Archive for September 27, 2011

South Sudan becomes newest member of UN health agency

Posted: September 27, 2011 by PaanLuel Wël Media Ltd. in Junub Sudan

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27 September 2011 – The world’s newest country, South Sudan, today became a member of the World Health Organization (WHO) after accepting the constitution of the United Nations agency as the annual UN event to promote support for global pacts and conventions drew to a close.

South Sudan, which became independent in July and a UN Member State later the same month, becomes the 194th member of WHO, the world’s pre-eminent health agency. UN Member States automatically become WHO members if they accept its constitution.

The step from South Sudan was one of eight treaty actions taken today at UN Headquarters in New York, bringing the total for the five-day treaty promotion event to 88.

Laos also signed the multilateral agreement for establishing a think tank for landlocked developing countries (LLDCs), which is set to be built in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia.

Togo and Slovenia signed the Nagoya Protocol, a text aimed at encouraging the more equitable sharing of genetic resources and their benefits, while Togo also signed a protocol on biosafety.

Mauritania signed the International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance as well as the Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, which Turkey ratified.

The treaty event is the UN’s annual attempt to encourage States to ratify, accede or sign up to global conventions and therefore promote the application of international law.

http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=39853&Cr=treaty&Cr1=

Sudan conflict set to ‘spiral out of control’ over disputed border

Posted: September 27, 2011 by PaanLuel Wël Media Ltd. in Junub Sudan

Geoffrey york, JOHANNESBURG

When Sudan peacefully split into two countries in July, the world stopped paying attention. The tension seemed to be over: Khartoum had accepted the loss of its southern half, the new nation of South Sudan was born, and decades of civil war had apparently been finally settled.

Yet instead of bringing peace, the birth of South Sudan has triggered a domino-like chain of conflicts in the disputed border regions between north and south. Those conflicts, in turn, are giving power to the hardliners on both sides: army generals who have seized power in Khartoum and rebel forces which are pushing for a new battle against the northern regime.

Two months after the south’s secession, the two countries are teetering on the brink of total war. Fighting has flared up in the contested border regions, the north is using brutal military tactics to impose its will on those regions, and crucial talks on unresolved disputes have broken down. Clashes and street protests have even spread to Darfur and East Sudan, broadening the front lines of the conflict.

“There is a real possibility of a new era of protracted civil war in Sudan,” the International Crisis Group warned in a new report.

“Fighting could expand quickly within Sudan and spill over into South Sudan,” it said. “The conflict in Sudan may spiral out of control and engulf the region.”

Khartoum has already wielded its military power to seize control of the disputed regions of Abyei, Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile over the past few months. Satellite images suggest that about 3,000 northern troops are massing in Blue Nile for a potential assault on rebel forces. “The satellite images reveal a wall of armour, including what appear to be main battle tanks, towed artillery, infantry fighting vehicles, armoured personnel carriers and troop transports, apparently accompanied by half a dozen Hind attack helicopters,” said a report by the U.S.-based Satellite Sentinel Project.

Reports by human-rights groups have documented how Khartoum’s air force has killed and maimed dozens of civilians in an indiscriminate bombing campaign in Southern Kordofan, forcing thousands of civilians to flee to caves and mountaintops, where they live in harsh conditions. “The Sudanese government is literally getting away with murder,” said a recent report by Amnesty International.

Across the disputed border regions, hundreds of thousands of ordinary people have been displaced from their homes – including 25,000 who fled from Blue Nile state into neighbouring Ethiopia in recent days, according to the United Nations refugee agency.

In an ominous sign of looming war, hard-line army generals in Khartoum appear to have led a “soft coup” within the ruling party, and their preference is for military tactics, rather than peace talks. Rebel forces in Darfur and Southern Kordofan, meanwhile, have forged a new alliance against the Khartoum regime, adding fuel to the tensions.

International pressure might be the only way to prevent full-scale war in Sudan. Yet the international community, especially the United States, seems to have lost interest in Sudan following the official independence of South Sudan in July.

