Archive for March 9, 2012

USA Government: Accountability In Sudan and Kenya

Posted: March 9, 2012 by PaanLuel Wël Media Ltd. in Sudan

We strongly support international efforts to bring those responsible for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes in Darfur to justice.

Photo: AP Photo/Abd Raouf
Sudanese Defense Minister Abdel Raheem Muhammed Hussein (file)

An international court has called to account a third top Sudanese leader for actions taken by the government during the conflict in the Darfur region. The United States believes that there cannot be a lasting peace in Sudan without justice and accountability. We strongly support international efforts to bring those responsible for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes in Darfur to justice.

On March 1, the International Criminal Court issued a warrant for the arrest of Sudan’s defense minister, Abdel Raheem Muhammed Hussein. The document lists 41 separate counts, charging that he is responsible for crimes against humanity and war crimes committed in Darfur. Specific allegations include his oversight of a government campaign of murder, rape, torture, destruction of property, pillaging and attacks against civilians.

Hussein is the latest of several Sudanese leaders accused of responsibility for brutal actions during the Darfur conflict, in which the United Nations estimates that as many as 300,000 people died and more than 2.5 million were displaced. Based in The Hague, the ICC has issued arrest warrants for two other Sudanese government officials, including Sudanese President Omar Hassan el-Bashir, for allegedly orchestrating these crimes in Darfur. The president and other government officials named oppose the proceedings.

The issuance of an arrest warrant for Hussein demonstrates the international community’s resolve to hold accountable those responsible for the atrocities committed in Darfur.

The United States continues to call on the government of Sudan and all other parties to the conflict to cooperate fully with the ICC, as required by United Nations Security Council Resolution 1593. It is especially important for the international community to show its support for accountability at a time of mounting violence in Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile states.

http://www.voanews.com/policy/editorials/africa/Accountability-In-Sudan–142086783.html

Accountability In Kenya

International Criminal Court has ruled that four leading political figures must answer charges related to the political and ethnic violence.

Photo: ICC
Deputy prime minister of Kenya Uhuru Kenyata (back row l) and Head of Public Service and Secretary to the Cabinet Francis Muthaura, (front row r) at a hearing in The Hauge.

After a lengthy investigation, the International Criminal Court (ICC) has ruled that four leading political figures must answer charges related to the political and ethnic violence that swept Kenya following the country’s disputed 2007 presidential election.

The ICC confirmed charges against Uhuru Kenyatta, William Ruto, Francis Muthaura and Joshua arap Sang for their alleged roles related to the deadly violence that swept Kenya in December 2007, during which at least 1,100 people died. President Mwai Kibaki asked his countrymen to remain calm in the aftermath of the ICC’s decisions on confirmation of charges.

The United States continues to believe that accountability for the 2007-2008 post-election violence is critical to ensuring Kenya’s democracy, peace and long-term stability. Under the ICC process, individuals are presumed innocent until proven guilty and we make no judgment as to the guilt or innocence of those subject to the recent decisions.

In the spirit of Kenya’s new constitution, which embraces transparency, accountability and integrity, we urge the Kenyan government, the people of Kenya and the individuals involved to continue to cooperate fully with the ICC proceedings and to remain focused on their nation’s future, especially through implementation of the national reform agenda. The United States is committed to continuing to support Kenya’s ambitious reform process as it looks ahead to its first national elections under the new constitution.

http://www.voanews.com/policy/editorials/africa/Accountability-In-Kenya–138237539.html


Amum said Sudan can take the south’s offer or leave it. “The figures for transit fee is 69 cents. If they don’t, there will be no deal, he said.”

Peter Heinlein | Addis Ababa

A senior Sudanese negotiator said he sees little hope for progress in talks with South Sudan on contentious issues left over from the two countries’ separation last July. Mediators in Addis Ababa are measuring progress in millimeters.

Former Sudanese Central Bank governor Sabir Mohamed al Hassan was blunt Friday when asked whether he thinks the current session of African Union-mediated talks might yield forward movement. “Personally, no. I don’t think so. I’m not really optimistic,” he said.

One track of the talks focuses on oil. The landlocked south must use the north’s pipelines to send its oil abroad. But a dispute over transit fees prompted the south to shut down production, costing both sides hundreds of million dollars per month in income.

Hassan, Khartoum’s lead negotiator in the oil talks, said it would be a victory if the two sides could simply agree to talk in a spirit of compromise.

“That the two parties sit down and negotiate in good faith, negotiate with the objective of reaching a compromise,” Hassan said. “That the two parties move forward to meet each other, not each party standing on its position.”

