Archive for the ‘Columnists’ Category


By Kur Wël Kur, Adelaide, Australia

salary

salary

February 19, 2017 (SSB) —- The book written in fragments of time, the lifespan of our planet, the Bible, proves to us (South Sudanese) and to the portion of the world population who’re Christians that God think(s) about South Sudanese in the same vein He thought about Israelites when they were troubled by the bondage and the wilderness.

But how many times have we read between the lines in the book of ages to understand this comparison? None, I would assume. I assumed because our leaders and us, citizens have tried all possibilities of human weaknesses, or call it human wickedness to prove ourselves ungodly. Think of barbaric killings. Dicing women into pieces. Rapping children and elderly. Roasting our fellow citizens alive… I can list a thousand cases to match the word-limit of this article, but still it won’t convey the message of this article in its purity.

So, I would like to settle on explaining why the economic crisis in South Sudan resembles the Israelites’ life in wilderness. I do acknowledge though, much is said and written about economic woes in our beloved country by the experts of immensely academic credentials. So, mind will make sense of biblical comparisons. Greed. Laziness. We’re all leaders; we’re followers.

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By Daniel Juol Nhomngek, Kampala Uganda

freedom-of-speech-in-south-sudan

February 19, 2017 (SSB) — Please Editor, allow me to respond to the response of Mathiang or Majuec Jalap to my Article entitled: What’s a Bad Law: A Commentary on Gok State Taxation Act, 2016, published on your Newspaper, the Dawn on 4th February, 2016 and Mathiang’s response to that Article was published on Dawn Newspaper on February 8, 2017.

In that article, I was writing about the bad taxation law in Gok State that is oppressive; a law that causes injustice; dumb laws, which are particularly bizarre; a law that is erroneous or a law where an attempted statement of the law is inaccurate or non-law.  As I explained in that article the reasons I called a bad law are that it imposes 1000 SSP, three tins of durra and three tins of groundnut to be paid by a tax payer. Then I concluded that that Taxation Act, 2016 of Gok State is a bad law because it met the characteristics of the bad law as stated in this paragraph.

In response to my article, Mathiang Jalap formerly known as Majuec Jalap, a name that I will continually use in this response attacked me and I need to summarize his main points below—

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The Bruises of the Civil War: A life without a Leg: The striking case of Ajah Majhok Kweeric

By Kur Wel Kur, Adelaide, Australia

freedom-of-speech-in-south-sudan

February 18, 2017 (SSB) — “A wife for her son.” “A grandson.” An heir.” Nyankoot Bolek kept pacing around the cow-dung heap, talking aloud to herself. She had yearned to hear good news from her son’s family. Announcing the birth. At that point, she had given up her ego of desiring a male child. “Any child would be a huge blessing,” she would tell herself.  An idiom that goes, “no news is good news,” knocked her unconscious. It numbed her mind. She longed for any news even the hint of her son committing adultery to “sire” a child would console her aching soul.

However, none of the news swirled into her ears. So, Nyankoot rooted for an idea of making a seventeen year old daughter of one of the akɔr waal, a pasture-hunter, her son’s wife. Ajah Majhok Kweeric was beautiful, brown-skinned and tall young woman. Her father, Majhok Kweeric was a wealthy and respectful 40-year-old. Nyankoot sent three young men, her nephews to court her.

 “Listen to her, talk and don’t forget any of her words; I will gauge every word myself; I can’t afford a stupid woman for my son,” she said.

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By Thiik Mou Giir, Melbourne, Australia

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The tragicomedy of the South Sudanese politics: SPLM-IG vs SPLM-IO

February 18, 2017 (SSB) — In 2013, the Iraqi Minister of Information, during Saddam Hussein’s era, Mohammed Saeed Al-Sahaf, once said about American army who were about to enter Baghdad:

‘I can say, and I am responsible for what I am saying, that they (Americans) have started to commit suicide under the walls of Baghdad. We will encourage them to commit more suicides quickly.’

In the case of American-Iraqi war, the quote didn’t apply to that situation at all.  The American invasion of Iraq was completed when American Army entered Baghdad without much resistance.

