The Martyrs’ Day: The Late Justice Martin Majier Ghai Ayuel

Posted: July 30, 2012 by PaanLuel Wël Media Ltd. in History, People
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THE LATE JUDGE MARTIN MAJIER: PROFILE OF THE LATE MARTIN MAJIER GAI AYUEL

By Hon. Maker Lual Kuol, Former Commissioner of Bor County

Martin Majiermajier

Forward
Almighty God help me to say the truth nothing but the whole truth about a man whose words and deeds in life were all the truth nothing but the truth. 

Reflection

Dear wife Kuei Bill Lual; 

On the 23rd December 1973, a great man stood behind us as a relative, brother in law and a friend to witness our matrimonial ceremony at the Anglican Church in Wau. Approximately twenty years later, that great man was no longer there. In his memory, I still remember your encouraging and soothing words when I first broke the news of his disappearance and ultimate death to you in a whisper at our shelter at Lobone displaced camp (He died for the cause of his people) May this little contribution of mine be a way for better and bigger contribution from relatives, friends and well wishers of the great veteran politician by which hopefully a nation devoid of treachery and jealousy is founded in Southern Sudan; where all people shall be equal citizens and the first among equals be on the basis and merits of sacrifices and self denial not on basis of debasing selves, flattery and hypocrisy.

Introduction

In mourning or announcing a death in Sudan and Africa in general, a dead is related to his important kin and kith and according to that trend, Martin obituary would have been announced as follows: (late Martin was a father in law to commander elTahir Bior Lueth, former secretary of commerce in SPLM, cousin in law to commander Kuol Manyang Juuk; former secretary for finance, commerce and production; Cousin to both commander Wal Athieu Madol former deputy chief of staff for administration and commander Ayuen Alier Jongroor; former commander of SPLA general HQS and uncle to Lt. Colonel Erjok Bullen Geu; signal commander in the office of the commander in chief of SPLA. Late Martin was therefore a relative of big five and other highly respected fears and staunch pillars of SPLA/M. But the announcement did not go that way and may be distancing self spared skins and other valuables.

This incomplete profile of the veteran lawyer and statesman Martin Majier is an interlude and a preface for a better and a comprehensive one from many of his relatives, friends, colleagues, supporters, sympathizers and well wishers who may have a heart to contribute towards his remembrance and commemoration… I am just therefore, preparing the way to the capable and efficient in that respect…Martin personality prompted me for such a hasty action. I wish the human values which were in him could be easily passed to the generation to come, otherwise honesty which was the corner stone of his fame could have been passed specially at this moment where moral corruption has been institutionalized though not documented.

Martin Majier

Birth

Martin Majier Gai Ayuel was born to a well to do family in Bor district in 1940. Gai Ayuel, Martin father was the chief of his lineage Piol of Palek clan till his death in 1970. Gai inherited the chieftainship of his lineage from his father Ayuel Yuot as it is the tradition in many areas of Sudan and Africa. Martin’s Mother, Late Agok Jongroor hailed from Koc, a sub clan of Juorkoc in Makuac Payam. Nyankuek Lukuac Ajuong, Martin’s maternal grandmother, hailed from Guala, 2 a subclan of Juorhol in Kolnyang payam. Martin therefore was biological a blood of Juor Palek, Juor Koc, and Juorhol that constitute Bor South constituency, the one late Martin represented to the regional assembly in Juba for three consecutive terms till eruption of hostilities in Sudan for the third time since Sudan independence in 1956.

Education

Martin started his education at Anyidi Bush School in 1950 and later moved to Malek primary school where he completed his primary education. In 1954, he was accepted at Atar intermediate school where he proceeded to Rumbek secondary school in 1958 after passing the intermediate examination. In 1962, late Martin joined the University of Khartoum where he graduated with LLB in law in 1967. His academic performance was exceptionally excellent. His school certificate could allow him to join any faculty in the university. Most surprisingly, Martin sat for the Sudan school certificate while on the run from security agents during a strike staged by the students at the time.

Worth mentioning, in 1963 a competition was held world wide among university students by an American firm. The topic for the competition was about how best the peace could be maintained in Africa and late Martin achieved the first position among the competitors and was invited to visit Washington DC.

Youth

Martin was among the few educated youth in the area who used to combine between the rural life and the urban life activities. He had his lower fore teeth removed and got initiated to manhood at sixteen as it is the tradition with Dinka and other African communities. Martin was fond of wrestling; a Dinka Bor favorite sport, dancing and hunting; all activities he used to practice during schools annual vacations. While at cattle camps during the vacations, Martin never forgot about reading. He used to arrange his books in a box in such a way that would make it easy for his illiterate mother to pick them for him whenever he wanted at one at the cattle camp. Those social activities earned him popularity among peers, colleagues and the community as large.

