Archive for February 1, 2012


New York, US – The World Food Programme (WFP) said it would scale up food assistance to reach 80,000 people affected by the recent escalation of ethnic violence in South Sudan’s Jonglei state. WFP Deputy Executive Director, Ramiro Lopes da Silva, made this known on Tuesday after a visit to the region.

The WFP official said ‘the violence in Jonglei is only one of the many challenges that South Sudan is currently facing, and the world must respond to ensure that the people of South Sudan have the support they need to build a peaceful and prosperous country’.

In a statement, da Silva said ‘many of the women I met in Pibor and Akobo had lost their children and had no one to depend on but the humanitarian agencies on the ground’.

He noted that deadly clashes between the Lou Nuer and Murle communities in recent weeks had displaced tens of thousands of civilians.

The statement quoted da Silva as saying that the development had prompted UN agencies to launch a major humanitarian operation to assist those in need.

The WFP official said: ‘part of WFP’s response includes providing a 15-day emergency food ration to displaced persons who have been affected by the attacks, as well as using logistics expertise to help other humanitarian agencies overcome challenges to establish a way for people to access their services’.

He also said said that WFP had already deployed three helicopters, an airplane and 28 trucks to deliver ‘not just food but also shelter items and medical supplies to remote corners’, adding that ‘one of its priorities is to distribute food before the rain starts in March as 90 per cent of locations targeted for assistance will become inaccessible by road.’.

The UN agency also emphasized the need to help affected households cultivate their own crops in time for the next harvest in August.

‘Ten locations in Jonglei have already been reached by WFP. Five of these are located in Pibor county, including Pibor town and surrounding villages, Lekuangole, Gumruk, Labrab and Boma.

‘Five more are located in recently affected areas in the northern parts of the state. Initial emergency food assistance has been provided in Duk Padiet, while distributions are ongoing in Akobo and Walgak, Yuai in Urur county and Waat in Nyirol county,’ the statement added.

Pana 01/02/2012

http://www.afriquejet.com/south-sudan-wfp-scales-up-food-assistance-for-80000-people-2012020132600.html

Sudan, South Sudan Chambers of Commerce Discuss Trade Relations
Sudan Vision
Khartoum – The Sudanese Businessmen and Employers Federation (SBEF) and South SudaneseChamber of Commerce, Industry and Agriculture discussed methods to activate economic and commercial relations between the two countries. The meeting, co-chaired by 

South Sudan: WFP scales up food assistance for 80000 people
Afrique en Ligue
New York, US – The World Food Programme (WFP) said it would scale up food assistance to reach 80000 people affected by the recent escalation of ethnic violence in South Sudan’s Jonglei state. WFP Deputy Executive Director, Ramiro Lopes da Silva, 

UN investigates reports of South Sudan massacre
Reuters
UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) – The UN mission in South Sudan is investigating reports of a massacre of nearly 80 people by armed men in uniforms in Africa’s youngest nation, the United Nations said on Wednesday. “According to local sources, 


KHARTOUM | Wed Feb 1, 2012 1:37pm EST

Feb 1 (Reuters) – Sudan, stepping up its rhetoric, accused South Sudan of “hostility” in their row over oil transit fees and said it would hold Juba responsible for any attack on northern oil facilities, a state-linked news website said on Wednesday.

The two neighbours are locked in a worsening row over disentangling their oil industries after the South split from Sudan and became independent in July, following decades of civil war that ended with a peace deal in 2005.

The landlocked new nation took three-quarters of the oil production – the lifeline of both economies – but needs to pay for using northern export facilities and the Red Sea port of Port Sudan.

Tension rose when Sudan said last month it started seizing southern oil at Port Sudan as compensation for what it called unpaid pipeline transit fees. Juba, the southern capital, responded last week by shutting down its entire output of 350,000 barrels a day.

The African Union has been trying to broker a deal but a meeting between Sudanese President Omar Hassan al-Bashir and his southern counterpart Salva Kiir failed last week. More talks are scheduled for next week.

The Sudanese negotiation team said South Sudan had not been ready to reach a fair deal at the latest round of talks in Addis Ababa, the state-linked Sudanese Media Centre (SMC) said, citing a statement issued by the delegation after its return.

