Archive for the ‘Kur Wël Kur’ Category


By Kur Wël Kur in Adelaide, Australia

politics of food

July 2, 2017 (SSB) — “Maintain his eye contact, and through his words, I will look at his heart,” said the blind man to his young son who was as well his guide. This is Dinka proverb; it’s an epitome of an intelligent man acknowledging his disability. Life, whether king’s or beggar’s life depends on this simple logic of truth.

It’s a submission and dependency of intelligent and intellectual leaders on their subordinates or guardians that make them exceptional leaders. And when a leader submerges in this logic, it’s called “a leadership of creative reasoning.”

To ask for directions isn’t your weakness. Any traveller who hits a dead end and persists on going forward without looking out for the detour, lacks an ability of connecting the dots backward. In this instance, most travellers or tourists need guides. So, tourists would mention sites they would love to visit, but the guides would be the ones to take them to these sites.

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Appraisal: My appreciation on Hon. Makeer’s authenticity in his 54-page book, “Personalities with Positive Indelible Finger Prints in the History of South Sudan.”

By Kur Wël Kur, Adelaide, Australia

Personalities with Positive Indelible Finger Prints in the History of South Sudan

Personalities with Positive Indelible Finger Prints in the History of South Sudan

May 27, 2017 (SSB) — Are you hungry for the history? Not just for any history like that corrupted history, but the right history of our heroes. If you do, then check out this elder’s writings. I settled to follow Hon. Makeer Lual Kuol, to read what he writes in its entirety when I read his tribute (The Martyrs’ Day: Martin Majier Ghai Ayuel) to Late Martin Majier Gai in 2012.

Why?

Because he’s trustworthy. He never shies away from mentioning the bruises of the civil war, atrocities the South Sudanese had committed among themselves in the course of waging the liberation war. And he does it in the lifetimes of those who facilitated those atrocities or in the faces of the bystanders of such atrocities. Elders like him, those who don’t get shooed away by the consequences of telling or writing the truth, possess every inch of authenticity to write the political chronicles of South Sudan.

Because his writings,  his dictions and his storytelling techniques, his tactics of pulling readers, promising and luring them into reading his writings by giving them (readers) nuggets of curiosity, make him someone worth following.

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By Kur Wël Kur, Adelaide, Australia

Kiir, Ajongo, Kuol, Wani, Awet

May 13, 2017 (SSB) — Is South Sudan dictatorial or democratic? I can’t help asking myself this question. It’s a question I know the answer to. And the answer is a big-bellied fat no. But before I gauge our beloved country in any of these systems of governance, I will have to make an impression that even the governance in the state of nature is much better than the type of governance in our beloved country.

Because in nature, all the hierarchical animals observe some rules in their societies. For example, threats to power (dominance) and territory are viewed differently.  Among the hierarchical animals, power is individualistic but territory is communal. Any male/ female,  which aspire for the dominant female’s/male’s position, must prepare for an individualistic challenge (war). The rest of the members would either spectate, or go about their businesses when the challenger and the dominant female or male are viciously attacking each other.

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By Kur Wël Kur, Adelaide, Australia

Tribal war of south sudan

Tribal war of South Sudan?

April 29, 2017 (SSB) —- With almost absolute certainty, I believe we, the South Sudanese people ( government proposers and opposers)  don’t need philosophers of wars like a fifteen century war philosophers such as Niccolo Machiavelli , or Michael Walzer, a war philosopher who still breathes  air in the same atmosphere like us, to explain to us how exhaustive and expensive war is.

Because by ourselves, we have seen the consequences of war. Our citizens in thousands have died in wars and of wars-related causes; our citizens in millions are displaced; our agricultural lands are left for weeds. What sieves out of war is brutality.  If arthropods such as crabs can adopt coexistence and adapt to their environments without engaging in time-wasting wars, then why don’t we, the humans, the South Sudanese learn to stop the vicious cycle of war in our hard-earned country?

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By Kur Wël Kur, Adelaide, Australia

April 9, 2017 (SSB) —- Stride by stride, a fishing spear down here and up there: the escort, mohandessin and military truck, zoomed away from Ngalangala, gathering the red dust towards Torit. It was a slow and tiresome journey for Nyankoot, Ajah and Elizabeth, but a drudgery for the six minesweepers, mohandessin because they had to spear most spots on the road especially unsuspicious spots. The enemy had trained traitors to plant mines in unsuspicious places such as rocky places or under rotting logs that lay about on roads.