Pagan Amum, Chief Negotiator of the southern Sudan People's Liberation Movement (L), listens to remarks by Stephen Dhieu Dau, Minister of Petroleum and Mining in South Sudan, at Paloich Airport in Melut, South Sudan, February 21, 2012 Pagan Amum, Chief Negotiator of the southern Sudan People’s Liberation Movement (L), listens to remarks by Stephen Dhieu Dau, Minister of Petroleum and Mining in South Sudan, at Paloich Airport in Melut, South Sudan, February 21, 2012

Speaking to VOA earlier in the week, South Sudan’s chief negotiator Pagan Amum indicated the oil talks are hopelessly deadlocked. The Khartoum side is asking for a package of charges totaling $36 a barrel, while the delegation from Juba is offering a flat rate of 69 cents.

Amum said Sudan can take the south’s offer or leave it. “The figures for transit fee is 69 cents. If they don’t, there will be no deal, he said.”

Diplomats following the talks say the atmosphere had been frigid since this 10-day negotiating session began with a shouting match over the sensitive issue of nationalities – specifically, the fate of southerners in the north, and northerners in the south.

A member of the African Union mediation team urged patience, noting that the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement that ended the Sudanese civil war took four years to negotiate.

The main sticking point in the nationalities track of the talks is the fate of 35,000 women and children the south says were abducted by the north during the long civil war.  Briefing VOA on condition of anonymity, a senior South Sudan official said any agreement must refer to these people as “abductees.”

Khartoum flatly rejects such a characterization. Northern negotiator Hassan blames the south for adopting an uncompromising position when it would be easy to refer the matter to a high-level commission.

“I don’t know how to say it, but the way, the approach, was not constructive,” Hassan said. “We said, let us set up the committee, give it the power to look into the situation of all nationalities, without exception, but they insisted, no.”

Analysts watching the talks say breaking the deadlock is critical because of the degree to which both sides financially depend on oil. The south in particular has no other significant source of foreign revenue.

The nationalities issue is considered equally critical. With the south’s independence looming last year and no solution in sight, the two sides agreed to allow another six months for a settlement. Those six months are up April 8. After that date, hundreds of thousands of people on both sides of the border could become illegal aliens in their own homes.

http://www.voanews.com/english/news/africa/Hope-for-Progress-Dim-in-Sudan-South-Sudan-Talks-142084643.html


(Click on the video below to watch Joseph Kony interview/speaking).

Joseph Kony, Exclusive Interview – KONY 2012

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KdBcypx1DfE&feature=related

Meeting Joseph Kony – Uganda June 2006

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=dWiF9hSgyoU#!

Kony 2012 Youtube Video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y4MnpzG5Sqc

Online, a Distant Conflict Soars to Topic No. 1

By JOSH KRON and J. DAVID GOODMAN

KAMPALA, Uganda — Jason Russell said he never knew he was driving into a war zone. At 24, he had just graduated from the University of Southern California after studying film, he said, and was out looking for a story to tell.

Suddenly, he said, gunmen shot at the truck in front of him, and that is how he discovered the horrors wrought byJoseph Kony and his Lord’s Resistance Army. Mr. Russell would dedicate the next nine years of his life, often in obscurity, to making them a household name.

This week, in a testament to the explosive power of social media, he managed to do so in a matter of days, baffling diplomats, academics and Ugandans who have worked assiduously on the issue for decades without anything close to the blitz of attention that Mr. Russell and his tight-knit group of activists have generated.

Since being posted on Monday, their video, “KONY 2012,”has attracted more than 50 million views on YouTube and Vimeo, generating hundreds of thousands of dollars in donations on the first day alone and rocketing across Twitter and Facebook at a pace rarely seen for any video, let alone a half-hour film about a distant conflict in central Africa.

Though Mr. Russell is at a loss to fully explain it, he has clearly tapped into a vein of youthful idealism that the authorities the world over have been struggling — and failing — to comprehend and keep up with. YouTube said the popularity was driven by viewers in the United States and those younger than 25. Many parents, including at least one in the State Department, discovered the video only after their children showed it to them.

“Mark had it brought to his attention by his 13-year-old, I think, earlier this morning,” Victoria Nuland, a State Department spokeswoman, said at a news briefing on Thursday, referring to her colleague, Mark C. Toner.

The surge of awareness is even more remarkable considering that President Obama, under pressure from Congress, announced in October that he had authorized the deployment of about 100 American military advisers to help African nations working toward “the removal of Joseph Kony from the battlefield,” a major step in American foreign policy in Africa.

Yet many viewers had never heard of Mr. Kony or his murderous band of fighters until seeing the video by Mr. Russell’s group, Invisible Children, pop up in their Facebook feeds. On Tuesday, views on YouTube, already climbing steadily, exploded at a vertiginous rate after celebrities began posting messages, including Oprah Winfrey, with her nearly 10 million Twitter followers. Soon, other celebrities, like Rihanna and Ryan Seacrest, who were similarly bombarded with messages from the campaign’s supporters, began posting about it, too.