A Student Activist

Martin enrolment into school coincided with vivid political changes in the country when the condominium rule was about to depart from Sudan. In 1956, Sudan obtained her independence from the condominium rule. Southern Sudanese on the other hand were struggling for special status for the South, a demand rejected by the North. The North Arabs did not only object to the demand for a federal status for the South but conspired in handing over the power to the military junta of general Abbud on 17th November 1958 in order to cuff the mouths of ever rebellious Southern Sudanese as Torit revolt of 1955 set a precedent for that. That conduct of the North created a favourable political environment for young men like Martin to get engaged and involved in politics at that tender age. His role as a student activists reached the peak at Rumbek secondary school and at the University of Khartoum. During the Annual celebration of 17th November Revolution in 1961, Rumbek primary school was force to act a play whereby a Southern Sudanese was depicted malnourished and being assisted with food by a Northern Sudanese. That show angered the South Sudanese and Rumbek secondary school being the leading educational institution in the South at the time, took the lead in the protest and opposition by staging a strike in 1961 and 1962. As staunch member of the student union, Martin kept on instigating and sensitizing the student to continue the struggle…Despite the incessant haunting and harassment by the security agents, Martin never gave in till the approach of the Sudan School Certificate examination in 1962, the ones he highly passed. At the University, Martin augmented his political activities. On the 21st October 1964, he was among several students who clashed with the security forces at the University barracks till ones of their colleagues fell a victim of an intended bullet. The igniting cause for those clashes was a debate on the southern problem. Those clashes escalate to cover the whole country and consequently resulted into the fall of the military government of General Abud. The political parties which were disbanded during the military system rejuvenate and new ones sprouted. Southern Sudanese united under the banner of Southern Front and Martin was among the founders of that party. On the famous Sunday the sixth massacre of December 1964 in which Southerners were indiscriminately targeted in the three towns of Khartoum, Martin and his colleagues Southern students in the University of Khartoum played a great role in assembling their fellows southerners into the football stadiums of Khartoum and Omdurman during the chilling winter of the North as a safe guard to their lives.

Marriage

Martin is survived by two wives and eleven children. He married to his first wife Akon Achiek Wai Deng in 1966 at the time he was at his final studies at the University. Akon bore him eight children (four boys and Four girls) namely, Ayuel, Nyanwal, Gai, Wai, Nyanakuek, Mac, Achol and Aluel in the respective order of their birth. His second wife; Keth Alier Mabiei Nhial, whom the late married in 1981 bore him three daughters namely: Ayen, Akuot and Agok in the order of their birth. The two wives hail from families with good name and reputation in Bor area. Martin marriage to the two widened and tightened the network of the relationship mentioned earlier in the vast constituency he represented to the regional Assembly. As the saying goes, “Behind any great man there is a good woman” Akon and Keth in that respect fitted the saying. Both women contributed effectively to Martin’s good career in administration, politic and social life. They clearly conceived the position of their husband as a judge and a politician and therefore lived to the standards and requirements of the position. Management of the little earning to suffice the large extended family was a charm they perform perfectly. Their home was filled with warm and affection.

Government Service

Upon graduation and passing of BAR; a special examination sat for by the law graduates of which its passage is a pre requisite in joining the law profession, Martin was posted to elObeid in Kordufan in 1968 as a magistrate. In 1969, he was transferred to Kaduglei where he served for one year before moved to Malakal in 1970. In 1971, Martin was transferred to Sinja Abdalla in Blue Nile province. In 1972 and after the conclusion of Addis Ababa accord, Martin was transferred to Wau as a resident magistrate. It is during his services in Bhar elGhazal where his capabilities as an efficient judge greatly shone. His role in investigating and settling the inter tribal fights positioned him high among the few prominent judges in the Sudan. His investigation and trials to cases bore both political and social dimensions. He wanted to see an end to the tribal fights and squabbles in the whole of Southern Sudan as they contribute to the backwardness of the people of the South.

Martin through out his judicial service endeavored to bring about changes into the judicial service to conform to changes in the country and the aspiration of the people. He saw that no much was appearing in the horizon despite the assumption of powers by the Sudanese themselves. And it was not easy to bend the rigid system, Martin tender in his resignation from the judiciary service in 1976. His resignation echoed loudly among his colleagues and friends in the Government circles and efforts were joined up to persuade him to withdraw the resignation and he gave in to the will of the people. He continued in judicial service till 1977 when he opted to join the political life.

Politics

Martin joined politics officially in 1977 by contesting for Bor South constituency. He won the seat unopposed for two consecutive terms and once by a landslide majority. The constituency he represented is famous for having produced many prominent figures in socio-economic, political and administrative fields in Southern Sudan in particular and Sudan in general. It is from the same constituency late Bullen Alier Bior, former minister of Animal Resources in the central government and the first representative of the constituency after its inception in 1953 emerged. Bullen was succeeded by late Elijah Ajith Mayom in representation of the constituency for two consecutive terms in 1957 and 1966 to the National assembly. Mayom, who once lead the liberal party group in the parliament, was known for his strong advocacy for a federal arrangement for the South. In 1968 Elijah was succeeded by lawyer Abel Alier former vice- president of the Republic of Sudan for eleven years and president of three Regional governments in Southern Sudan.

It is from the same constituency great clergy men such as late RT. Rev. Bishop Daniel Deng Atong one of the first consecrated African Bishops in Sudan and late pastor Nickanora Achiek Deng Ariir emerged. The constituency also produced personalities such as Gordon Apech Ayom, former member of the Senate and one of those who translated New Testament into Dinka. The constituency also produced personalities such as late chief Joseph Machiek Deng who was through out his reign as a chief a thorn in the flesh of the colonials’ masters. It is from the same constituency the first student activists, late Alier Gureec, late Philip Abuor, late Paramena Kuol Nyok and late Rueben Mac Buot hailed. The four activists were among the first students to be dismissed from Rumbek secondary school for their political activities in 1951. Despite their dismissal, the four climbed the ladder of administration in the civil service and organised forces to occupy higher positions. Alier and Kuol became managers in the telecommunication department, Abuor became a senior administrator in the local government and Rt. Lt General Ruben Mac became the first commissioner of police in Southern Region.

