Archive for February 21, 2012


* South Sudan escalates row with Chinese oil firms

* Petrodar head expelled for lack of cooperation – official

* Chinese firms investigated for helping Sudan seize oil

* China is the biggest buyer of South Sudan’s oil

* Thursday’s talks with Sudan delayed till March 6- official (Adds more quotes, details, background)

By Hereward Holland

PALOUGE OIL FIELD, South Sudan, Feb 21 (Reuters) – South Sudan has expelled the head of Chinese-Malaysian oil consortium Petrodar, the main oil firm operating in the new African nation, a top southern official said on Tuesday, escalating a row between Juba and Chinese oil firms.

South Sudan has repeatedly attacked Chinese oil firms and launched an investigation into whether they helped Khartoum seize southern oil being exported from the landlocked country through Sudan. Juba has shut down its oil output of 350,000 barrels per day to end the seizures, which were sparked off by a dispute over transit fees.

“The (oil) minister has just expelled the president of Petrodar,” said Pagan Amum, South Sudan’s top negotiator for talks with Sudan over oil payments.

“I think one of the reasons is lack of cooperation by the President of Petrodar (with the government) and we have dismissed him and expelled him and we are asking the partners to appoint a new president,” he told Reuters during a visit to the Palouge oil field.

Amum said relations with China were good but there were difficulties with some oil companies.

Petrodar, which pumped 230,000 bpd and exported the southern oil through a Sudan pipeline until the shutdown, categorically rejected the accusations on Sunday and said it had followed only southern instructions.

South Sudan’s attack on Chinese interests is puzzling Western diplomats because China is the biggest buyer of its oil.

Petrodar is a consortium of mainly Chinese state firms Sinopec, Chinese National Petroleum Corp and Malaysia’s Petronas. It runs oil fields in South Sudan’s Upper Nile state, to which Palouge belongs, and also an export pipeline through Sudan.

Many South Sudanese feel bitter about China because of its support for Khartoum during decades of civil war between the Muslim north and mainly Christian South that killed two million people. The conflict ended only in 2005 with a peace agreement that paved the way for southern independence.

OIL TALKS DELAYED

South Sudan took three-quarters of Sudan’s oil production when it became independent in July but needs to export crude through a northern pipeline and a Red Sea port.

Both states have failed to agree on transit fees Juba needs to pay, prompting Khartoum last month to seize at least three southern oil shipments at the Red Sea terminal.

Amum also said oil talks with Sudan scheduled for Thursday would be delayed until March 6.

“On the request of the government of Sudan the talks have been postponed to March 6,” he said.

A spokesman for the Sudanese foreign ministry said he could not confirm the date.

The African Union has been trying to resolve the oil conflict but positions are wide apart. The South wants to pay around $1 a barrel as fee, while Sudan demands $36 a barrel plus $1 billion in rear payments since July.

Apart from oil, north and south also need to solve a long list of other conflicts such as marking the violent border and finding a solution for the disputed border region of Abyei. (Reporting by Hereward Holland; additional reporting by Khalid Abdelaziz; writing by Ulf Laessing; Editing by Marguerita Choy and Keiron Henderson)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/02/21/southsudan-china-idUSL5E8DLA7420120221

A Chinese puzzle

Over the past decade, China has done well out of the principle of “non-interference” that governs its foreign policy. An increasing number of countries has engaged with Beijing, encouraged by its stated disinclination to meddle in others’ internal affairs. Today, about 850,000 Chinese work abroad, with many thousands in potentially dangerous corners of Asia, the Middle East and Africa.

Recent events in East Africa are now testing the sustainability of this laid-back doctrine. The dispute between Sudan and South Sudan over how to share oil revenues following Juba’s recent independence has blocked Beijing’s seventh-largest supplier of crude oil. The political chaos in the region has also led to the kidnapping of 29 Chinese workers, causing popular discontent in Beijing.

So far, China has conveniently relied on other countries to intercede for it. The negotiations leading to last year’s peace agreement were largely conducted by a troika formed by the US, UK and Norway. The recent effort to resolve the oil dispute has been led by the African Union (AU).

Unfortunately for Beijing, free-riding is no longer an option. South Sudan’s rejection of the AU’s proposal on how to share oil revenues has discredited it as an effective mediator. As for the US, long-standing sanctions and its involvement in last year’s partition of the country has made its relationship with Khartoum too poisonous for it to have credibility.

This leaves a political gap, which it would be only natural for China to fill. The large loans that Beijing is channelling to Khartoum give China substantial leverage on the Sudanese government. And despite long-standing suspicion between Beijing and Juba, negotiators from South Sudan have conceded that China is a long-term strategic partner for their country.

As escalating economic and political tensions risk a new armed conflict, China’s closer involvement could clearly be desirable for the region. Greater engagement would be in Beijing’s self-interest too.

Non-interference has served China well in giving it an entree to the developing world. But to protect the interests it has fostered, it cannot always hang back and expect others to sort out problems.

http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/41574dc8-5c8a-11e1-911f-00144feabdc0.html#axzz1n3IY0SG9

South Sudan expels head of Chinese-Malaysian oil firm
Reuters
South Sudan escalates row with Chinese oil firms * Petrodar head expelled for lack of cooperation – official * Chinese firms investigated for helping Sudan seize oil * China is the biggest buyer of South Sudan’s oil * Thursday’s talks with Sudan 

South Sudan expels head of Chinese-Malaysian oil firm
Reuters Africa
PALOUGE OIL FIELD, South Sudan, Feb 21 (Reuters) – South Sudan has expelled the head of Chinese-Malaysian oil consortium Petrodar, the main oil firm operating in the new African nation, top southern officials said on Tuesday, escalating a row between 
South Sudan fears impact of oil shutdown
Financial Times
By Katrina Manson in Juba For a country that has just lost 98 per cent of its revenues, South Sudanbarely seems to have noticed. Multi-storey buildings are still going up in its dusty capital of containers and thatch and traders hawk patriotic 
North-South Border Peace Conference in Aweil Calls for Assistance
AllAfrica.com
Juba — A three day peace conference, bringing together communities from either side of the tense border between north Sudan and newly independent South Sudan, has called for international assistance to complement efforts aiming at mitigating border 
JobsCash Transfer Project Manager – South Sudan
Reuters AlertNet
Manage an ECHO-funded project on response to emergency needs of conflict affected people inSouth Sudan, including responsibility for achievement of project objectives and outputs as well as smooth implementation of project activities.