“The Government of Sudan … called on the southern government to review its hostile leaning towards Sudan,” the SMC said, adding that Sudan remained ready to continue talks in “good faith.”

Sudan also again accused Juba of supporting rebels in the main northern border state of South Kordofan, the SMC said.

“The Government of Sudan will hold the government of South Sudan responsible for any attempt to target or sabotage oil fields, facilities and oil infrastructure,” SMC said, without elaborating.

There was no immediate reaction from Juba. South Kordofan is home to much of Sudan’s remaining oil industry after the split.

Fighting broke out in June between the Sudanese army and rebels of the SPLM-North, and clashes spread to Blue Nile in September. Both states border South Sudan.

Blue Nile and South Kordofan contain large groups who sided with the south in the civil war, and who say they have continued to face persecution inside Sudan since South Sudan seceded.

The SPLM is now the ruling party in the independent south and denies supporting SPLM-North rebels across the border.

Events in South Kordofan and Blue Nile are difficult to verify because aid groups and foreign journalists are banned from areas where fighting takes place.

SPLM-North is one of a number of rebel movements in underdeveloped border areas who say they are fighting to overthrow Bashir and end what they see as the dominance of the Khartoum political elite.

The fighting has already forced about 417,000 people to flee their homes, more than 80,000 of them to newly independent South Sudan, according to the United Nations. (Reporting by Ulf Laessing and Khalid Abdelaziz; editing by Tim Pearce)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/02/01/sudan-south-oil-idUSL5E8D15ZZ20120201

South Sudan lists demands in oil row with north

Al Jazeera – ‎Jan 31, 2012‎
The United States has called on Sudan and South Sudan to end their dispute over oil transit fees. Sudan has released four oil tankers that belongs to the south as a gesture of good will. But the government of South Sudan, which halted its oil 

UNITED NATIONS | Wed Feb 1, 2012 1:50pm EST

(Reuters) – The U.N. mission in South Sudan is investigating reports of a massacre of nearly 80 people by armed men in uniforms in Africa’s youngest nation, the United Nations said on Wednesday.

“According to local sources, so far 78 people were reported killed, 68 wounded, nine missing and thousands are reported to be displaced,” U.N. spokesman Martin Nesirky said.

“The team from the U.N. Mission (UNMISS) observed 15 bodies that were still unburied,” he said.

UNMISS personnel saw the unburied corpses in the Bulich area of South Sudan’s Warrap State, Nesirky said, adding that the attack had reportedly been carried out “by an unknown number of armed uniformed men from Mayendit County, Unity State.”

UNMISS’s human rights team will investigate the incident while humanitarian agencies operating in the region will hold an emergency meeting to coordinate a response, Nesirky added.

South Sudan seceded from Sudan in July 2011 under a 2005 peace agreement that ended decades of civil war with Khartoum, though the two sides have yet to resolve a long list of disputes. The south continues to grapple with tribal and rebel violence, as well as a dispute with Khartoum over oil revenues.

Earlier this month Russia announced that it was withdrawing its helicopters and crew from UNMISS, a move that will cause difficulties for the strapped mission.

Moscow said the decision had nothing to do with security.

(Reporting By Louis Charbonneau; Editing by Sandra Maler)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/02/01/us-southsudan-un-idUSTRE81020O20120201

Sudan says South Sudan “hostile” in oil row
Reuters
KHARTOUM Feb 1 (Reuters) – Sudan, stepping up its rhetoric, accused South Sudan of “hostility” in their row over oil transit fees and said it would hold Juba responsible for any attack on northern oil facilities, a state-linked news website said on 
South Sudan: Tensions Rise Amidst Kidnappings
AllAfrica.com
Khartoum — Tension is growing in the border between Sudan and the new South Sudan as governments of the two states accuse each other of attacks. The governments in Khartoum and Juba are throwing accusations of supporting the rebels operating in their 
Sudanese Rebels Pressure China
Wall Street Journal
By NICHOLAS BARIYO KAMPALA Uganda—The Sudanese rebel group holding 29 Chinese hostages demanded that Beijing persuade the government of Sudan to halt a military offensive in the African nation’s restive south, raising the political stakes in a

Wall Street Journal
UN investigates reports of South Sudan massacre
Reuters
UNITED NATIONS (Reuters) – The UN mission in South Sudan is investigating reports of a massacre of nearly 80 people by armed men in uniforms in Africa’s youngest nation, the United Nations said on Wednesday. “According to local sources, 

Kampala (Platts)–1Feb2012/336 am EST/836 GMT

South Sudan President Salva Kiir Mayardit has said that his country will not resume oil production and exports despite Sudan’s decision over the weekend to release two oil tankers that were detained due to a dispute between the two countries over transit fees.

