Archive for the ‘Featured Articles’ Category


Why Economic and Political Uprising are civil means to end the Life of the Repugnant and Unproductive Government: The Case of the Government of South Sudan

By Tong Kot Kuocnin, Nairobi, Kenya

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January 12, 2017 (SSB) —- The history of many African Liberation Movements have succinctly and coherently revealed that fighting for freedoms, in order to free your people from all yokes of oppression and marginalization of the repressive and most terrible despotic regimes in Africa is one thing and maintaining the legacy after the war to live longer is another. Too many African liberation movements suffered this fate and SPLM as one of the Africa’s strongest liberation movements of its time is thoroughly defaced by this disease and is on the next row.

The SPLM fought a fierce protracted civil war with the Islamist led government centered in Khartoum for more than two bloody decades which eventually culminated to the signing of the comprehensive peace agreement which form legal basis for south Sudan statehood. That was such an admired and well received legacy the SPLM as a liberation movement registered in the history of our nation. But is this legacy worth living on as it should have been? It’s certainly not. The SPLM after becoming a ruling party in both the former Sudan and the Republic of South Sudan seems to have felt short of its visions and missions and certainly lost its right direction.

The legacy which it had earned is being eaten away by some ants in its own thatched house where its cleaners became bosses. The legacy is no longer worth living in hearts and minds of the peoples of south Sudan, maybe only the SPLM diehards like myself may say yes, it would live worth living but loosely because it is the same SPLM that is eating its own tail. This is manifested by unethical and unprocedural reckless quirky mismanagement of almost all the resources of the state misguided by this assumption of being leaders of SPLM. This malfeasance conducts by these leaders led to the standstill and hence dysfunctionality of all the other organs of the party hence relegating some of them becomes weak and useless.

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By Longar Mathiec Wol, Nairobi, Kenya

Nyawan and her children in Akobo

Bany Kiirdit: The shameful suffering of the children of our martyrs and heroes is disgraceful; photo by Emmanuel Kenyi

January 10, 2017 (SSB) — They call them fathers, mothers, sisters, brothers, sons and daughters and we call them fallen heroes/heroines. The war of struggle for the independence of South Sudan brought about mixed effects; positive and negative. Positive in sense that we got independence and negative because the hopes have never been fulfilled. That independence cost us lives. The life of those we call heroes or heroines. That damage caused by losing these relatives is unrepairable.

The pain of losing the father, mother or relative. After these children’s parents gave up their life to free us; their children become a victim of their heroic act. They roam on the streets of ever states in south Sudan and we call them street children without knowing that their parents’ lives gave us homes we live in. We don’t bother to question what pushed them to the streets but we kick them out in our houses when they want place to sleep, when the want food to eat.

If their parents resurrect from death, they will call us all kind of names and will never accept to offer their precious life again for our freedom. They will know that what they did has benefited few not the way they expected. They will know that they were praiseworthy when they were alive but not after they passed way. They will know that country only knows them when they are a live but not after they are gone.

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By Ariik Atekdit, Juba, South Sudan

RSS coat of ARMS

South Sudan’s coat of arms, in which the eagle symbolizes vision, strength, resilience and majesty, and the shield and spear the people’s resolve to protect the sovereignty of their republic and work hard to feed it.

January 9, 2017 (SSB) — The crisis in South Sudan is not a question based on ideological conflict. Every faction whether being rebels of Dr Riek Machar or Dr Lam Akol wants the country to be ruled the way it is portrayed in the SPLM Manifestation. Kiir Mayardit in Juba and Pagan Amum in exile equally believe that there is nothing new to be added to the Garang’s proposed system of the SPLM government.

No single man among the rivals has come out with any different ideology to pull rope with against the standing one. And if there is no any different ideology that is conflicting in Juba administration, then what is the problem? We just need to sit down and set a constitution that will guide the principle and ideology of the 21 years of struggle.

To my simple understanding, the political agitation of South Sudan demands a constitutional solution. The ruling elements might be hesitating that if any permanent constitution with any national concrete principles is put in place then the constitution will definitely not forgive their wrongdoings and set them for political eviction but that is the only solution to our national conflicts and South Sudanese must demand it now and not later.

