Archive for the ‘Education’ Category


Importance of Using Information Communication and Technology Education (ICT) In Learning, Teaching and Working Process

By Ustaz John Garang Ayii Riak, Zhejiang, China

The author, Ustaz John Garang Ayii Riak, is a Master’s Degree Student on Comparative Education Program, Zhejiang Normal University, East China
The author, Ustaz John Garang Ayii Riak, is a Master’s Degree Student on Comparative Education Program, Zhejiang Normal University, East China

Tuesday, 02 July 2019 (PW) —- In recent years, several studies and reports have highlighted the opportunities and the potential benefits of using ICT for improving the quality of education and work. ICT is regarded as a “main tool for constructing knowledge culture (UNESCO, 2001). It can be noted that ICT education in schools in the 21st Century continues to face some challenges in developing societies. The European Commission is promoting the use of ICT in learning processes through its eLearning Action Plan, one of the aims of which is “to improve the quality of learning by facilitating access to resources and services as well as remote exchange and collaboration” (Commission of the Europe, 2001).

Information and communication technology (ICT) is a force that has changed many aspects of the way we live. If one was to compare such fields as medicine, tourism, travel business, law, banking, engineering and architecture, the impact of ICT across the past two or three decades has been enormous. The way these fields operate today is vastly different from the ways they operated in the past. But when one looks at education, there seems to have been an uncanny lack of influence and far less change than other fields have experienced. A number of people have attempted to explore this lack of activity and influence (eg. Soloway and Prior, 1996; Collis, 2002).

(more…)

By Ustaz John Garang Ayii Riak, Zhejiang, China

Friday, June 28, 2019 (PW) —- When South Sudan gained her independence in 2011 from Sudan is trying to fix its’ education, in order to have its own recognizable educational system like any other country in the world, but there are many challenges that are dragging back its educational development and such factors that annihilating and thrashing the educational development included wars conflicts that are resulted from political struggling by greedy politicians who are impatient to give the president a chance to complete his term. Another key factor that is affecting education is ongoing endless and awful economic crisis that terrorized every citizen in the country and lack of sufficient and well qualified teachers in the country.

In fact South Sudan is rich with qualified staff but they are not in teaching career due to the lack of funds because many deserted there for NGO jobs. The main aim of writing this article is to appeal to the government importance of education toward the national building in order it should prioritize and inject more money into the education sector because the relation between educational development and financial inputs South Sudan as a young nation cannot develop without the government periodization because there is a serious need to invest a lot of money in the education unit in order to speed up the development and improvement of our national education system, today the money given to the education sector is too insufficient since education demands a lot, such as teachers’ salary and operational cost plus other allowances.

(more…)

South Sudanese Students in Zimbabwe Shut Down the South Sudanese Embassy in Harare Over Unpaid $1.4 million School Arrears that was approved by the Council of Ministers in Juba, South Sudan

By Mabil Manyok Nhial, Gweru, Zimbabwe

South Sudanese Student Shut Down the Embassy in Harare.jpg
South Sudanese Student Shut Down the Embassy in Harare.jpg

Wednesday, June 19, 2019 (PW) — A group of 130 South Sudanese students on a Government Scholarship, have, today shut down the Embassy of South Sudan to Southern African Countries of Zimbabwe, Malawi and Mozambique, which is based in Harare, Zimbabwe. The South Sudanese Students came to Zimbabwe four ago on a Government Scholarship with the hope of coming to study their various courses and going back with their academic documents. However, what has now seen the light of day is sadly unfortunate. Some 79 students, who recently finished their four-year programmes, have been denied their academic testimonials as a result of substantial arrears, which the Government of South Sudan has not yet paid.

All 130 students have now occupied and shut down the Embassy because they believe that the Embassy of South Sudan to three Southern African countries, based in Harare, represents their Government. They tried all the possible means to talk to the Government, but their intention did not bear any fruits. Therefore, they decided to occupy and shut the Embassy down because this would give pressure to the Minister of Finance to release the approved amount of money as soon as reasonably needed.   

Zimbabwean Public Universities have been so kind in that they have been providing accommodation, feeding and lectures to students even when the arrears have not been cleared. Now, these universities have been forced by the situation to deny giving students their transcripts because of fees, which have not been paid for three semesters. Students’ fees in their accounts have gone as high as US$7000 and above per student.

