Archive for the ‘Contributing Writers’ Category


By Bëc George Anyak, Glasgow, UK

juba-city-south-sudan

Juba, South Sudan

February 25, 2017 (SSB) — I always scratch my head when I hear some high profile figures from the Government of South Sudan quoting the promised city of Ramciel as a “No Man’s Land”. Whatever the meaning of this coined term, I must confidently say that there is no such thing as No Man’s land in the Republic of South Sudan and Ramciel land is not exceptional for that matter. It has its rightful owners and you will get to know the owners of Ramciel at the concluding part of my piece, but first, I prefer to take you through a brief background about Ramciel City Project and the chronology of events about this Project.

 Before the formation of the autonomous Government of Southern Sudan in 2005, the SPLM under chairmanship of late Dr.John Garang de Mabior formed an assessment committee in 2003 led by Dr. Riek Machar Teny, SPLM Vice Chair for Administration. The committee visited Yirol County which was then under the County Secretary (Commissioner) and the present Governor of Eastern Lakes State Gov.Rin Tueny Mabor and later met Hon. Kon Anok County Secretary of Awerial County. The delegation left Yirol through Madbar, Bunagok to Ramciel and from Ramciel through Thian, Malek then back to Yirol.

(more…)


By Madhieu Thiep Madhieu, Juba, South Sudan

thomas-cirilo-swaka

Thomas Cirilo Swaka, former SPLA deputy chief of staff for logistics

February 23, 2017 (SSB) — The government of South Sudan as well as army general headquarters has been experiencing sequence and unofficial resignations and defections of senior government officials for no genuine reasons. I called it unofficial resignations because most of these officials who abandon allegiance did not formally submit their letters of resignation personally to authority concern but sent they sent them to media.

Last week, General Thomas Cirillo, Deputy chief of staff, and head of military justice quitted their positions and joined Riek’s faction accusing the government of ethnic bias and dominant of SPLA by particular tribe, citing favoritism, land grabbing and corruption as their major reasons of leaving jobs. Another Brig. Gen who had been in charge of Logistic support in SPLA General HQRS and a former Sudan Army force loyalist defected this week, and blames country administration falsely of mismanagement and bias policies.

(more…)


What the people from Equatoria need to understand the current war is that the war is not about tribes but between the government and those who are planning to remove the government by force.

By David Deng Chapath, Kampala, Uganda

the-politics-of-south-sudan-ig-vs-io

The tragicomedy of the South Sudanese politics: SPLM-IG vs SPLM-IO

February 22, 2017 (SSB) —- The present civil war broke in 2013 in Juba. The war began within the SPLM party and later spread like a wild fire to the Upper Nile Region. After several attempts to end the war the peace was signed in 2015 which led to the coming back of Riek Machar in April 2015.

When Riek came there was a lot of hope that at last peace was at all the corners of South Sudan. However, due to the reckless and chaotic character of Riek Machar the conflict was resumed from where it was left and continued up to date.

As pointed out in the above paragraph, after the war broke out in Juba in July 2016, it spread over all South Sudan and ended killing more people. The war at this point has become complicated as it has taken tribal dimension.

(more…)


By Deng Kiir Akok, Juba, South Sudan

the-politics-of-south-sudan-ig-vs-io

The tragicomedy of the South Sudanese politics: SPLM-IG vs SPLM-IO

February 18, 2017 (SSB) — Dictionary.com defined resignation as formal statement, document stating that one gives up an office or position. While on the other hand, rebellion is a resistance to or defiance of any authority, control or tradition. Except for Nhial Deng Nhial’s resignation in 2006 from his post as minister for regional cooperation of the defunct Government of southern Sudan. Since then the others who followed had been on zigzagging. No one has ever followed the normal resignation procedures.

In normal procedures for resignation one needs to send his/her letter of resignation to employer and then wait for an approval that will not last than two to three weeks. In most cases for South Sudanese, they do not follow these steps. As a result, they quit before their boss sign or approve their letters. Some took an online resignation as the case of Thomas Cirilo, the former deputy chief of logistics.

Proper procedures were not applied in the Lam Akol’s resignation letter last year as minister for Agriculture and food security. He made sure he was in Khartoum before announcing his resignation. The same method was used by Thomas Cirilo, The author of this piece is wondering why does most South Sudanese resign while they are outside the country? They usually resign their positions while in Sudan, Ethiopia and Kenya. Lam Akol and Thomas Cirilo are now the living examples for those who resign while abroad. Akol did not take long in this position before resigning from last year formed Transitional Government of National Unity (TGoNU). He was by then in Khartoum.