The constituency is also known for its great participation in promotion of African cultures and artistry by producing great singers like Ayom Thuonglual, Lou Ayuel, Wel Reec, Malual Kur Ajak and Arou Jok Macuer. In the field of sports, great wrestlers glared such as Athel Akuc, Aciek Mabil, Nyalueth Anyieth, Angeth Dengtiel, Abuy Nyiel and Mayen Ayaan and many others who entertained generations for decades. Last but not least, the constituency had produced a generation of humorists and philosophers such as Nguet, Macot Mac Awar, Mac Yuot, Kuol Chol and Agher. Above all, Bor South constituency is among the few constituencies that had never been represented by an Arab to the National Assemblies since its inception.

On wining the seat for the first time, Martin was elected deputy speaker for administration in the Regional Assemble. When general Lagu carried out reshuffle in his cabinet in 1979, Martin was given the portfolio of Legal Affairs; a position he did not hold long as he resigned when Lagu did not heed to his advice over the 1.5 million S/pounds allegation and for that he was the first South Sudanese to resign his ministerial position. When elected again unopposed in 1980, Martin was appointed for the second time to the Legal Affairs ministry under Abel Alier third regional government. During his tenure in the office, Martin achieved many successes among them the release and compensation of 240 abducted children from Aweil area by Rezegat Arabs of Southern Kordufan. On the border issue, stirred up by the Arabs North to slice off some land from the South, Martin stood firm against the Northern encroachment attempts and the issue died down. Martin was also instrumental in the condemnation of the government in inciting the Abiye Massacre of 1980.

In 1981, Numiery dismissed the Regional government and dissolved the regional assembly for having expressed their opposition to the border issue and division of the South into three regions. Following the dissolution, Southern members in both the National and Regional Assemblies formed a body known as the Solidarity of the Southern members to defend the rights of the South as well as to protest the measures taken by Numiery. Numiery in considering the body rouge and contemptuous ordered the rounding and locking up of the Solidarity members including Martin into the famous Kober Prison not to be released till the verge of 1982 general elections. Martin won the elections for the third time by a landslide majority and the last Regional government in Juba was formed under James Joseph Tambura.

Northern interference in the South affairs continued to rise. In 1983 and immediately after the revolt of battalion 105 in Bor, Pibor and Pochalla, Numiery got the pretext of dividing the South into three regions (Equatoria, Upper Nile and Bhar elGhazal) The funniest in Numiery move was also the division of the regional assembly into three assemblies by throwing members of a particular region into their region of origin and by that procedure, Martin fell into Upper Nile category. Numiery whims were nothing but naivety and jokes to Martin. He therefore decided to go into the bush to tune to the language that the Arabs understand better and that is the arm struggle.

In the Arm Struggle

Martin was among the first founders and architects of the Sudan People Liberation Movement and Army. On the formation of the movement, Martin nominated and supported John Garang for the leadership of the Movement; a suggestion opposed by the group of Akuot Atem, Samuel Gai Tut and Abdalla Chuol. Success of Garang to assume the leadership of the movement resulted into the first crack in the struggle and into the formation of an opposed organisation; the Anyanya Two Movement. Martin participated actively in the organization of the SPLM/A as well as travelling abroad to rally support for the Movement both politically and materially. His joining the movement together with Ateng Alier Kuany motivated and encourage the youth from their respective constituencies of Bor South and Bor Centre to rush in thousands to the training centres. Those youths were the first largest military division in the movement known as Koryom. Contingents from this division were the first to display the strength and might of the movement and its army when they inflicted the first major defeat on the elite paratroopers and commandoes of the Sudanese army on the 25th December 1984 at Pan Welabirya a long Bor-Juba road. The defeated enemy abandoned many tanks and trucks with many dead bodies scattered around.

Information from reliable source confirms that the letter which was written to people in Bor 1983 urging the youths to join the movement was forged in Martin’s name as his reputation and fame were enough to make the people believe the contents and therefore rushed in their thousands to the training centers as it actually happened. Over three Quarters of Koryom hailed from Bor South and part of Bor center Constituencies…

Majier GhaiDetention and Death

It is very unfortunate that political conspiracies started to loom around the great leader on baseless grounds that he was planning subversive and sedition activities to depose John Garang from power. In 1985, Martin was detained with other 20 implicated officers from Bor South among them were Capt Philip Ayuen Lueth 1st Lts Abraham Jok Aring, Maker Thiong Maal, Chol Gai Arou, 2nd Lts were Majok Chol Naai, Ateny Mayen Deng, Mabior Ajot and Kuai Kuei. The arrested officers were seriously tortured while undergoing interrogations and consequently, two officers; 2nd Lt. Majok Chol Naai and 2nd Lt. Ateny Mayen Deng lost their lives. The rest of the officers were later released with out trials. The same implicated officers gallantly continued the struggle till some fell martyrs for the noble cause of the people among them Capt. Mabior Ajot, Capt. Kuai Kuei and others. Mabior Ajot refused to leave the SPLA artillery behind in Kapoeta in 1992. Mabior preferred death to desertion, Kuai Kuei made name in Bhar elGhazal for his heroic activities.