South Sudan fears impact of oil shutdown

Financial Times – ‎
By Katrina Manson in Juba For a country that has just lost 98 per cent of its revenues, South Sudan barely seems to have noticed. Multi-storey buildings are still going up in its dusty capital of containers and thatch and traders hawk patriotic 

The SPLM has sadly learned of the untimely death of Mohammed Wardi, the great Sudanese teacher, poet and musician. Today is a day for mourning and remembering the passing on of this revolutionary singer. Mohammed Wardi was a true Sudanese national figure who had made great influence on the lives of ordinary Sudanese citizens. He was an icon of African culture in a community that has been denied of its original heritage for ages by the ruthless Arab racist killers of African culture and traditions.
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President Salva Kiir Hugs Mohammed Wordi When He (Kiir) Was Launching His Elections Campaign in Juba on Wednesday, February 24, 2010
Photos by Comrade Larco Lomayat
Mohammed Wardi hails from Nubi tribe of Halfa. The Nubi is an African distinct community whose members are faithful Muslims. Although a Muslim, Mohammed Wardi did not mix his Islamic faith with his African background. He was not ashamed for being an African and as a gifted linguist and musician he used to compose his famous songs in both Arabic and Nubi.
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As early as late 1950s, Mohammed Wardi used to come to Southern Sudan and made great music performances. He did not have any stereotypes and as such he was the first musician from Northern Sudan who people from the South called their true son and brother from the north.
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Late Mohammed Wardi was a revolutionary thinker and a believer in New Sudan on new basis. In solidarity with marginalized people of Sudan, he welcomed the October uprising against the oppressive regime of Ibrahim Aboud in 1964. Although the October political Change was hi-jacked by the Sudan traditional political opportunists, he still remained faithful to the struggle for freedom of the marginalized Sudanese people. This great human rights and freedom fighter joined the SPLM in 1980s and provided a morale booster to the SPLA fighters during the liberation war.
This short account of the political and cultural contribution made by the late Mohammed Wardi to the lives of the Sudanese people has not covered his vast role as a teacher, freedom fighter and musician. Nevertheless, Mohammed Wardi’s legacy will continue among the South Sudanese people and one is also sure that the rationale Sudanese people will remember him too in that same capacity.
May God rest his soul in eternal peace.
Cde. Bol Makueng
SPLM Secretary for Information, Culture and Communication
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by Wanjohi Kabukuru

Everyone wants a piece of the pie that is Juba, South Sudan.

Almost a year before the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) was signed in Nairobi Kenya intense lobbying had begun. The signing of the CPA on 9th January 2005 unleashed a frenzied scramble for Juba’s resources.

While the CPA is widely acknowledged as having initiated a new dawn in the Sudan, it also triggered off an economically hewn interest attracting both the developed and the developing nations.

The successful South Sudan secession referendum in January 2011 and eventual independence celebration cooled the frayed nerves of many who had adopted a wait-and-see attitude over South Sudan.

However it is instructive to note that since 2005 USA, China, India, Norway, Ethiopia, Malaysia, Turkey, Kenya, Uganda and South Africa and their respective private sectors have been in the forefront seeking to secure business concessions with the new nation. To make this easier and faster all these nations have embassies and consulates in both Juba and Khartoum. Southern Sudan’s massive oil boom, tourism concessions, logging, lucrative mining and infrastructure tenders, medical supplies, education, financial services, agriculture, defense contracts and commodities supplies are a glee to many triggering what is now politically referred to as “land grab”.

The Norwegian People’s Aid (NPA) commissioned investigations on the alleged “land grab” in South Sudan which culminated into a 48-page dossier dubbed “The New Frontier”. The dossier reveals that in the period 2007 to 2010 “foreign interests sought or acquired a total of 2.64 million hectares of land (6.52 million acres) in the agriculture, forestry and biofuel sectors alone.”

According to the report’s author David Kuol Mading “That is a larger land area than the entire country of Rwanda,” said the report’s author, David Kuol Mading. “If domestic investments, tourism and conservation are added, the figure rises to 5.74 million hectares (14.17 million acres), or nine percent of Southern Sudan’s total land area.”.

“With the nascent state of government, a society still reeling from years of conflict, and the legal ambiguity of the transitional period, there is also a danger that this influx of investment, if left unchecked, may serve to undermine livelihoods,” the report says.

Foreign interests into the South Sudan pie have managed to secure some 5.74 million hectares of land for agribusiness concerns namely agriculture, forestry, biofuels, eco-tourism and carbon trading.

Exactly two years after the signing of the CPA, the well known wildlife lobby Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) conducted an aerial survey which revealed thriving wildlife in large hordes, along the South Sudan Savannah and sudland. In comparison WCS compared the South Sudan savannah wildlife to the ones found in Tanzania’s Serengeti plains. This revelation debunked the myth that South Sudan had no wildlife and at the same gave rise to new investments interests on tourism and conservation.

Indeed the largest land deal detailed in the report is primarily hinged on wildlife conservation and tourism. It is the leasing of 2,280,000 hectares (5,631,600 acres) in Boma National Park which is situated in Jonglei state to an Emirati company Al Ain Wildlife. Under the agreement, Al Ain National Wildlife will construct high-end class hotels and tented resort camps within the park. In this stake the Government of South Sudan (GOSS) is said to have a concession of only 35%. Incidentally, public consultations and local community involvement were not factored in when this deal was struck.

This is followed by US firms Nile Trading and Development and Jarch Management, which have leased 600,000 hectares (1,482,000 acres) in Central Equatoria state and 400,000 hectares (988,000 acres) in oil-rich Unity state for agricultural investments. The latter scheme results from a controversial deal which was signed two years ago between Jarch, a New York-based investment house, and former warlord turned deputy commander of the SPLA General Paulino Matip.

Prince Budr Bin Sultan of Saudi Arabia has been granted a 25 year lease on some 105,000ha in Gwit for agricultural purposes. According to the dossier others involved in seeking large scale land based investments in South Sudan include Central Equatoria Teak Company (UK/Finland), Madhvani (Uganda), Green Resources (Norwegian) and its South Sudan subsidiary TreeFarms, Blue Lakes (Kenyan), MAJ Foundation (Indian), Fenno Caledonian (Finnish), Citadel Group (Egyptian), and the Australian outfit Concorde Agriculture.