(more…)

Final Report on Our Trips conducting Educational Development Researches Across China, 2017-2019

Prepared by Mr-John Monyluak Thon Lal, Master’s Degree Student/ Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua City, China

South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir Mayardit (L) with his Chinese counterpart Hu Jintao

Introduction

Wednesday, May 1, 2019 (PW) — The report will focus on all trips; most of focus will be Hangzhou, Zhejiang, Wuhan and Beijing. But before disseminating the report in details, let explain my bona-fide start for coming to China, first was a initial and a wonderful admission, after when Zhejiang Normal University decided to enroll me as a Master Degree student in The Program of Comparative Education; I officially made my decision to came and study here, because never forgot that a chance came at once and go.

My desire for study in abroad I was specifically interested to study in probably two Countries, the China and Japan, the reason behind this, I though that I am naturally socialistic when viewing the way I want people to live, people should respect each other, always smile, do right things and refrain from bad ones. The humanism should be guided base on natural norms sharing of equal opportunities and cooperation.

These two Countries should have these principles most importantly China. Because I learned a lot about China History especially Mao Zedong and Confucius their history is well known worldwide, These are the reasons allowed me to came, this report will much talk of trips that we had last year in Hangzhou, Wuhan as well as the development in Hangzhou and this University, it will also in collaborate the trip that we had in Beijing.

(more…)

LEARNING EXPERIENCE AND EDUCATIONAL TRAVELS IN CHINA

ByMr. Bek Dhuorjang Chol

Masters of Art Student in Comparative Education 2017/2019, Institute of International and Comparative Education, Zhejiang Normal University – Jinhua, People’s Republic of China

Table of Contents

Table of Contents. i

Executive Summary. i

1.    Introduction – Learning Experience in China. 1

1.1.     A visit to Shanghai city. 1

1.2.     A visit to Shanxi Province and Jingangshan District 2

1.3.     A visit to Beijing and Lesson Learnt 3

1.4.     Chinese Food and Cuisines. 3

2.    Educational Travels in China. 5

2.1.     Academic Trip within Zhejiang Province. 6

2.2.     Academic Trip to Hubei Province. 7

2.3.     Academic Trip to Yunnan Province. 8

2.4.     Academic Trip to Beijing. 9

3.    Obstacles and Subjective Impressions. 10

3.1.     Teaching and Classroom Management 11

3.1.1.      The Dimension of Rational Class: 11

3.1.2.      Helpful Classroom Situation: 12

3.2.     Advanced Technology and Apps. 13

3.3.     Obstacles. 14

4.    Conclusion and Recommendations. 14

 Executive Summary

Sunday, April 28, 2019 (PW) —- My postgraduate learning experience as a foreign international studying away from home and loves ones has been most remarkable, and interesting in terms of having adopted the life one couldn’t imagine before. I consider this paper as an opportunity of brainstorming to pen down such wonderful memories which have a positive impact in one’s life and learning resulting in the development of academic knowledge and skills.

This paper presents personal account on life and educational experience in China since 2017-2019 as a refreshing up memories and highlights some social, historical and cultural aspects of my learning experience and educational travels in China while paying close attention to the progress of technological advancement made by the Chinese higher learning institutions and mechanism to continue improving and maintain contacts with concern authorities as envisaged in the academic code of conduct and principles of shared future for the benefit of the educators, learners and leadership. In addition, it identifies some shortcomings on the relativity of the areas visited; topics presented for discussions and the major being undertaken by the students.

(more…)

The roles of teachers as vibrant agents of change and the enormous challenges besetting their teaching profession

By Abraham Mabior Rioc, Hong Kong, China      

Friday, April 5, 2019 (PW) — The teaching profession in some countries, especially the developing nations, has often been ignored in terms of allocation of enough educational resources to meet the societal goals of quality education. As a result, this renders the profession less desirable when it comes to national intake quota per se and also contributes to low morale among instructors at all levels of education.

In most cases, the position of a teacher is very important in the society for it disseminates important messages and vital information through learning and teaching domains which are pertinent to professional and intellectual development. For this reason, the teaching profession continues to lose its brilliant and qualified manpower to other sectors despite the vital roles they play in the nation building. 

