heat for hours to celebrate the birth of their new nation. Sudan was the first country to recognize South Sudan’s independence. This was a historic achievement that represents a new beginning for the people of South Sudan as well as those of Sudan.

Mr. Chairman, this achievement was far from inevitable. Just a year ago, the peace process between the Government of Sudan and the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement was stalled. Many doubted whether it would be possible to have an on-time, peaceful referendum for Southern Sudan and whether the Government of Sudan would ever accept the results. A return to open conflict seemed very possible. During that time, President Obama committed to reenergizing the peace effort, and since then, we have intensified our diplomatic engagement with the CPA parties as well as our partners in the African Union, IGAD, Europe and the United Nations. The President himself, the Vice President and his entire national security team have been involved in this effort around the clock. We are grateful for the support that this committee and you in particular, Mr. Chairman, have given to this effort. We also appreciate the efforts that so many Americans have made to keep a spotlight on the situation in Sudan.

Over the last year, the leaders of Sudan and South Sudan have demonstrated their capacity to work together on the major task of separation and to overcome great odds in their search for peaceful completion of the CPA. Nevertheless, this period has also been marked by armed clashes along the border, a crisis in Abyei, and fighting currently under way in the northern state of Southern Kordofan. Several critical issues regarding relations between the two states that were to be negotiated by July 9 have not been resolved. Thus the situation remains fraught with serious threats to peace. The two states must work to rekindle the spirit of cooperation that was so evident after the referendum of January 9 and which was promised again by the two leaders in the ceremony of July 9.

The CPA parties have made some progress in their negotiations over the past few months, but as I indicated above some of the most important issues namely oil, Abyei and citizenship remain unresolved. How these outstanding issues are managed over the near term will define the future relationship between Sudan and South Sudan. At the IGAD Summit on July 4, President Bashir and President Kiir committed to continue negotiations beyond July 9. We are urging the parties to quickly return to the negotiating table in the coming days and set a firm deadline for completing this unfinished business. The parties should work with the support of the African Union High-Level Implementation Panel (AUHIP) to finalize mutually-beneficial arrangements, in particular, oil revenues, citizenship, Abyei, and their shared border. Allowing these issues to linger without resolution for too long could destabilize the future relationship between Sudan and South Sudan.

Of particular importance is the contentious issue of Abyei. After months of rising tensions and a buildup of forces by both sides, the Sudanese Armed Forces (SAF) forcefully took over the disputed area of Abyei in May. An estimated 100,000 people were forced to flee their homes. After weeks of intense negotiations, the parties signed an agreement on June 20 outlining temporary arrangements for Abyei, to include the establishment of a new UN peacekeeping force in Abyei and the redeployment of all Sudanese military forces from the area. Secretary of State Clinton met with the parties in Addis Ababa during these talks and played an important role in finalizing this deal. We then led efforts in the UN Security Council to quickly secure a resolution authorizing this new peacekeeping force, which will consist of up to 4,200 Ethiopian peacekeepers.

The violence that flared in Abyei cannot be allowed to return and jeopardize the larger peace. It is critical that the parties move forward with genuinely implementing this agreement over the coming weeks as they continue to work toward a final arrangement on Abyei. The Ethiopian peacekeepers have begun deploying to Abyei. The SAF and Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) must follow through with their commitment to withdraw their forces. Conditions must be put in place to allow those displaced from Abyei to voluntarily return home in safety and dignity as soon as possible. Enormous damage was done to homes and other structures in Abyei and much was looted during the SAF take-over. Considerable assistance will therefore be needed for those returning home. We are working closely with the Ethiopian peacekeeping force, the United Nations humanitarian agencies, and our own USAID to arrange support for a safe, voluntary return. At the same time, as part of their negotiations, the parties need to resolve Abyei’s final status. Negotiations on this matter were delayed by the SAF take-over of the area and the extensive negotiations for assuring the departure of military forces from there. This delay was costly. It will take weeks for the Ethiopian forces to be fully deployed and some time for the displaced to feel it safe to return.

Negotiations on the oil sector are equally important, but they must move on a quicker timetable. By the end of July, there has to be an understanding of how oil will be marketed and sold and to what extent the SPLM will provide some tapering off of reductions of income to the north. Agreement is made more difficult, however, because the SPLM does not want to make such a decision without final agreements on Abyei, the border, and perhaps some other issues. We are thus faced with conflicting timelines. In this situation, it is imperative that if there is no final resolution of oil revenue distribution, there must be an interim agreement by the end of July. Each side has claimed it is ready to shut down the oil flow if there is no agreement, positions that if acted upon would only hurt both sides and above all the people of all Sudan. Thus this issue demands action very soon.

Mr. Chairman, beyond their negotiations with each other, Sudan and South Sudan must also work to establish peace within their respective borders. Despite their separation, both countries have significant diversity and must decide how they will manage that diversity over the coming years.  Most immediately, we remain deeply concerned about the situation in the northern border state of Southern Kordofan, an area that is home to tens of thousands of SPLA fighters. The people of Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile were promised in the CPA that their political interests would be addressed in a process of popular consultations. Unfortunately, those consultations have not occurred in Southern Kordofan. Tensions increased in Southern Kordofan following the state’s heavily-contested elections in May. The SPLM refused to accept the results of the election in which the sitting Governor was declared the winner. It was in this atmosphere that the Government of Sudan issued an order to the SAF to dissolve the Joint Integrated Units and forcibly disarm SPLA units that remained in the state. On June 5, intense fighting broke out between the SAF and SPLA forces in the state. To date, the fighting has continued, with the SAF carrying out aerial bombardments of SPLA areas. We are extremely concerned by credible allegations of targeted and ethnic-based killings and other gross human rights abuses. These abuses must end, an investigation must be conducted, and perpetrators must be held accountable. The UN estimates that 73,000 people have been displaced by the fighting, and critical access and resupply routes for humanitarian agencies have been blocked.

Negotiations over Southern Kordofan began in Ethiopia in late June under the auspices of the AUHIP. The Government of Sudan and the SPLM-North signed a framework agreement on June 28 outlining new political and security arrangements for Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile states. This agreement has the advantage of calling for addressing political issues at the same time as security ones, which is indispensable for reaching an agreement to cease hostilities and lay the groundwork for a longer term settlement. Unfortunately, President Bashir has raised problems with the framework agreement, which puts negotiations at risk. We continue to call on the parties to return to the negotiating table, to recognize the need to address both political and security issues, and to agree on a cessation of hostilities which would allow unfettered humanitarian access. Despite the opposition of Khartoum, we also continue to call on the Government of Sudan to accept a continued UN presence in the two states of Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile to support a cessation of hostilities, humanitarian access, and the establishment of new security arrangements. We believe, and we know that much of the international community agrees, that it is in their interest to do so. The Security Council has expressed its readiness to authorize continued UN operations if Khartoum consents.

Within Sudan, we also remain deeply concerned about the security and humanitarian crisis in Darfur. Clashes continue to occur in North and South Darfur between the Government of Sudan and an alliance of Darfur rebel groups, notably the Sudanese Liberation Army and the Justice and Equality Movement. The SAF continues to use aerial bombardments as well as proxy militias as part of its military strategy against the movements, thereby resulting in civilian casualties. Conflict and widespread insecurity impact the humanitarian situation negatively and hamper humanitarian organizations from carrying out their activities in the deep field. The GOS continues to obstruct access of UN-African Union peacekeepers and humanitarian organizations struggle to obtain visas and travel permits from the GoS, which undermine the effectiveness and independence of humanitarian efforts. We have consistently pressed the Government of Sudan to provide full and unfettered access for aid workers and peacekeepers, in order to deliver humanitarian assistance across Darfur. Our own humanitarian staff is only able to access Darfur with high level visits. Otherwise, operational access is simply not possible. Although there has been some limited IDP resettlement in West Darfur and a significant increase in seasonal IDP returns for cultivation, around 2 million Darfuris overall remain in IDP camps. Approximately 70,000 additional persons have been displaced since December 2010.