Posting to Twitter on Wednesday, Mr. Seacrest wrote, “Was going to sleep last night and saw ur tweets about #StopKony … watched in bed, was blown away.”

Gripping and evocative though it is, the video has alarmed many veteran observers of the devastation Mr. Kony and his fighters have left in their wake over the years. Many specifically take issue with the video and the organization for how they present the fight against the rebels, as well as how the organization spends its money behind the scenes.

Not until halfway through the film does Mr. Russell mention that “the war” he describes is no longer happening in Uganda, where he sets the documentary. The Lord’s Resistance Army left the country years ago, migrating to more fragile nations like the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Another complaint among critics is that the film fails to mention the human rights abuses by the Ugandan military, and that Mr. Russell’s narration could imply that there are as many as 30,000 child soldiers in Mr. Kony’s army today. After years on the run, the group is believed to be down to hundreds of fighters, though they still prey mercilessly on civilians.

Mr. Russell, a co-founder of Invisible Children, acknowledges that he has not made the most nuanced or academic of films. The video charts his personal odyssey to tell the world about Mr. Kony’s reign of terror and bring it to an end. He may have boiled down the issues, but that is what it takes to captivate so many people, he contends.

“No one wants a boring documentary on Africa,” he said. “Maybe we have to make it pop, and we have to make it cool.”

“We view ourself as the Pixar of human rights stories,” he added.

Others take issue with the amount of money Invisible Children — which brings in and spends millions of dollars a year — dedicates to officer salaries, filmmaking costs and travel, as opposed to on-the-ground programs to help rebuild the lives of people traumatized by decades of conflict.

“Along with sharing the movie online, Invisible Children’s call to action is to do three things: 1) sign its pledge, 2) get the Kony 2012 bracelet and action kit (only $30!), and 3) sign up to donate,” a deconstruction of the film on the Web site of Foreign Policy reads.

Some have called the video a pitch-perfect appeal to so-called slacktivism, a pejorative term for armchair activism by a younger generation, often online. But rather than eschew such digital action, the video takes it as one of its primary goals. Making Mr. Kony infamous, after all, is just a click away.

The criticism notwithstanding, there was an excited commotion at the charity’s office in downtown San Diego, where dozens of volunteers and staff members were handling a flood of incoming phone calls. With hundreds of boxes of promotional material piled all around, the office had the hubbub of a campaign in the final days before the election. Staff members said that additional volunteers were flying in from out of state to join the cause and that donation pledges were coming in at an unprecedented rate.

“It was unstoppable,” Noelle Jouglet, 29, a spokeswoman for the group, said of the video’s rapid spread. “It went internationally very quick. This is a game-changing event for our company.”

She said she had barely slept in recent days as she dealt with the interest in the group’s cause and the criticism of the group’s methods, from time zones around the world. Some calls, she said, were from people who had previously pledged donations but now, after reading the online criticism of Invisible Children, wanted their money back.

Activism in conflict zones has long brought both benefits and unforeseen consequences. It clearly helped make the crisis in Sudan’s Darfur region an international issue. But many analysts also argue that the one-sided way activists painted the conflict — highlighting the Sudanese government’s crimes against villagers while largely ignoring the atrocities committed by rebels — ultimately made it harder to negotiate an end to the crisis.

In this case, some experts said Invisible Children’s campaign, while oversimplified, could help add to the international resolve to stop the killing.

“It’s ultimately a good thing,” said Pernille Ironside, a senior adviser for child protection at Unicef who is an expert on the Lord’s Resistance Army. “It’s not just one organization in the United States who has discovered this issue,” she said. Still, Invisible Children “is essentially distilling a very complicated 26-year war into something that’s consumable and understandable by mass media.”

Mr. Russell said he was far from finished with his campaign, which he said was an example of just how much young political novices could accomplish. “We are ready to make this bigger,” he said. “We are waiting for Jay-Z” to trumpet the cause.

And as a filmmaker, he said he had already received plaudits from producers in Hollywood. “They are getting in touch with the Academy Awards. They want this to be up for an Oscar.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/09/world/africa/online-joseph-kony-and-a-ugandan-conflict-soar-to-topic-no-1.html?_r=1&src=me&ref=world


South Sudan accuses Khartoum of ‘enslaving’ thousands

South Sudan’s chief negotiator Pagan Amum said the government of Sudan refused the inclusion of the freedom of about 35,000 South Sudanese enslaved citizens. (File photo)

South Sudan’s chief negotiator Pagan Amum said the government of Sudan refused the inclusion of the freedom of about 35,000 South Sudanese enslaved citizens. (File photo)
AFPBy Jenny Vaughan | AFP – 

South Sudan accused former foe Sudan on Friday of holding 35,000 Southerners as “slaves,” stalling talks to resolve a furious oil dispute as tensions remain high between the two neighbours.