Martin remained in detention till released shortly in November 1992 to be rearrested after two months of freedom. It is after that last detention he met his fate. In his last arrest, many officers, seniors as well as juniors from Bor South were once more implicated and arrested in Western and Eastern Equatoria on the usual fall charge of conspiracy to overthrow John Garang. Among the arrested officers in the second arrest were Cdrs Makuei Deng, Alier Magaardit, Majur Nhial Makol, Machar Akau, A/Cdrs Mach Paul, Ateny Mayen, Abdullah Fatah Kelei Riak, Capts. Akuak Kudum, Majok Nyieth, 1st Lt Alier Apollo, Agany Aguto, Malet Apat, Mabior Rual, Sergent Mac Thui Guut, Alier Riak Garang and Bior Anyieuei. Again following the 1992 mass arrest of officers from Bor South two officers died under torture, namely Capt Majok Nyieth and Capt Akuak Kudum, a veteran fighter of Anyanya one movement.

Martin Family as well as the public remained ignorant of Martin death till his death was disclosed during SPLM national convention at Chukudum through a demand for the release of political prisoners. The circumstance of his death and others were explained to have taken place while attempting to escape??? Martin was murdered and many other prominent members of the movement were murdered with him. The brutality applied in eliminating Martin and his colleagues political prisoners exceeded all brutalities applied in human history beginning from the guillotine execution during the French revolution to gas chambers for the Jews during the Nazis Germany.

Martin’s Personality

It is a trend and a habit of some people to cling to the powerful and the authority because they can determine the fate or destiny of people but the dead is a by gone how much great his personality and reputation were. Some people try to distance themselves from the dead lest they are sprinkled or stained with dirt…Martin therefore is a personality people can not simply deny and forget for short lived opportunities and non lasting treasuries. Martin was a personality of highest caliber. He was honest, sincere, humble, democratic, courageous and hardworking; qualities the modern world desperately scrambles for them as a thirsty for water and to corroborate my claim and each is free to judge:

Probity

Honesty is especially requisite for lawyers in particular and to all in general and Martin in that respect fitted it shoes. He distanced himself through out his life from enriching himself through his position as a judge and a politician. All what he used to have from food to clothing and furniture were simple and modest. Thanks to his two wives who lived to the position of their husband With exception of the North, Martin never departed from cultivation as it was the only way whereby he could supplement the little earnings to support the large family…Martin was not only honest in hand pocket but also in words and deeds. He was straight forward in his deal with people. Hypocrisy, flattering, backbiting and sneering were not part of his a habits and character. He was critical of corruption in high places and that was why he resigned his ministerial position during Lagu presidency of the High Executive Council when Lagu refused to clear his name from corruption allegation. That honesty earns him the title of Mr. Clean among his colleagues and those who knew him.

Democracy

Martin was democratic in behaviour and approach. He believed very strongly that prevalence of democracy was the only way of maintaining peace and tranquillity in societies and systems. On the change move in Regional Government in 1977, some people were of the opinion that Numiery decreed the continuation of Abel Alier as the president of the High Executive Council such that the Addis Ababa agreement get firm as it was still fragile. Martin opposed the proponents of the idea, he argued that supposed it was Lagu or a different person who was steering the affairs in the South what would have been the position of Abel Alier supporters. His argument proved correct when Alier was ousted democratically in 1977 and brought back the same way in 1980 as president of the High Executive Council for the third time.

Courage

Martin was courageous and that was evident from his adventures as a student activists during his secondary and University studies. He was about to risk his educational future for the cause of his people. Though fourth year student are always exempted by their colleagues from joining the strike, Martin join and lead the strike in Rumbek in 1962. In 1966, Martin went for leave in his home area Bor at the time when security was tense all over Southern Sudan and the educated were particularly targeted by the Northern army. In actual fact, he went to Bor area on a secret mission to diffuse a growing tension between Anyanya rebels in Bor area and the civil population. After assisting in calming the nerves of the two parties, he proceeded with settlement of his marriage of his elder wife. 1965-70 were critical periods Southern Sudan as random and indiscriminate killing were common practices. Many South Sudanese got confined to the North during that period to avoid risking lives. Martin was the first minister to willingly resign his position in the South, an action many fear to risk in Africa. Also as a member of Solidarity group, Martin never cared of the consequences of their action. He was aware that Numiery was going to act drastically and he did by locking all the members in. Martin despite his big family responsibility marched to the bush to join the arm struggle. When released for a brief period of two months, Martin did not think of going to the big cities of Kenya and Uganda. He preferred to stay among the suffering they led to the jungle in the displaced camps.

Humility

Simplicity was another important characteristic in Martin personality. He was ever jolly and friendly with whoever came across him. He was extrovert and humble in his approach and acquaintance with people. Martin could have an open heart to a child as to elderly person. If no elderly around to chat or converse with him, Martin could create an environment by inducing a small child nearby to a heartedly conversation which he usually started with teasing and gradually developed into laughter and serious conversation. Martin was famous of teasing anybody including his seniors in the government. I doubt very much if he had not teased Numiery during their visit to Badalita in Zaire in 1980. Home games and sports were other factors that widened his scope of social life with people. When he was serving in Wau, he was once elected as chairman of Wau officials’ social clubs. He was also fond of playing court yard tennis in order to reduce his obese body for which he also used to follow the strictest dietetic measures. He could take one meal per day or sometimes skipped meals for the whole day. Despite all those dietetic measure, his body continues to bulge out. He abandoned smoking earlier and drinking was occasional.