We have invested considerable efforts in pushing the Government of Sudan and the armed movements to commit to serious negotiations in Doha. Two of Darfur’s rebel groups, the Liberation and Justice Movement (LJM) and the Justice and Equality Movement (JEM) have participated in the Doha negotiations. The LJM may sign a peace agreement with the Government of Sudan this week; however LJM has little military strength on the ground. Negotiations between JEM and the Government of Sudan have been suspended since early May, and JEM is currently reconsidering its position on the results of the Doha process. We have emphasized to the Government of Sudan that an agreement with the LJM would be a positive step toward peace, but that it must continue to negotiate with the other armed movements. We also will be applying pressure on the non-negotiating armed movements to return to peace talks.

The position of the armed movements is also of concern. Several of them insist that they do not wish to negotiate on Darfur so much as on changes to the regime in Khartoum, and in some cases are determined to pursue that objective through fighting in and beyond Darfur. This position does not permit realistically peace talks with the Government of Sudan. We will also continue to encourage the non-negotiating armed movements to return to peace talks on Darfur. While the Doha process has now come to an end, other venues can be developed if talks are possible. In this regard, we are currently consulting with the AU, the UN and our international partners on a way forward after Doha that builds on progress achieved in Doha and leads to a more comprehensive settlement.

Any successful peace process must engage not only the armed movements, but also the people of Darfur. The UN and the AU have put forward the initiative of a Darfur Political Process, through which Darfuris would express their views on the way forward for a political settlement. However, we feel strongly that the current security and political environment would not lend itself to a credible or legitimate peace process in Darfur. For this reason, we will be coordinating with the AU and the UN on the necessary enabling conditions that we believe must be in place before the U.S. will support a Darfur-based process.

Mr. Chairman, Sudan needs to end its isolation in the international community and secure a more prosperous future for its people. It has a historic opportunity to do so with the completion of the CPA. Sudan faces an uncertain economic future as it adjusts to a significant loss of oil revenue and continues to shoulder nearly $38 billion of debt. Undoubtedly, Sudan is in need of debt relief, access to the resources of the International Financial Institutions, and a sustainable climate for private investment. Provided Sudan fulfills its obligations under the CPA, the United States is prepared to help.

We have laid out a roadmap to normalize our bilateral relations and taken initial steps in that direction. In February, following a successful referendum, the President began the process of reviewing Sudan’s designation as a state sponsor of terrorism. Last month, the President dispatched Deputy National Security Advisor John Brennan to Khartoum to discuss this review and to demonstrate our commitment to this process. Additionally, we have been actively involved in the World Bank technical working group to review the process for Sudan’s debt relief. We have also approved licenses for several American companies wishing to participate in agricultural development in the north.

However, we can only move forward with improved bilateral relations, as outlined in the roadmap, if the Government of Sudan fulfills its obligations under the CPA and demonstrates its commitment to peace within its borders and with its neighbors. A failure to reach a cessation of hostilities will negatively impact this process. U.S. government action to lift remaining U.S. economic sanctions and to request legislative assistance with the removal of applicable foreign assistance restrictions also will be dependent on Sudanese actions in Darfur. We will expect to see concrete actions on humanitarian access, freedom of movement for UNAMID peacekeepers, engagement in peace talks, an end to the use of proxy militias and targeting of civilians, and an improvement in justice and accountability so the reign of impunity in Darfur does not continue. This is not just the position of the United States. It is also the view of other members of the international community and international creditors.

Mr. Chairman, the Government of South Sudan will also depend on international support as it seeks to address its many challenges. South Sudan has some of the lowest development indicators in the world, and its people have high expectations that their lives will improve with independence. Many of its people also remain vulnerable to the activity of armed militias in the border states of Unity, Jonglei, and Upper Nile to the North, and the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) in the state of Equatoria regions to the south. The United States has provided significant support for South Sudan over the years, and we will remain a steadfast partner as South Sudan seeks to peacefully meet these challenges. The strong ties between our peoples go back many decades, and we want to continue to build on that partnership.

Over 15 countries have offered capacity building assistance to the GOSS. Following the Troika development ministers’ visit in May, USAID is working closely with the AU, UN, ADB, EU, India, China, South Africa, Uganda and others to ensure that the ROSS has a viable human capital plan in place to build capacity for key functions in Juba and state governments. This builds upon the work USAID has done over the last 7 years in the Ministry of Finance, the Central Bank of South Sudan, health, education, and agriculture. USAID is working with partners to scale up to ensure that stop gap measure along with medium to long term capacities are being addressed. The United States, the UN, the UK, and other donors will focus on building a human rights culture throughout the GOSS, including the SPLA. All the donors will help in economic development. The United States plans in particular to make a major effort in agricultural production, which can help the vast majority of South Sudanese and for which there is much promise.

To succeed and to sustain international support, the Government of South Sudan must demonstrate its commitment to building an effective, democratic and inclusive government that embodies South Sudan’s diversity, respects human rights and delivers services with transparency and accountability. The eyes of the world will indeed be on South Sudan in the weeks and months ahead. The government must deliver on its commitment to a broad-based, inclusive process to write its permanent constitution. The government must also put in place safeguards to prevent corruption and avoid the pitfalls that have befallen many other oil-producing nations. President Kiir made a strong statement in his inaugural address on these very issues. The United States will work with other international partners to provide advice and support for the government to help him implement those pledges.

Mr. Chairman and other members of the committee, the challenges ahead are great, but the historic occasion last Saturday offers a new beginning for the people of South Sudan and Sudan. Now it is up to the leaders and people of South Sudan and Sudan to turn this moment of promise into lasting peace. We will continue to assist them in this hard work. Over the coming months, the Obama administration’s engagement will be unwavering, and we will be a steadfast partner to all those in Sudan and South Sudan who seek a better future of peace and prosperity.

http://www.state.gov/s/sudan/rem/2011/168657.htm


UN Security Council members vote during a past meeting at the headquarters in New York.

Photo/FILE UN Security Council members vote during a past meeting at the headquarters in New York.

United States of America: draft resolution before The Security Council,

           Security Council
SC/10632

 
Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York
 
Security Council
6764th Meeting (AM)
Security Council Calls for Immediate Halt to Fighting Between Sudan, South Sudan,Resumption of Negotiations, Unanimously Adopting Resolution 2046 (2012)