“There is unfortunately a disagreement, because the government of Sudan refused the inclusion of the freedom of about 35,000 South Sudanese enslaved citizens,” South Sudan’s chief negotiator Pagan Amum told AFP.

Amum said the abductees were taken hostage during Sudan’s bloody 1983-2005 north-south civil war which ended in a peace deal that paved the way for South Sudan’s formal independence in July.

Thousands of South Sudanese were allegedly abducted by pro-government militia forces during the war and forced to work in the north, claims rejected by the government in Khartoum.

The rivals are in the Ethiopian capital holding the latest round of dragging African-Union led talks. The two countries have been at loggerheads since the South broke away, threatening to reignite conflict between the two former bitter enemies.

Oil has been a major sticking point in the talks, since Juba took 75 percent of Sudanese oil at independence but Khartoum controls processing and export facilities.

But deals must also be made on contentious nationality issues, as well as border demarcation and the future of the contested Abyei region, claimed by both sides but occupied by Khartoum’s army.

Juba took the drastic decision to halt crude production in January, despite oil making up 98 percent of its revenue, after Sudan started seizing its shipments in lieu of a deal on transit fees.

Khartoum said the approach from South Sudan was “not constructive” and proposed the creation of a separate high level committee to deal with the sticking points on nationality issues.

However, Sudanese negotiator Sabir Mohamed al-Hassan said the talks were stalled because the South insisted on hammering out details about the proposed committee, including how citizens would be repatriated.

“They insisted to go into detail and we refused to go into detail, and the meeting broke down,” he said.

Some 500,000 South Sudanese remain in Sudan, and Khartoum has given them until April 8 to leave or regularise their status. However, the United Nations has said it is logistically impossible to repatriate all within the timeframe.

Under South Sudanese law any Southern ethnic group member, or with ancestors born in the south, is eligible for nationality.

“That is why we thought it would be important to set up this committee as soon as possible because on the 8th… if there is not agreement, definitely there will be complications,” Hassan added.

Hassan admitted a deal is unlikely to be reached before this round of negotiations close on March 16.

“It takes two to tango. Personally, me… I’m not really optimistic,” he said.

http://news.yahoo.com/sudan-accuses-khartoum-enslaving-thousands-164051091.html

South Sudan accuses Khartoum of ‘enslaving’ 35,000 citizens

Friday, 09 March 2012

By AFP 
ADDIS ABABA

South Sudan accused former foe Sudan on Friday of holding 35,000 Southerners as “slaves,” stalling talks to resolve to furious oil dispute as tensions remain high between the two nations.

“There is unfortunately a disagreement, because the government of Sudan refused the inclusion of the freedom of about 35,000 South Sudanese enslaved citizens,” South Sudan’s chief negotiator Pagan Amum told AFP.

Amum said the abductees were taken hostage during its bloody 1983-2005 civil war, which ended in a peace deal that paved the way for the South’s formal independence in July.

The rivals are in the Ethiopian capital holding the latest round of dragging African-Union led talks. The two countries have been at loggerheads since the South split from the north in July, threatening to reignite conflict between the two former bitter enemies.

Oil has been a major sticking point in the talks, since Juba took 75 percent of oil at independence but Khartoum controls processing and export facilities.

But deals must also be made on contentious nationality issues, as well as border demarcation and the future of the contested Abyei region, claimed by both sides but occupied by Khartoum’s army.

Juba took the drastic decision to halt production in January, despite oil making up 98 percent of its revenue, after Sudan started seizing the crude in lieu of a deal on transit fees.

Khartoum said the approach from South Sudan was “not constructive” and proposed the creation of a separate high level committee to deal with the sticking points on nationality issues.

However, Sudanese negotiator Sabir Mohamed al-Hassan said the talks were stalled because the South insisted on hammering out details about the proposed committee, including how citizens would be repatriated.

“They insisted to go into detail and we refused to go into detail, and the meeting broke down,” he said.

http://english.alarabiya.net/articles/2012/03/09/199668.html


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

March 9, 2012 
Public Information: 202-712-4810

www.usaid.gov

BOMA, SOUTH SUDAN – The United States Government inaugurated the Boma National Park Headquarters in South Sudan’s Jonglei State, drawing attention to the important role that the establishment of protected area management and local governance infrastructure can play in contributing to security, stability, eco-tourism and economic growth, especially in the more isolated regions of South Sudan. This critical infrastructure was built with funding from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). Boma was established as a national park in 1986, when South Sudan was part of Sudan.