In one of his lectures at St. Lawrence University in Uganda, Prof. J.C Sekamwa, a prominent professor of Education in Uganda had this to say: “Teacher is like a father who loves all his children irrespective of their behaviors and manners”. In a different context, in his teaching, he would always tell us (his students) that teaching, and learning is the opposite side of the same coin and each supplement one another. In this respect, it implies that a teacher is like a biological father or mother who does not discriminate against his or her own children–being the lame, weak, thief, mention them. 

(more…)

“University of Juba Student Activities -history doesn’t forgive and as well it doesn’t forget”

By Bek Dhuorjang Chol, Juba, South Sudan

Bek Dhuorjang Chol
Bek Dhuorjang Chol

Sunday, 31 March 2019 (PW) — Ten (10) years ago, the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement Students League (SPLM SL) in the university had participated in the Juba University Students Union elections and won those elections. In 2009 elections, the SPLM SL in coalition with other students’ organizations won JUSU elections and formed a collegial student’s leadership. During the sitting of the council of forty (40) members, the members elected Majok Ayii Muorwel as speakers of the council and Ahmed Abasher Alkhatim Ashgar who hail from Nuba Mountains as president of JUSU. Abasher appointed Dr. Albino Bol Dhieu as the information secretary and Dr. John Sebit Madit Johnson as academic affairs secretary.

During this period, the SPLM SL and JUSU were vigorously doing great facing a lot of challenges related to the political situation of the country. By then Dr. Lam Akol Ajawin had broken away from the SPLM and founded SPLM DC. The challenges of 2010 elections were ahead while bearing in mind the southern Sudan and Abyei Area referendum, and the popular consultation to the people of the Blue Nile and Nuba Mountains according to the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA). Abasher had demonstrated a very good leadership at the end of his term by having successfully handed over the JUSU back to its rightful members of the general assembly.

(more…)

The role of active bystanders in the provision of quality education during emergency situations in South Sudan

By Abraham Mabior Rioc, Paris, France

education

Friday, March 01, 2019 (PW) — Education has been considered a tool for socio-economic progress at family through national level. For this reason, it remains a desire for the general public to receive an elitism of the education system both during emergency and non-emergency situations. Basically, this enhances the acquisition of quality and relevant skills as well as meaningful knowledge that can answer societal problems in different forms. In most of the developing countries including South Sudan, education has largely been undermined and ignored by policy actors and their implementing political agents. Undeniably, it is clearly manifested in the performance of education system, poor or inadequate tangible educational facilities simply because most of the country’s citizens are passive bystanders within the wider South Sudanese education circle.

 In this setting, South Sudanese are passive bystanders when it comes to the provision of education at all levels. By definition, active bystander is someone who can speak and act immediately when sensing something unusual going on in his or her presence. In contrast, passive bystander is someone who does not take part in the situation or say something at all.  In fact, these types of people exist in every society including at family and bureaucratic levels.  From the perspective of education in emergencies, schools at community level have been affected differently as a result of dynamic cultural, political, and social factors which need immediate interventions from active bystanders. As a point in case, most of the political leaders, academics, and practitioners have always remained inactive when it comes to educational decision-making and immediate intervention in the face of crises. (more…)


Analysis on New Strategy by African Union

Title: Current Difficulties and The way forward the implementation of Continental Strategy for Africa 2016 to 2025