Speaking at the 18th African Union Assembly in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, late Monday, Mayardit said that oil production would remain suspended until a permanent resolution to the conflict is reached, according to a copy of his speech obtained by Platts.

The ships were freed By Sudan as a goodwill gesture in the hope that South Sudan would reverse a protest shutdown of its oil facilities, Platts reported earlier this week citing a Sudanese official.

The Sudanese government and South Sudan are locked in a bitter row in which Khartoum has been demanding that landlocked Juba pay $32.20/barrel, according to Mayardit’s speech, for the transit of oil through the only pipeline connecting South Sudan’s oil fields to export facilities located at Marsa Bashayer in Sudan on the Red Sea.

South Sudan earlier this month declared a force majeure on its end-December and January loading supply of Nile and Dar Blend crude, industry sources said previously, and was moving toward a total suspension of oil production and operations.

On January 25, South Sudan’s parliament agreed to halt oil production in the country.

In his speech Monday, Mayardit said: “We acknowledge that most of the oil infrastructure lies on the territory of Sudan, however, the oil clearly belongs to South Sudan.”

“This unilateral decision to take our crude entitlements is unmistakably a violation of the sovereignty of South Sudan and must be condemned.”

South Sudan has alleged that Khartoum blocked four ships with 3.5 million barrels of Dar Blend from sailing out of Marsa Bashayer, and have further prevented another four ships — due to load 2.8 million barrels of Nile and Dar Blend crude — from docking at the port, according to an earlier statement by Mayardit.

Mayardit said Monday that South Sudan has lost more than $850 million since Sudan began confiscating the country’s oil exports on December 8, 2011. But he reiterated that South Sudan remained committed to resolving the dispute and that it was willing to negotiate payment terms for the transit of oil.

He added that all outstanding dues and claims between the two countries should be settled through an independent transparent committee comprising three members– one each to be nominated by Sudan and South Sudan and the third by the African Union.

On January 26, South Sudan signed a memorandum of Understanding with Kenya to construct an alternative oil pipeline that would run from South Sudan’s oil fields to Kenya’s Lamu Island in the Indian Ocean. South Sudan produces around 350,000 b/d of crude oil.

http://www.platts.com/RSSFeedDetailedNews/RSSFeed/Oil/7121483

Israel announces South Sudan asylum-seekers have until March to leave country
Haaretz
After South Sudanese independence, Population Authority said asylum-seekers could safely return home; meanwhile, Petah Tikva District Court stays deportation order on 130 Ivory Coast families. By Dana Weiler-Polak One thousand asylum-seekers from South 

South Sudan president says oil production to remain suspended
Platts
South Sudan President Salva Kiir Mayardit has said that his country will not resume oil production and exports despite Sudan’s decision over the weekend to release two oil tankers that were detained due to a dispute between the two countries over 

Sudan, Egypt abductions highlight risks to Chinese
Boston.com
In contrast to the quick resolution of the Egypt hostage-taking, the ordeal of 29 Chinese workers from dam and engineering firm Sinohydro Group has dragged on since their kidnapping by rebels in theSudan’s South Kordofan region on Saturday.