Ever since, the world had wondered whether there would ever be a moment, when a people, anywhere in the world, who would collectively commit suicide.  The world dismissed Sahaf’s words, thinking it was something unimaginable.  This stood true until year 2013.

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How to tax people in Gok State without being affected by taxation but at the same time benefit from taxes they pay

By Daniel Juol Nhomngek, Kampala, Uganda

salary

salary

February 18, 2017 (SSB) — In the recent debate on taxation law in Gok State, there are a lot of arguments for and against the rationale for taxing the citizens of Gok. For those who were and are against the imposition of taxation, their main argument was and still as summed up in this question: why should the people who don’t have sources of income or those with zero income be taxed?

The argument above for the opponents against taxation is very strong and the law in an ordinary circumstance may uphold it because taxation is based on the ability of a tax payer to pay. Where the tax payer is not able to pay or he or she is unemployed then there is nothing to tax and taxes should not be imposed.

To digress a bit before I access the argument of those who argue in favour of paying taxes, I need to briefly explain the meaning of ability-to-pay. Ability-to-pay is an economic concept which provides that those who have more resources (wealth), or earn higher incomes should pay more taxes. Hence, in economy, the ability to pay taxes such as income tax or tax on luxury goods is viewed as means of income redistribution.

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The formation of SPLA in 1983: SPLA is not a Dinka army as defected South Sudanese claims overdue times in South Sudan

By David Matiop Gai, Juba South Sudan

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Red army procession in Aweil, Sept 2016

February 13, 2017, (SSB) –— When untruth leads its own ways first, the truth will disappear from the surface reality, but truth itself or telling the truth will set us free. The false appearances today in South Sudan have fault lines or divisive great lines in South Sudan politics.  I want to deconstruct what distinct between inside and outside SPLA in South Sudan as a South Sudanese. It is better to go through the corridors of SPLA formation in 1983 than creating liars here and there.  These are liars created and circulate across the globe tarnishing the image of Dinka but the truth will save Dinka people from the burning hatred of their fellow South Sudanese people.

I am here writing this article to repute a claim documented by Gen. Thomas Cirillo in his resignation letter addressing it to the President of the Republic Gen. Salva Kiir Mayardit. In his letter addressing to the president, or to resign from his position, is not a problem because it is his right to do so if he feels he could not work in the army or in the government of South Sudan anymore.  Resignation mean acceptance of something undesirable but inevitable. Resignation is not a crime and it had not starting with Gen. Thomas Cirillo, but many people did that in favour of their integrity like Nhial Deng Nhial resigned one time in Kiir government, and he did not touched any tribe in South Sudan, which mean Cirillo resignation is something else, or non-other than rebellion.

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The Intractable Challenge to Modernizing the Republic of South Sudan vs. Building Ramciel City

By David Mayen Ayarbior, Juba, South Sudan

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David Mayen Ayarbior, a Lawyer, Political Economist, and International Security specialist, is the author of House of War: Civil War and State Failure in Africa

February 12, 2017 (SSB) — A couple of weeks ago our country (Juba City) was ornamented by a visit from His Majesty King Mohammed VI of Morocco which lasted for about twenty-four hours (or two days).  During the visit, South Sudan and Morocco signed MOUs and Cooperation Agreements in many areas, including mining, agriculture and more important: construction of a whole new capital city in Ramciel.

Being one of the richest businessmen in Africa, the Moroccan King’s first visit to a sub-Saharan African country would not have been possible if he wasn’t convinced that it made good business sense. Nonetheless, it remains a very good gesture from the King to look for business in our country. Like a few other sub-Saharan countries, the potential opportunities for huge business profit in ours are immense.

The visit has been discussed by South Sudanese everywhere. For those in government it wouldn’t have happened at a more opportune juncture as this one, where only condemnations are flying all over the place. Not only has the government been chastised by the international community and accused of all kinds of human rights violations, its very legitimacy is being challenged by potent rebellions at home. It is also struggling with “managing” the economy.

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By Daniel Juol Nhomngek, Kampala, Uganda

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February 12, 2017 (SSB) —- In most of the African countries that have been at war for a very long time peace remained elusive. This is because peace and development have proved far more difficult and complex to achieve than the Afro-optimists envisaged in the immediate post-independence period, owing to a range of domestic and external factors (see; Peace & Conflict in Africa edited by David J. Francis).