(more…)


By David Deng Chapath, Kampala, Uganda

Traffic police in Bor, Solomon Mabior Ruar

Jonglei state Director of traffic police Col Solomon Mabior Ruar on the fourth independence day picture by Mach Samuel

February 16, 2017 (SSB) — There has been disturbing report in recent time of some respected and important generals in the South Sudanese Police Service turning the police into political arena. What they are doing is contrary to the nature and understanding of the police.

The police are not supposed to be politicians but they must be technocrats or those who are well trained and skilled in policing because the role of the police is to keep law and order and investigation of crimes as part of keeping law and order. This means that the one in charge of the police must not be politicians but well trained police officer that deals with issues objectively.

However, the report indicates that one of the generals in the Police of South Sudan is seriously openly campaigning to be appointed so that he replaces the current General Inspector of Police (IGP) of South Sudan, General Makur Marol.

(more…)


By Madhieu Thiep Madhieu, Juba, South Sudan

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

February 14, 2017 (SSB) —- During our independent from Khartoum oppressive regime in 2011, the people of South Sudan were overwhelmingly happier about the birth of their own sovereign nation which they thought would be free from all forms of miseries. Citizens countrywide celebrated and welcomed the historic victory with joy and great expectations, that service would be closer to them at affordable cost. But that hope seemed to have yielded fruits for the first few years of our independent, because our South Sudanese pound was more valuable and prove stronger in the region.

 Life was so much simple those days especially for people who lack job to earn living. Survival was easily tackled without serious struggle or hardship. Markets were full of items and the prices remain manageable compare to today where prices of goods keep on skyrocketing hour after an hour and day by day. Today, Scarcity of commodities in the market and higher cost of trading have negatively affected the livelihood of ordinary people of South Sudan who heavily rely on low government pay or micro businesses.

(more…)


By David Deng Chapath, Kampala, Uganda

thomas-cirilo-spla-deputy-chief-of-staff-for-logistics-resigns-from-the-spla

Lt. Gen. Thomas Cirilo Swaka, SPLA deputy chief of staff for logistics, resigns from the SPLA.jpg

February 13, 2017 (SSB) —- On 11/02/2017 Gen. Thomas Cirillo Swaka, resigned from his post as the SPLA Deputy Chief of General Staff for Logistics.  In a six-page letter of resignation that was punished on the Website of PaanluelWel.com, on the same date of resignation as mentioned above, Gen. Cirillo cited the reasons for his resignation of which he claimed to be the following—

That the country has been dominated by Dinka tribe of President Kiir and the army has been turned to tribal militia that targets non-Dinka ethnicities.  He further accused the South Sudanese President Salva Kiir, the Chief of Staff General Paul Malong of “deliberately orchestrated planned violations” of the August 2015 peace agreement” which led to fighting in Juba in July last year.

He, in addition said, “The President and these SPLA officers have systematically frustrated the implementations of the peace agreement and pursued the agenda of Jieng Council of Elders (JCE) of ethnic cleansing, forceful displacement of people from the their ancestral lands and ethnic domination,”.

(more…)


By Mading Gum, Nairobi, Kenya

eco-bus

Wreckage of Eco Bus: Attack on Friend Bus, Gateway Bus and Eco-Bus today on the Juba-Nimule Highway, left score of people dead and others feared kidnapped bu gunmen

February 13, 2017 (SSB) — Of all the leadership qualities that made Garang one of the greatest freedom fighters in Africa one stands out, Garang was a great thinker. Garang offered a new nationalism of Sudanism, opposed to divisiveness and separatism. He imagined a political community in New Sudan in which democracy, equality, economic and social justice and respect for human rights is the core. In his mind, the enemy was clear: all the institutions of oppression that have been evolved in Khartoum to oppress the masses of the Sudanese people. ‘The masses of the Sudanese people’. Remember that.

But why did Garang define the enemy as the institutions of oppressions rather than Arabs? Was Diein Massacre of 1987 not carried out by armed Arab Baggara militias who killed and burnt to death hundreds of Dinkas? Were Arabs militias of Rufa in Jabalyin not responsible for the massacre of over 200 Shilluk civilians in 1989? What about over 90 Shilluk victims who fled for safety but were killed in cold blood at the nearby police station manned by Arabs?