Hardworking

Martin was known for his hard work. He would go to the office very early in the morning and remained there till after official working hours. He used to sit in the court sometimes seeing cases till late into the night. Accumulation of cases was a rare phenomenon in all the courts he passed through. Equally he was a hard working farmer. When he was serving in Wau, he had a piece of land at the outskirt of the town which he used to put under different crops. He used to go with all members of his family to the field at the week ends to return late in the evening. The food crops he used to produce were a supplement to his earning. While under detention in SPLA prisons at Raads and Buma, Martin engaged himself in farming and wood curving. He used to make chairs and beds for himself and his colleague’s prisoners

Unity of the Southern People

Martin was among the few Southern Sudanese who through out his life and career kept advocating for the unity of the Southern Sudanse as it was the only means the 9 enemy Arabs could be defeated. He was not tribal in his approaches, contacts and thinking. Coming back of Abel in 1980 as president of the High Executive Council was greatly attributed to his efforts. As a moderate thinker, he was able to reconcile extremists of the two parties (Abel and Lagu groups) and sort of a national government was formed in the South.

Unpleasant Characteristics

No human being is void of odd characteristics and Martin was not exceptional. One bad characteristic in him was he could be easily annoyed but despite all this, he would be the first to mend the fences as he did not like to loose friends or miss company.

Conclusion

Death is a natural phenomenon of which the proclivity world wide is to mention the good about the deceased. For the happier for the death of Martin, silence is the best placebo. But to utter derisive and sarcastic statements about LATE Martin Majier such as “their Mandela” is regrettable. That uttering denotes to the long imprisoned South African leader, Nelson Mandela who emerged from prison to the leadership of his country; South Africa, as the first black president of the former Apartheid regime. The sarcastic as such challenge and despise Martin relatives, friends, supporters and sympathizers that Martin is now dead, let him emerge from death to the leadership of the people of South Sudan. For the malevolent, it could be said that that comparison is irrelevant and unrealistic for the following reasons:

Firstly, Mandela got released in Nov. 1992 and Martin got rearrested in the same period and to die in detention before the election of Mandela as president of South Africa in May 1994. Secondly, there are no presidents in the bush but freedom fighters. Southern Sudanese did not take to the bush in search of leaders and rulers but they took arms in search for freedom and rights, otherwise if it was the matter of leaders and presidents, Southerners would have remained inside the country and continued sieving their nobles jackanapes and nincompoops till they arrive at a better one that could lead them…

Thirdly, when Martin was a student activist in early 60s, he never dreamt of one day of becoming a parliamentarian, a minister or a president. He was just struggling for the rights of his people without expectation of any rewards. Above all, ascending positions and descending from them is determined by luck and above all by the Almighty God. Martin could have lost his life or risked his educational future but he survived the circumstances by the help of Almighty God.

 Fourthly, Martin was a gentleman and a leader in his own right and capacity. It is South Africans who knows much about the qualities of Mandela and South Sudanese know much about the qualities of Martin Majier Gai as a leader. Mandela despite the world recognition of his personality fits to be a president in South Africa not anywhere else in the world including Southern Sudan.

 Fifthly, Mandela is not the only leader in South Africa nor is he a jack of all trades, but there are others who are or were equally respected and loved by South Africans such as former Archbishops of Johannesburg and Noble Peace laureate Desmond Tutu, Thabo Mbeki, George Slavo and slain student activist Steve Beko and many other among whom Mandela was just the first among equals.

It is therefore in the world of sufferers from inferiority complex and world of poor heartedness where only the high position is seen as where one can contribute towards the development of his people. But in the world of the normal any persons with the desirable human qualities is a leader at any position. William Shakespeare, the British novelist whose writings were for the transformation of the British society is more famous than many British Prime ministers, Martin Luther King, the black American civil rights activist may be more popular than many American Presidents; the German religious reformist, another Martin may be more remembered than many Germany kings and Chancellors. Similarly, Gandhi outshines many Indian presidents and Prime ministers.

On the other hand, other leaders who intrigue and crookedly climbed the ladder of the leadership of their nations to the top positions such as Hitler, Mussolini, Mobutu and Idi Ami, are remembered for their brutalities, despotism, corruption and gross human rights violation. Their children and grand children would walk in disguise in the streets and public places in Bon, Rome, Kinshasa and Kampala and if discovered would be greeted with Stones and rotten eggs. Oppositely, children and grand children of Willy Brandt, Mariano Romeo, Patrice Lumumba and Joseph Lule would be a cause of a traffic jam in the streets of Frankfort, Toronto, Lubumbashi and Jinja while being asked by admirers to initial autographs. For the sarcastic furthermore, Mandela would have not survived till present time had he been to some African or jungle prisons. Twenty eight years in prison were enough for Mandela to lose his life through concocted stories of such as having met his fate while attempting escape by trying to cross the ocean swimming from Robin Island to the mainland or simply by taking the TB which he contracted in the prison as a good pretext for his death. Though a racist regime, Apartheid bore conscience for Mandela.

Sarcasm was that Martin found a sharpened knife and exposed his neck at it. The sarcastic went as far as mentioning the name of his pop, the knife owner. He did not know he was incriminating some one on one hand and legalizing and confirming the murder on the other!!!!