The fate of the disputed regions, including Blue Nile and Southern Kordofan, was supposed to be settled by “popular consultations” in the border regions, according to a peace agreement between the south and north in 2005. But those consultations were never properly held, and both sides seem to be switching back to military tactics now.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/africa-mideast/sudan-conflict-set-to-spiral-out-of-control-over-disputed-border/article2182482/

South Sudan signs cooperation pact with AfDB

Posted: September 27, 2011 by PaanLuel Wël Media Ltd. in Junub Sudan

The African Development Bank (AfDB) has signed an agreement with the South Sudanese government to enable the bank to extend financial support to the world’s newest state, the AfDB said in a statement on Monday.

AfDB President Donald Kaberuka and South Sudanese Finance Minister Kosti Manibe Ngai, signed the general cooperation agreement in Washington, on the sidelines of the International Monetary Fund/World Bank annual meeting.

The agreement allows the AfDB to begin offering financial and technical aid to the South Sudanese government, pending its full membership of the AfDB.

The Bank President said the board of governors had endorsed the cooperation agreement with South Sudan, which would enable the bank to boost its presence in South Sudan, which clocked two months old on 9 September, 2011.

South Sudan welcomed the endorsement of the country’s national development plan and welcomed the pledged financial assistance ahead of the country’s full membership.

Ngai said the expected funding from the bank would enable the infant nation to fast-track the implementation of the projects identified under the development plan.

Kaberuka emphasized the urgent need to have the AfDB on the ground in South Sudan, saying: “This urgent need was appreciated by all the bank stakeholders, who accepted a fast-track approval of this general cooperation agreement.”

http://www.afriquejet.com/south-sudan-signs-cooperation-pact-with-afdb-2011092723321.html

As peace unravels, Sudan teeters on the brink of war again

Posted: September 27, 2011 by PaanLuel Wël Media Ltd. in Junub Sudan

The following post is part of a new series that brings a fresh perspective to global news from our team of foreign correspondents

After decades of near-constant civil war, Sudan seemed to have finally found a peaceful compromise, allowing its southern half to break away into independence this year. But now the peace is unraveling – and the two new countries could be on the brink of war again.

Fighting has flared up in several contested regions of Sudan. The north is using brutal military tactics to impose its will on the disputed regions. And talks between Khartoum and the newly independent country of South Sudan have broken down, leaving rebel militias on the verge of war against the north again.

“There is a real possibility of a new era of protracted civil war in Sudan,” the International Crisis Group has warned in a new report.

“Fighting could expand quickly within Sudan and spill over into South Sudan,” it said. “The conflict in Sudan may spiral out of control and engulf the region.”

Khartoum has already wielded its military power to seize control of the disputed regions of Abyei, Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile over the past few months. Sudanese warplanes have bombed civilians in Southern Kordofan, and satellite images have shown that thousands of northern troops are massing in Blue Nile for another potential assault.

Across the disputed regions, hundreds of thousands of ordinary people have been forced to flee for their lives – including 25,000 who fled from Blue Nile state into neighbouring Ethiopia in recent days, according to the latest reports from the United Nations refugee agency.

In another ominous sign of an escalating war, hardline army generals in Khartoum appear to have led a “soft coup” within the ruling party, and their preference is for military tactics, rather than peace talks. Rebel forces in Darfur and Southern Kordofan, meanwhile, have forged a new alliance against the Khartoum regime, threatening to trigger another war.

International pressure might be the only way to prevent full-scale war in Sudan. Yet the international community, especially the United States, seems to have lost interest in Sudan following the official independence of South Sudan in July – which was apparently Washington’s chief priority in Sudan.