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Consolidating Unity and Lasting Peace in an Ethnically Divided South Sudan

By Tong Kot Kuocnin, Nairobi, Kenya

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January 7, 2017 (SSB) — Faced with the challenges of a nation’s building and preserving and consolidating peace and unity in an ethnically divided south Sudan, it is now high time to initiate an equal quest for a national identity. What has to be promoted is an orientation from the freedom of indifference where almost everybody feels excluded from the stakes of his/her own nation to a freedom of involvement where each and every one of us plays role in reshaping the chattered away and loss of ownership and nationalistic tendency in the hearts and minds of the people from various communities in south Sudan. This demands the harmonization of rights and duties of all.

So far, however, the argument which had vividly overwhelmed and flooded the minds of everybody in south Sudan is the idea that the conflict which has almost engulfs the nation is a conflict between Dinka(s) and Nuer(s) where some other people who are even stakeholders in the governance of the country since day one are reluctant and paid no attention at all. Our responsibility in preserving our unity and peace is a collective issue to be addressed by all and not the only two tribes which are sentimentally at loggerheads on the common property of everybody in south Sudan. South Sudan doesn’t belong to the Dinka and Nuers alone. It’s belongs to all its inhabitants i.e. all the tribes in south Sudan including the aforementioned tribes.

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Why the Seat of Hybrid Court for South Sudan should be situated within South Sudan

By Tong Kot Kuocnin, Nairobi, Kenya

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January 5, 2017 (SSB) — This article explores fears of the two principal leaders who are opposed to the establishment of the hybrid court for South Sudan and argue clearly, in an attempt to dispel their negative perceptions with regards to the court’s establishment. Our leaders are obliged to honor the terms of the agreement they have both signed in letter and spirit and any attempt to sidestep any provision of the agreement amounts to its breach which invites some international consequences on either side.

The reason as to why a court which like hybrid court for South Sudan was needed to try crimes committed during the conflict is two folds; (1) the opposition trust not any longer the judiciary of South Sudan due to its subservience to the regime they are fighting because the opposition question whether the legal regime in South Sudan has the ability to address such crimes and (2) because the crimes committed during the conflict are international in character (war crimes and crimes against humanity excluding genocide which is not agreed upon as per the findings of the African union Commission of Inquiry on the conflict in South Sudan).

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The Impetuses for Transformation and Reform in Leadership and Management of the Judiciary of the Republic of South Sudan

By Tong Kot Kuocnin, Nairobi, Kenya

Chan Reech Madut

Justice Chan Reech Madut, head of South Sudan Judiciary

January 5, 2017 (SSB) — The agreement on the Resolution of the conflict in the Republic of South Sudan mandates a reconstruction of South Sudanese society according to the ideals and values expressed in its preamble and in a host of other related provisions enshrine therein. In this respect the agreement unmistakably conveys its overriding objective to provide a framework to transform South Sudan into a united, democratic and prosperous society founded on human dignity, social justice, human rights and the principles of good governance. Whereas every institution of governance in this country, either in its constitutional design or responsibility, has a duty to oversee these reconstructive reforms, the Judiciary which is the discussing topology of this article occupies a unique place.

This is because the Judiciary is tasked with the important role of interpreting the constitution, finding and giving it meaning where there is contestation, and robustly patrolling its boundaries whenever there are threats. In many respect, therefore, the Judiciary is the ultimate agency that will oversee a successful transitional reforms. For the Judiciary to ably perform this role, it must lift itself out of years of political servitude, low standards of professionalism and interference, wide corruption and delinquent jurisprudence into a position of institutional independence and autonomy that secures public confidence and a jurisprudence of that commands Peer respect.

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“We the willing, led by the unknowing, are doing the impossible for the ungrateful. We have done so much, with so little, for so long, we are now qualified to do anything, with nothing”

Prepared by Editorial Team: Kur Wël Kur, Emmanuel Ariech Deng and PaanLuel Wël

PaanLuel Wël: South Sudanese Bloggers (SSB): The Best Articles, Writers, of the Year 2016

December 31, 2016 (SSB) — The year 2016, in some hours, will dwindle into the past, and the people of South Sudan, along with the rest of the world, will welcome 2017. Every New Year is a joyful celebration, a celebration of the last year achievements, achievements that include being alive and healthy, recognizing the selfless leaders, whether in journalism, governance, or other important issues such as women’s rights issues, economic growth, conflicts and peace.

This year, our country, with its suffering population, has been featured hundreds over hundreds of websites all over the world, mostly in bad light. However, PaanLuel Wël: South Sudanese bloggers (SSB), our own website, occupies the central stage in publishing articles, which make sense of the dire situations in our beloved country. It is also an instrumental informant to South Sudanese worldwide because it publishes opinion articles and news commentaries from South Sudanese, both within and outside the country. These opinions explain the general and specific lives and situations of South Sudanese in countries such as Australia, Britain, Canada, New Zealand, USA, and many other places where South Sudanese are taking refuge.