The sarcastic and therefore the happier for the death of Martin had their motives behind the utterance, but what about that Martin’s relative who was scolding people for having mourned and grieved for Martin’s death “it is Martin relatives who are supposed to mourn Martin” retorted the relative of unknown motives. “If there is anybody to ask about Martin death, it is only his clan men not any body else” continued the relative to caution. What ever the motives behind the kin utterances, no body called for anything except mourning of an innocent nationalist. I think mourning is not shelves like any other thing. To Martin, many were biological and socially related not necessarily to be from his lineage or clan. If that relative could recall when he was chained up with other ten between Atepe and Pageri in 1992, when falsely accused of having connived in a conspiracy lead by Martin. At certain stage, that relative became exhausted by continuous beating and running and decided not to move anymore. Beating was then concentrated at him to force him to run but he closed up his mind. We had to persuade him to oblige as beating was never stopping. I think no anyone of similar age in the movement ever faced such a humiliating treatment. In actual fact that mass arrest of officers from South Bor in Western and Eastern bank was intended to terrorize, scare and insert fear into hearts of those officers such that they distance themselves from Martin who was alleged to be the leader of the concocted coup. Martin was disappeared and murdered afterwards when the environment was conducive and all suspected would be retaliators buried their heads in the sand. For the sarcastic and the relative of unknown motive, if we take the death of people as simple as that we are therefore setting a precedent in our history that any body with power can prescribe death at leisure and on that trend; people are to condemn the Nuremberg trials of Nazis after the Second World War or legalize the guillotine executions sets up by Robespierre and associates during the French revolution. Many, among them some relatives of Martin tried to invent stories to convince the people and to please the elites of the time that Martin was guilty and therefore deserve death. Unfortunately, he was not tried to prove his guilt. With the exception of very few, many Southerners were exposed to suffering and many thought time was running out for a name or a living and shedding dignities for a short while may help in achieving the purpose or (Aim justifies the means) as asserted by Machiavelli. Despite the oppression, many persevered and preferred to maintain their dignities than to survive on debasing selves and creating false lies and information about others to the masters of death and life.

As said history repeats it is true. During the SPLA/M struggle, some people gave themselves the right of judging others and categorizing people as ‘revolutionaries’ and ‘reactionaries’. In other words categorizing themselves as revolutionaries. Nearly forty years ago, some of the so called revolutionaries or their fathers and kin were once traitors or agents of the Regime in Khartoum. They obstructed the cause of the people of Southern Sudan. Whole clans enrolled into national guards or Haras eLwatani in Arabic to act as informers against their brothers and fellow country men for a monthly pay of two and the half Sudanese pound ($ 7.5 at that time rate) whether higher than what Judas Iscariot received for the blood of our Lord Jesus Christ, no one can tell. Some of those traitors ascended high position in the movement. Instead of cleansing themselves from that great permanent shame of treachery they evolved overnight from traitors to arrogant revolutionaries legalizing the death of innocent people. As traitors they used sticks to signal out their suspects at the river queues and road blocks but as ‘revolutionaries’, they used guns and other sophisticated means to eliminate their enemies.

With regard to the conflict between the Arab North and the African South, Martin position was clear; a total liberation and secession from the North. Over four decades of political relations since independent were enough to prove the insincerity of Arabs towards the South.

Martin is dead, but his noble characters especially honesty which was the corner stone of his fame are left behind for generations to come to arm themselves with, as they are qualities that can not be obtained through relief, IMF or World Bank loans. And as comparison is a guide line in life, Martin symbolized honesty and that comparison was irritating to many corrupt.

May the Almighty God rests Martin’s soul in external peace as well as the souls of Martin Makur Aleiyou, Benjamin Bol Akook, Martin Kejibura, Yunis Abu Sudur, Edward Demitry, Bol Manguak, Dr. Carlos Madut, Atali, Jordan Alier Bol, Lazarus Guguei Ngang, Dr, Juac, Hakim Gabriel Aluong, Lawyer Manyuon Anyang, Majok Chol Naai, Ateny Mayen, Akuak Kudum, Majok Nyieth and many others who disappeared for no reasons other than the fear of the unknown. Equally, may Almighty God rest the souls of many Southern Sudanese who shed their blood for the noble cause of liberating their people? AMEN

http://dengkei.tripod.com/mmglaw.html

PULLOUT: While under detention in SPLA prisons at Raads and Buma, Martin engaged himself in farming and wood curving. He used to make chairs and beds for himself and his fellow prisoners”

He was a knowledgeable, ambitious man, says Awet

The man who designed the national flag is remembered by politicians nearly two decades after his death, reports DANIEL DENG BOL & MADING DE YAK CHOLDIT:–

As the saying goes, “Behind any great man there is a good woman”.

Martin’s first wife Akon Achiek Wai Deng, married in 1966 during his final years at university, bore him eight children: Ayuel, Nyanwal, Gai, Wai, Nyanakuek, Mac, Achol and Aluel.

He married Keth Alier Mabiei Nhial in 1981 who bore him three daughters namely: Ayen, Akuot and Agok.

Martin’s marriage to the two wives widened and tightened the network of the relationship in the vast constituency he represented to the regional Assembly.

Both women contributed effectively to Martin’s good career in administration, politics and social life. They clearly conceived the position of their husband as a judge and a politician and, therefore, lived to the standards and requirements of the position. Management of the little earning to suffice the large extended family was a charm they perform perfectly. Their home was filled with warm and affection.