Lays Out Time Frame to Conclude Negotiations under Auspices of AfricanUnion;
Expresses Intent to Take Measures under Article 41 on Sanctions for Non-compliance
         Condemning the repeated incidents of cross-border violence between Sudan and South Sudan, including seizure of territory, support to proxy forces and aerial bombing, the Security Council this morning decided that Sudan and South Sudan must immediately cease all hostilities, withdraw forces, activate previously-agreed security mechanisms, and resume negotiations under threat of sanctions.
          Acting under the binding Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter in unanimously adopting resolution 2046 (2012), the Council decided that the parties must formally convey their commitments to end hostilities, including aerial bombardments, not later than 48 hours from the adoption of the resolution to the African Union and the Security Council.  Within one week, they must activate border security mechanisms, including the Joint Border Verification and Monitoring Mechanism, without prejudice to ongoing negotiations on disputed areas.
          Within no more than two weeks, the Council decided in addition, Sudan and South Sudan must unconditionally resume negotiations under the auspices of the African Union High-level Implementation Panel to reach consensus on oil and related payments, the status of nationals of one country residing in the other, demarcation of borders and the final status of the disputed Abyei area.  If those negotiations failed to result in agreements within three months, the Council requested the Secretary-General, in consultation with African partners, to report on the status of talks.
           In addition, the Council decided that the Government of Sudan and the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North (SPLM-N) must cooperate with the High-level Implementation Panel and the Chair of the Intergovernmental Authority for Development (IGAD) to reach a negotiated settlement on security arrangements in Blue Nile and South Kordofan States, strongly urging them to accept the tripartite proposal of the African Union, the United Nations and the Arab League to permit humanitarian access to the population in those two areas.
          On all issues regarding compliance with the resolution, the Council requested the Secretary-General to work closely with the African Union and other African partners and inform the Council within 15 days and in two week intervals thereafter, expressing its intention, in the event that any or all of the parties have not complied with its decisions, “to take appropriate additional measures under Article 41 of the Charter as necessary”, referring to the Article on sanctions.
Following the adoption of the text, Council members took the floor to urge both parties to avert a greater conflagration by compliance with the resolution and to complete the implementation of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, which ended the decades-long Sudanese civil war.  “Both countries are on the brink of returning to the horrors of the past, taking the entire region with them,” the representative of the United States warned.
         Most speakers expressed strong support for the work of the African Union’s High-level Implementation Panel, with some saying that a main impetus for their affirmative vote for the resolution was the text’s support for the central role of that body.  Some speakers directly warned of their willingness to impose sanctions if compliance was not obtained, while others, including China’s representative, reiterated general reticence on imposing such measures.  While most speakers accorded equal blame for recent violence on the parties, some, including the representative of the Russian Federation, urged a stronger response to South Sudan’s occupation of Heglig, urging that an assessment of damage and other actions be taken.
          Taking the floor following Council members, the representatives of South Sudan and Sudan welcomed the Council’s strong support for the African Union’s role in trying to bring about a peaceful resolution of the Conflict.  South Sudan’s representative underlined his country’s withdrawal from Heglig and called for efforts to bring about Sudan’s withdrawal from Abyei, also requesting international humanitarian aid.
          Sudan’s representative welcomed the condemnation of the occupation of Heglig, but said that the lack of a timeframe for ending support to rebel groups in Sudan would make it harder to achieve peace, and he said his country was not bombing outside its own territory.  He also noted that the African Union decisions on the matter had not advocated the imposition of sanctions.
            Representatives of South Africa, India, Germany, Colombia, France, Togo, Morocco, United Kingdom, Pakistan, Guatemala, Portugal and Azerbaijan also spoke.
            The meeting began at 11:04 a.m. and ended at 12:09 p.m.
Resolution
The full text of resolution 2046 (2012) reads as follows:
The Security Council,
Recalling its previous resolutions and statements on the situation in Sudan and South Sudan, in particular resolutions 1990 (2011), 2024 (2011) and 2032 (2011), and its presidential statements of 6 March 2012 and 12 April 2012, andfurther recalling the priority it attaches to the full and urgent advancement of all outstanding issues from the Comprehensive Peace Agreement,
Reaffirming its strong commitment to the sovereignty, independence, unity, and territorial integrity of Sudan and South Sudan, and to the purposes and the principles of the United Nations Charter,
Noting paragraph 7 of the 24 April 2012 decision of the Peace and Security Council of the African Union at its 319th meeting, and reiterating that the territorial boundaries of states shall not be altered by force, and that any territorial disputes shall be settled exclusively by peaceful means,
Recalling the importance of the principles of the peaceful settlement of international disputes, good neighborliness, non-interference and regional cooperation,
Deeply committed to seeing Sudan and South Sudan become two economically prosperous states living side-by-side in peace, security, and stability, andunderlining the importance of building mutual trust, confidence and an environment conducive to long-term stability and economic development,
“Condemning the repeated incidents of cross-border violence between Sudan and South Sudan, including troop movements, the seizure and occupation of Heglig, support to proxy forces, and Sudanese Armed Forces aerial bombardments,
Condemning actions by any armed group aimed at the forced overthrow of the Government of either Sudan or South Sudan,
Expressing deep concern at the humanitarian situation created by the fighting between Sudan and South Sudan, and the continued fighting in the states of Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile, in Sudan,
Strongly condemning all acts of violence committed against civilians in violation of international humanitarian law and human rights law,
Welcoming the withdrawal from Heglig of the army of South Sudan and callingfor the immediate cessation of aerial bombardments by the Sudanese Armed Forces against South Sudan,
Strongly condemning the violations of human rights of non-combatants in the affected area, the damage to economic infrastructure, in particular oil installations, and all inflammatory statements, which result in mutual demonization and the threat of hostile action by extremist elements, including xenophobic attacks,
Calling for an impartial fact finding effort to assess the losses and economic and humanitarian damage, including to oil facilities and other key infrastructure, in and around Heglig,
Expressing deep concern at the fate of the nationals of both countries resident in each other’s territory, following the end of the transition period that occurred on 8 April 2012,
Recalling the June 29, 2011 Agreement Between the Government of the Sudan and the Government of Southern Sudan on Border Security and the Joint Political and Security Mechanism, taking note of the commitment in Paragraph 2 to create a safe demilitarized border zone (SDBZ), and the 30 July 2011 Agreement on the Border Monitoring Support Mission Between the Government of Sudan and the Government of South Sudan, which elaborates on the establishment of a Joint Border Verification and Monitoring Mechanism (JBVMM) with an area of responsibility corresponding to the SDBZ, and a Joint Political and Security Mechanism (JPSM),
Recognizing the urgent need for Sudan and South Sudan to commence the process of border demilitarization,
Deploring the failure of Sudan and South Sudan security forces to redeploy from the Abyei Area in accordance with their Agreement of 20 June 2011 and resolution 1990 (2011),
Convinced that there can be no military solution to the conflict in Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile, and stressing the urgent need for a political and negotiated solution, based on respect for diversity in unity,
Reaffirming its previous resolutions 1674 (2006) and 1894 (2009) on the protection of civilians in armed conflict, 1612 (2006), 1882 (2009), and 1998 (2011) on children and armed conflict, 1502 (2003) on the protection of humanitarian and United Nations personnel, and 1325 (2000), 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009), 1889 (2009) and 1960 (2010) on women, peace and security,
Welcoming the continuing efforts of the African Union to support Sudan and South Sudan in addressing the legacy of conflict and bitterness in Sudan, notably through the conclusion of the January 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA), its implementation, in particular the holding of the referendum on self-determination of South Sudan, and the negotiations on post-secession relations,
Commending the efforts of the AU High-level Implementation Panel, including its Chairman President Thabo Mbeki, former Presidents Abdulsalami Abubakar and Pierre Buyoya, the Chairperson of the Intergovernmental Authority on Development, Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi, the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Sudan and South Sudan, Haile Menkerios, and the United Nations Interim Security Force for Abyei (UNISFA) under the leadership of Lieutenant General Tesfay Tadesse,
Expressing its full support for the 24 April 2012 decision of the Peace and Security Council of the African Union at its 319th meeting on the situation between the Republic of Sudan and the Republic of South Sudan, in order to ease the current tension, facilitate the resumption of negotiations on post-secession relations and the normalization of their relations, including, in particular the road map outlined in that decision,
Determining that the prevailing situation along the border between Sudan and South Sudan constitutes a serious threat to international peace and security,
Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,
“1.   Decides that Sudan and South Sudan shall take the following actions with immediate effect
unless otherwise specified below:
(i)   immediately cease all hostilities, including aerial bombardments, with the parties formally conveying their commitment in this respect to the Chairperson of the African Union Commission and the President of the Security Council not later than 48 hours from the adoption of this resolution;
(ii)  unconditionally withdraw all of their armed forces to their side of the border, in accordance with previously adopted Agreements, including the Agreement on the Border Monitoring Support Mission of 30 July 2011;
(iii)activate, within no more than a week of the adoption of this resolution, the necessary border security mechanisms, namely the Joint Border Verification and Monitoring Mechanism (JBVMM) and the Safe Demilitarized Border Zone (SDBZ), in accordance with the administrative and security map presented to the Parties by the AUHIP in November 2011, it being understood that this map in no way prejudices ongoing negotiations on the disputed areas and demarcation of the border;
(iv)  cease the harbouring of, or support to, rebel groups against the other State;
(v)   activate the ad hoc Committee, under the Joint Political and Security Mechanism, to receive and investigate complaints and allegations made by one party against the other;
(vi)  immediately cease hostile propaganda and inflammatory statements in the media, as well as any attacks against the property, religious and cultural symbols belonging to the nationals of the other State, with the two Governments assuming full responsibility for the protection of each other’s nationals in line with international principles, consistent with the Framework Agreement on the Status of Nationals of the Other State and Related Matters initialled in March 2012;
(vii)implement pending aspects of the 20 June 2011 Agreement on Temporary Security and Administrative Arrangements for the Abyei Area, in particular the redeployment, within no more than two weeks of the adoption of this resolution, of all Sudanese and South Sudanese forces out of the Abyei Area;
“2.   Decides that Sudan and South Sudan shall unconditionally resume negotiations, under the auspices of the AUHIP and with the support of the Chairman of IGAD, at a time to be set by the AUHIP in consultation with relevant international partners, but within no more than two weeks from the time of adoption of this resolution, to reach agreement on the following critical issues:
(i)            arrangements concerning oil and associated payments;
(ii)          the status of nationals of one country resident in the other, consistent with the Framework Agreement on the Status of Nationals of the Other State and Related Matters initialled in March 2012;
(iii)         resolution of the status of the disputed and claimed border areas and the demarcation of the border; and
(iv)        the final status of the Abyei Area;
“3.   Decides that the Government of Sudan and the SPLM-North shall extend full cooperation to the AUHIP and the Chair of IGAD, to reach a negotiated settlement on the basis of the 28 June 2011 Framework Agreement on Political Partnership between NCP and SPLM-N and Political and Security Arrangements in Blue Nile and Southern Kordofan States;
“4.   Strongly urges Sudan and the SPLM-Ntoaccept the tripartite proposal submitted by the African Union, the United Nations and the League of Arab States, to permit humanitarian access to the affected population in the two areas,ensuring in accordance with applicable international law, including applicable international humanitarian law, and guiding principles of emergency humanitarian assistance, the safe, unhindered and immediate access of United Nations and other humanitarian personnel, as well as the delivery of supplies and equipment, in order to allow such personnel to efficiently perform their task of assisting the conflict-affected civilian population;
“5.   Decides that the negotiations referred to in paragraph 2 above shall be concluded within three months of the adoption of this resolution, and in the event these negotiations fail to result in an agreement on any or all of the issues within the allotted timeframe of three months, requests the Secretary-General, in consultation with the AUHIP, the Chair of IGAD, and the Chairman of the AU Commission, to report within four months of the date of this resolution to the Security Council on the status of the negotiations, including detailed proposals on all outstanding issues;
“6.   Requests the Secretary-General to consult with the African Union on the implementation of this resolution and the decisions of the AU PSC, to work closely with the AUHIP in support of its facilitationefforts, and to inform the Security Council within 15 days and in two week intervals thereafter on the status of compliance by SudanSouth Sudanand the SPLM-N with the decisions set forth in this resolution, and expresses itsintention, in the event that any or all of the parties have not complied with the decisions set forth in this resolution, to take appropriate additional measures under Article 41 of the Charter as necessary;
“7.   Calls upon all parties to promote and protect human rights, including those of women and people belonging to vulnerable groups, to comply with their obligations under international law, including international humanitarian and international human rights law, and calls for those responsible for serious violations of such law, including sexual violence, to be held accountable;
“8.   Commends the efforts by UNISFA in carrying out its mandate, expressesits deep appreciation for the work of the Force Commander and the troop-contributing countries, and expresses its intention to evaluate the mandate of UNISFA in the context of compliance by Sudan and South Sudan with the decisions set forth in this resolution, and with the fulfilment of their commitments as set out in the 20 June, 29 June, and 30 July 2011 Agreements;
“9.   Stresses the importance of, and the need to restore, a comprehensive, just and lasting peace between Sudan and South Sudan;
“10.  Decides to remain actively seized of this matter.”
Statements
               SUSAN RICE United States) welcomed the Council’s action, which underscored its strong and unanimous support for the road map for peace laid out by the African Union Peace and Security Council.  The current conflict was on the verge of becoming a full scale war.  Both countries were on the brink of retuning to the horrors of the past “and threatening to take the entire region with them.  The fighting must stop, and stop now.”  The conflict did not begin last week, last month, or last year.  The tensions underlying it had long roots, most recently in unresolved issues regarding the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement.  For months, the international community had sent strong warnings to the parties to resolve those issues peacefully.  To date, they had failed to do so.
Throughout the conflict, “there has been a long history of promises made and promises broken,” she said, stressing that, with its vote today, the Council had imposed tight deadlines for action by both sides in line with the African Union road map.  The Council must continue to press both parties to implement that peace plan, including through the withdrawal of all forces from border areas, activating border security mechanisms and ending support for rebel groups working against the other State.  It was also necessary for the parties to return to the negotiating table under the auspices of the African Union High-level Implementation Panel.  That was the only way that further conflict could be avoided.  If the parties failed to carry out all the aims of the African Union plan, the Council was united in its determination to hold them accountable by imposing Chapter VII sanctions on both sides as necessary.
She welcomed the commitment of South Sudan to abide by the African Union road map and the decisions of the Security Council.  The Government of Sudan should clarify its statement of earlier today to accept the African Union road map in full.  The bombing of areas in South Sudan was “deeply alarming and profoundly disturbing, especially in light of South Sudan’s recent steps towards peace.”  Such actions being carried out by Sudan must halt.  Meanwhile, South Sudan should refrain from any retaliation, especially cross-border attacks.  Occupation of Heglig was illegal and must not happen again.
                  LI BAODONG (China) said his delegation was deeply worried about the deterioration in relations between the two countries.   China hoped the two sides would respect each other’s sovereignty and territorial integrity and follow the path of peace laid out by the African Union.  Both sides should pursue dialogue and negotiations and make joint efforts to forge good neighbourly relations.  At the same time, the international community should take an objective and impartial stance on the matter and avoid taking sides.  Stakeholders should also refrain from interfering in the mediation efforts.
“We are always very cautious regarding the use or threat of use of sanctions,” he said, expressing support for the African Union’s efforts to solve the dispute.  China hoped both countries would cooperate with the African Union and sought an early and proper solution to the relevant issues.  Taking into account the African Union’s communiqué and the request of both sides, China had voted in favour of the resolution and would continue to take an active role in working with the international community to address the issue.
                    BASO SANGQU ( South Africa) said that his delegation remained concerned that the current escalation had seriously damaged the relationship between Sudan and South Sudan and had brought the two States to the brink of war.  It was clear that there was no military solution to the dispute.  What was required was for the parties to commit to living peacefully side by side, with respect for each other’s territorial integrity.  The parties must commit to the aims of the African Union road map agreed by the Peace and Security Council.  That Council had called on the United Nations to endorse its road map, and South Africa was pleased the Security Council had been able to unanimously adopt the resolution, which should help the African Union as it sought to ensure the parties resumed negotiations.  The onus rested with the political leadership of both countries, which must work to ensure that all their people enjoyed peace, security and development.  “They must give effect to their previous commitment to never return to war,” he said.
                          MANJEEV SINGH PURI (India) also expressed serious concern over developments between the two countries, saying there was an urgent need to settle all issues peacefully through negotiations, under the framework of the Panel headed by Thabo Mbeki.  He stressed his country’s consistent support to the efforts of the African Union High-level Implementation Panel to bring about a situation of two viable stable States in peace with one another.  He hoped that the adoption of the resolution would assist those efforts.