Boma National Park covers 20,000 square kilometers of woodland savanna and grassland in Jonglei and Eastern Equatoria states. The park protects one of the largest intact savanna ecosystems in East Africa, hosting significant wildlife populations, including elephants, giraffe, buffalo, numerous antelopes (including common eland, lesser kudu, Bohor reedbuck, gazelles, tiang, Lelwel hartebeest, Beisa oryx, and roan), and an impressive diversity of migratory birds. Boma also hosts critical breeding grounds for the 750,000-strong white-eared kob migration and provides key dry season forage for other migratory antelopes.

Jonglei State, particularly the isolated and remote regions around Boma National Park, has been marked by ongoing instability and insecurity. There has been a continued presence of rebel militias and fighting between ethnic groups fueled by the prevalence of small arms, lack of government presence, and inaccessibility in the rainy season, due to the absence of roads. Protected area management will play a critical role in strengthening and supporting local government and improving security in addition to protecting biodiversity and providing a sustainable foundation for economic growth. USAID and the Wildlife Conservation Society are supporting the South Sudan Wildlife Forces to undertake law enforcement and monitoring activities and to develop security partnerships with other armed forces and local communities.

U.S. Ambassador to South Sudan Susan D. Page, who represented the U.S. Government at the event, said, “It is so important that we continue to work together to preserve this area and its wildlife, which are threatened by hasty and unplanned development, or by wildlife poachers, who would ruin a world treasure for their own short-term benefit.”

USAID is providing a wide array of assistance to support the development of South Sudan. USAID is focused on making the new nation increasingly stable by helping the government deliver basic services to citizens, providing effective, inclusive, and accountable governance, diversifying the economy and combating poverty.

For more information about USAID and its programs in South Sudan, visit http://www.usaid.gov/locations/sub-saharan_africa/countries/south_sudan/index.html.

As I See It: The Emerging South Sudan State: Challenges and Solutions (2)
Sudan Vision
The South Sudan Liberation Army SSLA under the Command of Lt.-General James Gai Yoach (SAF) is now one of the most potent forces to be reckoned with that could exert more pressure points against the SPLA throughout the oil and mineral rich Greater 
US Government Inaugurates National Park Headquarters in Pristine Wildlife Area 
USAID (press release)
BOMA, SOUTH SUDAN – The United States Government inaugurated the Boma National Park Headquarters in South Sudan’s Jonglei State, drawing attention to the important role that the establishment of protected area management and local governance 

By Flavia Krause-Jackson – Mar 9, 2012

South Sudan, which shut down its oil industry in January, has enough foreign exchange reserves to last 18 months and is exploring new ways to raise cash including issuing bonds, Vice President Riek Machar said.

The African nation will post a budget deficit next year as a result of lost oil revenue, Machar predicted in an interview in New York today after visiting investors. To close the gap, the country may seek commercial loans, sell bonds overseas and truck at least a third of its oil production to ports in other nations, he said.

South Sudan, which gained control of about 75 percent of the previously united Sudan’s 490,000 barrels a day of output at independence in July, completed a shutdown of production Jan. 28. It took the action after accusing Sudan of stealing its oil. Sudan said it confiscated the crude to make up for unpaid fees.

The dispute over the fees South Sudan pays the neighboring country to ship the crude via a pipeline to the Red Sea shows few signs of being resolved anytime soon. Oil accounts for more than 95 percent of the economy of South Sudan, according to the government. South Sudan’s gross domestic product per capita is $2,981 a year, according to the International Monetary Fund.

“We are not yet agreed,” Machar said. “There is no time limit. We are still negotiating on this. We can’t pay $32 per barrel as transit fees. That is one-third of the price of oil.”

The largest customer for the oil is China, according to the International Energy Agency.

Peace Deal

A peace deal that ended a two-decade civil war required the north and south to split oil revenue equally prior to the south’s independence. Machar said that in spite of the spat over oil and violence at the borders, he saw no reason for the two nations to return to war.

‘Yes, there is war across our borders, in Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile and Darfur, but this is a matter of the North,’’ he said. “We have no involvement in it.”

The former head of the UN in Sudan, Mukesh Kapila, this week called for international intervention to prevent “genocide” in the Nuba mountains region where the Sudanese government is fighting insurgents.

The Nuba Mountains are in Southern Kordofan, an oil-rich state where fighting broke out in June between the government and the rebel Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North. The conflict has spread to neighboring Blue Nile state and forced tens of thousands of people to flee into South Sudan.

Machar also downplayed unrest in South Sudan’s Jonglei state and attributed violence there to cattle-rustlers.

The violence there “is not directed against investors or the government, he said. ‘‘We are correcting that. We are disarming the civilian population so the security situation is stabilized.’’