 Frequently, the contents (a corporal who was in charge of escort and Nyankoot with her daughters) of the truck had to deboard for the fresh air and to shake off the fatigue of sitting. The journey took a full duration that a footing to Torit could take.

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Bruises of the civil war: “My 75 cows, 35 goats as your dowry, and two steers killed…” (Part 9)

By Kur Wël Kur, Adelaide, Australia

war

March 30, 2017 (SSB) — After her dream, Akuol Manguak wasn’t suicidal but she refused to talk to anyone in the compound except to her niece, Martha. The two guards left behind to look after Akuol and the girls observed everything in silence. Their job was to stop any violence but any cold, thorny relationship among the family members stood in their faces with impunity.

In one of the mornings of her stay in Ngalangala, Nyankoot had no regards for Akuol’s emotional buttons. She pressed any of them and Akuol was more stressed. “Akuol, what’s going on?” She asked.

“Shouldn’t I suppose to ask the same question?” Akuol shot back in a disrespectful manner, narrowing her eyes to the point of seeing nothing.

“My 75 cows, 35 goats as your dowry, and two steers killed to seal your marriage! Then, 7 years later, you have nothing to show me; and you’re talking to me as if I am your maid (domestic worker),” she barrelled out these words in Aliab’s accent.

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 By Kur Wël Kur, Adelaide, Australia  

Prof Majok Kelei stands next to UNMISS chief at Council of ministers in Bor picture by Mach Samuel

Prof Majok Kelei of Dr. John Garang University stands next to UNMISS chief at Council of ministers in Bor, picture by Mach Samuel

March 26, 2017 (SSB) — Since her birth in the winter of 1938, Nyankoot Bolek had never seen even a hill. Just anthills she enjoyed luring the termites out of them with flames in April every year. But it had never happened to see a giant mountain up close. They had managed with her second daughter- in- law to ride on the back of the heavy trucks that UN hired in Kenya to transport food relief (sacks of sorghum and cartons of oil) to hunger-stricken places in liberated areas.

Their clothes were modest if one takes into the consideration the number of women and teenage girls with nothing more than a traditional sewn skirt in South Sudan by that time. Ajah was wearing a new traditional skirt and a Malaya, a linen sheet made of polyester. And no shoes. In fact, shoes were unthinkable. Her mother in law was wearing an African dress that resembled a night gown. All of their clothes were in bright colours.

They were exhausted from their journey from Aliab to Terekeka, then with a canoe, another kind- hearted mundri man rowed them across the Nile to Gameza where Nyankoot Bolek kissed the driver’s palm for a lift.

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The Bruises of the Civil War: A life without a Leg: The striking case of Ajah Majhok Kweeric

By Kur Wel Kur, Adelaide, Australia

freedom-of-speech-in-south-sudan

February 18, 2017 (SSB) — “A wife for her son.” “A grandson.” An heir.” Nyankoot Bolek kept pacing around the cow-dung heap, talking aloud to herself. She had yearned to hear good news from her son’s family. Announcing the birth. At that point, she had given up her ego of desiring a male child. “Any child would be a huge blessing,” she would tell herself.  An idiom that goes, “no news is good news,” knocked her unconscious. It numbed her mind. She longed for any news even the hint of her son committing adultery to “sire” a child would console her aching soul.

However, none of the news swirled into her ears. So, Nyankoot rooted for an idea of making a seventeen year old daughter of one of the akɔr waal, a pasture-hunter, her son’s wife. Ajah Majhok Kweeric was beautiful, brown-skinned and tall young woman. Her father, Majhok Kweeric was a wealthy and respectful 40-year-old. Nyankoot sent three young men, her nephews to court her.

 “Listen to her, talk and don’t forget any of her words; I will gauge every word myself; I can’t afford a stupid woman for my son,” she said.

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By Kur Wël Kur, Adelaide, Australia

Obama’s Statement on US Recognition of the Republic of South Sudan, July 9, 2011.