Revised by John Monyluak Thon Lal, MA/Student/Zhejiang Normal University/China

Email: thonlalchuoidit@gmail.com

+8617858993975

AU higher education

Contents

1.1- Introduction. 2

1-2 What is the Agenda 2063?. 2

2-1 The Current Difficulties in Implementing CESA 2016-2025:- 3

2-2 Insecurity and Lack of centers:- 3

2-3 Quality and Equity:- 4

2-4 The difficulties in learning:- 4

2-5 The problem related to low enrollment in secondary education:- 5

2-6 Illiteracy is a challenge:- 5

3-1 The practical Reasons in Implementing CESA 16-25:- 6

1-    First start with AU Vision.. 6

3-2 The core reasons:- 7

3-4 Aims and purposes for the Strategy 16-25:- 10

3-5 Clarification on CESA 16-25:- 11

3-6 The Overview of Sub-Sectors:- 12

3-6-1- Educational Development in Africa: 12

3-6-2 Primary Education:- 13

3-6-3 Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET):- 13

4-1 The Experiences and Lessons of Implementing CESA 16-25:- 14

4-2 Inclusion and Gender equality: 14

4-2-1 Lesson on out-of-school children:- 15

4-2-2 Lesson on Gender Equality Strategy for CESA 16-25:- 15

4-2-3 Lesson on inclusion of Refugees in education sector planning:- 16

4-3 Inclusion of the children with disability and Children with Albinism:- 16

4-4 Promoting Youth and Adult Literacy:- 17

4-5 Secondary Education:- 17

4-5-1 Quality and Equity:- 17

4-5-2 Tertiary Education:- 18

4-5-6 Access to specialization in Africa:- 18

4-6      University education Quality and Equity:- 18

4-7 Informal and non-formal Education and training and illiteracy:- 19

5-1 The More effective ways of implementing CESA 16-25:- 19

5-2 Conferences by PACE:- 20

5-3 Access to implementation:- 21

5-4 Funding Mechanism for Implementation:- 21

5-5 Some African Countries are implementing the policies:- 22

CONCLUSION.. 23

(more…)


Higher Education South Sudan: Action Research to investigate quality of teaching and challenges, in higher education reform in South Sudan – Upper Nile University Case Study

 Mr John Monyluak Thon Lal,  MA/Student Zhejiang Normal University, China

Higher Education in South Sudan

Table of content

Dedication——————————————————————————————————-4

Acknowledgement———————————————————————————————5

Abstract———————————————————————————————————-6

1-1 Introduction————————————————————————————————-7

1-2 Statement of the Problem——————————————————————————–9

1-3 Objective of the Study———————————————————————————-10

1-4 Research Questions————————————————————————————–11

Literature Review

2-1 Background of Higher Education———————————————————————–12

2-2 Higher Education—————————————————————————————–14

2-3 Budget in Use———————————————————————————————15

2-3-1 Research methodology——————————————————————————–16

2-4 Data Analysis———————————————————————————————17

2-5 Economic challenges———————————————————————————–19

2-6 Conclusions———————————————————————————————–20

2-7 Reflections————————————————————————————————22

2-7-1 Recommendations————————————————————————————-23

2-8 References————————————————————————————————-29 (more…)


By Ustaz John Garang Ayii Riak, Bor, South Sudan

The Treasure of South Sudan

  1. Introduction

Saturday, February 2, 2019 (PW) —- South Sudan known, as the Republic of South Sudan is a landlocked Country in East Africa region, which gained its independence on 9th July 2011 from the Sudan. Sudan and its people are marked by more continuous civil war since 1950s, and the lives of people in the South must therefore be understood in terms of the effect of civil war on them. It has been the longest lasting armed conflict in Africa, and has had particularly devastating effects on the population and education especially in south. During the war, the existing schools were turned into empty shells. Children at all levels were left out of school. The main reason was lack of enrolment opportunities, lack of school buildings, rising educational costs for poor families, high dropout rates due to insecurity and inadequate government expenditure especially in HE (UNICEF, 2008; 14).

1.1. Higher Education Institutions’ System (HEIs) 

The HE system is refers to the education offered after secondary school, or HE is any institution above the high school level, Colleges, universities and technical schools are called institutions of higher education where students can enroll in diploma, associate, degree or 4- or 5-year degree programs or Master Degree and PhDs. Institutions are splits into three sub-sectors: Universities, Other Degree Awarding Institutions (ODAI) and Other Tertiary Institutions (OTI) sub sectors. (more…)


By Mabil Manyok Nhial, Gweru, Zimbabwe

 

deng-deng-hoc

Deng Deng Hoc, South Sudan minister for Education

Sunday, January 13, 2019 (PW) — Doing many things at ago is doing nothing! Is it not true and correct that South Sudan is sadly addicted to perennial confusions?! Logic has it that it is wise to do one thing at a time in order that it bears fruits.

As one of the participants in the National Curriculum Review conference that was held in Juba a few days before the December 15 incident erupted, I personally heard the then Undersecretary of Higher Education Science and Technology, Hon. Deng Deng Hoc Yai, now in charge of the Ministry of General Education, enthusiastically emphasising on the adoption of French and Kiswahili as well as native languages apart from ITC at both primary and secondary levels in the curriculum of South Sudan. The hall broke into a thunderous round of applaud since his words were interlaced with those of the majority in the Hall.