Externally, Africa is perceived as a continent stricken by wars, poverty, perpetual political instability and armed conflicts, unrelenting economic crises, famines and diseases. Because of that the external powers who try to bring peace to Africa see it as hopeless continent, which prompts their decision to impose the peace as they understand it.

Consequently, they end imposing what is called Liberal Peace Project Tradition, in which peace building is understood in term of intervention designed to facilitate the establishment of durable peace and prevent the recurrence of violence. Such intervention as it has been observed by some writers peacekeeping, peace support operations, disarmament, demobilization, rehabilitation and reintegration.

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What the South Sudanese politicians should learn about the resignation?

By Daniel Juol Nhomngek, Kampala, Uganda

THE NEED FOR WHO TO BLAME FOR ONE'S OWN MISDOING...

February 10, 2017 (SSB) — It has become a culture in South Sudan to see the Government employees just resign as they wish sometime with or without following the right procedure. Such a conduct should stop with immediate effect. Even if a person is happy with the system because of poor performance of the government, that does not warrant a politicians under normal circumstances to break the rule of procedure in the resignation process.

The law is that if one wants to resign from the system because of bad governance or another belief he or she holds against the system, then, he or she must follow the right procedure in order to show that he or she knows the system and if her or she is given an opportunity he or she may be able to establish the system.

However in the recent time, some of the politicians who have shown that they are fighting for good governance are not showing how good governance works by following the right procedure and right system. What they must learn from today onward is that good governance start with good system and good system comes through following right procedures in all that is done.

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By David Matiop Gai, Juba, south Sudan

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February 10, 2017, (SSB) — Identifying youth leaders is a sole responsibility of those leaders who are already in leadership. The future of youths in South Sudan is uncertain. Youths are couched for executing tribal conflicts, followers of weak and self-ambition politicians, failed politicians, tribal politicians, and their potential talents supposed to be use for national development is always exploited by these politicians and put youths as a fence for their own protection.

Youths always died in a big number in South Sudan, and nobody mind about their lives even parents. Both those in leadership, and parents failed to advise youths because youths long time ago live by advices of elderly people and parents. Lives of youth hood is stupid, and fool,  they relayed on their own strengths and ability, and therefore, elders, leaders, and parents  adjust youths on the right paths of save life.

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By Daniel Juol Nhomngek, Kampala, Uganda

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The released political detainees are: former cabinet affairs minister Deng Alor Kuol; former minister of telecommunications and postal services Madut Biar Yel; former youth minister Dr. Chirino Hiteng; former finance minister Kosti Manibe; former roads and transport minister Gier Chuang Aluong; former justice minister John Luk Jok, and former Lakes state governor Chol Tong Mayai; while those who remain in detention are: Pagan Amum Okiech, former secretary-general of the ruling SPLM party; Oyai Deng Ajak, former minister for national security; Majak D’Agoot, former deputy minister of defence and Ezekiel Lol Gatkuoth, former South Sudanese ambassador to the United States.

February 8, 2017 (SSB) — The recent resignation by the Gok State Minister of Education, Gender and Social Welfare, Hon. John Marik Makur, has caused a raw in the social media and in particular on facebook.  Many people gave various comments on the report posted by Journalist Manyang Mayom on his timeline carrying the reasons for the resignation of Hon. Former Minister of Education.

In that post, Manyang reported Marik makur to have said the following as quoted below—

 “After having reviewed and evaluated over the past ten months as a minister; numerous aspects of our morale and constitutional responsibilities towards service delivery and development to our communities, which apparently not realized and mainly attributed to manners and ways of your leadership.

Therefore, I concluded that my contributions and many vital projects developed by the institution (ministry of physical infrastructure) I led; were consistently not awarded or deliberately ignored and quite often were passed over or misdirected. Therefore, I felt to have sufficient grounds to honorably submit this resignation for no other reasons than personal convictions.