February 3, 2017 (SSB) — When it comes to politics, the world needs politicians. Even the dumb politicians, but malleable are better than brilliant businesspeople who think only in one way, profit. Months ago, Donald Trump was chorus of shouts in USA presidential race, but now the echoes of those shouts are reaching the US valuable allies.

In his presidential campaign, Trump made it clear that all countries receiving protection from US must pay the cost for their protection. A statement that qualifies his mantra: “America first.” To the sensible citizens, Trump was a big joke to the US politics. So to them, it was a matter of time and his reckless words would knock him out of the race. But wishing with no action is a sterilised seed of hope. Trump won.

Just in less than two weeks after his inauguration, Trump inked daring executive orders to legalise his spewed words. According to Quartz Media LLC, “Donald Trump signed 18 executive orders and memos in his first 12 days in office, for an average of 1.5 executive actions per day.”

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By Kur Wël Kur, Juba, South Sudan

img_6102

February 1, 2017 (SSB) — Two days later, M.O.T (Nhials Kech)’s two bodyguards spilled into the compound, reared by one guard, then Nhials strutted in, and finally, his three experienced guards witnessed the closing of the compound gate. Nhials was heavily guarded because of his position in his battalion. Several other officers with the same ranks (lieutenant commanders), but with the roles in logistics, communications, and trainings received less attention in regard to their security.

His bodyguards routinely received security briefings on holes and strengths in officers’ security from the head of military intelligence (MI). In alignment with MI advice, Nhials always sat far off from the fence in his compound. His guards’ bench was positioned against the fence so whenever the four guards sit on it they create a barrier, humans’ shield; one guard at the gate, and the other would patrol the whole compound: behind the kitchen, around Nhials’ hut, behind Elizabeth’s  that became Elizabeth and Martha’s hut, behind three huts for guards( two in a hut).

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Bruises of the Civil War: Without a leg (Part 5)

Posted: January 22, 2017 by PaanLuel Wël in Columnists, Kur Wël Kur

By Kur Wel Kur, Adelaide, Australia

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January 22, 2017 (SSB) — Martha Bil Deng paced into Nhials Kech’s compound in one of the evenings in 1988. Her auntie, Akuol Manguak was relaxing in an arm chair and resting her feet on a bambeer (a traditional four legged stool) under sanusia mango tree.

And Elizabeth Aliet was sweeping the western site of the compound. Sweeping the compound was one of her numerous jobs: laundering, cooking, water-fetching, boiling of bath-water, and any God knows domestic work that Akuol Manguak could think of. In fact, her uncle’s wife overworked her like a maid, a domestic worker instead of treating her a relative, or like her own child.

“Aliet, leave whatever you’re doing and grab a chair for the visitor,” Akuol Manguak yelled at her.

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By Kur Wël Kur, Adelaide, Australia

JIPDD

The Jonglei Institute for Peace, Democracy and Development – JIPDD

January 16, 2017 (SSB) — Elizabeth Aliet Kuot was a double orphan; both parents and siblings died of civil war related causes. At the age of eleven, her newly wedded paternal uncle adopted her so she became her uncle’s first child. The problem was her uncle’s wife, a jealous and mean woman; Akuol Manguak was a middle-height, with ostrich’s egg-shaped face, a wet-looking haired, nineteen-year old woman; her teeth were as white as cotton-boll.

As soon as she moved into her own house, Akuol Manguak [her uncle’s wife], took Elizabeth Aliet with her. In darkness of the house and privacy of a newly wedded life, she abused her verbally and physically. “lift your ass off the ground, you little lazy ‘thing’”, she would seize her butts pushing and sending her to glide horizontally mid-air.

Sometimes, on Elizabeth Aliet’s unlucky days, she would land on misplaced objects. Her arms, calves, and even her belly, sustained bruises; bruises she blamed on the Civil war. Without civil war that claimed her kind, hardworking and most beautiful mum, she wouldn’t have been in the hands of that heartless and barren woman.