The fate of the disputed regions, including Blue Nile and Southern Kordofan, was supposed to be settled by “popular consultations” in the regions, according to a peace agreement between the south and north in 2005. Yet those consultations were never properly held, and both sides are switching back to military tactics.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/africa-mideast/as-peace-unravels-sudan-teeters-on-the-brink-of-war-again/article2181437/

South Sudan could shake up Nile River status quo

Posted: September 27, 2011 by PaanLuel Wël Media Ltd. in Junub Sudan

South Sudan wants to join the regional organization that handles disputes over the Nile River’s water resources, putting pressure on members to figure out a more detailed policy.

By Alex Thurston, Guest blogger / September 27, 2011

A barge arrives at the Nile port of Kosti at White Nile State on Sept. 21, 2011. Traders from Khartoum have been shipping food and consumer articles to newly independent South Sudan, with at least four container barges serving the trade route bound for the south, leaving Kosti every week.

Even before South Sudan’s independence, countries like Egypt became nervous about how the creation of the tenth Nile Basin state would affect the region’s delicate water politics. Would South Sudan side, as Sudan had (and still does), with Egypt and promote the status quo (which gives a large share of the Nile to Egypt)? Or would the new country join the upstream countries, led by Ethiopia, that are demanding a larger share of the Nile for themselves?

After independence, South Sudan struck a conciliatory tone toward both Egypt and Ethiopia, but two developments will definitely attract Egypt’s attention. First, South Sudan wants to formally join the Nile Basin Initiative, the organization that is attempting to resolve the disputes over the region’s water. This request will surprise no one and indeed it makes eminent sense, but it is a reminder to Egypt that South Sudan will soon have to develop a more detailed Nile policy, one that will inevitably tilt in one direction or another.

Second, South Sudan has announced plans to build a hydropower dam near the city of Wau. Wau sits on the Jur River, a tributary of the Bahr el Ghazal River which is itself a tributary of the White Nile. South Sudan’s dam is not intended, it seems to me, as an act of aggression, but the move will remind neighbors that this new country has pressing energy, infrastructure, and resource needs.

Egypt’s new government, judging by its outreach to Ethiopia, wants a solution to the Nile dispute. As the case of South Sudan shows, there are many moving parts in the equation, but it does seem that the status quo will have to change, and in fact may be changing already.

Alex Thurston is a PhD student studying Islam in Africa at Northwestern University and blogs at Sahel Blog.

http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Africa/Africa-Monitor/2011/0927/South-Sudan-could-shake-up-Nile-River-status-quo

SOUTH SUDAN: Heading for severe food shortages

Posted: September 27, 2011 by PaanLuel Wël Media Ltd. in Junub Sudan

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Photo: Jared Ferrie/IRIN

WFP has expressed concern about rising food insecurity as fuel and commodity prices rise (file photo)

JUBA, 27 September 2011 (IRIN) – UN agencies are warning that newly independent South Sudan will face chronic food shortages next year due to internal and border insecurity, erratic rains and a huge influx of returnees from the North.

The UN Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) said a Rapid Crop Assessment carried out in August showed South Sudan was likely to produce 420,000-500,000MT of food this year – half the required amount.

Elijah Mukhala, FAO food security specialist, said it estimated 1.2 million people would be “severely food-insecure” next year, compared with 970,000 last year, with the deficit set to increase by about a quarter from 300,000MT last year.

“We made gains in 2010. Right now, all these gains are being reversed, and the two main issues are insecurity and rainfall”, causing shortages and price rises in both countries, FAO food security coordinator Mtendere Mphatso said.

Separated, not divorced

South Sudan gained independence from the north in July 2011 after decades of civil war that killed around two million and left the country in ruins. But while secession was peaceful, violence in border areas in Sudan has flared for months. Tens of thousands of refugees have fled southwards from Southern Kordofan, Abyei and Blue Nile, with returnees from Khartoum and subsequent border closures placing a further strain on the now landlocked nation still dependent on the North for most goods.

“For 2012, we are worried for food production on the northern side as they have also had erratic rains,” Mphatso said. In addition, the North has lost many South Sudanese farm labourers, which could result in dramatic price increases and food insecurity for all but the three southern states.

UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator Lise Grande said more than three million people (36 percent of the population) in South Sudan were classed as moderately or severely food insecure in 2011, and the burden was increasing.

More than 340,000 people have arrived in South Sudan since January, and internal violence has pushed around the same number again away from their homes and fields.

In South Sudan, waves of inter-communal fighting, including cattle rustling, fights over water holes and retaliation attacks, as well as between rebel militia, have left thousands dead or displaced. More than 600 people were killed in August in eastern Jonglei state alone after cattle raids, and the UN says it has dealt with 34 separate emergency operations this year.

Running out of food

“A lot of those people who were coming back were poor. They were running,” Grande said of the massive influx around the January secession referendum. While 80 percent have been resettled, the lack of jobs in a country where the majority rely on small-scale farming and those coming from the north have to transition their skills from urban to rural, is also cause for concern.

This year, World Food Programme (WFP) has fed 1.8 million vulnerable people with 62,000MT of food, while late harvests prolonged the usual May-to-August hunger season by a month.

But with a 13,500MT food shortfall, WFP is concerned about rising food insecurity as fuel and commodity prices rocket.

When 110,000 people fled south after Sudanese military forces occupied the contested border town Abyei in May, pre-positioned food was ready to cater for 112,000. However, Grande said nobody had estimated the situation would last this long, and now food was running out and rains had cut off areas where large numbers of refugees were stuck.

About 40,000 people still in the swampy border town of Agok (45km south of Abyei) have been on half rations this month due to access problems. Recent flash floods mean this situation could continue into October, as trucks carrying 170MT of government-donated food from Kwajok, the state capital of Warrup, to the south, cannot get through.

In the other neighbouring state of Northern Bahr el-Ghazal, WFP says a quarter of the population is severely food-insecure.

Santino Longar, assistant commodity auditor for World Vision International in Kwajok, said there was no more food for the community of 21,000 as an influx of 13,000 internally displaced peoples (IDPs) had exhausted pre-positioned supplies.

“The food used to come from the north, but since the crisis [of
Abyei], the road is closed,” Longar said. Poor rains and a late harvest could push tensions in the host communities to violence, as seen in the nearby town Tonj, he added.

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Photo: Maryline Dumas/IRIN
Insecurity and erratic rains are reversing gains made in 2010 on food security (file photo)

“The food at the market is very expensive and at times, in some places you don’t find it,” he added, saying life for the IDPs and returnees in Warrup state was very bad.

Security issues

In addition to refugees from Abyei, demobilized South Sudanese troops marching back south on empty stomachs have created further resource problems.

Grande said UN humanitarian operations were being hampered by 116 incidents involving mainly looting or violence towards staff by rebel militia and the Sudan Peoples’ Liberation Army (SPLA), and the laying of new mines.

Two UN staff members were killed in an attack in May after SPLA troops commandeered six vehicles.

More than 8,000 new refugees have entered the country, fleeing violence in neighbouring Southern Kordofan, while 7,500 more have fled attacks from Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) in the southwest.

The FAO predicts that all but three southern states will face major food shortages due to insecurity and problems near the Sudan border.

Price hikes

There is a steady flow of goods from Uganda and Kenya, but in Juba’s crowded market, fruit and vegetable sellers say they are not earning enough.

“We are making a very small profit now. All things now, they are expensive: green beans, rice, fruits,” said Simaiya Nassara, a vendor who buys produce from her native Uganda.

South Sudan’s National Bureau of Statistics says the inflation rate rose 9 percent last month, and more than 57 percent compared to August 2010.

"The biggest problem we are having here is taxes, and fuel in the whole country. That’s why the price of food is very expensive. All the food is coming from Uganda. Even Khartoum, now they divided the country, things will be difficult now… and prices will also go up," said vendor Margaret Akulu, who says some produce is now impossible to get because of northern blockades.