Martin was among the few educated youth in the area that used to combine between the rural life and the urban life activities. He had his lower fore- teeth removed and got initiated to manhood at sixteen as it is the tradition with Dinka and other African communities. Martin was fond of wrestling — a Dinka Bor favorite sport, dancing and hunting.

He never stopped practicising even when he went to school. He would compete during the vacation.  While at cattle camps during the vacations, Martin never forgot about reading. He used to arrange his books in a box in such a way that would make it easy for his illiterate mother to pick them for him whenever he wanted one at the cattle camp. Those social activities earned him popularity among peers, colleagues and the community at large.

Nearly two decades after his death, how do people remember him?

Q. What do you know about  late martin majer  Gai? What role did he play as a revolutionary person?

D/SPEAKER DANIEL AWET AKOT: I do not know the late Majer personally, but physically when I met him at Itang, Ethiopia. I was working in the North and from the North I left for the bush for 14  years. When I went to Ethiopia in 1985 I met him at 2pm for a short time, but I did not meet him a free I met him while he was under detention.

Q. He was a revolutionary person and you just heard about him. What role did you hear he played in the SPLA/SPLM?

AKOT: First I was told the late Majier was a knowledgeable, ambitious man.

If he was alive he would have given good leadership as others are now doing.

He was an objective, intelligent man who knew where he was going. He was a quiet person  and a simple lawyer who had been handled cases when he was taken to Bhar el gazal  around, 19 2-1975.

MP MAJOK DUT MUORWEL, Tonj: Briefly I saw him one year before the war. He was much senior than me in education and age. So he graduated and came to work before me but when I graduated and came and worked in the regional government here, I found him to be a man who would not accept any nonsense. He would simply call a spade a spade

Q. And his contribution in the war?

MAJOK: In the war he was one of the architects of the SPLM/SPLA disciplinary laws of 1984. That was his major contribution as a lawyer. He was spearheading the formation of these laws and it was those laws that brought us to this independence. Without those laws we would have not made it.

MAJOK ALITH JACOB, Juba University: Martin Majier Gai wrote the SPLM/SPLA party manifesto. He participated in the mobilization of youth to join the movement. He advised some of the intellectuals both in Khartoum and southern Sudan to join the liberation struggle. He also allegedly advised the SPLM/SPLA leadership not to graduate 10,000 recruits who mainly came from the greater Bor with few from the rest of the region in training camp in bilpam in Ethiopia. He was misquoted. He was arrested in jebel rat.

http://newtimes-ss.com/?p=714

There’re no presidents in life, only freedom fighters, so was Majier Gai

Some people try to distance themselves from the dead lest they are sprinkled or stained with dirt. Martin is one individual people may simply deny and forget. Martin was honest, sincere, humble, democratic, courageous and hardworking.

Honesty is especially requisite for lawyers in particular and to all in general and Martin in that respect fitted it shoes. He distanced himself throughout his life from enriching himself through his position as a judge and a politician. He was simple and modest.

Martin never departed from cultivation as it was the only way whereby he could supplement the little earnings to support the large family.

Majier was straight forward in his dealings with people. Hypocrisy, flattering, backbiting and sneering were not part of his habits and character.

He was critical of corruption in high places. That was why he resigned his ministerial position during Lagu presidency. That honesty earned him the title of Mr. Clean among his colleagues and those who knew him.

Martin was democratic in behaviour and approach. He believed very strongly that prevalence of democracy was the only way of maintaining peace and tranquility in societies and systems. On the change in Regional Government in 1977, some people wanted Numiery to decreed the continuation of Abel Alier as the president of the High Executive Council.

Martin said that suppose it was Lagu or a different person who was steering the affairs in the South what would have been the position of Abel Alier supporters? His argument proved correct when Alier was ousted democratically in 1977 and brought back the same way in 1980 as president of the High Executive Council for the third time. As a moderate thinker, he was able to reconcile extremists of the two parties (Abel and Lagu groups) and a sort of a national government was formed in the South.

Martin was courageous. He risked his educational future for the cause of his people. Though fourth year students are always exempted by their colleagues from joining the strike, Martin joined and led the strike in Rumbek in 1962. In 1966, Martin went for leave in his home area Bor when security was tense all over the south and the educated were particularly targeted by the Northern army. He went on a secret mission to diffuse growing tension between Anyanya rebels in Bor area and the civilians. After calming the nerves of the two parties, he proceeded with settlement of his marriage of his elder wife. The years 1965-1970 were critical. Random and indiscriminate killing were common practices. Many Southerners confined to the North during that period to avoid risking lives. Martin was the first minister to willingly resign his position in the South, an action many feared to risk in Africa. As a member of Solidarity group, Martin never cared of the consequences. Numiery acted drastically. He locked up the members. Majier went to the bush to join the struggle when released for a brief period of two months. Martin did not think of going to the big cities of Kenya and Uganda. He stayed among the suffering in the displaced camps.

Majier was a simple man. He was extrovert and humble in his approach and acquaintance with people. Martin was a conversationalist. If there was no elder was around to chat or converse with him. Martin was famous of teasing anybody including his seniors in government. Home games and sports were other factors that widened his scope of social life with people. In Wau he was once elected as chairman of Wau officials’ social club. He played tennis. He could take one meal per day or sometimes skipped meals for the whole day. Despite all those dietetic measures, his body continued to bulge out. He abandoned smoking earlier and drinking was occasional.