Today, PaanLuel Wël: South Sudanese bloggers (SSB) is celebrating the diverse and excellent works of some writers and acknowledging the work of other hundred contributors, columnists and opinions-writers whose names or works won’t appear in this article. We got lots of writers on our website, and it is imperative to motivate and encourage them with something unique to mark the end of the year 2016 and the commencement of the year 2017.

Here are the 2016 review:

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Tributes, Homages and Salutations to one of the eminent South Sudanese artists, David Garang Deng Aguer, popularly known as “Adun Ciin Daam”

By Awuol Gabriel Arok, Juba, South Sudan

Artist David Garang Deng Aguer

Artist David Garang Deng Aguer

December 28, 2016 (SSB) — With distress and grieve you will be missed David, never did you see the morning and evening of 27 December 2016 deep into the New Year 2017 which you have just missed by 5 days, lifeless feverish had just taken hold of you on the gloomy evening of 26 December 2016 and greatly robbed your loving relatives, friends, colleagues and people of South Sudan of your precious soul and comforting Art.

Dear David; with heavy heart and watery eyes, I salute your wholesome comradeship, your energetic and visionary dream as the bible says ‘‘Each man should give what he has decided in his heart to give, not reluctantly or under compulsion, for God loves a cheerful givers’’  2 Corinthians 9:7 of which you have bravely responded to without reservations.

Dear David; you have given the people of South Sudan a complete and connected switch that will remains in history, your humble songs did not only entertain us but have united and counseled our minds that have been traumatized by the long wars of liberation, preciously when the need for counseling and awareness was high, your nationalistic songs of freedom have opened up veins and arteries of peace, love, unity and awareness.

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“If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will eventually come to believe it.” Joseph Goebbels, a Nazi politician and Hitler’s Propaganda Minister.

By Hon. Taban Abel Aguek (MP), Yirol, South Sudan

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December 26, 2016 (SSB) —- In the last few weeks, there have been sustained warning of looming genocide in South Sudan. As reported by Sudan tribune, UN Secretary General Mr. Ban Ki Moon, was the latest to add his voice to the matter saying before UNSC Monday last week, “If we fail to act, South Sudan will be on a trajectory towards mass atrocities.” UN Special Advisor on Prevention of Genocide, Adama Dieng, also expressed fear of genocide occurring in South Sudan just after brief visit to the country. The statement by both Mr. Ban Ki Moon and Mr. Dieng were not any different from those of US Permanent Secretary to the UN, Ambassador Samantha Power, who without shame compared the situation in South Sudan to the one of Rwanda of 1994.

Without fair evaluation, these UN elite personalities bought into false reports coined by Yasmin Sooka, Chairperson of the Commission on Human Rights in South Sudan, some bogus ‘paid’ civil society organizations and some wicked elements of the Enough Project. All connived on how to influence and usher quick move for sanctions and arms embargo on South Sudan. For genocide warnings to be issued, there must be strong indicators, carefully examined and clearly justifiable, to unleash such warnings. According to media reports, Mr. Ban Ki Moon cites only two indictors: first, that President Kiir and his loyalists are “contemplating a new military offensive in the coming days against the armed opposition led by Machar”. Secondly, that there are clear indications that Riek Machar and their opposition groups are pursuing a military escalation.

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By Wol Deng Atak, Nairobi, Kenya

National Dialogue Steering Committee and Advisers

National Dialogue Steering Committee and Advisers

December 20, 2016 (SSB) — The recent proposal for National Dialogues unveiled by President Salva Kiir Mayardit, in his speech to Parliament, is a good stride toward a right direction. The revelation is also in line with political opposition’s leaders and media personalities who earlier called for the same national exercise. Thus, it is evident that the opinion resonates with President Kiir. Furthermore, nurturing this quest for national dialogue will consolidate peace and national spirit. This, however, is only achievable if President Kiir creates environment for free media and relax curbs placed on freedom of speech in the country.

Concern is growing in proponents as quarters within Kiir’s administration secretly voice serious reservations on the proposed National Dialogue. Their reservations are understandably based on fear of loosing influence they have enjoyed during years of political and economic crisis in the country. Their major fear is in possible new dimension to power equation that may result from National Dialogue. However, the opposition to National Dialogues needs not to be incentivized because it is the only road to peace building, reconciliation and national unity.