Market vendors said local authorities increased three-monthly permits for the tiny stalls from 150 (US$35) South Sudanese pounds to 1,110 ($280). This, in addition to more checkpoints and traffic police charging food trucks from the Ugandan border, would push up prices further.

The government recently pledged to crack down on corruption, seen as the new nation’s major stumbling block, starting with the removal of 13 illegal checkpoints in the capital, and work with local businesses to try to curb rising food prices in a country that is a net importer of almost all food.

Only 4 percent of available agricultural land is cultivated, despite South Sudan’s fertile soil.

The lack of basic infrastructure seriously hampers its ability to feed itself and the World Bank has identified agricultural support and road-building as priorities in the world’s newest nation. Before that, however, the violence must stop.

hm/mw
http://www.irinnews.org/report.aspx?reportid=93832


By Laura Smith-Spark, CNN
updated 3:22 PM EST, Tue September 27, 2011

The Globe Theatre will host 37 Shakespeare plays in 37 languages.
The Globe Theatre will host 37 Shakespeare plays in 37 languages.

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • Shakespeare’s plays will be presented in 37 different languages
  • Theater companies from all over the world are taking part
  • Among them are groups from South Sudan, Afghanistan and the United States
  • The Globe to Globe festival is part of London’s Olympic build-up

(CNN) — It will be Shakespeare as nobody has seen it before. Over six weeks next spring, London’s Globe Theatre will present all 37 of the Bard’s plays in 37 languages, performed by companies from as many countries.

Theater groups from the newly independent nation of South Sudan and conflict-torn Afghanistan, as well as the Balkans, China, New Zealand, South Africa, Italy, France, Russia and Belarus will be among those taking part.

One play, Love’s Labour’s Lost, will be performed entirely in British Sign Language (BSL), used by the deaf community, while the Q Brothers from Chicago will stage Othello in hip hop.

Tom Bird, festival director for the Globe to Globe event — which will run from April to June as part of the “cultural Olympiad” ahead of the London 2012 Olympics — told CNN it was the most ambitious project of its kind.

Between a third and a half of the plays to be staged had already been adapted into the various languages, but the festival’s organizers also traveled widely looking for talented theater groups to create new adaptations.

They were “completely bowled over” by the enthusiasm shown for the project by countries around the world, he said, and had to make some difficult decisions about who would make the cut.

“The tricky thing is we can’t get everyone in, so we thought a little bit about the languages that are spoken in London, like Urdu, Yoruba and Polish,” Bird said.

“We also looked at countries that have a great long history of performing Shakespeare, like Georgia and Armenia, and finally if there was a very good show, we could take that anyway.”

Some of the groups chosen to take part face “incredible obstacles that no European or Western theater company would have to put up,” he said.

The actors from Afghanistan had been rehearsing in the British Council compound in the capital, Kabul, that was attacked last month, leaving eight people dead and twice as many injured. “Luckily they weren’t there on that day, but it was really a very, very lucky miss,” Bird said.

The Afghan actors cannot currently get visas for Britain in Kabul, so will have to rehearse The Comedy of Errors in India and then travel to London from there, he said.

Acting involving both men and women, the latter not always covering their heads, also presents a cultural challenge, he added.

The theater company from South Sudan gave its first performance at independence day celebrations this summer, as the new nation emerged from decades of civil conflict.

The group will perform William Shakespeare’s Cymbeline in Juba Arabic, in what will be “a great moment in the history of the country,” Bird said.

The three plays of Henry VI, about England’s first great civil war of the 15th century, will be staged as a Balkan trilogy by the national theaters of Serbia, Albania and Macedonia, whose actors can draw on the region’s recent turbulent past.

Globe to Globe’s statement points to the Belarus Free Theater — which will perform King Lear — as “the world’s bravest theater company” for its work, “which it does in spite of the threat of state persecution.”

The Palestinian group Ashtar Theater, from Ramallah, will present Richard III in Palestinian Arabic, while the Israeli National Theater company Habima will perform The Merchant of Venice in Hebrew.