South Sudan Says Total Ready to Start Oil Exploration in Jonglei
BusinessWeek
31 (Bloomberg) — Total SA has agreed to begin oil exploration in the South Sudanese state of Jonglei where it holds a concession, the newly independent nation’s chief negotiator said. “Total has already committed themselves to start the exploration 

UN Humanitarian Official to Visit South Sudan
Voice of America (blog)
The United Nations is sending a senior official for humanitarian affairs on a mission to South Sudan. In a statement Tuesday, the world body announced that Valerie Amos, UN Under Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief 

South Sudan’s Development: How Will It Be Financed ?
Voice of America
January 31, 2012 South Sudan’s Development: How Will It Be Financed ? Panelists at a recent VOA-sponsored public discussion answer audience questions Nation building is never easy. And forSouth Sudan, it is an even more difficult task given the 

Q+A: Can buyers of seized Sudanese crude get into legal trouble?
Reuters UK
By Florence Tan and Osamu Tsukimori | SINGAPORE (Reuters) – Buyers of South Sudanese oil seized by Sudan may escape legal trouble although Khartoum may get dragged into a prolonged arbitration battle for selling crude at steep discounts, lawyers said 

Israel Says It Will Deport South Sudanese
ABC News
Now that their country has gained independence, thousands of migrants from South Sudan must leave Israel or face deportation, Israel’s Interior Ministry said Tuesday. Some 7000 South Sudaneseare believed to be in Israel, part of a larger influx of 

South Sudan rejects AU oil plan
Financial Times
South Sudan’s chief negotiator has rejected African Union-backed proposals that could see it pay up to $6.5bn to Sudan in the latest attempt to break a vicious deadlock between the two over sharing oil revenues. The impasse, which reached a head at the 

South Sudan lists demands in oil row with north
Al Jazeera
The United States has called on Sudan and South Sudan to end their dispute over oil transit fees. Sudan has released four oil tankers that belongs to the south as a gesture of good will. But the government of South Sudan, which halted its oil 
Sudan, Egypt abductions highlight risks to Chinese
STLtoday.com
17, 2010 file photo, Chinese technicians man drilling equipment on an oil rig in Paloich, South Sudan. Militants apparently captured 29 Chinese workers after attacking a remote work site in the volatile South Kordofan region of neighboring Sudan, 
Solidarity and hope for South Sudan
Vatican Radio
Born in Ireland, Sister Patricia Murray is a Loreto Sister and the Executive Director of an organisation called Solidarity with South Sudan. As news reports tell of continuing violence and dispute in Africa’s newest nation, Sister Patricia is adamant 
Nigeria Is Part Of South Sudan History — UN Commander
Leadership Newspapers
Moses Obi, the Commander United Nation Mission in South Sudan, has said that Nigeria is part of the history of the new country of South Sudan. Obi, said the Comprehensive Peace Agreement meeting between the South and North of that country first held in 

Leadership Newspapers
EU pressed to ‘step up’ aid to war-torn South Sudan
TheParliament.com
By Martin Banks – 1st February 2012 A senior Unicef representative in South Sudan has appealed to the EU to “step up” its aid to the war-ravaged country. During a visit to Brussels, Yasmin Ali Haque pressed the EU to provide more financial and 
UN scales up food assistance for more than 80000 people in South Sudan
UN News Centre
An internally displaced mother and her children among IDPs in South Sudan. Photo: UNMISS/Gideon Pibor The United Nations World Food Programme announced today that it will scale up its assistance to reach 80000 people affected by the recent escalation 
Israel says it will deport South Sudanese migrants
Boston.com
Thousands of people from South Sudan who live in Israel must leave the country or face deportation, said the interior ministry’s spokeswoman Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2012. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit, Files) By Diaa Hadid Associated Press / January 31, 

By DIAA HADID Associated Press
JERUSALEM January 31, 2012 (AP)

Now that their country has gained independence, thousands of migrants from South Sudan must leave Israel or face deportation, Israel’s Interior Ministry said Tuesday.

Some 7,000 South Sudanese are believed to be in Israel, part of a larger influx of some 50,000 African economic migrants and asylum seekers who have poured into the country in recent years.

Sabine Haddad, an Interior Ministry spokeswoman, said the South Sudanese migrants will be offered voluntary deportations that include a $1,300 grant and a plane ticket home. After March 31, those caught will be deported, she said.

“Now that South Sudan has become an independent state, it is time for you to return to your homeland,” a ministry statement said.

South Sudan gained independence from Sudan last July.

William Tall of the United Nation’s High Commission on Refugees said Israel must individually screen asylum applications by South Sudanese to see if they are genuine refugees. Otherwise, Tall said, Israel would be in violation of agreements it signed about asylum seekers.