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By Kur Wël Kur, Adelaide, Australia

wanjohi1

January 7, 2017 (SSB) — Just for updates, Honourable Weston is a Kenyan politician who’s also a regional coordinator for Friends of South Sudan in East Africa (FOSSEA). This year, he’s running for a seat in Roysambu constituency as a member of parliament (MP). Roysambu is a suburb in Nairobi that’s surrounded by Kasarani, Mirema, Thome, and Zimmerman. The United States International University (in Mirema) is not far away from Roysambu.

With his personal profile in place, I would like to dive into reasons for wishing him the best in his political campaign. No country, or citizens of another country should meddle in politics of another country. However, wishing others in their fair political process is a meaningful gesture.

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By Kur Wël Kur, Adelaide, Australia

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January 7, 2017 (SSB) — Aged 26, Zacchaeus urged himself to marry as quickly as possible. Terrors of the lonely death, without a descendant, kept him awake in countless nights. He preferred a time alone most of the times; time to reflect on insurmountable responsibility to nurse his family tree back to a biological growing speed.

There was only one way to do that: To marry and have many sons. And handfuls of daughters for wealth. Wealth for his sons to marry many wives. Wives to maze his clan with his descendants. One of Zacchaeus’ lonely times was to wander off to the town. His battalion was in a barrack fifteen minutes away from the Torit town. His occasional loitering got him into rough edges with his boss, 2nd LT Kala. He warned him many times, but Zacchaeus became creative. He looked for slightest excuses to visit Torit town especially the deep well hand-pumps positions.

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“We the willing, led by the unknowing, are doing the impossible for the ungrateful. We have done so much, with so little, for so long, we are now qualified to do anything, with nothing”

Prepared by Editorial Team: Kur Wël Kur, Emmanuel Ariech Deng and PaanLuel Wël

PaanLuel Wël: South Sudanese Bloggers (SSB): The Best Articles, Writers, of the Year 2016

December 31, 2016 (SSB) — The year 2016, in some hours, will dwindle into the past, and the people of South Sudan, along with the rest of the world, will welcome 2017. Every New Year is a joyful celebration, a celebration of the last year achievements, achievements that include being alive and healthy, recognizing the selfless leaders, whether in journalism, governance, or other important issues such as women’s rights issues, economic growth, conflicts and peace.

This year, our country, with its suffering population, has been featured hundreds over hundreds of websites all over the world, mostly in bad light. However, PaanLuel Wël: South Sudanese bloggers (SSB), our own website, occupies the central stage in publishing articles, which make sense of the dire situations in our beloved country. It is also an instrumental informant to South Sudanese worldwide because it publishes opinion articles and news commentaries from South Sudanese, both within and outside the country. These opinions explain the general and specific lives and situations of South Sudanese in countries such as Australia, Britain, Canada, New Zealand, USA, and many other places where South Sudanese are taking refuge.

Today, PaanLuel Wël: South Sudanese bloggers (SSB) is celebrating the diverse and excellent works of some writers and acknowledging the work of other hundred contributors, columnists and opinions-writers whose names or works won’t appear in this article. We got lots of writers on our website, and it is imperative to motivate and encourage them with something unique to mark the end of the year 2016 and the commencement of the year 2017.

Here are the 2016 review:

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By Kur Wël Kur, Adelaide, Australia

life-lesson-ssb

December 31, 2016 (SSB) — Within 20 minutes of his arrival, Zacchaeus contacted his boss, partly to report his punctuality and partly to report the demise of the five UN personnel. His boss was a 2nd lieutenant, Ibrahim Kala, a scruffy looking guy who had a tendency of narrowing his eyes whenever he talks to those below him in rank.

His office was a mango tree with a welcoming shade; and Kala ordered his guards to encircle the tree with white ashes every morning; so anybody who trampled over the line without a permission was considered a trespasser who would receive a necessary disciplinary action except those high ranking goons, Kala referred to his seniors in the privacy of his thoughts.

“Hello boss”, Zacchaeus said with military discipline in his manners.

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By Kur Wël Kur, Adelaide, Australia

Ruined by the SUN, by Wënnë Madyt Dengs

Ruined by the SUN, by Wënnë Madyt Dengs

December 25, 2016 (SSB) —- “Call me Zacchaeus,” he said to one his soldiers. Zacchaeus loathed those who addressed him by his ancestral middle and last names. His full names were Zacchaeus Bol Chol. Part of his protest was rooted in the fact that his new-founded faith, Christian faith preaches life after death; that righteous Christians will resurrect and be addressed by the angels with their Christian names. And part of his insistence to be addressed by the name of Zacchaeus is the relic behind the name.