Bird hopes the range of languages represented will bring a new audience to the Globe, a reproduction of the original Elizabethan theater on the banks of the River Thames in which William Shakespeare himself had a stake.

An estimated 60,000 Bangla speakers live in London’s inner city Tower Hamlets area, he said — and the festival organizers hope many will want to see The Tempest performed in that tongue.

Some of the 130,000 Brazilians in London could also flock to the Globe to see Romeo and Juliet performed in Brazilian Portuguese by a troupe from Belo Horizonte.

As for those theater enthusiasts who don’t speak a myriad of languages?

They won’t find a line-by-line subtitling of each play, Bird said, but a synopsis will be provided so people can follow the gist of what is happening — and performances will be limited to no more than two-and-a-quarter hours in length. Audiences can also enjoy experiencing performance styles, costumes and music from the four corners of the world.

“We want people to really listen to the language, even if they don’t understand it,” Bird said. “We hope they will enjoy hearing these familiar stories in an unfamiliar language.”

Tickets will be on sale to the public from October 17. The Globe to Globe festival starts April 23, William Shakespeare’s birthday.

http://www.cnn.com/2011/09/27/world/europe/uk-shakespeare/

World is truly a stage for London Shakespeare fest

Actors perform in Shakepeare's Henry VIII at the Globe theatre in London July 6, 2010. REUTERS/Luke MacGregor

Actors perform in Shakepeare’s Henry VIII at the Globe theatre in London July 6, 2010.

Credit: Reuters/Luke MacGregor

LONDON | Tue Sep 27, 2011 5:26am EDT

LONDON (Reuters) – London’s Globe theatre on Tuesday said it will host all of Shakespeare’s 37 plays performed in 37 languages by 37 companies in a stage festival with acting troupes from Afghanistan and newly independent South Sudan.

“Globe to Globe” will run for six weeks, starting from its launch on April 23 next year. It is part of the London 2012 Festival, itself the climax of the Cultural Olympiad, a four-year celebration of arts and culture in Britain leading up to the summer Olympics in the capital city next year.

Globe to Globe kicks off with an adaptation of Shakespeare’s poem “Venus and Adonis” performed in Zulu, Xhosa, Sotho, Tswana, Afrikaans and South African English.

The plays proper get underway on April 23 with “Troilus and Cressida” staged in Maori and featuring the traditional “haka” dance.

“The Merry Wives of Windsor” is performed in Swahili, “Richard III” in Mandarin, “Richard II” in Palestinian Arabic and “Othello” in hip-hop.

The three Henry VI plays about England’s civil war are presented as an “epic and sweeping Balkan trilogy,” organisers said on Tuesday, featuring national theatres from Serbia, Albania and Macedonia.

From Afghanistan, and leaving Kabul for the first time, is theatre company Roy-e-Sabs with “The Comedy of Errors,” while a specially-formed troupe from the world’s newest country South Sudan will perform “Cymbeline.”

Belarus Free Theatre, dubbed by the Globe as “the world’s bravest theatre company,” stages “King Lear” while Deafinitely Theatre from London will translate the pun-riddled text of “Love’s Labour’s Lost” into British sign language.

Fittingly for a theatre project designed to coincide with the Olympics, the Globe is offering what it calls the “Yard Olympian” allowing the buyer to see all 37 plays and one poem for 100 pounds. (Reporting by Mike Collett-White; Editing by Bob Tourtellotte)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/09/27/uk-stage-shakespeare-idUSLNE78Q00N20110927

South Sudan cracks down on soaring crime

Posted: September 27, 2011 by PaanLuel Wël Media Ltd. in Junub Sudan

Juba – South Sudan vowed on Tuesday to crack down on the flow of people and goods to the newly independent country, amid fears of terrorism and soaring crime levels that the government blames on outsiders.

Interior Minister Alison Monani Magaya said strengthening the country’s police forces to tackle rebel groups, disarmament and a spike in serious crime was a priority.