With the help of paid smugglers, Africans have been sneaking into Israel through its porous border with Egypt’s Sinai desert since 2005.

Their numbers have surged as word spread of safety and job opportunities in the relatively prosperous Jewish state. Most have come from Sudan and Eritrea, where many fled persecution and abuse.

Israel has offered protected status to the Sudanese and Eritreans because of abuses there, allowing them to stay and work in Israel. Many have found their way to the impoverished southern neighborhoods of Tel Aviv, an area with so many migrants that Israelis have labeled it “little Africa.”

The influx has sparked a national debate. Some Israelis fear the migrants will compromise the state’s Jewish character and have become an economic and social burden. Others don’t want their country, which grew out of the Nazi genocide of Jews in World War II, to turn away people escaping persecution.

Israel is trying to cut down on infiltration of migrants by building a a 150-mile (250-kilometer) barrier along the border with Egypt, expanding its detention facility and threatening stiff punishments to people who assist or employ them.

http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/israel-deport-south-sudanese-15478927#.TylF_cVrPTQ

Israel announces South Sudan asylum-seekers have until March to leave country

After South Sudanese independence, Population Authority said asylum-seekers could safely return home; meanwhile, Petah Tikva District Court stays deportation order on 130 Ivory Coast families.

By Dana Weiler-Polak

One thousand asylum-seekers from South Sudan are losing their collective protection, and those who do not leave by the end of March will be deported, the Population and Immigration Authority announced on Tuesday.

Meanwhile, the Petah Tikva District Court stayed a deportation order against 130 families from the Ivory Coast. A month ago, the authority announced that they would be deported, too.

Yapi Yves-Cesaire - Alon Ron - 01022012 Ivorian Yapi Yves-Cesaire and his family in their south Tel Aviv home earlier last month.
Photo by: Alon Ron

The Ivorians were given a month to leave voluntarily, after the Israeli authorities said that they could return home safely because the civil war there had ended.

Following South Sudan’s declaration of independence in July, the Population Authority decided that these citizens could safely return home, too.

They had received collective protection prior to the declaration of independence because Sudan considers Israel an enemy country.

The authority said it would give every departing South Sudanese citizen a $1,300 grant to ease his or her return home.

Critics called the move premature, inappropriate and dangerous.

“South Sudanese citizens must have full access to determination of refugee status on a case-by-case basis if they so desire,” said Sharon Harel, the representative of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in Israel.

“If such access is not made possible, it will contravene the refugee convention and Israel’s commitment to it,” Harel added.

“People have to be given time to get organized, to know where they are going |And if they have a place to live and a job. They can’t uproot their lives in Israel and ensure a new life in South Sudan within two months,” said Sunday Ding, an asylum-seeker from South Sudan who has been in Israel since 2006 and is now a student at Tel Aviv University.

“Unfortunately we still hear … that the situation in South Sudan is not good and people are being murdered, so to force them to go back is regrettable,” said Hamed, another asylum-seeker.

Some of the Ivorians who appealed to the court have families.

In some cases their status as asylum-seekers is under review, or they have medical problems or humanitarian reasons for their request to stay in Israel.

The appeal states that the Interior Ministry’s decision to send the Ivorians home is “premature, contrary to the United Nations’ position, and places their lives in danger.”

The Population and Immigration Authority says there are approximately 2,000 Ivorians in Israel; other estimates state that there are no more than 500.

http://www.haaretz.com/news/national/israel-announces-south-sudan-asylum-seekers-have-until-march-to-leave-country-1.410288



President Kiir joins the other African heads of state and governments as they pose for a photo in front of the new AU headquarters.
[Photo: Thomas Kenneth]

Speech delivered by President Salva Kiir Mayardit at the 18th AU Assembly in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Your Excellencies,

On behalf of the people of South Sudan, allow me to express to all the member states of African Union our gratitude for the warm welcome accorded to the Republic of South Sudan upon our admission into this noble and prestigious organization.  We are truly honored to join you as a sovereign state and look forward to fully engaging in this forum.