China National Oil Petroleum Corporation, Malaysian oil giant Petronas, Moldovian oil Company Ascom Group, India’s Oil and Natural Gas Corporation (ONGC) Videsh and Sweden’s Lundin are exploring and exploiting oil in Jonglei state. According to Minority Rights Group International, French oil giant Total also holds massive oil concessions in Jonglei.

In the name of assisting the new nation come into being, the reality however showcases personal, national interest and little to do with philanthropy. Putting all these in perspective, tales of large scale bribery, underhand dealings and official malfeasance denotes the real ‘scramble for the South Sudan’. Accusations of corrupt ministers continue to dog President Salva Kiir’s new cabinet.

Widow of the liberation hero John Garang, Rebecca Nyandeng de Mabior has found herself on hot soup for criticizing Kiir’s government and condemning corruption in cabinet. She was first demoted from her roads and transport cabinet portfolio and appointed to a less glamorous post of Special Adviser on Gender and human rights.

In more ways than one all these factors not only affect the economies of all these countries involved but also shape their foreign policies and realign their international relations and obligations. In other words there has been a radical paradigm shift within South Sudan, largely driven by the profit motive.

Interestingly the scramble for business in Juba has seen strong African entrepreneurs pushing the limits off the savvy and more monied US, UAE, China, EU and Indian firms. Leading African nations entrenching their businesses in South Sudan include South Africa, Sudan, Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia and Egypt.

South Sudan is Uganda’s main export market, importing goods worth $184.6 million in 2009, according to the Uganda Exports Promotions Board. Kenyan exports to South Sudan were worth $157.7 million the same year. Apart from Nairobi, Khartoum, Cairo, Kampala and Addis Ababa the other major African player in Juba is Pretoria.

South African interests in Juba kicked off in earnest in 2004 when Mechem a subsidiary of Denel (the South African arms parastatal) began its demining operations in Southern Sudan. Mechem which is known globally for its mines removal and battle grounds clearance is still undertaking its operations in Southern Sudan today. As of last year it had cleared 9050km of road removing 3237 anti personnel, unexploded ordinances (UXO), anti tank land mines. This is only a tip of the ice-berg of SA’s involvement in South Sudan. South Sudan is said to purchase much of its weaponry from Denel and even training of its key security personnel is conducted by the South African Defense Forces (SADF).

Lately South African Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) and Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) have intensified their engagement with Southern Sudan paving way for an influx of South African businesses making inroads in Juba. In February 2009 a Breakfast Roundtable hosted by the DFA bringing together, South African business magnates and Government of Southern Sudan (GOSS) ministers opened the floodgates of the scramble for the South Sudan pie not just by private South African firms but also government parastatals. In July 2009 under the DTI led some 20 South African public and private sector companies on a trade and investment mission to South Sudan. The 20 companies covered, telecommunications, agriculture, forestry, water purification, timber, financial services, infrastructure development, energy and minerals, SAB Miller has invested over R354 million in the South Sudan Beverages Limited. PetroSA has oil concession rights and Global Engineering Consortium SA signed a $21 million contract with Sudan Railway Corporation. New Kush Exploration Company registered in both South Africa and UK has been awarded several exploration rights for gold and uranium in South Sudan.

At the heart of these business deals is the South African-Sudanese Joint Business Council. Spoornet, Denel, Arivia, Safcol, SAB Miller, Mechem among other South African entities have all dipped their fingers on Southern Sudan’s pie of timber, technology, infrastructure and defense contracts. Intensive South African interests in the Sudan are said to have nosedived during the tenure of President Thabo Mbeki. To this day Mbeki, is deeply involved in the peace process of the Sudan. He is still the chairperson of the African Union High Level Implementation Panel for Sudan.

With the emergence of a new republic, the scramble has just reached fever pitch and Pretoria, Washington, Mumbai, Beijing, Nairobi, Kampala, Addis Ababa, Bangkok, Istanbul are upping their game. These are among the key issues that ascertain the deep involvement of foreign nations in Juba.

Some foreign entities in South Sudan:
Kenya Commercial Bank – Kenya
Equity Bank – Kenya ,
UAP Insurance – South Africa
SAB Miller – South Africa
Mechem – South Africa
Commercial Bank of Ethiopia – Ethiopia
Itsalat International – Saudi Arabia
Petronas – Malaysia
Byblos Bank – Lebanon
China National Petroleum – China
RAK Ceramics – UAE
Barwa Real Estate – Qatar
Total – France
Arab Swiss Engineering Co (ASEC) – Egypt
Qatar National bank – Qatar
Delta Industries – Egypt
Emirates Bio Fertilizer – UAE
The Lundin Group – Sweden/Switzerland
ONGC-Videsh – India
ASCOM Group -Moldova

AUTHOR: Wanjohi Kabukuru
URL: http://www.africasia.com/
E-MAIL: wanjohi [at] positiveoutcomes.org

http://farmlandgrab.org/post/view/19544

South Sudan seeks food and farmland investments

ReutersBy Ulf Laessing | Reuters

JUBA (Reuters) – South Sudan hopes to attract investors from Gulf Arab states, Israel, China and fellow African countries to boost production of basic food items, a government official said on Thursday.

Created in July after a 2005 peace agreement with Khartoum, Africa’s newest nation faces food shortages and grave economic challenges such as annual inflation at almost 80 percent in November.

Around 2.7 million South Sudanese will need food aid from next year as widespread violence and crop failures have hit hard farm production, according to the United Nations’ food programme.

South Sudan has held talks with investors from Gulf Arab states, Israel, China, Uganda and the Netherlands to invite them to invest into agricultural production, said Elizabeth Manoa Majok, undersecretary in the ministry of commerce, industry and investment.

“The government has made food production the top priority…80 percent of South Sudan depend on agriculture,” Majok said in an interview in the capital Juba.

“No serious commitment has been made so far….(but) interest of investors is big,” she said.

South Sudan wants with the help of investors to increase production of basic food items such as sugar, rice, cereals and oilseeds, livestock as well as cotton, she said.

“We import everything, even tomatoes. We should produce this ourselves,” Majok said. “We have the farmland, the resources.”

The government was preparing tenders to invite investors to revamp food factories damaged during the civil war and was also open to other partnerships such as farmland investments, she said without giving details.

Desert Gulf Arab countries have been trying to buy or lease farmland in Africa and Asia to secure food supplies but local famers have opposed such investments in some countries.

EAST AFRICA TRADE

Civil war waged for all but a few years since 1955 has left South Sudan with an almost complete lack of infrastructure and industry, aside from oil. The country has few paved roads outside Juba and large parts become inaccessible by ground transport during the rainy season.