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By Ariik Atekdit, Tonj, South Sudan

dec15-1

December 17, 2016 (SSB) —- It is now three years since 15 December 2013, when the country slipped into a badly deteriorating conflict. Never did we know that the conflict which was totally of the SPLM’s big House dispute would turn into a nationwide civil war with thousands of people killed and millions others displaced within and without the country. I just don’t want to bore the readers with a lot of the crisis’ statistics of human and properties destruction, however, the truth remains that this nation has had a very bad experience at the age it was supposed to continue with the spirit of struggle that has kept South Sudanese together for the last two decades before the CPA and beyond.

The unity was first lost to the street at the SPLM House long in April 2013 when Dr Riek Machar spoke to international media outlets declaring himself that he would rival his Party Chairman, Mr. Kiir at the SPLM convention that would grant him a ticket to contest in 2015 Presidential elections. With a lot of tensions in the Presidential Palace of J1, President Kiir Mayardit issued a decree dismissing all members of his cabinet including his deputy on July 23 and suspending his party long serving Secretary General, Mr. Pagan Amum Okiech. The move brought about a bulky density of security and political tensions as fear of unknown continued to rise and surface in Juba and villages.

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By Taban Abel Aguek, Yirol, South Sudan

RSS coat of ARMS

South Sudan’s coat of arms, in which the eagle symbolizes vision, strength, resilience and majesty, and the shield and spear the people’s resolve to protect the sovereignty of their republic and work hard to feed it.

December 17, 2016 (SSB) — South Sudan is a country that emerged to be an independent State from a wave of turbulent eras of uncertainties. Its history is largely an account of a series of protracted conflicts. In fact, South Sudanese people have, for the past centuries, invested more in wars than any other thing.

The history of the struggle of the black people of Sudan and South Sudan goes back to as early as prehistoric time. According to some recorded materials, the black people of the ‘Sudans’ were continually pushed way beyond Egypt until they found themselves in the present day Sudan and South Sudan before and after the 14th Century, following the collapse of the Christian Nubian Kingdoms of Makuria and Alodia.

Then the South Sudanese continued to wage bitter wars later against the Anglo-Egyptian colonization and then again against successive Arab Islamic regimes in Khartoum. And for all the wars the South Sudanese fought both in the ancient days down to most recent ones, there was one chief cause among all other things: Identity.

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A message of peace and reconciliation on the 3rd anniversary of the South Sudanese civil war

December 15, 2016 (SSB) — During the outbreak of the South Sudan conflict in December 2013, and its most recent resurgence in July 2016, hundreds of thousands of people have been killed, thousand have fled to neighbouring countries while others have sought refuge in Internally Displaced Peoples (IDPs) camps across the country.

Applauding the tolerance demonstrated by the people of South Sudan, who continue to endure immense hardships worsened by the security, social and economic challenges.

Denouncing the rise in hate speech and incitement perpetrated by members of the South Sudanese community within the country and those in Diaspora in different media outlets especially social media.

Acknowledging the gross atrocities and crimes committed against the citizens of this land, such as rape, targeted and ethnic killings, looting of property, gutting of villages among others.

Emphasizing the need to expedite the formation of the hybrid court to hold accountable the perpetrators of these injustices as key to paving the way for lasting peace and reconciliation.

Appreciating all efforts exerted by the stakeholders of the Agreement on the Resolution of the Conflict in The Republic of South Sudan (ARCISS) and its resultant peace process including, government, opposition, civil society, the international community and the citizens.

Realizing the importance of the call for national dialogue echoed across the political divide, the need to ensure a safe space where citizens and other stakeholders alike can freely express themselves cannot be over emphasized.

Anataban calls for the silencing of guns to ensure a conducive environment for fruitful dialogue, reiterating the need for the inclusion of youth, women and other sectors of the South Sudan society to guarantee all voices are expressed, most so the voice of those at grass root level.

Further urging the South Sudanese to take up ownership of our current situation, and stressing the need to play our roles in our various individual capacities and contribute to upholding the dignity of the people of South Sudan.


‘A community of young South Sudanese creatives who are tired of seeing our people suffer’.