The people of South Sudan will long remember the African Union and particularly IGAD for facilitating the resolution of the decades-long conflict in Sudan along with many of our international friends.  Without your invaluable support and guidance, peace may have taken longer to achieve.

Your Excellencies,

On the current oil crisis in our country and in response to the statement just issued, I would like to clarify the position of my government. The ongoing negotiations between the Government of South Sudan and the Government of Sudan – which we continue to be involved in – have been critical for both nations.  We believe that true negotiations must be based on the following two principles:

The principle of peaceful coexistence of South Sudan and our neighbor, Sudan.  This stability will also strengthen the overall stability of the region in particular and the continent at large.

Secondly, the principal of reasonable and fair commercial engagement that ensures the economic viability of both states, in a manner that is respectful and agreeable to both nations.

Your Excellencies,

We reached this current crisis for several reasons.  Most significant was Khartoum’s unilateral decision to enact a bill to levy a fee of 32.2 dollars per barrel to the South Sudan oil that passes through their territory.   While negotiations were taking place to determine a fair fee, Khartoum began diverting and confiscating our oil by force.

We acknowledge that most of the oil infrastructure lies on the territory of Sudan, however the oil clearly belongs to South Sudan.  This unilateral decision to take our crude entitlements is unmistakably a violation of the sovereignty of South Sudan and must be condemned.

This act was implemented despite the fact that the oil operating companies have repeatedly explained that the Republic of South Sudan has been and is paying transit fees to Sudan.

We have no objection to paying Khartoum for the use of their infrastructure, however it must be a mutually agreeable price and to date we have NOT agreed on their proposed price of 32.2 dollars per barrel, nor do we have any intention to accept that price.

It is completely out of international norms and it is a precedence that we will not set.

Since they began their campaign of recovering funds that they unilaterally decided to levy against South Sudan, they have prevented ships from leaving Port Sudan.  They have prevented other ships from docking to collect their purchases.

They have completed constructing a tie-in pipeline designed to permanently divert almost 75% of our daily entitlements.

On Sunday, our offices in Port Sudan confirmed that documents have been processed to allow two detained ships to sail.  The reason for this development is an attempt to coerce us into signing the cover agreement presented by the AUHIP.

To date, the loss of revenue to the Republic of South Sudan amounts to almost 850 million dollars.  These funds are critical to the security and welfare of the citizens of South Sudan and must be recovered.


Your Excellencies,

At the initial phase of this crisis, I immediately informed regional leaders of the developing situation.  We sought advice and exhausted all possibilities to resolve this situation, including our continued involvement with AUHIP negotiations.  Finally, we concluded that due to the fact that we can no longer guarantee that our oil will reach its intended destination, we cannot allow oil production to continue.

At this time, the oil will remain in its natural place- the ground- until the situation is amicably resolved.

Your Excellencies,

We were unable to sign the cover agreement presented by the AUHIP on Friday for several reasons:

The transitional financial provisions were not in line with what we anticipated.

The agreement excluded the concepts of peaceful coexistence and mutual viability for both states.

In general, the proposed agreement was vague on several issues.  Meanwhile, it tied the Republic of South Sudan to urgently provide cash and oil to the Government of Sudan without first addressing the issues that made us reach this point.

In order to move forward, we would like the AU to understand that we stand ready to contribute to the financial physical gap being experienced by the Government of Sudan only within bearable costs limits.  This august house is well aware that we are the youngest nation on earth and that development is limited. Whatever limited resources we have must be dedicated to developing South Sudan.
We must be guaranteed swift and peaceful resolutions to the outstanding CPA issues including Abyei and the borders. The Abyei issue was resolved by the Permanent Court of Arbitration.  That decision needs to be respected and implemented.  In addition, the borders have been agreed upon (80%) and it must be demarcated immediately.

We suggest that all outstanding arrears and claims between the parties should be settled through an independent transparent committee, that would be comprised of three members.  Both Sudan and South Sudan would be able nominate a committee member who is not of either nationality.

The third member would be nominated by the African Union. This committee would audit and ensure that payments are transparently made.

In conclusion, the Government of Sudan must continue to make concessions as evidence of good faith and no hidden agenda.  Only at that time, will we be able to negotiate reasonably and hopefully end this stalemate.

Thank you.