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The institution in my pocket. The misconception of owning a company in South Sudan

By Longar Mathiec Wol, Nairobi, Kenya

corruption

February 7, 2017 (SSB) — The word company in any part of the world might carry the same meaning, but when it comes to south Sudan the meaning of company popularly known locally as chirka might be different for some of the reasons not known by the public but to the company owners and the country. In south Sudan people think having accompany is being rich which is completely a misconception. Company is not a money laundering machine but to legally allow you to operate.

Therefore, what exactly is the real meaning of the company from other part of the world? Well, company is a word from companion, or group of two or more people with the same idea or ideas coming together to register business name, own and run it. People sometimes call a company as enterprise or firm. But all these names have one goals and objectives, which is the delivering of goods and services to the consumers or people. Therefore, let look at the definition of the company and how people perceive the word company in south Sudan.

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By David Matiop Gai, Juba, South Sudan

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February 7, 2017 (SSB) — As you followed the other parts of this article, this part four is all about the ways people get curses from the evil spirits forces. Man believes in things made by handcrafts, and the thought was either in village or in town, one may become the most powerful, foreseeing, and proclaims the unseen events to happen. The causes of curse among South Sudanese in generals, and the consequences of elimination of lives were far rooted in witchcrafts. It was believed that bad wishes do occurred in several ways. The curses came as a result of shams, and worshipping of idols.

 You may heard South Sudanese named themselves after Christian naming, but believers of those days were church goers, even until today, issues of salvation, born again, sanctification, justification, forgiveness of our sins through the blood of Jesus Christ on the cross are all seen less- to be believe among South Sudanese Churches because the Church had made itself as a traditional church routine whereby people share witchcrafts and church spiritualties together outside and inside the church, and there is no problem.

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The Oxfam should in its operating be guided by its principles and goals but not to become another branch of the government in South Sudan

By Daniel Juol Nhomngek, Kampala, Uganda

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February 5, 2017 (SSB) — The Organization called the Oxfam is a confederation of 19 affiliates group of companies working in over ninety (90) countries, all working as one Oxfam on six goals that support their shared vision of a just world without poverty.

The principle is that whether the Oxfam is running life-saving emergency responses, life-changing development projects or campaigning at the grassroots to tackle poverty, Oxfam’s work is always rooted in a vision of a world where women and men are valued and treated equally, able to influence the decisions that affect their lives and meet their responsibilities as full citizens.

In achieving the abovementioned vision, Oxfam operates on six goals that put local communities and the voices of poor people at the centre of change. The purpose of these goals is to enable the Oxfam to end the injustice of poverty in long run. Hence, the Oxfam’s goals (for more information visit: http://www.oxfam.org.uk › what we do › about us › How we work) are to

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By David Matiop Gai, Juba, South Sudan

youth for peace in south sudan

February 4, 2017, (SSB) – The youths’ future in South Sudan. Why youth leadership referred to young people as leaders of tomorrow? What is the future of youths in a devastated state of South Sudan?  Are youths ruin in decades of war and conflicts as effects and impacts concern or there is a hope for youths?

Historically, traditionally, and culturally, for many centuries, youths are defined as leaders of tomorrow in South Sudan as well as in Africa.  Leaders of tomorrow! Youths! Is it logic? Is it necessary?  Is it visionary? It is planned? Is it cultural? It is a respect? Is it a system? Or this is an oppression of youths in African societies? Please look at systematic blockage mechanism.

The concept was originated from the traditional ideologies of garden concept, whereby a garden produces new seeds in a year for the next season from the seeds of past season or harvests. But what failed to do is to prepare these young leaders for tomorrow, otherwise why do we call somebody whom you did not prepare to be a leader of tomorrow even without couching him, training, knowledge, skills, plans, objectives, aims, and mission about tomorrow?

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By Thon Atem Ayiei, Juba, South Sudan

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February 5, 2017 (SSB) —- Good experience and bad experience move altogether in human life. You don’t expect to be happy all the time and Vice Versa. You don’t wish to be left behind by your age mates so that you are cited as an example of failure in a society. Any of your decisions have to be in line with the situation of that very circumstance.

There are other situations whereby anyone can simply subject him/herself into a certain mayhem which will later amount to desperation and an unprecedented choice. It’s very important to take a decision with clarity of mind in order to avoid a blame of others or avoid missing the best opportunities in life.