The tragedy in the South Sudan brutal conflict is lack of political imagination beyond tribes, hatred, revenge and self-enrichment. Garang offered New Sudan that transcends tribes in the past. None does today.

(more…)


Success of government begins from an individual working in the government: The case of Honourable minister in the office of the president of South Sudan, Mayiik Ayii Deng

By David Deng Chapath, Kampala, Uganda

RSS coat of ARMS

South Sudan’s coat of arms, in which the eagle symbolizes vision, strength, resilience and majesty, and the shield and spear the people’s resolve to protect the sovereignty of their republic and work hard to feed it.

February 9, 2017 (SSVB) — In my recent visit to South Sudan I was surprised to observe some notable changes that had taken place in the office of the President of the Republic of South Sudan, General Salva Kiir Mayardit. There is in other words rule of law and good management in the office unlike in the past when the State house was turned into a den of mismanagement.

As observed in the above paragraph, the following changes had taken place: there is strict observance of the rule in the State House; no more shadow dealings or cheatings; there is order in the State House as rules are being applied equally to all the people who want to see the President. As a result, the conflicts that used to occur frequently in the State house are minimized to the lowest level. Resources in the State are being protected unlike in the past when millions of dollars were siphoned away from the State House.

In general, the State House is now the real state house and it is no longer the State House by name as it used to be.  In the past State House was controlled by the relatives of the President without his authorization and corrupt the system, which extremely affected the relationship of the President with the citizens of South Sudan.  However, today there is a success in the State House or J1 in Juba which shows that there will be success in the government.

(more…)


The use of force and governance:  Is the use of force necessary for good governance in South Sudan?

By David Deng Chapath, Kampala, Uganda

Tribute to Isaiah Abraham

Tribute to Isaiah Abraham: The Dark Ages of South Sudan Liberation

February 8, 2017 (SSB) — The readers of this article may find it odd for combining the force and governance as the co-existence of the two is not always seen clearly in the democratic society. According to the Constitution of South Sudan, South Sudan is a democratic country that must respect human rights and democratic principles.

When we talk of human rights as seen in the above paragraph, we are simply talking of the respect of personal liberties and freedoms, and that is the reason why the use of force is not frequently observed in democratic country.

However, where the country is in chaos as we see in the case of South Sudan, then there is a need for the use of force to reform the people in order to maintain law and order, which means that the use of force is necessary in South Sudan.

(more…)


By Madol Madol Aguer, Juba, South Sudanteg-scholarship-program

February 8, 2017 (SSB) — Our young girls who are supposed to be our future wives, mentors, coaches and more importantly co-lives share that have the biggest responsibilities are unfortunately mistaken the freedom and trusts granted to them by uncles, fathers and mothers. When I talk of asset, it is the business term describing the wealth one has in the business apart from the goods and services given the firm, shop and industries. Therefore, Girls are our national asset in South Sudan base on the asset’s definition and generally the whole world can agree with me if I said that girls are an asset of any nation.

I valued them because am here because of the woman, my mum. Am a graduate because of her strong encouragement and continues support during unpredictable journey and I believe that any angel who will married me deserved the honor and respect for that matter. I do not see any different between female and male since we are both creatures of God and we resemblance God’s image, we live in the temporary all of us, we have equal opportunity before him, and we have equal rights whether we misused it. We are the children of God.

(more…)


By Roger Alfred Yoron Modi, Juba, South Sudan

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

February 7, 2017 (SSB) — The National Dialogue announced by President Salva Kiir as an initiative to “end violent conflicts in South Sudan, reconstitute national consensus, and save the country from disintegration and usher in a new era of peace, stability and prosperity” is misleading and not within the framework of the Agreement on the Resolution of the Conflict in South Sudan ARCISS as is being purported.

Though this may sound surprising to some if not most, President Kiir has no authority to form any committee under Article 101 (j) of the Transitional Constitution of the Republic of South Sudan TCRSS, the Article he cited in the Republican Order NO.27/2016 for the formation of the National Dialogue Steering Committee.

Under the terms of ARCISS, which ought to prevail over the TCRSS, the power to nominate, appoint and establish independent Commissions, interim and ad hoc Commissions and Committees shall and can only be exercised under:

  1. Chapter One, Article 8 (1) read together with Article 8 (1) (3) which require the President to act in consultation with the First Vice President in order to reach at mutual understanding and agreement. Or
  2. Chapter One, Article 9 (1) (3) read together with Article 9 (1) (3) (2) which give the Council of Ministers, with the agreement of two-thirds (67%) and a quorum of at least twenty-three (23) of its Members present, the authority to decide in the event of a deadlock.