"It’s never been a part of our life here, and according to intelligence, these people are coming from outside, from neighbouring countries. They are committing sophisticated crimes such as armed robberies on shops and people," Magaya told a news conference.

He was unable to provide statistics but said the southern capital Juba had been particularly hit by an influx of criminals, spawning money counterfeiting and drugs operations.

The government hopes a new database to screen and track foreigners will curb concerns over people pouring into the new country unchecked and South Sudan ranking fifth in the Terrorism Risk Index published last month.

It also promised tighter border controls with Sudan, having identified around 27 entry points for vehicles.

"We are also concerned that terrorism will come here because of our weak infrastructure, and so we are setting up an anti-terrorism unit. We are taking this very seriously," said Information Minister Barnaba Marial Benjamin.

He said the Ugandan rebel Lord’s Resistance Army was operating near the border with Chad, supported by the Sudanese government, and was still a threat to the economy and security in the west of the country.

Trained by Khartoum

"These people that we are aware of are being trained by Khartoum to hit us with two stones," said Benjamin, accusing the north of wanting to destabilise South Sudan and its neighbours.

Some rebel groups have responded to President Salva Kiir’s amnesty promise, including up to 10 000 troops under renegade general Peter Gadet who were successfully integrated last month.

But Benjamin said a steady supply of weapons from the north was undermining the government’s efforts.

Fighters loyal to renowned rebel leader George Athor were still a major threat to people’s security, he added, warning the amnesty offer was not "open-ended, and a government has a duty to protect its citizens".

Magaya said it was a "big task" to strengthen and professionalise South Sudan’s police force, widely viewed as corrupt and heavy handed by the public.

But he underlined the government’s intention to raise standards, and expressed hope a permanent police presence in all states would boost security and disarmament after decades of civil war that left the region awash with weapons.

http://www.news24.com/Africa/News/South-Sudan-cracks-down-on-soaring-crime-20110927

PaanLuel Wël:Washington DC, USA.
https://paanluelwel2011.wordpress.com/

Sudan vows at UN to settle remaining disputes with South Sudan

Posted: September 27, 2011 by PaanLuel Wël Media Ltd. in Junub Sudan

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Ali Ahmed Karti, Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Republic of the Sudan

26 September 2011 – Sudan is committed to resolving all the remaining disputes related to its peace accord with South Sudan, including border demarcation issues and the division of oil revenues, the country’s Foreign Minister told the General Assembly today.

Ali Ahmed Karti told the Assembly’s annual general debate that his country had accepted South Sudan’s decision to secede in July – not because it did not want unity, but because it wanted stability and sustainable peace.

South Sudanese voted overwhelmingly for separation in a referendum at the start of the year, held as part of the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) that ended the long-running north-south civil war in Sudan.

But the two countries remain divided on some issues since secession, including how to divide revenues from oil production and the exact border between them.

In his address Mr. Karti said the Government in Khartoum was also giving priority to resolving the conflict in the western region of Darfur, which has been waged since 2003.

He backed the recently signed Doha Document for Peace in Darfur, a Qatari-mediated agreement aimed at spurring an eventual comprehensive accord to end the conflict, saying it responded to all the aspirations of the people of the remote and arid region.

Mr. Karti said the resettlement of internally displaced persons (IDPs) and refugees as a result of the conflict was now one of the key elements of the Government’s strategy to bring peace back to Darfur, where rebel groups have fought Government forces and allied militiamen.

Mr. Karti met today with Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, and the UN chief commended Khartoum for its peaceful implementation of the South Sudan referendum. He encouraged the Foreign Minister to work towards resolving all remaining issues.

But Mr. Ban voiced concern over continued deadly fighting in Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile states, which lie next to the border with South Sudan, and he called on the Sudanese Government to make progress so that a cessation of hostilities can be struck and humanitarian workers can reach those affected by the fighting.

http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=39818&Cr=sudan&Cr1=