That contradicts the February assessment of the UN, whose emergency relief coordinator,Valerie Amos told reporters on Feb. 2 that she had seen a ‘‘terrible situation’’ on visiting the area.

To contact the reporters on this story: Flavia Krause-Jackson at the United Nations atfjackson@bloomberg.net;

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-03-09/south-sudan-has-18-month-foreign-exchange-reserve-machar-says.html

Machar urges Wall Street investors to work in South Sudan


March 9, 2012 (JUBA) – In an effort to promote South Sudan to the world’s largest investors, the Vice President of the Republic, Riek Machar Teny, visited the New York Stock Exchange in in the United States of America on Thursday and held a number of meetings with leading business people.

Machar told the investors that South Sudan is now a sovereign nation with business potentials and is free from the debts and sanctions attached to north Sudan, from which South Sudan seceded in July last year. The issue of debts is contested between the two nations, with Khartoum maintaining that South Sudan should share the burden but Juba has so far refused saying that debt was built up financing the military in its two-decade civil war with southern rebels.

As well as international debt the two sides are negotiating on a host of other issues including oil, borders, and the disputed Abyei region. Despite the tension along the north-south border and internal security issues a report by the London-based think tank Chatham House in February found that agricultural investment in South Sudan was higher then could be expected considering the risks.

Machar told the potential investors that eight month old South is has huge potentials in oil, agriculture, wildlife and tourism and urged them to do business in the region.

The Vice President while in New York also met with the American Ambassador to the United Nations, Susan Rice, and discussed a wide range of issues including the ongoing post-independence negotiations between Juba and Khartoum in Addis Ababa.

The main issue under discussion is the shutdown of South Sudan’s oil production in February over a dispute over transit fees. Khartoum began confiscating Southern oil claiming Juba owed it $1 billion for the use of its pipelines and refineries since July when the existing deal expired.

China, the main importer of South Sudanese oil has urged the two sides to find a new deal but is also among the countries mentioned in relation to Juba’s plan to build a new pipeline to Kenya to end their dependence on using Port Sudan on Red Sea.

Machar also met with the Chinese Ambassador to UN, Li Bidoang who expressed his country’s strong support to see Sudan and South Sudan share a harmonious relationship. Ambassador Bidoang described his country’s relations with South Sudan as “strong as stone.”

Machar will end his two days stay in New York on Friday.

(ST)

http://www.sudantribune.com/Machar-urges-Wall-Street-investors,41847

South Sudan Has 18-Month Foreign Exchange Reserve, Machar Says
Bloomberg
South Sudan, which shut down its oil industry in January, has enough foreign exchange reserves to last 18 months and is exploring new ways to raise cash including issuing bonds, Vice President Riek Machar said. The African nation will post a budget 

South Sudan Marks International Women’s Day
Oye! Times
She appreciated the government of South Sudan for giving women the 25% representation. Kiden also urged United Nations International Children’s Emergency Fund (UNICEF) to translate the child ACT to the local languages so as to help women understand the 
Health leaders: Average person lives to be 40 in South Sudan
Los Angeles Times
Lul Pout Riek was in Los Angeles to talk about South Sudan, the planet’s newest nation. The numbers fell almost casually from his tongue, all too familiar to him, but they shocked Angelenos in the Century City hotel who had gathered to hear him and 

Sudan Honors PM to Help End Tension With South Sudan
AllAfrica.com
In a show of support for Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai as a peace-maker, the Sudanese government has called on the Premier to help end tension with South Sudan. The request cements the Prime Minister’s position as a man of peace despite suffering 

When Joseph Kony almost came in from the cold: Juba peace talks
Christian Science Monitor
Peace talks in the South Sudan city of Juba between 2006 and 2008 held out the promise of an end to Africa’s longest insurgency. Here’s how they ended. By Scott Baldauf, Staff Writer / March 9, 2012 In this November 2006 file photo the leader of the

South Sudan claims Moyo land, arrests 6 Uganda MPs
New Vision
By John Odyek and Joyce Namutebi The presidential and foreign affairs committee has asked government to prevent armed persons from Sudan from controlling parts of Moyo district and claiming it is part of South Sudan. The committee wants government to 

Salisbury High sophomore plans pasta dinner
Salisbury Post
After wrapping up the book, she started scouring the Internet for information about Sudan. That’s when she stumbled upon a website for Raising South Sudan, a project created through the nonprofit Mothering Across Continents to build schools in South 

start operation in South Sudan
Coastweek
NAIROBI (Xinhua) — Kenya’s Cooperative Bank Group will start its operation in South Sudan in the next four months following an initial investment of 14.5 million US dollars, said the group on Thursday. The Bank’s Managing Director Gideon Muriuki said 

UN envoy on children and armed conflict to visit S. Sudan
Sudan Tribune
By Julius N. Uma March 8, 2012 (JUBA) — The United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) has announced its Special Representative of the Secretary-General (SRSG) for Children and Armed Conflict is due in South Sudan this week…

JUBA, 9 March 2012 – President Salva Kiir Mayardit has issued the following decrees:

1-    Presidential Decree No. 18/2012 for the appointment of grade (1) Ambassadors into the diplomatic and Consular service in the ministry of foreign Affairs and international Cooperation of the Republic of South Sudan, 2012 AD.