He fancied the boldness and determination of Zacchaeus to climb up a Figtree in order to see the Son of God, Jesus.  Zacchaeus was a corporal in 1996, a rank he earned after series of battles that left him with bruises, but thanks to God no broken bones. At least not yet in October, 1996. He lived with a wife whom dowry was unpaid, two small children, and 4 -year-old daughter, and 2-year-old son.

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Sebit William Garang Dut: The Sudan civil war, and those who poured their parental guidance into nurturing us

By Kur Wël Kur, Adelaide, Australia

Sebit William Garang Dut

Sebit William Garang Dut, former SPLM/A camp commander in charge of Jesh el-Amer in Palotaka, Eastern Country

December 15, 2016 (SSB) — For those of you who know little or nothing about this leadership genius, I would like to take your time to understand how this man “carried” us, the Face Foundations in Palotaka (Palataka), on his shoulders.  I believe Sebit William Garang Dut deserves a recognition for his contributions in bringing up the unaccompanied minors of the Palataka (Palataka) in eastern Equatoria.

Before I ask your opinions about whether he deserves a platform of heroism or not, I would like to mention his South Sudan Liberation Profile (SSLP). Who was he in the course of the liberation? David Matiop Gai, the writer of Dinka Community: The MTN of South Sudan, Palotaka (Palataka)  Face Foundation: Dr. John Garang’s Predictable Seeds for New Sudan series and other political articles on PaanLuel Wël, has this to say about Sebit William Garang Dut:

“Sebit William Garang Dut is the elder son of William Garang Dut from Anook community in Maar Payam. He was a director of education in the autonomous government of Southern Sudan. Sebit went to Bongo in Ethiopia. He graduated in rank of 1st lieutenant (LT). He was injured on leg in Jackou. In 1990 Dr. John Garang sent Sebit William to Palataka face Foundation as camp commander with rank of captain. He was promoted as a lieutenant commander in 1992. He served as an educationist in the liberated areas until the birth of CPA. He is now a director of education in the ministry of General Education in the government of South Sudan”

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To all our Caretakers, Those Who Poured Their Parental Guidance into Nurturing Us

By Kur Wël Kur, Adelaide, Australia

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December 11, 2016 (SSB) — At early ages, those who criss-crossed deserts into Ethiopia and those of us who plunged into a different weather at Palataka in Equatoria, found ourselves in the hands of other adults. In the livelihood of rearing cattle, our parents instilled independence into us at young ages.

So, living far away, following green pastures and waterholes for our herds of cattle wasn’t a problem for us (the Dinka children). By ‘’perfect strangers’’ (most of the times, they were uncles), we would get whooped when we trailed off from the tangent of the conventional norms of our ancestral lives; sometimes, we would get praised when we aimed at doing the right things with the right accuracy of our behaviours.

However, brutes do exist, those who hate the guts of other peoples’ children. They’re everywhere. If given chances, they would abuse other peoples’ children physically. It’s this same notion that forces parents to confide the responsibilities for their children only to those they trust. Dr. John Garang with those who were in the echelons of his leadership were aware of this truth. So, when it came to us in Pinyidu and in Palataka, they (Dr. John and his generals) didn’t take it lightly.

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By Kur Wël Kur, Adelaide, Australia

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December 10, 2016 (SSB) — As you start reading this article, think about those who made you rather than those who broke you. Our veterans die every single day: they die when we blame them for what happened in the past, they die when we blame them for what matters today, and they will die when we in the future blame them for woes and losses.

Today, I sit here pressing the key of every letter of the alphabet to help me convey my appreciation to two of my living heroes. As limited as the time is, I will mention their names as quickly as possible, just to give you a freedom or permission of deciding whether to keep reading or clicking off.

The living heroes in my mind today are: Sebit William Garang Dut and Awur Mawel Malual. As soul-shattering as war is, humans including myself have accepted war as an integral part of humans in this life. It makes or breaks people. As scattered as SOUTH SUDANESE are, war has made them who they are, whether for the best or for worst.

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