Email: anatabanss@gmail.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AnaTaban 

Twitter: https://twitter.com/AnaTabanSS

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U8F8rc3kf9k&feature=youtu.be    

The opinion expressed here is solely the view of the writer. The veracity of any claim made are the responsibility of the author, not PaanLuel Wël: South Sudanese Bloggers (SSB) website. If you want to submit an opinion article or news analysis, please email it to paanluel2011@gmail.com. SSB do reserve the right to edit material before publication. Please include your full name, email address, the city and the country you are writing from.


Sebit William Garang Dut: The Sudan civil war, and those who poured their parental guidance into nurturing us

By Kur Wël Kur, Adelaide, Australia

Sebit William Garang Dut

Sebit William Garang Dut, former SPLM/A camp commander in charge of Jesh el-Amer in Palotaka, Eastern Country

December 15, 2016 (SSB) — For those of you who know little or nothing about this leadership genius, I would like to take your time to understand how this man “carried” us, the Face Foundations in Palotaka (Palataka), on his shoulders.  I believe Sebit William Garang Dut deserves a recognition for his contributions in bringing up the unaccompanied minors of the Palataka (Palataka) in eastern Equatoria.

Before I ask your opinions about whether he deserves a platform of heroism or not, I would like to mention his South Sudan Liberation Profile (SSLP). Who was he in the course of the liberation? David Matiop Gai, the writer of Dinka Community: The MTN of South Sudan, Palotaka (Palataka)  Face Foundation: Dr. John Garang’s Predictable Seeds for New Sudan series and other political articles on PaanLuel Wël, has this to say about Sebit William Garang Dut:

“Sebit William Garang Dut is the elder son of William Garang Dut from Anook community in Maar Payam. He was a director of education in the autonomous government of Southern Sudan. Sebit went to Bongo in Ethiopia. He graduated in rank of 1st lieutenant (LT). He was injured on leg in Jackou. In 1990 Dr. John Garang sent Sebit William to Palataka face Foundation as camp commander with rank of captain. He was promoted as a lieutenant commander in 1992. He served as an educationist in the liberated areas until the birth of CPA. He is now a director of education in the ministry of General Education in the government of South Sudan”

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Michael Malaak Mayen, Juba, South Sudan

salary

salary

December 12, 2016 (SSB) — The effectiveness of official intervention in foreign exchange market is a crucial policy issue for South Sudan. The Bank of South Sudan abolished its fixed exchange rate regime due to gross overvaluation of it currency, the South Sudanese Pound. Since the abandoning of the fixed exchange rate regime and the introduction of a manage float in 2015, the Bank of South Sudan introduced the monthly and sometimes quarterly auctioning of foreign exchange. In the new regime, the Bank instructed commercial banks to report their daily exchange rates.

In the face of the underdeveloped interbank foreign exchange market, the weighted average of commercial banks daily rates, enable the Bank of South Sudan to obtain market-based official exchange rate.  The introduction of the auctions was the consequence of the country’s shallow and underdeveloped interbank market for foreign exchange. Intervention in foreign exchange market changes the balance between domestic and foreign currency denominated in the markets, which induces the investors to adjust their portfolio, changing the exchange rate. Furthermore, the information contained in interventions modifies expectations regarding the future spot exchange rate, leading to an immediate adjustment to the current exchange rate.

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To all our Caretakers, Those Who Poured Their Parental Guidance into Nurturing Us

By Kur Wël Kur, Adelaide, Australia

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December 11, 2016 (SSB) — At early ages, those who criss-crossed deserts into Ethiopia and those of us who plunged into a different weather at Palataka in Equatoria, found ourselves in the hands of other adults. In the livelihood of rearing cattle, our parents instilled independence into us at young ages.

So, living far away, following green pastures and waterholes for our herds of cattle wasn’t a problem for us (the Dinka children). By ‘’perfect strangers’’ (most of the times, they were uncles), we would get whooped when we trailed off from the tangent of the conventional norms of our ancestral lives; sometimes, we would get praised when we aimed at doing the right things with the right accuracy of our behaviours.

However, brutes do exist, those who hate the guts of other peoples’ children. They’re everywhere. If given chances, they would abuse other peoples’ children physically. It’s this same notion that forces parents to confide the responsibilities for their children only to those they trust. Dr. John Garang with those who were in the echelons of his leadership were aware of this truth. So, when it came to us in Pinyidu and in Palataka, they (Dr. John and his generals) didn’t take it lightly.

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By Tong Kot Kuocnin, Nairobi, Kenya

RSS coat of ARMS

South Sudan’s coat of arms, in which the eagle symbolizes vision, strength, resilience and majesty, and the shield and spear the people’s resolve to protect the sovereignty of their republic and work hard to feed it.