Often described as one of the world’s least-developed nations, it has high levels of poverty, illiteracy and maternal mortality rates. Hospitals and schools are scarce.

South Sudan is also under pressure to diversify its economy away from oil generating 98 percent of state revenues. Oil reserves will halve by 2020 if no new finds are made, according to the International Monetary Funds (IMF).

To facilitate trade with East African countries such as Uganda and Kenya the government is considering setting up free trade zones in border areas, Majok said.

“Consultants are doing a study on free zones. We haven’t announced it yet,” she said.

Landlocked South Sudan depends for most of its needs on imports which are driving up inflation. Roads to Uganda and Kenya are poor and tensions with Khartoum have disrupted supplies from the north.

“Their loss is bigger than ours because we are a big market,” Majok said of tensions with Khartoum hitting bilateral trade.

Majok also said the government had passed new investment laws and was about to approve another package of bills to improve legal security for foreign firms.

http://news.yahoo.com/sudan-seeks-food-farmland-investments-060639569.html

South Sudan threatened by land grab

Four months before South Sudan becomes an independant nation nine percent of the country has been targeted by investors, a Norwegian People’s Aid report reveals.

Author: Tine Johansen

South Sudan threatened by land grab

The report, The New Frontier, A baseline survey of large-scale investment in Southern-Sudan, is part of a baseline survey of large-scale land-based investment in Southern Sudan prepared for Norwegian People’s Aid (NPA). It presents data on 28 foreign and domestic investments planned or underway across the ten states of Southern Sudan. In just four years, between the start of 2007 and the end of 2010, foreign interests sought or acquired a total of 2.64 million hectares of land (26,400 km2) in the agriculture, forestry and biofuel sectors alone. That is a larger land area than the entire country of Rwanda.

South Sudan threatened by land grab
Jan Ledang, NPA South Sudan Country Director (left)

If one adds domestic investments, some of which date back to the pre-war period, and investments in tourism and conservation, the figure rises to 5.74 million hectares (57,400 km2), or nine percent of Southern Sudan’s total land area. While in theory, this influx of investment could provide development opportunities for rural communities, without the appropriate procedures in place there is a danger that it will serve to undermine livelihoods. Below are a series of recommendations that may help the Government of Southern Sudan (GoSS), its international partners, civil society, companies, investors, and rural communities in Southern Sudan to address the risks and opportunities of largescale land investments moving forward:

1. Adopt a presumption in favor of disclosure for all documents associated with large-scale land-based investments;

2. Develop clear jurisdictional roles for public institutions at all levels, including an appropriate balance between central oversight and state-level flexibility, and providing a role for the legislative branch in approving large-scale land allocations;

3. Consider establishing a graduated land ceiling in which the authorization of successively higher levels of government is required as the size of land allocations increases;

4. Consider a temporary moratorium on all land acquisitions above a certain size in order to allow time for the appropriate procedures to be put in place;

5. Establish a technical committee to review all existing contracts to ensure that they comply with relevant provisions of the 2009 Land Act, the 2009 Local Government Act, and the 2009 Investment Promotion Act;

6. Promote alternative business models that better account for the needs of local populations, such as giving communities an equity stake in the venture or maximizing the links between companies and smallholder producers living on or around the project area;

7. Explore opportunities for constructive engagement with companies that demonstrate a willingness to adhere to regulatory standards and prioritize the development needs of host communities.

Click on the PDF icon below to see the full report

Download high resolution version of the report (7 mb)

http://www.npaid.org/en/News_Archive/?module=Articles;action=Article.publicShow;ID=17086


By Jared Ferrie – Feb 21, 2012 10:40 AM ET

South Sudan Welcomes London Court Ruling on Disputed Oil Cargo

South Sudan welcomed the ruling by a London court to withhold payment for a cargo of crude until ownership of the oil was settled with neighboring Sudan.

The ruling was a “positive thing” because it means that Sudan will not receive a share of the proceeds from the sale of oil “stolen” by the Sudanese government, South Sudan government spokesman Barnaba Marial Benjamin said today by phone from Juba, South Sudan’s capital. “We are satisfied as long as it doesn’t go to Khartoum.”

South Sudan declared independence in July, taking control of oil fields that produced about 75 percent of Sudan’s crude output of 490,000 barrels of a day.

Talks have so far failed to yield an agreement on how much landlocked South Sudan should pay to transport its oil through a pipeline across Sudan. South Sudan halted output last month after Sudan confiscated southern crude, saying it was taking it to make up for unpaid fees.

The disputed oil includes 600,000 barrels of Nile Blend that Sudan loaded onto the oil tanker Ratna Shradha on Jan. 19. Oil trader Trafigura Beheer BV, confirmed yesterday that the court ruled that all proceeds from the shipment, which it bought from Sudan and sold to Tokyo-based JX Nippon Oil & Energy Corp, remain with the court until ownership is legally established.

Sudan Foreign Ministry Spokesman al-Obeid Murawih didn’t answer his phone when Bloomberg called seeking comment.

To contact the reporter on this story: Jared Ferrie in Juba, South Sudan atjferrie1@bloomberg.net

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-02-21/south-sudan-welcomes-london-court-ruling-on-disputed-oil-cargo.html

Disputed Sudan Oil Can Unload After Court Ruling, Trafigura Says

February 21, 2012, 12:43 AM EST

By Jared Ferrie

Feb. 20 (Bloomberg) — A crude oil cargo that’s been stranded at sea because of a dispute between Sudan and South Sudan can unload in Japan after a court ruling in London, oil trader Trafigura Beheer BV said.

“We can confirm that the English court has ordered that the delivery can be made,” Trafigura, which bought the disputed cargo, said in a statement. “The court will hold all proceeds related to the cargo until ownership is legally established.”

South Sudan declared independence in July, taking control of fields producing of about 75 percent of Sudan’s 490,000 barrels a day of crude output. The division of oil resources has become a subject of contention between the two countries as South Sudan claims the Sudanese government in Khartoum is illegally selling the crude.

The oil tanker Ratna Shradha has been sitting off the coast of southern Japan since Feb. 14 and hasn’t docked, according to AISLive data compiled by Bloomberg. The ship loaded about 600,000 barrels of Nile Blend in Sudan on Jan. 19.

The tanker’s owner asked the court to rule on the matter because ownership of the cargo is disputed, said Pagan Amum, South Sudan’s chief negotiator in talks with Sudan.