The Ambassadors are:

S/N Name
1- Mr. Majok Guandon Thiep
2- Dr. Chol Deng Alak
3- Mr. Mohamed Hassan Bakeit
4- Mr. Makelele Nyajok
5- Dr. Eluzai Mogga Yokwe
6- Dr. Akec Khoc Acieu
7- Mr. Sebit Abbe Alley

Directives are given to the minister of foreign Affairs and International Cooperation to transfer and assign the ambassadors so appointed in accordance with this decree forthworth.

2-    Presidential Decree No. 19/2012 for the appointment of Grade (1) Ambassadors in to the Diplomatic and consular service in the ministry of foreign Affairs and international Cooperation of the Republic of South Sudan. The Ambassadors are: –

S/N Name
1- Mr. Paul Macuel Malok
2- Dr. Andrew Akon Akec Kuol
3- Mr. Kuol Alor Kuol

The minister of foreign Affairs and international Cooperation is hereby directed to transfer and assign the Ambassadors so appointed in accordance with this decree forthworth.

3-    Presidential Decree No. 20/2012 for the appointment of Grade (2) Ambassadors into the Diplomatic and consular service in the ministry of foreign Affairs and international Cooperation of the Republic of South Sudan, 2012 AD.

The Ambassadors are:

S/N Name
1- Mr. Anthony Louis Kon
2- Mr. Ajing Adiang Mariik
3- Mr. Alier Deng Rual
4- Mr. Akuei Bona Malwal
5- Mr. Majak Philemon Majok
6- Mr. Baak Valentino Wol
7- Mr. John Andruga Duku
8- Mr. Mariano Deng Ngor
9- Dr. Francis George Nazario
10- Mr. Joseph Moum Majak
11- Mr. Parmena Makuet Mangar
12- Mr. Philip Jada Natana
13- Mr. Arop Deng Kuol
14- Mr. Michael Majok Ayom
15- Gabriel Gai Riak
16- Mr. Bol Wek Agoth
17- Dr. John Gai Yoh
18- Dr. Daniel Peter Othol
19- Mr. Ezekiel Lol Gathouth
20- Mr. Samuel Luate Lominsuk
21- Mr. Awad El Karim Ibrahim Ali
22- Mr. Adam Saeed AbuBakr Kabawa
23- Mr. Mustafa Lowoh Walla
24- Mr. Aban Yor Yor
25- Ms. Sittona Abdalla Osman
26- Mr. Pidor Tut Pul
27- Mr. James Ernest Onge
28- Mr. Jwokthab Amum Ajak
29- Mr. Paul Malong Akaro
30- Mr. Deng Deng Nhial
31- Mr. Lazaros Akoi Arou
32- Mr. Ruben Marial Benjamin
33- Abdon Terkoc Matuet
34- Mr. James Pitia Morgan
35- Mr. Dhanojak Obongo Othow
36- Mr. Jokwen Yukwan Ayiik
37- Mr. Michael Nyang Jok
38- Mr. Michael Mayiel Chuol
39- Ms. Abuk Nikonora Manyok
40- Ms. Nyandeng Joshua Dei Wal
41- Mr. Chol Mawut Unguec Ajonga
42- Mr. Darius Garang Wol Mabior
43- Mr. Joseph Ayok Ayok

The minister of foreign Affairs and international Cooperation is hereby directed to transfer and assign the Ambassadors so appointed in accordance with this decree forthworth.

4-    Presidential Decree No. 21/2012 for the appointment of Grade (3) Ambassadors into the Diplomatic and Consular Services in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and international Cooperation of the Republic of South Sudan 2012 A.D.