December 9, 2016 (SSB) — The rule of law doctrine envisages that the power of the state and government be only exercised in consonance with applicable laws and set procedures. In this article, I shall labour to bring to forefront why upholding constitutional order and the rule of law matters for the present and future south Sudan. In every democratic country the world over, respect for the rule of law demands the separation of powers of the three arms of government, the legislature, judiciary and executive.

In South Sudan, the legislature and the Judiciary are mere messengers of the executive which only do what appeases the executive and especially, the President. The legislature and judiciary in South Sudan are mere rubber-stamp which only knows how to worship and leaks the shoes of the executive arm of government. Where did they this precedent from? It is crystally envisaged in the doctrine of the rule of law that citizens are able to hold their government accountable through courts law as guaranteed in the constitution and other regional and international legal instruments.

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Book Title: Politics of Ethnicity and Governance in South Sudan: Understanding the Complexity of the World’s newest Country, by John Adoor Deng

Politics of Ethnicity and Governance in South Sudan: Understanding the Complexity of the World’s newest Country, by John Adoor Deng

Politics of Ethnicity and Governance in South Sudan: Understanding the Complexity of the World’s newest Country, by John Adoor Deng

Book Abstract

This little book documents the brief history of contemporary South Sudanese politics within the context of the 22 years of the second war of liberation. A portion of it explores 17 years of the first Sudanese civil war that ended in 1972 through the Addis-Abba Agreement. The book has made meaningful analysis of the governance after the birth of the World’s newest Republic (South Sudan). It is divided into seven major chapters. Each chapter addresses the unique context of the South Sudanese political, civil, religious and military life. Chapter one introduces the book in its etymological context to the reader and chapter two narrates on ethnic groupings in South Sudan. Chapter three explores the significant roles played by ethnic groups during the war of liberation in South Sudan and beyond. This chapter appreciates positive contributions made by various ethnic groups in supporting the war efforts.

In chapter four, the author teased the negative politics rendered in ethnic context and explained how that negativity resulted in bloodshed of innocent civilians. In this chapter, some theories that have aided negative ethnic politics in the country have been discussed. Chapter five addresses religious significance and explores its negative role in fueling conflicts and feuds in South Sudan and elsewhere in the world. A significant part of this chapter is dedicated to the discussion of South Sudan as a failed state in chapter six; and as a country born in the 21st century, many analysts have argued that South Sudan has double-jumped to top the world’s failed and fragile states.  The book concludes with suggestions for institutional reforms in a quest to install good governance in the Republic of South Sudan.

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By Miss Adol Makeny Dhieu, Sydney, Australia

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Introduction:

December 7, 2016 (SSB) — Role of fathers in their children lives is not a Western idea only. It is as universal and natural as creation itself. Western cultures have however advanced in making it a focal point of research and study simply to reinforce its important in a developing child’s life. Developing societies too have their ways of reinforcing this idea, for example, in South Sudan villages and across rural Africa, men take on various roles deem manly with their sons en-toed.

They could go hunting together, storytelling, herding, cultivating, making tools (if bless with blacksmith or engineering skills) etc. In cities for example, a true Southern man would spare time and spend it with his children, ask about how their day went and what they did at school, tell them about his work and the impact it has on the society etc. Child-rearing, was never a woman job only, nor is it parents only, it indeed takes a village in Africa and elsewhere for that matter, to raise a child, especially boys.

South Sudanese parents in the west, especially in Australia and specifically fathers, have either lost touch with this idea at no fault of their own or have intentionally decides to neglect their primary roles as fathers. This article intend to outline issues that led to failure of not meeting this obligation, few alleviating suggestions and lastly, the importance of a fatherly role in a child’s life.

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South Sudanese perspective of what derailed the journey to economic development

By Paul Logali, Logali House, Juba

The current state of RSS

December 6, 2016 (SSB) — After the government of South Sudan was established in 2006, initiation of rapid economic development programs followed led by the public sector in partnership with the private sector. Part of my assignment was to participate in developing industrial strategies and polices for the ministry of Commerce, Industry and Investment.

To get this done we had to travel to all the previous 10 states to consider the views and perspectives of all the state and non state actors about economic development issues, the roles of the private sector and the challenges they thought should be captured in the formulation of these policies.

We equipped ourselves with working tool kits [questionnaires] that have been tested in other post conflict environments to help us collect the data required. Among these tools were a set of kits designed to examine and inform us about the mental models of our people.

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