                         PETER WITTIG (Germany), enumerating the worrying events of the past months, said that an unequivocal message had been sent to the parties to end what he called a clear threat to international peace and security.  He strongly supported the leadership role of the African Union on the issue and urged the parties to seize the opportunity posed by the adoption of the text to return to a peaceful resolution of the issue through negotiations.  He affirmed that the Council would remain focused on the issue.
                      VITALY CHURKIN (Russian Federation) said he had supported the resolution insofar as it supported resolution of the conflict through negotiation under the mechanisms of the African continent itself, including Mr. Mbeki’s Panel.  However, in light of the severe repercussions of the occupation of the oil fields of Heglig, it was not appropriate to welcome the withdrawal of South Sudanese troops from that area.  Compensation needed to be provided, among other responses.  He maintained, in addition, that the situation in Sudan’s Blue Nile and South Kordofan States should not be placed under the framework of the resolution, saying that armed groups, supported from outside, were fomenting destabilization in Sudan.  He urged caution in the imposition of sanctions, supported the mediation of Thabo Mbeki to normalize the situation and urged the parties to cooperate with that mediation.
                   NÉSTOR OSORIO (Colombia) found it regrettable that the first steps of the recently-born State of South Sudan would be acts of war.  Peaceful negotiation, using regional organizations, was the only way of resolving such situations.  Supporting the African Union road map of 24 April, he said it was crucial that both parties return to the spirit of compromise that made the Comprehensive Peace Agreement possible.  The adoption of this resolution gave a clear sign of the firm determination of the Council not to allow the situation to worsen further.  The parties must forge a relationship based on cooperation and peaceful coexistence.
                   MARTIN BRIENS ( France) welcomed the adoption of the text and appreciated the work done by the African Union over the past few weeks to ease tensions between the two sides and restart negotiations on unresolved issues regarding the Comprehensive Peace Agreement. Thanks to the Council’s decision today, the African Union road map now had the authority of a Chapter VII resolution, and both sides must come back to the negotiating table to deal with those unresolved issues.  This was a clear way forward and it was up to the two Governments to abide by the decisions taken by the Security Council and the African Union.
                   KODJO MENAN (Togo) said his delegation was pleased with the Council’s action, especially since the text just adopted stipulated that urgent measures be taken, so Sudan and South Sudan could return to peace.  After the African Union communiqué on the issue, it was crucial for the Council to act.  Togo believed that the two countries must follow the path of peace and negotiation and, in that regard, welcomed the decision of South Sudan to withdraw its forces from border areas.  Sudan should do likewise and end aerial bombardment, and both sides should return to the negotiations being led by Thabo Mbeki.  Both sides should avoid confrontation and begin good faith negotiations to resolve open issues, in line with the aims of the African Union.
                MOHAMMED LOULICHKI (Morocco) said his delegation had voted in favour of the text because it had called on both Governments to immediately cease violence and begin negotiations.  It had also called on both sides to respect each other’s sovereignty and territorial integrity.  Morocco believed that priority should be given to dialogue and negotiations.  Neither side should support rebels seeking to undermine the move towards peace, and should instead return quickly to the negotiating table.  Sanctions should be imposed only when there was a necessity to do so, and, quoting a recent Arab League decision, he said that Arab countries were prepared to support the negotiation process.  The Arab countries had also proposed the creation of a commission of inquiry into the damage wrought by the conflict.
                  PHILIP PARHAM (United Kingdom) said that, in recent weeks, the Security Council had expressed its growing alarm at the escalating tensions and violence between Sudan and South Sudan.  With its adoption of the current resolution, the Council had made it clear that the conflict must end.  The text, with the weight of Chapter VII of the Charter, gave full support to the African Union road map, and called on both sides to agree to a cease fire and follow the African Union framework towards peace and lasting security.  The resolution also called on Sudan, South Sudan and the Sudan People’s Liberation Army-North (SPLM-N) to actively find a solution to the unresolved issues regarding the Blue Nile and South Kordofan.  The resolution made clear that those parties must comply with all elements of the decisions taken by the Security Council and the African Union.  The United Kingdom hoped Sudan and South Sudan would choose the peace, security and prosperity that the people so desperately needed and deserved.  The African Union had expressed its willingness to support all efforts towards reaching that goal.
                   RAZA BASHIR TARAR (Pakistan), expressing serious concern over the situation, said it was urgent for the international community to urge both parties to return to negotiations and peaceful resolution of their differences.  Supporting the central role of the African Union in the situation and all conflicts in Africa, he said that the Council must stand united behind the Union in the maintenance of peace and security on the continent.  The Council, however, should be cautious in the use of sanctions and he regretted that several proposals from Council members threatened to create fissures between members and that several proposals of the African Union were not taken into consideration.  The tendency of the Council to respond selectively to the Union’s efforts was counterproductive.  He called on both countries to “help us help them” find a peaceful resolution of the situation.
                  GERT ROSENTHAL (Guatemala), also expressing alarm, said both parties had the responsibility for the resumption of armed activity.  In voting for the resolution, he was responding to the appeal of the African Union, as well as the need to maintain international peace and security.  There was now a new opportunity to highlight all the elements of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement to achieve a firm and lasting peace within the framework of cooperation between both countries.
                  JOÃO MARIA CABRAL (Portugal), also expressing deep concern, urged both parties to respond favorably and immediately to today’s resolution and the work of the African Union High-level Implementation Panel.  He also stressed the importance of implementation of the provisions of the resolution that focused on human rights and humanitarian concerns.
                Council President AGSHIN MEHDIYEV (Azerbaijan), speaking in his national capacity, took note of the Council’s deep commitment to the viability of Sudan and South Sudan, and said that it was important that the resolution supported the central role of the African Union, as well as the peaceful settlement of disputes and the inadmissibility of the use of force and seizure of territory.  He welcomed the end of the occupation of Heglig and said additional steps should be taken, including an assessment of the losses incurred.
             DENG ALOR KUOL, Minister of Cabinet Affairs of South Sudan, said that his Government appreciated the Council’s prompt response to the African Union’s request to reinforce that regional body’s decisions regarding his country and Sudan.  He recalled — and reiterated his Government’s support for — its withdrawal of its police force from the Abyei Area on 28 April.  His Government expected the international community to exert efforts to ensure the “immediate and complete withdrawal of Sudan Armed Forces” from that area, he said, also noting that his Government had already committed to a cessation of hostilities and the resumption of negotiations under the auspices of the High-level Implementation Panel.  South Sudan welcomed the Council’s commitment to strengthen the African Union-led process through the active participation of the United Nations, the Chairman of the Intergovernmental Authority for Development (IGAD) and other international partners.
“We appeal to the United Nations and its Member States to urgently mobilize humanitarian assistance for the population affected by Sudan’s continuous aerial bombardment and ground incursions in the northern States of South Sudan,” he said, also calling for urgent assistance for the tens of thousands of civilians displaced by the Sudanese Armed Force’s invasion of the Abyei Area last May.  Finally, he said that South Sudan looked forward to good faith implementation of the resolution just adopted.
              DAFFA-ALLA ELHAG ALI OSMAN (Sudan) saluted all Council members who had insisted that the current text condemn the violence in Heglig, describing it as encroachment on his country’s territorial integrity.  He also thanked those members that had called for conducting a fact-finding mission to investigate the extent of the damage done by SPLM-N in Heglig.  He welcomed the efforts of the African Union to promote peace and security throughout the continent and especially welcomed the recent statement that placed the African Union High-level Implementation Panel at the head of the negotiation process.
“We intend to keep this process within the African continent under the leadership of Mr. Mbeki,” he said.  At the same time, he said that peace between the two countries would only be achieved through halting all forms of support and sheltering of rebel armed groups.  He was concerned that the Council’s current resolution did not set out timeframes on that matter, as it had in other areas.  “This we find impracticable,” he said, also expressing concern about recent declarations by the Government of South Sudan to return to Heglig.  He also called for accuracy regarding talk about “aerial bombardment”.  Sudanese forces did not bombard any areas inside South Sudan, but his country had the right to use any means to rebuff and ward off any aggression within its own territory, including using its air force.  With all that in mind, he said that security issues between the two countries should be given priority when negotiations were restarted.
As for South Kordofan and Blue Nile, he said the African Union communiqué did not request putting maters regarding those areas under Chapter VII.  The African Union had requested endorsement of its road map, but did not include those areas.  In addition, the Council’s resolution threatened the use of sanctions, while the African Union had not posed such a request.  The Council must verify its actions in such matters and Sudan would make known its particular reservations regarding that matter.  He reiterated his Governments support for and belief in the Charter-mandated principle of State sovereignty and territorial integrity.
* *** *