Even if the government would argue that the required consultation was conducted, the fact that the President’s Order has been based on the Article101 (j) simply makes it (the Order) inconsistent with the ARCISS. In other words, a body formed based on the TRCSS, violating the very letter and spirit of the ARCISS, cannot be within the framework of the ARCISS.

(more…)


By Jongkuch Jo Jongkuch, Bor, South Sudan

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

February 7, 2017 (SSB) — Yes peace can be our triumph when we are all unites; I’m urging all the politicians and all youths to keep us out of war in South Sudan. We should take example of the speech by Martin Luther, “The Quest for Peace and Justice” during the Nobel Lecture.

It is necessary to love peace and sacrifice for it and we must concentrate not merely on the negative expulsion of war but on the positive affirmation of peace in our country, South Sudan.

We must see that peace represents our superiority as young nation South Sudan, peace is the only superior way to discords war. South Sudanese must transform the dynamics of power struggle from the negative arms groups.

(more…)


By Madhieu Thiep Madhieu, Juba, South Sudan

power

electrical power

February 7, 2017 (SSB) —- It is my great obligation to have this opportunity to share my piece of writing in relevant to the aforementioned issue that had dismayed and profusely discomforted me beyond description or explanation.  The core main of my article is none other than lack of government power supply in our national capital and other main cities in the country. Juba being seat of our central government has never been supplied with government hydro electric power for quiet along time.

 Majority of our civil population in the city and other towns resorted to using personal generators in their households as the only means of accessing electricity for their own commercial or private purposes. Government offices and other vital institutions operate with the help of local generators which make the city noisy causing embarrassment to international visitors.

(more…)


By Tong Kot Kuocnin, Kampala, Uganda

Chan Reech Madut

Justice Chan Reech Madut, head of South Sudan Judiciary

February 6, 2017 (SSB) — Pursuant to the provisions of Article 122(1) of the Transitional Constitution 2011 (Amended 2015), the judicial power is derived from the people and shall be exercised by courts in accordance with the customs, values, norms and aspirations of the people and in conformity with this constitution and the law. The court of Appeal has powers under Article 122(4) of the said fundamental law to adjudicate on disputes and render judgments in accordance with this constitution and the law.

The structure of the judiciary of South Sudan is provided under Article 123(a)-(e) in which the Supreme Court is the highest court and a custodian of the Transitional Constitution and Constitutions of the states. It is a court of cassation which has final jurisdiction over both civil and criminal matters. It is a court in which the decisions of the Courts of Appeal are appealed against before it. The Court of Appeal is an appellate court where decisions of the high courts are appealed against.

(more…)


By Martin Ariel Majak, Alexandria, Egypt

splm wars

Battle for the soul of the SPLM party

February 6, 2017 (SSB) — As you may know very well that what we call a country of our own didn’t pop out of the blue. It was as a result of the sacrificial blood of our fallen and wounded heroes. We didn’t just think of secession overnight and then got granted self-rule the following day. NO.

It was a kind of perilous journey in which many of our compatriots perished in the course of fighting for our common cause of gaining independence. It was a difficult undertaking to be taken by cowards but our brave men dared to challenge the Goliath and won in the end.

We did really loose the best and the nicest of us. I salute them. Without them, we couldn’t be calling South Sudan – a country of our own now. Their blood traded us independence. Indeed, they were the true patriots who bought for us the invaluable thing – freedom.

(more…)


By Ring Mayar, PhD., Canberra – Australia

Chan Reech Madut

Justice Chan Reech Madut, head of South Sudan Judiciary

February 6, 2017 (SSB) —- Today I would like to outline the importance of People’s Constitution, by anchoring the foundation of the Constitution on the vital interests of the people. I define those vital interests as People’s Republic rights and values that could significantly impact on security, economic empowerment and the viability of South Sudan Statehood.

Before going on tangent about South Sudanese vital constitutional interests, allow me first to elaborate upon the lagging drift in formulating a permanent constitution for South Sudanese people, since its independence from Sudan on July 9th 2011. In similar token, let’s examine the current Sudan’s Interim Constitution.