Recently, the same Ministry publicly made it known to the citizenry that the government is planning to hire some teachers of Kiswahili from Tanzania. This appeared in the news on 7th July, 2018. Firstly, no one had and still has a gut to question it because it is what is already in the curriculum. Secondly, Kiswahili has been adopted as the official language for the East African Community (EAC), of which South Sudan is a member. (more…)


By Malith Alier, Perth, Australia

corruption in south sudan

Saturday, January 12, 2019 (PW) — Kenyan schools typically reopen in the first week of January and normally go on for three terms  with three breaks to conclude an education year. 2019 goes down as a year when Kenya changes to another system to supersede its old 8.4.4 which has been running for a long time. Competence Based curriculum (CBC) begins in with lower primary and will progress in implementation according to Education Cabinet Secretary (CS), Amina Mohamed.

According to Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, Kenya adopted the 8.4.4 system after it previously used the East African (7-4-2-3) system when the Community disintegrated. Under the leadership of President Moi, the country implemented the system in 1985. It meant 8 years of primary, 4 years of second, and 4 more years of university education. (more…)


The positive implications of embracing Innovative Teaching and Learning Strategies in South Sudan: The Case of the Academic staff of Higher Education in South Sudan.

By Ustaz Abraham Mabior Rioc, Hong Kong, China

Dr. John Gai Yoh on his strategic views of South Sudan Education System

Dr. John Gai Yoh on his strategic views of South Sudan Education System

Friday, January 04, 2019 (PW) —- At the global level, institutions of higher learning are gearing towards innovative teaching and learning strategies that are aimed at producing worthwhile graduates who are job creators rather job seekers. As a result of producing quality outputs with looked-for tertiary education qualifications, most of the world best universities and colleges thrive to gauge their curricula, teaching force and the educational resources at their disposal. In doing so, they measure the best means of the delivery of the subject matter to the learners by employing innovative-based teaching methods. This is done so because of the demands of the labor markets as they change their focus in recruiting graduates who retain a variety of innovative mindsets and skills that can make them stand out as effective workforce in their workstations

By contrast, the tertiary education in South Sudan has a lot of expectations to be desired by its citizens on one hand and accomplished by the government on the other hand. In academic reality, the institutions of higher learning in South Sudan, both private and public, are suffering from lack of innovative teaching and learning skills. As such, this is not because the academic staff are not qualified to deliver the right content in an innovative manner. However, the fact remains that are they are the least motivated workforce across the country in terms of salaries and other benefits that account for professional development. Despite the fact that they possess desired qualifications, experiences, and capabilities, there is a tendency of low morale towards their teaching profession. (more…)


By Muon Matai Muon, Nairobi, Kenya

education-4

Tuesday, August 14, 2018 (PW) —- “If you close your eyes to facts, you will learn through accidents” there goes a conventional African proverb. In recent decades, Africa’s educational landscape has been minimally covered or worse, largely ignored. That is the best case scenario. The worst case has been that those who take the bull by the horns come not from within but outside our map. Throughout time and space, there has not been a visitor who could solve a domestic problem.

A good visitor would recommend a solution. If the victim does not take it head on, they move to other areas, say polio eradication, malarial war, climate change you mention it. With no body taking charge in fixing our education, a great deal of humanitarian work shifts gears to other “critical issues” facing the continent. Abject poverty, dilapidating health care, civil wars, environmental conservation, the list goes on. Billions of dollars in aid has been injected into these ‘critical areas” over the years.

While a significant effort has been made in transforming the continent’s education, the alarm is ringing and Africa’s education skeleton is, borrowing a line from one African analyst a “time ticking bomb.” Africa’s educational statistics remains a big concern to the continent but more so, to the outside world where the mother continent finds refuge. (more…)


South Sudan: from Lost Boys to leaders — REPORT from Jesuit Refugee Service

JRS scholars - This group of men are former refugees assisted by JRS in the 80s and 90s while they were in exile in Kakuma. Many were resettled or went on to attain higher education in Kenya. They have now returned to their home country to contribute back to society. (Angela Wells / Jesuit Refugee Service)

This group of men are former refugees assisted by JRS in the 80s and 90s while they were in exile in Kakuma. Many were resettled or went on to attain higher education in Kenya. They have now returned to their home country to contribute back to society. (Angela Wells / Jesuit Refugee Service)

Juba, 8 January 2016 – In the late 1980’s and early 1990’s, more than 20,000 boys and girls who fled Sudan’s second civil war lost their families along the way. For years the international community has called them the “Lost Boys”, but today they are no longer boys nor are they lost.