        Recalling its previous resolutions and statements on the situation in Sudan and South Sudan, in particular resolutions 1990 (2011), 2024 (2011) and 2032 (2011), and its Presidential Statements of 6 March 2012 and 12 April 2012, and further recalling the priority it attaches to the full and urgent advancement of all outstanding issues from the Comprehensive Peace Agreement,

Reaffirming its strong commitment to the sovereignty, independence, unity, and territorial integrity of Sudan and South Sudan, and to the purposes and the principles of the United Nations Charter,

Noting paragraph 7 of the 24 April 2012 decision of the Peace and Security Council of the African Union at its 319th meeting, and reiterating that the territorial boundaries of states shall not be altered by force, and that any territorial disputes shall be settled exclusively by peaceful means,

        Recalling the importance of the principles of the peaceful settlement of international disputes, good neighbourliness, non-interference and regional cooperation,

Deeply committed to seeing Sudan and South Sudan become two economically prosperous states living side-by-side in peace, security, and stability, and underlining the importance of building mutual trust, confidence and an environment conducive to long-term stability and economic development,

Condemning the repeated incidents of cross-border violence between Sudan and South Sudan, including troop movements, the seizure and occupation of Heglig, support to proxy forces, and Sudanese Armed Forces aerial bombardments,

Condemning actions by any armed group aimed at the forced overthrow of the government of either Sudan or South Sudan,

Expressing deep concern at the humanitarian situation created by the fighting between Sudan and South Sudan, and the continued fighting in the states of Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile, in Sudan,

Strongly condemning all acts of violence committed against civilians in violation of international humanitarian law and human rights law,

Welcoming the withdrawal from Heglig of the army of South Sudan and calling for the immediate cessation of aerial bombardments by the Sudanese Armed Forces against South Sudan,

Strongly condemning the violations of human rights of non-combatants in the affected area, the damage to economic infrastructure, in particular oil installations, and all inflammatory statements, which result in mutual demonization and the threat of hostile action by extremist elements, including xenophobic attacks,

Calling for an impartial fact finding effort to assess the losses and economic and humanitarian damage, including to oil facilities and other key infrastructure, in and around Heglig,

Expressing deep concern at the fate of the nationals of both countries resident in each other’s territory, following the end of the transition period that occurred on 8 April 2012,

Recalling the June 29, 2011 Agreement Between the Government of the Sudan and the Government of Southern Sudan on Border Security and the Joint Political and Security Mechanism, taking note of the commitment in Paragraph 2 to create a safe demilitarized border zone (SDBZ), and the July 30, 2011 Agreement on the Border Monitoring Support Mission Between the Government of Sudan and the Government of South Sudan, which elaborates on the establishment of a Joint Border Verification and Monitoring Mechanism (JBVMM) with an area of responsibility corresponding to the SDBZ, and a Joint Political and Security Mechanism (JPSM),

Recognizing the urgent need for Sudan and South Sudan to commence the process of border demilitarization,

Deploring the failure of Sudan and South Sudan security forces to redeploy from the Abyei Area in accordance with their Agreement of June 20, 2011 and resolution 1990 (2011),

Convinced that there can be no military solution to the conflict in Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile, and stressing the urgent need for a political and negotiated solution, based on respect for diversity in unity,

Reaffirming its previous resolutions 1674 (2006) and 1894 (2009) on the protection of civilians in armed conflict, 1612 (2006), 1882 (2009), and 1998 (2011) on children and armed conflict, 1502 (2003) on the protection of humanitarian and United Nations personnel, and 1325 (2000), 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009), 1889 (2009) and 1960 (2010) on women, peace and security,

Welcoming the continuing efforts of the African Union to support Sudan and South Sudan in addressing the legacy of conflict and bitterness in Sudan, notably through the conclusion of the January 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA), its implementation, in particular the holding of the referendum on self-determination of South Sudan, and the negotiations on post-secession relations,

Commending the efforts of the AU High-level Implementation Panel, including its Chairman President Thabo Mbeki, former Presidents Abdulsalami Abubakar and Pierre Buyoya, the Chairperson of the Intergovernmental Authority on Development, Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi, the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Sudan and South Sudan, Haile Menkerios, and the United Nations Interim Security Force for Abyei (UNISFA) under the leadership of Lieutenant General Tesfay Tadesse,

Expressing its full support for the 24 April 2012 decision of the Peace and Security Council of the African Union at its 319th meeting on the situation between the Republic of Sudan and the Republic of South Sudan, in order to ease the current tension, facilitate the resumption of negotiations on post-secession relations and the normalization of their relations, including, in particular the Roadmap outlined in that decision,

Determining that the prevailing situation along the border between Sudan and South Sudan constitutes a serious threat to international peace and security,

        Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,

1.     Decides that Sudan and South Sudan shall take the following actions with immediate effect unless otherwise specified below:

(i)     immediately cease all hostilities, including aerial bombardments, with the parties formally conveying their commitment in this respect to the Chairperson of the African Union Commission and the President of the Security Council not later than 48 hours from the adoption of this resolution;

(ii)    unconditionally withdraw all of their armed forces to their side of the border, in accordance with previously adopted Agreements, including the Agreement on the Border Monitoring Support Mission of 30 July 2011;

(iii)   activate, within no more than a week of the adoption of this resolution, the necessary border security mechanisms, namely the Joint Border Verification and Monitoring Mechanism (JBVMM) and the Safe Demilitarized Border Zone (SDBZ), in accordance with the administrative and security map presented to the Parties by the AUHIP in November 2011, it being understood that this map in no way prejudices ongoing negotiations on the disputed areas and demarcation of the border;

(iv)   cease the harbouring of, or support to, rebel groups against the other State;

(v)    activate the ad hoc Committee, under the Joint Political and Security Mechanism, to receive and investigate complaints and allegations made by one party against the other;

(vi)   immediately cease hostile propaganda and inflammatory statements in the media, as well as any attacks against the property, religious and cultural symbols belonging to the nationals of the other State, with the two governments assuming full responsibility for the protection of each other’s nationals in line with international principles, consistent with the Framework Agreement on the Status of Nationals of the Other State and Related Matters initialled in March 2012;

(vii)  implement pending aspects of the 20 June 2011 Agreement on Temporary Security and Administrative Arrangements for the Abyei Area, in particular the redeployment, within no more than two weeks of the adoption of this resolution, of all Sudanese and South Sudanese forces out of the Abyei Area;

2.     Decides that Sudan and South Sudan shall unconditionally resume negotiations, under the auspices of the AUHIP and with the support of the Chairman of IGAD, at a time to be set by the AUHIP in consultation with relevant international partners, but within no more than two weeks from the time of adoption of this resolution, to reach agreement on the following critical issues:

(i)     arrangements concerning oil and associated payments;

(ii)    the status of nationals of one country resident in the other, consistent with the Framework Agreement on the Status of Nationals of the Other State and Related Matters initialled in March 2012;

(iii)   resolution of the status of the disputed and claimed border areas and the demarcation of the border; and

(iv)   the final status of the Abyei Area;

3.     Decides that the Government of Sudan and the SPLM-North shall extend full cooperation to the AUHIP and the Chair of IGAD, to reach a negotiated settlement on the basis of the June 28, 2011 Framework Agreement on Political Partnership between NCP and SPLM-N and Political and Security Arrangements in Blue Nile and Southern Kordofan States;

4.     Strongly urges Sudan and the SPLM-N to accept the tripartite proposal submitted by the African Union, the United Nations and the League of Arab States, to permit humanitarian access to the affected population in the two areas, ensuring in accordance with applicable international law, including applicable international humanitarian law, and guiding principles of emergency humanitarian assistance, the safe, unhindered and immediate access of United Nations and other humanitarian personnel, as well as the delivery of supplies and equipment, in order to allow such personnel to efficiently perform their task of assisting the conflict-affected civilian population;

