The Book of Isaiah Chapter 18: Its relevancy and relation to South Sudanese

Posted: October 17, 2017 by PaanLuel Wël in Columnists, Commentary, Contributing Writers, Junub Sudan, Opinion Articles, Opinion Writers

By Zack Mayul, Kampala, Uganda

Mandela and John Garang

Nelson Mandela and John Garang

October 17, 2017 (SSB) — To add on what Tearz Ayuen wrote five years back. How he revised the book of Isaiah chapter 18. How he proposed that the men should be inspired again and rewrite something in a better way. Probably, in the past participle tense because we have seen enough of this “will” over and over again.

I think this is the time. The time to congregate together as one family headed by one bearded father, uncle, patron or brothers or sister. The time for miith ke piny ë kuch (the land of kush) to ask for forgiveness once and for all.

“Go back home, swift messengers! Take a message back to your land divided by rivers, to your strong and powerful nation, to tall your tall and smooth-skinned people, who are feared all over the world,” your man described.

Tall and smooth-skinned people as the prophet said. Whatever we have done, should be undone and the time should be now. It is not yet too late. Is it?

Father Lord, our great, great, great grandfathers might have sinned beyond humanity, but we shouldn’t be smeared and subjected to their mistakes.

What could that worst sin be than what other nations might have done?

In the Bible, we have read the story of Samson; a powerful man whom you appointed to be a judge and rule over your special people of Israel. Of whom Palestinians jived with a beautiful girl called Delilah; who was to study and deter his weaknesses and later on turned to be a sellout to this man over her maternal people. After that, they captured him, took him to Gaza where they torture him until he died.

Ammon, son of King David, raped his half-sister, Tamar whom he was denied that he shouldn’t marry her.

In the Bible, Amelikites attacked Israelites when they were returning back home to Canaan; a land that rightfully belongs to them.

In the New Testament, Jesus was whopped while he was here on earth and the entire nation was not punished because of that one man’s deed. He was made a refuge in Egypt, too. Israel is now at peace compared to the Nile residents.

Aside from that, in recent years; when colonialism came into our lives, women were raped, houses have been burned down, and Africans had been turned into fixed assets by the colonial regime. Their main duty was to provide labour to the white man: they were made to work minus meals and pays. Slept in places that were less better than managers.

On the other hand, when Christianity creep into our lives, we as the citizens of this land along the Nile, we totally agreed to do away with our heathens: we got rid of things like Liirpiöu for example, Mangok, Mayom, Aleer, Wieu, Ring; most especially in Dinka Bor’s land, and so was it to our tribes and sub-tribes all over.

Dear God, the men you inspired wrote the punishment in a present continuous tense and that’s what beats 59 kilograms, smooth-skinned, tall and dark young man like myself.

If at my age, I have been a refugee for my entire life, I can’t brainstorm the direction of my village. I wasn’t born in a hospital. Never went through all the grades of nursery and primary school. I witness death toll escalating every time. A Million kids are orphaned. Among many other things. Half of the entire population lives in exile. What else is left to punish again, sir?

This should be that time to let go of this punishment and begin a new chapter of life; we forget our dark past and we begin on another page. What do you think?

The author, Zack Mayul, is a 3rd-year student from Ndejje University Kampala perusing Bachelor of Science in Marketing. He can be reached Twitter and Facebook as Zack Mayul.

The opinion expressed here is solely the view of the writer. The veracity of any claim made is the responsibility of the author, not PaanLuel Wël: South Sudanese Bloggers (SSB) website. If you want to submit an opinion article or news analysis, please email it to paanluel2011@gmail.com. SSB do reserve the right to edit material before publication. Please include your full name, email address, the city and the country you are writing from, plus a concise biography of yourself.

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