As a result of group influence and wrong path, the living example is the current situation of our country whereby the rebellion was declared without considering the repercussions of it on the country significant installations, civilian’s lives and public properties. Commonly, the motive was just to cling to power and the exaggerated competition over who should manage the country affairs without weighing the venom of the country economic viability.

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By David Matiop Gai, Juba, South Sudan

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February 4, 2017, (SSB) — Mr. President, Beny Kiir Mayardit, increases or adds more four states to make the total of thirty six states in the Republic South Sudan. The reasons of these four states are cited in two complaints. One was the fact of their appealing to your highly respected office last year in 2016. The second complaint was geographical qualification and reduction disputes over misplacement in the first place when states were formed.

From former Greater three Regions of Greater Upper Nile, Greater Bhar el-ghazal, and Greater Equatoria to former ten (10) states, and recently 28 states, while definitely before thirty two (32) states now in the Republic of South Sudan; still some areas want states of their own. The recent reparation or amendment of 28 states to thirty two states was pressurization from citizens to President Salva Kiir Mayardit that echo aloud and every area needs state or some areas are geographically fit for states.

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The Action of King of Morocco constitutes Political Bribery: A response to skeptics to the use of the term “bribery” in the recent Article on Morocco written by Beny Gideon Mabor

By Daniel Juol Nhomngek, Kampala, Uganda

February 2, 2017 (SSB) —- In the recent article by Beny Gideon Mabor Esq and published on Sudan tribune, which is entitled: South Sudan: Strategic choice between bribery and right to self-determination for Saharawi people one of the problems that many commentators could not comprehend was the reason why Beny Gideon Mabor chose and used the term bribery.

Briefly, in that article Beny was writing to explain the rationale behind Morocco wanted to go into bilateral relationship with South Sudan. In that article he warned South Sudan to be careful in dealing with Morocco as the dealing may have implications on her duties under the human rights law.  South Sudan has a duty to enforce human rights including the right to self-determination of the people of Western Sahara which Morocco wanted to suppress.

For that reason, since Morocco’s intention to rejoin African Union after thirty four (34) years of absence from the Union is to use the African Union as a platform to defeat the right to self-determination of the people of Western Sahara, Beny was warning South Sudan and advised its authorities to protect the interests of the people of Western Sahara who have the same history of South Sudanese.

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By Bol Madut Ayii, Juba, South Sudan

February 2, 2017 (SSB) — If there was a direct communication between the creator and human being, one would have kindly requested only five minutes to appeal to God to review the way he suddenly takes the lives of our dear one at the time that they are much needed.

I was deeply distressed by the sudden passing of the first chief Justice of the Republic of South Sudan late Justice John Wol Makec on the 17th of this Month.  Late John Wol was one of the few Justices who don,t joke when it comes to professionalism. His contribution to the legal fraternity has left an indelible mark in defense of an independent legal profession, for which we owe him eternal gratitude.

As a Judge, he was the most ardent supporter of an independent Judiciary. His legal dexterity/prowess was matched only by his humility and judicial temperament. His stewardship as the first chief Justice of this country and his contribution to the law and development of our judiciary were unparalleled and have help placed South Sudan as a proud member of African Countries that have good laws though the issue of enforcement maybe questionable.

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By Kur Wël Kur, Adelaide, Australia

Obama’s Statement on US Recognition of the Republic of South Sudan, July 9, 2011.

February 3, 2017 (SSB) — When it comes to politics, the world needs politicians. Even the dumb politicians, but malleable are better than brilliant businesspeople who think only in one way, profit. Months ago, Donald Trump was chorus of shouts in USA presidential race, but now the echoes of those shouts are reaching the US valuable allies.

In his presidential campaign, Trump made it clear that all countries receiving protection from US must pay the cost for their protection. A statement that qualifies his mantra: “America first.” To the sensible citizens, Trump was a big joke to the US politics. So to them, it was a matter of time and his reckless words would knock him out of the race. But wishing with no action is a sterilised seed of hope. Trump won.

Just in less than two weeks after his inauguration, Trump inked daring executive orders to legalise his spewed words. According to Quartz Media LLC, “Donald Trump signed 18 executive orders and memos in his first 12 days in office, for an average of 1.5 executive actions per day.”

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