“We will leave no stone unturned to recover the value of oil stolen by the government of Sudan,” Amum said. “We are encouraged by the steps taken by owners of the ship taken in the English court.”

An employee of Chambal Fertiliser and Chemicals Ltd., the Indian company that owns the ship, who answered the phone today, said nobody was available to comment. JX Nippon Oil and Energy, scheduled to take delivery of the oil, also declined to comment.

Ordered Shutdown

South Sudan ordered a shutdown of crude production after accusing Sudan of diverting fuel to its refinery, forcing companies to load oil onto ships it controlled, and blockading other shipments. Sudan said it confiscated crude to cover unpaid fees it’s owed for allowing the landlocked country to transport oil via a pipeline to Port Sudan on the Red Sea.

Sudan’s foreign ministry spokesman, al-Obeid Murawih, dismissed the dispute over Trafigura’s purchase.

“Whether we sold the oil or we not, consumed it or not, the buyers are willing to buy or rejecting — all these don’t help solving the core problem, which is reaching an oil deal between two countries,” he said by phone yesterday from Khartoum.

Dar Blend

Sudan put 1.9 million barrels of Dar Blend onto three tankers, comprised of 650,000 barrels on the Sea Sky, 750,000 barrels on the Al Nouf and 600,000 barrels on the ETC Isis, according to letters from oil companies that were provided by Amum. Sudan also loaded 600,000 barrels of Nile Blend onto the Ratna Sharada, the documents showed.

The Sea Sky and Al Nouf remain in the Fujairah area, on the coast of Sudan, according to AISLive data. The ETC Isis is located off Singapore.

The U.K. court decision for the sale to take place with the funds kept in escrow is “significant,” said Marc Mercer, an Africa associate with the Eurasia Group in London.

“The Trafigura experience makes the north’s sale of southern oil even more difficult to other such companies,” he said today in an e-mailed response to questions. “Litigation in court as well as the possibility of further proceedings should the oil be determined as stolen will be costly for all sides — financially and reputation wise.”

Sudan and South Sudan are scheduled to meet in the coming weeks in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, for the next round of negotiations on issues outstanding since the south separated. These include determining the status of the region of Abyei and disputed sections of the border, as well as agreeing on an oil revenue sharing arrangement.

Amum told reporters Feb. 15 that South Sudan will not begin pumping oil again until a comprehensive agreement is reached, which includes Sudan paying for southern oil it has confiscated.

–With assistance from Salma El Wardany in Khartoum. Editors: Raj Rajendran, Randall Hackley.

To contact the reporter on this story: Jared Ferrie in Juba, South Sudan at jferrie1@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Will Kennedy at wkennedy3@bloomberg.net

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2012-02-21/disputed-sudan-oil-can-unload-after-court-ruling-trafigura-says.html

Disputed Sudanese oil cargo yet to unload in Japan

Tuesday, 21 February 2012

Sudan has confiscated more than 6 million barrels of South Sudan’s oil since December due to the row over oil transit fees, a South Sudanese official said last week. (File photo)

Sudan has confiscated more than 6 million barrels of South Sudan’s oil since December due to the row over oil transit fees, a South Sudanese official said last week. (File photo)
By REUTERS 

SINGAPORE

A ship carrying disputed Sudanese crude remained anchored off southwest Japan on Tuesday, despite a British court ruling giving the tanker permission to unload, three shipping sources said.

The Ratna Shradha, which is owned by India Steamship, is holding 600,000 barrels of crude oil that South Sudan says was seized by neighboring Sudan last month and which sold it at deep discount to a North Asian trader, the sources said.

The tanker has yet to receive permission to dock from JX Nippon Oil & Energy, operator of the Kiire terminal, a source familiar with the matter said.

“The ship was scheduled to discharge at the terminal, but so far we have not received any news from JX Nippon,” the source said.

The tanker has remained off the terminal since Feb. 14, according to Reuters shipping data. The docking schedule for this week does not show the Ratna Shradha unloading, a second shipping source said.

At least two traders said the cargo had been bought by JX Nippon Oil and Energy.

India Steamship, a unit of Chambal Fertilizers and Chemicals Ltd., and JX Nippon Oil, both declined to comment.

Chambal Fertilizers submitted the case to a British commercial court on Feb. 15, a court official told Reuters, after questions over the legal ownership of the crude emerged.

The defendants in the case are listed as the Republic of Sudan, the Republic of South Sudan and Union de Banques Arabes et Francaises, the official added.

Geneva-based Trafigura, the world’s third largest oil trader, bought oil which the South Sudanese government claims was seized by its northern neighbour Sudan.

Landlocked, war-ravaged South Sudan must pump oil to the Red Sea via a pipeline across its northern neighbor to Port Sudan. Oil revenues account for 98 percent of the seven-month-old country’s income.

The Ratna Shradha is one of at least three tankers that are part of some $815 million in oil revenues that South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir accused Sudan of “looting” and which the government in Khartoum said provided compensation for unpaid transit fees.

It is not yet clear if the other disputed cargoes have been sold.

Sudan has confiscated more than 6 million barrels of South Sudan’s oil since December due to the row over oil transit fees, a South Sudanese official said last week.

http://english.alarabiya.net/articles/2012/02/21/196101.html


South Sudan wants alternative oil pipelines

By Edith M. Lederer

Associated Press / February 20, 2012

 UNITED NATIONS—South Sudan’s acting U.N. ambassador said Monday his country wants to build alternative pipelines through Kenya, Ethiopia and Djibouti to ship oil while trying to resolve a dispute with neighboring Sudan over fees for using its pipelines.

Landlocked South Sudan, which became independent from Sudan in July, shut down oil production Jan. 28 after accusing Khartoum of imposing extortionate fees and stealing $815 million of its oil revenue. A research note from Commerzbank last month said South Sudan was producing about 350,000 barrels of oil per day.

The countries split without resolving what to do with the coveted oil reserves. About two-thirds of the oil is in South Sudan, but the newly independent nation has been reliant on Sudan’s pipelines to export the oil through Port Sudan.

South Sudan envoy David Buom Choat said in an interview with The Associated Press that memorandums of understanding were signed with Kenya in late January for a pipeline that would go to the Indian Ocean port of Lamu and with Ethiopia and Djibouti in February. That pipeline would go from South Sudan’s Upper Nile state through Ethiopia to a port in Djibouti, he said.