Majier was known for his hard work. He would go to the office very early in the morning and remained there till after official working hours. He attended to cases late into the night. Accumulation of cases was rare in his courtroom. He was equally a hard working farmer. He had a piece of land at the outskirts of Wau where he took his family to farm during the weekends until evening. While under detention in SPLA prisons at Raads and Buma, Majier engaged himself in farming and wood curving. He made chairs and beds for himself and his prison colleagues.

Freedom Fighters

There are no presidents in the bush but freedom fighters. Southern Sudanese did not take to the bush in search of leaders and rulers, but they took arms in search for freedom and rights. Otherwise, if it was the matter of leaders and presidents, Southerners would have remained inside the country and continued sieving their nobles jackanapes and nincompoops till they arrived at a better one that could lead them.

When Martin was a student activist in early 60s, he never dreamt of one day becoming a Parliamentarian, a minister or a president. He was just struggling for the rights of his people without expectation of any rewards. Above all, ascending positions and descending from them is determined by luck and God. Martin could have lost his life or risked his educational future but he survived the circumstances by the help of Almighty God. Martin was a gentleman and a leader in his own right and capacity.

South Africa is instructive. It is South Africans who know much about the qualities of Mandela and South Sudanese know much about the qualities of Martin Majier Gai as a leader. Mandela is not the only leader in South Africa nor is he a jack of all trades, but there are others who are or were equally respected and loved by South Africans, such as former Archbishops of Johannesburg and Noble Peace laureate Desmond Tutu, Thabo Mbeki, George Slavo and slain student activist Steve Beko. Mandela was just the first among equals.

It is, therefore, in the world of sufferers from inferiority complex and world of poor heartedness where only the high position is seen as where one can contribute towards the development of his people. But in the world of the normal any persons with the desirable human qualities is a leader at any position. William Shakespeare, the British novelist whose writings were for the transformation of the British society is more famous than many British Prime ministers; Martin Luther King, the black American civil rights activist may be more popular than many American Presidents; the German religious reformist, another Martin may be more remembered than many Germany kings and Chancellors. Similarly, Gandhi outshines many Indian presidents and Prime ministers.

On the other hand, other leaders who intrigue and crookedly climb the ladder of the leadership of their nations to the top positions, such as Hitler, Mussolini, Mobutu and Idi Amin, are remembered for their brutalities, despotism, corruption and gross human rights violations. Their children and grand children would walk in disguise in the streets and public places in Bonn, Rome, Kinshasa and Kampala, and if discovered would be greeted with stones and rotten eggs.

For the sarcastic furthermore, Mandela would have not survived till present time had he been to some African or jungle prisons. Twenty seven years in prison were enough for Mandela to lose his life through concocted stories such as having met his fate while attempting escape by trying to cross the ocean swimming from Robin Island to the mainland or simply by taking the TB, which he contracted in the prison as a good pretext for his death.

Though a racist regime, apartheid bore conscience for Mandela. Sarcasm was that Majier found a sharpened knife and exposed his neck to it. The sarcastic went as far as mentioning the name of his pop, the knife owner. He did not know he was incriminating some one on one hand and legalizing and confirming his death on the other!

With regard to the conflict between the Arab North and the African South, Martin’s position was clear; a total liberation and secession from the North. Over four decades of political relations since independent were enough to prove the insincerity of Arabs towards the South.

Martin is dead, but his noble characters, especially honesty, which was the cornerstone of his fame are left behind for generations to come to arm themselves with, as they are qualities that cannot be obtained through relief, IMF or World Bank loans. And as comparison is a guide line in life, Martin symbolized honesty and that comparison was irritating to many others.

RELATIONS
Father-in-law to commander el-Tahir Bior Lueth, former secretary of commerce in SPLM.Cousin-in-law to Governor Kuol Manyang Juuk

Cousin to Wal Athieu Madol, former deputy chief of staff for administration.

Cousin to Ayuen Alier Jongroor, commander of SPLA General HQS.

Uncle to Lt. Colonel Erjok Bullen Geu, Commander in the office of the Commander-in-Chief of SPLA

FACT FILE ON MAJIER

Date of Birth:          1940

Father:                   Chief Gai Ayuel, Piol of Palek clan, died 1970

Grand father:          Ayuel Yuot

Mother:                  Agok Jongroor, Juorkoc, Makuac Payam

Grand mother:         Nyankuek Lukuac Ajuong, Guala 2, Juorhol, Kolnyang Payam

Constituency:           Bor South

BY JOHN MADING DE YAK CHOLDIT

http://newtimes-ss.com/?p=717

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Comments
  1. Nyok Garang de Nyok says:

    Great work of reminding us Maker!

    Like

  2. Chol Deng says:

    This is a divisive article example the author lied by saying that over three quarters of Koryom were from Bor South and that only Bor South officers were detained with Martin, what about Arok Thon, Kuanyin and Akuot Atem and many others?

    The author talked of Bor South constituency as the only producer of the history contributors in comparison to other constituencies very interesting, I thought he was going to mention Ajang Duot, Deng Malual, Mading de Garang Dr Deng Bul Yak not to mention the obvious Dr. as from that constituency.

    This is not being envious but facts be told Martin Majier was a great fighter and a honest man as known to many, how he fall out with his party SPLM/A is something that has nothing to do with his community, the more his issue is customized the more we preach the hatred and people will see him as from a certain place than a national icon.

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  6. Though you are absent we were still arrogance of you but the fingers that taken you away are still painting their colours on your people in the same way.

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