5.     Decides that the negotiations referred to in paragraph 2 above shall be concluded within three months of the adoption of this resolution, and in the event these negotiations fail to result in an agreement on any or all of the issues within the allotted timeframe of three months, requests the Secretary-General, in consultation with the AUHIP, the Chair of IGAD, and the Chairman of the AU Commission, to report within four months of the date of this resolution to the Security Council on the status of the negotiations, including detailed proposals on all outstanding issues;

6.     Requests the Secretary-General to consult with the African Union on the implementation of this resolution and the decisions of the AU PSC, to work closely with the AUHIP in support of its facilitation efforts, and to inform the Security Council within 15 days and in two week intervals thereafter on the status of compliance by Sudan, South Sudan, and the SPLM-N with the decisions set forth in this resolution, and expresses its intention, in the event that any or all of the parties have not complied with the decisions set forth in this resolution, to take appropriate additional measures under Article 41 of the Charter;

7.     Calls upon all parties to promote and protect human rights, including those of women and people belonging to vulnerable groups, to comply with their obligations under international law, including international humanitarian and international human rights law, and calls for those responsible for serious violations of such law, including sexual violence, to be held accountable;

8.     Commends the efforts by UNISFA in carrying out its mandate, expresses its deep appreciation for the work of the Force Commander and the troop-contributing countries, and expresses its intention to evaluate the mandate of UNISFA in the context of compliance by Sudan and South Sudan with the decisions set forth in this resolution, and with the fulfilment of their commitments as set out in the June 20, June 29, and July 30, 2011 Agreements;

9.     Stresses the importance of, and the need to restore, a comprehensive, just and lasting peace between Sudan and South Sudan;

10.   Decides to remain actively seized of this matter.

UN Council aims for Wednesday vote on Sudan crisis

By AFP: Wednesday, May 2  2012 

The UN Security Council hopes to vote Wednesday on a resolution that could threaten Sudan and South Sudan with sanctions if they do not stop fighting, diplomats said.

China and Russia, veto-wielding permanent members, are however leading resistance to any warning of international action against the rival countries, which many fear are headed for all-out war.

Sudan on Tuesday warned its southern neighbour, which split away last year, over widening “aggression” as the South alleged fresh clashes despite an African Union peace initiative in the oil-fuelled conflict.

Khartoum charged that “South Sudan and its army are working to widen the aggression and occupy some disputed points and areas by force. Sudan cannot allow the occupying troops to impose their power.”

More than a week ago South Sudanese soldiers said they had completed a withdrawal from Sudan’s main oil region of Heglig, which they occupied for 10 days, while Sudan launched air strikes across the border.

In New York, a resolution drawn up by the United States calls on the two countries to “immediately cease all hostilities” and withdraw troops to their own territory, in line with the call made by the African Union.

The resolution would threaten “additional measures” under Article 41 of the UN Charter, which allows for non-military sanctions.

China, which has strong trade ties with both Sudan and South Sudan, and Russia traditionally oppose warnings of sanctions. And the resolution could change before any vote, diplomats told AFP.

“This time it is less the Russians and more the Chinese,” one senior Western diplomat said on condition of anonymity. “If they keep on not liking it, they might abstain. I don’t think they will veto.”

China is more likely to accept the resolution as the request for possible sanctions has come from the African Union.

“It is much more difficult for the Chinese and Russians to say no to an AU request than a Western plan,” the envoy added.

Under the resolution, the two countries would have two weeks to “unconditionally” start talks under AU mediation on borders and sharing oil revenues, and they would have three months to conclude an accord.

UN leader Ban Ki-moon would have to report to the Security Council every two weeks on the crisis.

China and Russia are nervous even though no automatic sanctions are mentioned, diplomats said. “They oppose even the mention of Article 41,” one diplomat told AFP.

Speaking after talks with Sudan’s Foreign Minister Ali Karti in Moscow on Monday, Russia’s Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said his country was ready to support the resolution.

“It may include measures of economic pressure. But I would repeat that this is not an automatic decision, but only an intention depending on how the resolution is implemented,” he told reporters.

http://www.nation.co.ke/News/africa/UN+Council+aims+for+Wednesday+vote+on+Sudan+crisis/-/1066/1397996/-/167lcg/-/index.html


By Ian Timberlake (AFP)

KHARTOUM — Khartoum on Thursday said it seeks peace with South Sudan and hopes the small country responds favourably to African Union and UN resolutions for ending hostilities.

“The government of Sudan confirms her own strategic calls to have peace between the two states and it hopes the government of South Sudan gives a positive reaction to the African and UN Security Council resolutions,” the foreign ministry’s spokesman, Al-Obeid Meruh, said in a statement.

While recommitting Khartoum to African Union (AU) efforts to end hostilities between Sudan and South Sudan, the foreign ministry’s statement was vague in its response to a United Nations resolution backing the AU plan.

The UN Security Council on Wednesday ordered Sudan and the South to halt hostilities in 48 hours or face possible sanctions, giving diplomatic muscle to AU efforts to end violence and get peace negotiations started.

“The Minister of Foreign Affairs renews the position of the government of Sudan and her commitment to African solutions to African problems and conflicts,” said Meruh.

He said the minister, Ali Karti, also confirmed his readiness to cooperate with the AU mediation process led by Thabo Mbeki, the former South African president.

Sudan withdrew from that process after South Sudan began a 10-day occupation of the north’s main oil field in Heglig last month, a move which coincided with air strikes against the South and raised fears of all-out war.

The African Union itself, in a decision last Tuesday, asked the Security Council to endorse its demand that the two Sudans halt hostilities, start talks within two weeks and complete a peace accord in three months.

With China and Russia joining growing calls for a stop to the border conflict, which began in late March, the 15-member Security Council unanimously passed a resolution backing the AU effort.

Warning of a looming “full scale and sustained war,” US ambassador Susan Rice told the council “both countries are on the brink of returning to the horrors of the past and threaten to take the entire region with them.”

While still one country, north and south Sudan fought a two-decade civil war up to 2005 in which more than two million people died.

Tensions have quickly risen since the South’s independence in July last year with a series of issues unresolved.

South Sudan’s Minister for Cabinet Affairs Deng Alor Kuol offered his country’s “solemn commitment” to follow the resolution.

But he appealed to the United Nations to “urgently mobilise humanitarian assistance for the population affected by Sudan’s continuous aerial bombardments and ground incursions” into the South.

Sudan’s UN ambassador Daffa-Alla Elhag Ali Osman expressed reservations about the resolution, however.

“Peace between the two republics, Sudan and South Sudan, will only be achieved by halting all forms of support and sheltering proxy rebel and armed groups espoused by South Sudan,” Osman told the council.

On Tuesday Sudan’s foreign ministry said it had notified the AU that it agreed to the roadmap, but it also warned the South over widening “aggression”.

The South in turn alleged fresh armed clashes.

Sudan on Saturday expressed concern about an unspecified “hidden agenda” and rejected UN Security Council involvement.