S/N Name
1- Mr. Thiik Agoth Giir
2- Mr. Nickson Deng Peter
3- Mr. Morris Batali Simon
4- Ms. Mary Badoda Francis
5- Mr. Hamilton Michael Lugor
6- Mr. Akwoch Daniel Diing
7- Ms. Jago Arop Yor
8- Mr. James Kur Muorwel
9- Ms. Sarah Victor Bol
10- Mr. William Wani Ruben
11- Mr. Wol Mayar Ariec
12- Mr. David Buom Choat
13- Ms Agnes A.O Oswaha
14- Mr. Caesar Oliha Yanga
15- Mr. Garang Garang Diing
16- Mr. Kau Nak Maper
17- Mr. Ambrose Raphael Tamania
18- Mr. Kahmis Agar Wol
19- Mr. Hassan Yousif Ngor
20- Mr. John Simon Yor Kur
21- Mr. Juma Dino Amoi
22- Mr. Dominique Panthair Mading
23- Dr. Riek Pouk Riek
24- Mr. Martin Kahmis Tabia
25- Mr. Raphael Nhial Kulang
26-

 Reported by Thomas Kenneth


South Sudan and Greater Equatoria in particular has been marred by insecurities since the independence of our new nation.  Many innocent lives have been lost; properties have been illegally seized and occupied, and Greater Equatoria continues to face injustices and insecurities. ­­­­­­

We can cite several of these incidents.  Western Equatoria State continues to struggle with the atrocities committed by the Lord Resistant Army (LRA). Eastern Equatoria State recently witnessed violent confrontations between the Ma’adi and Acholi communities, which had been living in harmony for generations. Similarly, Central Equatoria State has witnessed multiple issues of insecurities such as previous Bari and Mundari conflict; and the recent land dispute of March 5, 2012 in Kemiru area of Juba County, where innocent citizens including women and children were killed.

The continuous inter-ethnic conflicts in several areas in the newly independent African nation, which has resulted in the loss of innocent lives, are unacceptable. Furthermore, the continuation of such conflicts tarnishes the image of the new nation and its people, who have struggled for more than fifty years to gain their independence. Therefore, regardless of whether the culprits are our brothers from Greater Bahr El Ghazal, Greater Equatoria, or Greater Upper Nile, the Equatoria Sudanese Community Association-USA (ESCA-USA) leadership condemns in the strongest possible terms the atrocities and insecurities resulting from such conflicts and misunderstandings; and more so, the recent events in Kemiru village of Juba County.

Although, the authorities at the national and state levels are working hard to minimize and eliminate insecurity in our beloved nascent nation, we still believe more can be done to ensure the safty the citizens of South Sudan and their properties.   We urge our leaders at the national and state levels to move swiftly to bring these culprits to justice.

Although our leaders at the national and state levels have our utmost support, we still hold them accountable for any shortcomings, especially loss of innocent lives particularly of women and children, as well as forceful seizure of properties.  Hence, ESCA-USA leadership stands ready to help in any way possible; however, will not accept anything less than safe, secure, and free South Sudan.

Our heartfelt condolence to victim’s families, and our thoughts and prayers are with them during this tragic time.  May the lord rest their souls in eternal peace.

God bless you

God bless Republic of South Sudan

Kwaje Lasu, RCP, MPH

President

ESCA-USA

Southern Sudanese Refugees Search for Kin in Ethiopian Camps

AllAfrica.com
He was in Kurmuk in South Sudan when the bombs fell in September. And when he heard the explosions he ran home and hurriedly collected his most important possessions: an English dictionary, a bible and a biology book. But while he was able to bring 

South Sudanese Christians Face Deadline To Leave The North
Eurasia Review
Sudan in February announced the deadline for the former citizens it had stripped of nationality afterSouth Sudan’s January 2011 vote to secede. The ultimatum will affect an estimated 500000-700000 people, who are mainly Christians of southern origin 


CFC Eyes Budding South Sudan Market

AllAfrica.com
By Victoria Rubadiri, 8 March 2012 Nairobi — CfC Stanbic Bank is eyeing the South Sudan market as it seeks to strategically position itself in the increasingly competitive banking sector. The bank’s Chief Financial Officer Edwin Mucai however 
EU Urges Sudan, South Sudan To Solve Post-secession Issues In AU-mediated Talks
RTT News
(RTTNews) – European Union Foreign Policy Chief Catherine Ashton has called on Sudan and South Sudan to redouble their efforts to find a negotiated settlement for all outstanding post-secession issues, in particular oil, citizenship, borders and Abyei, 
Sudan denies attacking South Kordofan civilians
BBC News
The government said any crimes against humanity are being committed by rebels backed by South Sudan. South Kordofan is one of three areas hit by conflict sinceSouth Sudan became independent from Sudan in July. Abyei and Blue Nile along with South 
Despite Tensions, Sudan-S. Sudan Talks Continue
Voice of America
March 08, 2012 Despite Tensions, Sudan-S. Sudan Talks Continue VOA News Talks continue between Sudan and South Sudan as they try to resolve simmering disputes over oil, borders, and citizenship issues. A VOA correspondent at the scene, in Ethiopia’s 
South Sudan Tribal in the Capital city: Culprits Captured
GroundReport
Mathok said that the arrest of the two soldiers who were identified to be from Sudan People Liberation Army has indicated that some individuals within the National forces are involved in fueling the crisis and claimed lives of innocent civilians in