“It’s starting the technical cooperation to build pipelines through those countries,” Choat said.

He said South Sudan is continuing negotiations with Sudan on the use of its pipelines but “it’s not going too well.”

“We are faithfully negotiating with them but they are not really negotiating in good faith,” Choat said. “They have put their efforts and mentality on cheating us or getting more than we can get from our own oil.”

Sudan has asked for $32 per barrel of oil shipped through its pipelines while South Sudan has offered $1 per barrel, an amount which the country’s information minister, Benjamin Barnaba Marial, has said is “the highest in the world.”

While South Sudan is losing massive amounts of money by shutting down its oil industry, Sudan is losing money as well — and it risks losing future revenue if the alternative pipeline routes South Sudan is planning are completed.

Almost all of South Sudan’s government revenue — 98 percent of it — comes from the oil sector.

Choat said the government is taking “austerity measure” by cutting government expenditures, increasing agricultural production which is a non-oil revenue source, and making sure taxes are collected.

Sudan and South Sudan have a host of other unresolved issues in addition to oil revenue including the demarcation of the north-south border and the status of the disputed Abyei region.

The two countries signed a memorandum of understanding on non-aggression in Ethiopia on Feb. 10, but days later South Sudan accused Sudan of bombing the border town of Jau.

On Friday, Sudan’s U.N. Ambassador Daffa-Alla Elhag Ali Osman accused South Sudan of harboring the remnants of rebels from the Darfur conflict in western Sudan. He urged the Security Council “to put pressure on the government of South Sudan not to assist the armed groups who are hosted now in South Sudan.”

Choat said South Sudan has told Sudan “that we are not harboring armed groups from Sudan in our territory — that includes from Darfur or anywhere because we have a policy of non-interference in the affairs of any other sovereign state.”

He called on the Security Council to demand that Sudan stop bombing South Sudan territory, including Jau and Bahr el Ghazal, and accused Khartoum of supplying arms and weapons to militia that are against South Sudan.

“Sudan should focus on solving its own problem rather than accusing South Sudan for no reason,” Choat said.

http://www.boston.com/business/articles/2012/02/20/south_sudan_wants_alternative_oil_pipelines/

South Sudan: UN urges ethnic groups to show how to ‘make your own peace’
UN News Centre
The top United Nations official in South Sudan has urged warring ethnic communities in the country to find peaceful solutions to their disputes and to serve as an example to other groups about how to turn challenges into opportunities…

South Sudan: New Pipeline Alternatives
New York Times
David Buom Choat, South Sudan’s acting ambassador to the United Nations, said his country wanted to build pipelines through Kenya, Ethiopia and Djibouti to ship its oil while trying to resolve a dispute with Sudan over fees for using its pipelines…

South Sudan: Students’ Union Receive 30000 SSP From Lakes State Governor
AllAfrica.com
By Misuk Moses Mule, 20 February 2012 Juba — The South Sudanese Students Union in Uganda has expressed gratitude to the Governor of Lakes State, Eng. Chol Tong Mayay over his support for the student activities. The Union Finance Secretary, 

Eight19 lights up South Sudan
Business Weekly
Cambridge CleanTech pioneer, Eight19, has begun deploying its IndiGo pay-as-you-go personal solar electricity system for off-grid communities in the world’s youngest country – South Sudan. Having launched the solar scratch cards in Kenya last September 

Canada deports HIV positive sex offender to South Sudan
DigitalJournal.com
By Arthur Weinreb By Arthur Weinreb. Winnipeg – The former Winnipeg resident, convicted of sex offences for failing to disclose his HIV positive status, has been removed from Canada. Whether his actions were criminal is now before the Supreme Court of 


DigitalJournal.com
Govt grants additional €500k to GOAL for South Sudan relief
Irish Examiner
The Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA) today said it has allocated €500000 to GOAL to help them respond to the urgent needs of tens of thousands of refugees in the Maban region of South Sudan. This funding is in addition to an initial €200000 provided 

Boston.com
By Edith M. Lederer AP / February 20, 2012 UNITED NATIONS—South Sudan’s acting UN ambassador said Monday his country wants to build alternative pipelines through Kenya, Ethiopia and Djibouti to ship oil while trying to resolve a dispute with 

South Sudan probes killing of Kenyan workers in Eastern Equatoria
Sudan Tribune
February 20, 2012 (JUBA) – South Sudan on Monday said it has formed a committee to investigate claims that three Kenyan’s have been killed and three others injured in an attack on Friday 17 February reportedly carried by armed bandits in Eastern 

South Sudan: Worsening food crisis
Eurasia Review
An already dire food situation in South Sudan could deteriorate amid growing economic problems, food shortages and a mass influx of people fleeing Sudan in the next two months, agencies warn. The UN World Food Programme (WFP) and Food and Agricultural 

Lasting peace in South Sudan?
Marshalltown Times Republican (blog)
In a word, that elusive state is what villagers of Old Fangak, South Sudan want. It is easy to understand after living and working among them for nearly nine days. Located in northeast South Sudan, Old Fangak specifically and South Sudan generally have 
South Sudan wants alternative oil pipelines
BusinessWeek
South Sudan’s acting UN ambassador says his country wants to build alternative pipelines through Kenya, Ethiopia and Djibouti to ship the country’s oil while trying to resolve a dispute with neighboring Sudan over fees for using its pipelines.

HIV-positive man convicted of aggravated sex assault deported to South Sudan
CTV.ca
Canada Border Services Agency confirmed that Clato Mabior was sent back to South Sudan on Wednesday. (file image) A Winnipeg immigrant convicted for failing to tell his sex partners he was HIV-positive has been deported. The Canada Border Services


CTV.ca
Steve Young: Ritual involves slicing open boys’ foreheads
Sioux Falls Argus Leader
A woman grinds grain in Panyang, South Sudan. Reporter Steve Young is traveling to South Sudan to report on David Jal’s mission to build schools and hospitals. / Rhonda Morse / Submitted photo Argus Leader reporter Steve Young is traveling in South 
South Sudan triggers domestic outcry in Beijing
Financial Times
By Katrina Manson in Juba Lu Zhifang’s mother was horrified at the prospect of her leaving China for the first time to take up a job in South Sudan, and she tried to stop her getting a passport. So when 29 Chinese workers were kidnapped north of the 

South Sudan: 9000 Kenyans Register in Juba
AllAfrica.com
By Lagu Joseph Jackson, 19 February 2012 Juba — At least about nine thousand Kenyans living in Juba the capital of South Sudan were registered following last month’s order from the Ministry of Interior that all foreigners should register with their 