They are remarkable men and women, many of whom have returned home as skilled professionals to build South Sudan from the ground up.

As children, the “Lost Boys” struggled to survive – many falling sick or becoming victims of war. Most were recruited to fight as child soldiers. The fortunate few made it to Kakuma refugee camp in northeastern Kenya, first established in 1992 to house Sudanese refugees.

From 1995 until the mid-2000s, the Jesuit Refugee Service (JRS) offered scholarships for hundreds of unaccompanied minors to attend local secondary schools.

In addition to empowering the students themselves, the scholarship programme also raised the standard of education in the camp, says Sister Maureen Limer, the then-JRS Kakuma Education Scholarship Coordinator who helped launch the programme. (more…)


By Pal Chol Nyan, Juba, South Sudan

corruption

January 30, 2018 (SSB) — Thank you, Professor Muludiang for having come out clearly against fake degrees. This situation of admission for degrees without the prescribed preconditions are destroying not only Zimbabwe but also our country. The truth of the matter as you clearly and succinctly stated is that this woman has never set foot on the campus of any University.

It was Mugabe, her husband, who awarded her with a PhD without having had to go through the normal academic way of earning a Doctorate of Philosophy.  Close home, some of our people have also set to obtain degrees as if the knowledge was in having a Master’s or a PhD degree.

(more…)


By Philip Thon Aleu, Juba, South Sudan

girl child education

Let’s educate our girls

January 24, 2018 (SSB) — In most traditional South Sudanese families, a girl’s future was decided mainly by parents and male siblings. Boys enjoy some autonomy in making choices – from early sexual education to choosing a future wife and earning a living by any means (being cattle raiding, stealing from relatives, any coercive channels or through an honest accumulation of wealth like rearing cattle, tending a garden or hunting.)

In contrast, girls were strictly prohibited from unauthorized boyfriends, sexual partners, barred and highly restricted from engaging in activities that garner incomes and their future was nearly 90% determined by their fathers, brothers and other male relatives. Mothers also ensured their daughters follow community’s accepted norms. A girl who resisted this highly controlled life has to rebel. She was cursed, disowned and subjected to extreme conditions including punishments causing death. A good girl is that who does not have sex anyhow but wait until marriage. She can be a fool, arrogant but being a virgin was sure deal to brag about and place her at the top in the community.

(more…)


Letter to Hon. Yien Oral Lam, minister for higher Education: Clarification of challenges facing South Sudanese students in Zimbabwe

By Eng Maker Makur, GWERU, Zimbabwe

Naath university students in Uganda organize a Farewell party for 2016, 2017 Graduates

January 6, 2018 (SSB) — On behalf of students in Zimbabwe and my own behalf, I would like to clarify and explain fully the position taken by South Sudanese students from 4 Universities of Midlands State University, Great Zimbabwe University, Chinhoyi University of Technology and Harare Institutes of Technology on the issue pertaining to our tuition, residents and feeding fees.

It was in February 2015 we arrived to Zimbabwe’s Universities mentioned above and National University of Science & Technology included on government scholarship. The government of South Sudan has been doing well until 2016 when some delayed of fees payment occurred which mostly affected students from 2 Universities of National University of Science & Technology and Harare Institutes of Technology while the other three Universities are cooperating well with their students in terms of service provision and lectures on the same note.

(more…)


By Longar Mathiec Wol, Juba, South Sudan

education

December 12, 2017 (SSB) — As the national dialogue kick off and the nation working toward unifying and stabilizing the peace thirsty nation through people to people consultation where people continue to give their views on how the current crisis in the country could be resolved once and for all. Personally, I think the efforts worth it; though the country still bleeding and the level of excruciation reached its climax still the peace loving South Sudanese believe peace is attainable even if it’s taking longer to come.

These peace lovers believe that all the sources should be exhausted no stone should be left unturned till the peace is achieved. The race toward saving South Sudan should be through multi-avenues efforts not only political means; but also social means through education as the alternative that could bring peace in the country.

However, as people trying to find the root cause of the conflict and how to address them. In some circumstances, people believe that one cause of the conflict is the ethnic isolation. This isolation happened when the people confined themselves only in the places where they were born and their ethnophobia and negative perception toward other ethnic continues to grow stronger and persist.

(more…)