After Khartoum’s military said it had forced the South out of Heglig, Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir vowed there would be no more talks with the the South, whose government he earlier described as an “insect” that must be eliminated.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5h7M28u7ZpvmVKMFRlEgys0xyLxsQ?docId=CNG.c804074b47587f04a7aa2c63af6ce86f.561

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May 02, 2012 South Sudan: Kosti Returnees Denied Aid, Forced Out Hannah McNeish | Juba,South Sudan South Sudan is voicing concern for southerners stuck at a way station in Sudan who are being forced to leave within days. Sudan has ordered between 
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UN gives Sudan, South Sudan ultimatum to halt hostilities
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UNITED NATIONS (AFP) – The UN Security Council on Wednesday unanimously passed a resolution giving Sudan and South Sudan 48 hours to halt hostilities or face sanctions. With China and Russia joining the growing calls for a halt to the growing border 
EU Gets South Sudan Ceasefire Assurance
CRIENGLISH.com
South Sudan has agreed to abide by the peace resolutions agreed with Sudan under the African Union appointed peace mediation committee, South Sudan officials confirmed to the European Union Commissioner for Development, Andris Piebalgs.
Sudan says it seeks peace with South
FOX 4 News
KHARTOUM, Sudan — Sudan on Thursday said it seeks peace with South Sudan and hopes the small country responds favorably to African Union and UN resolutions for ending hostilities. “The government of Sudan confirms her own strategic calls to have peace 

UN sanctions threat against Sudan-South Sudan
STLtoday.com
In an attempt to avert a new war in Africa, the UN Security Council unanimously approved a resolution Wednesday threatening non-military sanctions against Sudan and South Sudan if they don’t halt escalating violence and return to negotiations.

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By Kun Li TORIT, South Sudan, 2 May 2012 – There was only sorghum for lunch, but it didn’t make the preparation any simpler. 12 April 2012: UNICEF correspondent Kun Li reports on UNICEF’s efforts to treat malnutrition in the newly formed nation of 

Sudan/South Sudan; North Korea; Afghanistan; “Born too Soon” report; and more
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Sudan/S. Sudan: The Security Council today adopted a unanimous resolution calling on Sudan andSouth Sudan to immediately end hostilities and resume negotiations within two weeks to resolve all outstanding issues, and voiced its intention to take 

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By Simon Allison, 2 May 2012 A South African citizen has been kidnapped by the Sudanese army. Our government is outraged, but what of the ANC? Far from condemning the abduction, the ruling party is making nice with Sudan’s ruling party, promising to 
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Two diplomats at Uganda’s embassy in Juba yesterday sustained injuries after a plane carrying them crash-landed at South Sudan’s Yambio airstrip in Western Equatorial State, according to diplomatic and security sources. The plane’s unnamed pilot and 

By MICHAEL ONYIEGO 04/19/2012 

Sudan South Sudan Conflict

SPLA (South Sudan People’s Liberation Army) vehicles drive on the road from Bentiu to Heglig, on April 17, 2012. (ADRIANE OHANESIAN/AFP/Getty Images)

JUBA, South Sudan — South Sudan repulsed four attacks from Sudan over a 24-hour period as fighting on the border showed no signs of slowing, a military official said Thursday. Sudan’s president said the recent violence has “revived the spirit of jihad” in Sudan.

Despite the threats and hostilities, a southern government spokesman said South Sudan was only defending its territory and considers Sudan a “friendly nation.”

South Sudan military spokesman Col. Philip Aguer said three of the attacks were on Wednesday and one was on Thursday. He did not give a death toll.

South Sudan broke away from Sudan last year after a self-determination vote for independence. That vote was guaranteed in a mediated end to decades of civil war between the two sides. But the sides never fully agreed where their shared border lay, nor did they reach agreement on how to share oil wealth that is pumped from the border region.

Instead, the two countries have seen a sharp increase in violence in recent weeks, especially around the oil-producing town of Heglig. Both sides claim Heglig as their own. It lies in a region where the border was never clearly defined.

Aguer said southern troops repulsed one attack by Sudanese troops near Heglig on Wednesday and two attacks in Northern Bahr el Ghazal state. One was repulsed in Western Bahr el Ghazal state early Thursday, he said.

Sudan President Omar al-Bashir on Wednesday threatened to topple the South Sudan government after accusing the south of trying to take down his Khartoum-based government.

Al-Bashir continued his hardline rhetoric on Thursday in an address to a “popular defense” brigade headed to the Heglig area. The ceremony was held in al-Obeid, in northern Kordofan.

“Sudan will cut off the hand that harms it,” said al-Bashir, a career army officer who fought against the southern army, the Sudan People’s Liberation Army, during the 1983-2005 civil war. Al-Bashir seized power in a 1989 military coup.

The capture of Heglig by the South Sudanese “has revived the spirit of jihad and martyrdom among the Sudanese people,” he told the brigade’s 2,300 men, according to the official Sudan News Agency.

In Khartoum, the pro-government Sudanese Media Center said late Wednesday that fighting broke out between the two nations in the Al-Meram area in South Kordofan, with northern troops driving away what it called “remaining elements” of the SPLA. It said northern troops chased away SPLA fighters who fled across the border into South Sudan.

It said the fighting left an unspecified number of dead and wounded among the SPLA forces but gave no precise figures.

South Sudan government spokesman Barnaba Marial Benjamin said South Sudan does not consider itself at war with Sudan, but he said the south is defending territory it believes it owns based on borders outlined in 1956 by British colonialists.

“Up to now we have not crossed even an inch into Sudan,” Benjamin said. He added: “The Republic of South Sudan considers the Republic of Sudan to be a neighbor and a friendly nation.”

Benjamin said that southern forces would withdraw from Heglig if the African Union guarantees a cessation of hostilities, an agreement on border demarcation, and the withdrawal of Sudanese forces from the nearby border region of Abyei, with Ethiopian troops moving in as peacekeepers.

Benjamin said that al-Bashir is carrying out “genocide” against Sudanese people in the Darfur, South Kordofan and Blue Nile regions of Sudan. He said al-Bashir’s words Wednesday were a warning that he would like to do the same in South Sudan.

“Can they quote one war fought by the Republic of Sudan fought with any foreign country? They have always used their military artillery to kill the innocent people of Sudan as well as South Sudan,” Benjamin said.

The International Crisis Group said in a new analysis on Thursday that Sudan and South Sudan are “teetering on the brink of all-out war from which neither would benefit.” It said an immediate cease-fire is needed, then solutions to the unresolved post-referendum issues.

“Increasingly angry rhetoric, support for each other’s rebels, poor command and control, and brinkmanship, risk escalating limited and contained conflict into a full-scale confrontation,” the group said. “Diplomatic pressure to cease hostilities and return to negotiations must be exerted on both governments by the region and the United Nations Security Council, as well as such partners as the U.S., China and key Gulf states.”

The U.S. played a large role in brokering the 2005 peace accord between the two sides. China is a big player in the two countries’ oil industry.

___

Associated Press reporter Mohamed Saeed contributed to this report from Khartoum, Sudan.

Sudan-South Sudan Conflict: Sudan Launches Border Attacks, Says Official
Huffington Post
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Sudan launches 4 attacks into South Sudan, official says; gov’t calls Sudan 
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Bashir says Sudan to teach South “final lesson by force”
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By Khalid Abdelaziz and Alexander Dziadosz KHARTOUM (Reuters) – Sudan’s President Omar Hassan al-Bashir threatened war against his newly-independent neighbour on Thursday, vowing to teach South Sudan a “final lesson by force” after it occupied a 

JobsDDG Head of AVR – South Sudan
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Exciting opportunity to join a progressive organisation in a key leadership role and help shape the future of armed violence reduction programming in South Sudan and globally. Danish Demining Group (DDG) is the branch of the Danish Refugee Council 
Sudan launches 4 attacks on South Sudan, official says
Fox News
JUBA, South Sudan – South Sudan repulsed four attacks from Sudan over a 24-hour period as fighting on the border showed no signs of slowing, a military official said Thursday. In a further escalation of rhetoric, Sudan President Omar al-Bashir said 

Official: Sudan launches 4 attacks on South Sudan
Huffington Post
MICHAEL ONYIEGO | April 19, 2012 06:56 AM EST | AP JUBA, South Sudan — South Sudanrepulsed four attacks from Sudan over a 24-hour period as fighting on the border showed no signs of slowing, a military official said Thursday. Despite the hostilities 

South Sudan: The World Bank Group Reiterates Its Commitment to South Sudan’s
AllAfrica.com
Washington — The Republic of South Sudan became the newest World Bank Group member today when the Minister of Finance and Economic Planning, Kosti Manibe Ngai, signed the Bank’s Articles of Agreement and Conventions in Washington DC