Disputed Sudan Oil Can Unload After Court Ruling, Trafigura Says
BusinessWeek
20 (Bloomberg) — A crude oil cargo that’s been stranded at sea because of a dispute between Sudan and South Sudan can unload in Japan after a court ruling in London, oil trader Trafigura Beheer BV said. “We can confirm that the English court has  

By PaanLuel Wel

This is an insightful take on the Republic of South Sudan, thanks to the German Institute for International and Security Affair. As always, and shamefully for that matter, the foreigners have better understanding of our country, our problems, and possibly the solutions that are needed to curtail the blossoming danger we got ourselves embroiled in.

http://www.swp-berlin.org/fileadmin/contents/products/research_papers/2012_RP04_lac.pdf

And this second paper is an interesting interpretation of Dr. John Garang’s New Sudan Vision which the author referred to as “Sudanism.” check it out below!

http://digitalcommons.calpoly.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1006&context=histsp

Open Society: International Law and the Right to a Nationality in Sudan/South Sudan

http://www.soros.org/initiatives/justice/articles_publications/publications/sudan-nationality-20110218/sudan-nationality-20110218.pdf

The Right to a Nationality and the Secession of South Sudan: A C O M M E N T A R Y O N T H E I M P A C T O F T H E N E W L A W S

http://www.soros.org/initiatives/justice/articles_publications/publications/osiea-sudan-20120424/osiea-sudan-nationality-20122404.pdf

SUDAN HUMAN RIGHTS MONITOR, DECEMBER 2010 – JANUARY 2011

http://www.acjps.org/Publications/HRM/DecemberJanuaryMonitor_FINAL.pdf


WINNIPEG — A Winnipeg man who went to jail because he didn’t tell his sexual partners he has HIV has been kicked out of Canada.

Clato Mabior was deported to South Sudan on Feb. 15, the Canada Border Services Agency confirmed Monday.

The HIV-positive man was convicted in 2008 of aggravated assault for having sex with six women without disclosing his HIV status.

None of Mabior’s partners contracted HIV.

He was ordered deported in 2010.

That same year, Mabior was acquitted of four of the charges on appeal. The Manitoba Court of Appeal ruled that if an HIV-positive person wears a condom or has a low viral load and, therefore, a low risk of transmitting the virus, sex does not pose a risk of serious bodily harm.

He completed his criminal sentence in Dec. 2010, then remained in CBSA custody until his deportation.

Read more: http://www.globalwinnipeg.com/positive+deported+from+Canada+disclosing+status/6180806/story.html#ixzz1mzjNARcc

Stop jailing HIV-positive Canadians for not telling sex partners: Doctors

BY SHARON KIRKEY, POSTMEDIA NEWS DECEMBER 19, 2011
Today's triple drug cocktails can reduce the viral load of people living with HIV to undetectable levels — making their risk of transmitting the virus to partners "exceedingly low," Dr. Julio Montaner, director of the B.C. Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS. Seen in a file photo, Montaner delivers a speech, on July 23, 2010 in Vienna, during the closing Session of the 18th International AIDS Conference.
Canadians living with HIV should no longer face a possible prison sentence for failing to disclosure their infection to sexual partners, says an acclaimed Canadian doctor who helped revolutionize the treatment of HIV worldwide.

Drug cocktails known as HAART, or highly active antiretroviral therapy, can drive the viral load of people living with HIV to undetectable levels — making their risk of transmitting the virus to partners extraordinarily low, Dr. Julio Montaner, director of the B.C. Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS and colleagues M-J Molloy and Thomas Kerr write in this week’s edition of the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

Despite this, Canada has witnessed “an escalation in the number of people prosecuted for allegedly exposing sexual partners to the virus,” the team writes.

This country “now ranks among the world leaders in the rate of such prosecutions.”

In an interview, Montaner said that, for appropriately treated patients, the likelihood of transmitting HIV “approaches zero.” A study published this year found early treatment with HAART reduced by 96 per cent the likelihood that the infected person would pass the virus to a partner.

He said patients with HIV, unlike those with other sexually transmitted infections, are being singled out because of stigma and fear.

Cervical cancer, for example, is frequently caused by human papilloma virus, or HPV infections, Montaner said. “Do we place a burden on males infected with HPV to have to disclose every time that they have a sexual encounter that they have HPV? We don’t — and that’s only one example,” he said.

“To put the burden on the person infected with HIV that they have to disclose when they may be on treatment or using a condom, or doing both, is really not appropriate.”

“Let me be clear — I think that people who behave irresponsibly, they need to be judged accordingly and there are laws to address those issues. If you mislead somebody, if you misrepresent your status . . . But to have a policy that selectively targets HIV” is discriminatory and discourages people from seeking out testing and treatment, Montaner said.

It was once believed that HIV, if transmitted, meant a sure and relatively rapid death, Montaner said. Today, HAART has transformed HIV/AIDS into a chronic condition. Writing in the CMAJ, he and his co-authors say that long-term use of HAART drives HIV into “full, long term remission.”

“We can’t have a discourse that, on one hand, says things are different now — we can identify HIV, we can treat it, you can have a near normal life — and, on the other hand, says if you (do not disclose) to another person we are ready to put you in jail,” Montaner said.

The call by the B.C. experts for an end to the “criminalization of HIV” comes on the 30th anniversary year of the first documented cases of HIV and just as Canada’s highest court, the Supreme Court of Canada, prepares to hear two high-profile cases in February, one from Manitoba, the other Quebec, involving those living with the human immunodeficiency virus, or HIV.

In the first, Clato Mabior, an HIV-positive man and Sudanese immigrant in Winnipeg, was sentenced in 2008 to 14 years in prison after he was convicted of multiple counts of aggravated sexual assault for engaging in unprotected sex with six people — including a 12-year-old girl — and not disclosing his status.

An appeal court found that the original trial judge erred when he ruled Mabior was a “significant risk” even though he had an undetectable viral load and used condoms during intercourse on some of the occasions.

In the Quebec case, a woman known as D.C. had unprotected sex with her former spouse without informing him of her HIV status. She was convicted of sexual assault and aggravated assault. The Quebec appeal court acquitted her on the ground that, since her viral load had been undetectable during the period covered by the charges and the risk of transmission had been low, the fact that she had not disclosed her status had not had the effect of exposing her former spouse to “a significant risk of serious harm.”