(more…)


By Garang Aleu Abraham, Juba, South Sudan

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

February 5, 2017 (SSB) — Since time missionaries crossed the threshold of African boundaries with their approaches of rulings, being; religion, mainly Christianity, power by gun and slave trade, wars and boundaries demarcation, many African countries dropped their traditions for a love of trend and fashion.

According to many writers of an ancient tradition, Mark was the first missionary to Africa. Early Christian writers Clement and Eusebius both report that Mark preached in Alexandria, Egypt; Eusebius notes that he was martyred there.

However, Religion was a driving force during slavery epochs, and Christianity formed a major part of this, although the assertion of Evangelization was one of the justifications for enslaving Africans.

(more…)


“The power we discover inside ourselves as we survive a life-threatening experience can be utilized equally well outside of crisis, too. I am, in every moment, capable of mustering the strength to survive again—or of tapping that strength in other good, productive, healthy ways.” ― Michele RosenthalBefore the World Intruded

By Arol Dut Jok, Nairobi, Kenya

RSS coat of ARMS

South Sudan’s coat of arms, in which the eagle symbolizes vision, strength, resilience and majesty, and the shield and spear the people’s resolve to protect the sovereignty of their republic and work hard to feed it.

February 5, 2017 (SSB) — One empty rhetoric that I always hear as a presentation of our problems is that “The future of South Sudan is doomed”. The future that we just started 5 years ago should not be plagued with hopelessness and pessimism, but rather, be embraced with an optimism and unending quest for prosperity. The people of South Sudan have the power to change the future.

Yes, there are impediments as of current (some bigger than we could ever imagine) and the best way to deal with them is not giving up. If we give up, it means that we accept the hurdles that we are undergoing to annihilate our nation before us. The only way forward is that we have to slowly start pointing out our challenges and deal with them accordingly one by one.

On the other hand, I have a belief that sooner than later, the youth of South Sudan will stand together and make a significant change in regard to the prosperity of our nation. The point to note here is that youths play a fundamental role in shaping the important course of development, taking into account the anticipation for their positive actions to realize the proud image of their country as well as well-being of all citizens.

(more…)


By Hon. Atem Garang D. Dekuek, Juba, SOUTH SUDAN

abel-alier-and-governor-philip-aguer-demontarting-peace-and-reconciliation-picture-by-mach-samuel

Abel ALier and Philip Aguer picture by Mach Samuel

  1. Introduction

February 3, 2017 (SSB) — The Triangle formed by greater Pibor, Akobo and Bor is an area afflicted with hostility, violence and cattle rustling among its inhabitants (Anyuak, Murle, Nuer and Dinka). The violence had been and is continuing to persist on, as a consequence of endemic poverty, possibly aggravated by climate change, inadequacy of population of livestock, obsolete agricultural methods and implements, weak local governments, possession of huge numbers of small automatic firearms, politicization and polarization of the inhabitants and inhospitable environmental conditions of the area! All these factors contribute to the instability of this region.

Following the end of the liberation war with the signing of the CPA in 2005, the area was left devastated, exhausted, impoverished and isolated that accelerated the intensity of violence and hostility.

The British colonial authorities in South Sudan in the twentieth century (1898-1956) were able to establish a strong local administration in the area and applied modern strategies to: stop violence, maintain peaceful co-existence and provide methods for sharing natural resources. The British authorities policy of “pacification”; was achieved by 1930 in this area. Native administration was introduced which was used strictly as an instrument for law provisions enforcement, utilized traditional local authority, where the chiefs plaid pivotal role, rendered some minimum social services, collected taxes from the inhabitants, and conducted programmed peace conferences of which all their resolutions were implemented without fail.

At the dawn of the independence of Sudan in 1956, the legacy that the British rule left behind was the stability and peace among the people of this area. Unfortunately, that stability and peace started gradually to unwind back to a state resemblance to the situation that was prevailing pre-British rule, where the violence and anarchy spun. In 1963 the Anya-Nya war intensified and engulfed the area and the local authorities begun to lose their grip on the communities. That situation was, somehow, reversed in 1972 when a peace agreement between the Sudan government and the Anya-Nya was reached in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, though the stability and peaceful co-existence did not attain the standards that preceded the independence of Sudan. The rest of the period from 1983 to this day is a contemporary history of deteriorating security and relations in the area and reverting to pre-British rule era. It is actually more chaotic and worse as the inhabitants had acquired a lot of modern automatic small firearms, which make the death toll to be very high and tragic. Also the communities during the last three decades had been antagonized and divided along opposing, hostile and warring political affiliations.

(more…)