Writing in the CMAJ, the B.C. researchers say that high-profile cases may dissuade people from getting tested. “In some cases, information shared in counselling sessions between health care providers and people living with HIV/AIDS has been subpoenaed and entered into evidence in criminal trials,” they write.

“Prosecutions put the life of people living with HIV/AIDS at risk, increase the risk of HIV transmission and health care costs, and ultimately place the public at higher risk,” the authors say. “It is time to embrace the scientific evidence, recognize the ability of HAART to virtually eliminate the transmission of HIV, and do away with criminal prosecutions for HIV nondisclosure.”

Bill Flanagan, dean of the law school at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ont., said the argument makes sense.

Canadian judges have begun to recognize that if someone is on HAART and their HIV levels are sufficiently suppressed, “the risk of transmission is very low” and criminal prosecution isn’t warranted, even in the event that there was no disclosure of their HIV status, Flanagan said.

“To me the greater risk is unwarranted criminal prosecution that sends a strong message to people (that) the last thing you want to do in the world is seek HIV testing and counselling, because if you don’t know that you’re infected well then presumably that would always be a defence.”

“I just don’t see the criminal law being useful in any scenario other than the most egregious case of a person knowing that they’re infected, not seeking treatment and they knowingly place others at risk. There have been criminal prosecutions of those cases and in my view those are warranted.”

But that’s a very small minority, he said, “and hopefully will become even smaller as people become better aware of the benefits of treatment.”

Amir Attaran, a professor of law and medicine at the University of Ottawa, cautioned that while HAART has revolutionized the treatment of HIV, treatment can fail. “There is no such thing as an antiretroviral regimen with 100 per cent enduring clinical effectiveness. It doesn’t exist,” said Attaran, Canada research chair in law, population health and global development policy.

“I think that what they are proposing is very good food for thought,” Attaran said. But, “I think they have unfortunately created a bit of a straw man.”

People haven’t been prosecuted for nondisclosure, he said. “They’ve been prosecuted for assault, and if it were a different virus, or if it were a bacterium and it were syphilis it would be the same thing. There is no HIV exceptionalism that I see here.”

In his view, “nondisclosure is not the issue. Fraudulent nondisclosure is the issue.”

An estimated 75,000 Canadians are living with the virus; 3,300 people are infected each year. About 25 per cent of HIV-positive Canadians are unaware that they are infected.

Read more:http://www.canada.com/health/Stop+jailing+positive+Canadians+telling+partners+Doctors/5882334/story.html#ixzz1mzkjDDoQ

HIV sex offender booted from Canada

Toronto Sun – ‎
HIV sex offender Clato Mabior has been kicked out of Canada, the Canada Border Services Agency reported Monday. Mabior, whose high-profile sexual assault case regarding non-disclosure of his HIV-status is still being considered by the Supreme Court, 
CTV.ca – ‎
Canada Border Services Agency confirmed that Clato Mabior was sent back to South Sudan on Wednesday. (file image) A Winnipeg immigrant convicted for failing to tell his sex partners he was HIV-positive has been deported. The Canada Border Services 
Calgary Herald – ‎‎
WINNIPEG — A Winnipeg man who went to jail because he didn’t tell his sexual partners he has HIV has been kicked out of Canada. Clato Mabior was deported to South Sudan on Feb. 15, the Canada Border Services Agency confirmed Monday.
CBC.ca – ‎
Clato Mabior, seen in a police photo, was deported to Sudan on Feb. 15.Clato Mabior, seen in a police photo, was deported to Sudan on Feb. 15. A Winnipeg man convicted of sexual assault for failing to inform his sexual partners that he has HIV has been 
Winnipeg Sun – ‎
Clato Mabior, convicted of sex assault for failing to disclose his HIV status, is slated to be kicked out of the country soon, likely on Feb. 15. Clato Mabior has been kicked out of Canada, the Canada Border Services Agency reported Monday.
MetroNews Canada – ‎
A man convicted of having sex with a 12-year-old girl and who didn’t tell sex partners he was HIV positive has been deported. The Canada Border Services Agency reported Monday Clato Maboir was deported to South Sudan on Feb. 15.

South Sudan wants alternative oil pipelines

BusinessWeek
South Sudan’s acting UN ambassador says his country wants to build alternative pipelines through Kenya, Ethiopia and Djibouti to ship the country’s oil while trying to resolve a dispute with neighboring Sudan over fees for using its pipelines…

HIV-positive man convicted of aggravated sex assault deported to South Sudan
CTV.ca
Canada Border Services Agency confirmed that Clato Mabior was sent back to South Sudan on Wednesday. (file image) A Winnipeg immigrant convicted for failing to tell his sex partners he was HIV-positive has been deported. The Canada Border Services

Steve Young: Ritual involves slicing open boys’ foreheads
Sioux Falls Argus Leader
A woman grinds grain in Panyang, South Sudan. Reporter Steve Young is traveling to South Sudan to report on David Jal’s mission to build schools and hospitals. / Rhonda Morse / Submitted photo Argus Leader reporter Steve Young is traveling in South 

Boston.com
By Edith M. Lederer AP / February 20, 2012 UNITED NATIONS—South Sudan’s acting UN ambassador said Monday his country wants to build alternative pipelines through Kenya, Ethiopia and Djibouti to ship oil while trying to resolve a dispute with 

South Sudan probes killing of Kenyan workers in Eastern Equatoria
Sudan Tribune
February 20, 2012 (JUBA) – South Sudan on Monday said it has formed a committee to investigate claims that three Kenyan’s have been killed and three others injured in an attack on Friday 17 February reportedly carried by armed bandits in Eastern 

South Sudan: UN urges ethnic groups to show how to ‘make your own peace’
UN News Centre
The top United Nations official in South Sudan has urged warring ethnic communities in the country to find peaceful solutions to their disputes and to serve as an example to other groups about how to turn challenges into opportunities…

South Sudan: Worsening food crisis
Eurasia Review
An already dire food situation in South Sudan could deteriorate amid growing economic problems, food shortages and a mass influx of people fleeing Sudan in the next two months, agencies warn. The UN World Food Programme (WFP) and Food and Agricultural 

Lasting peace in South Sudan?
Marshalltown Times Republican (blog)
In a word, that elusive state is what villagers of Old Fangak, South Sudan want. It is easy to understand after living and working among them for nearly nine days. Located in northeast South Sudan, Old Fangak specifically and South Sudan generally have