Posts Tagged ‘ethiopian prime minister’


ADDIS ABABA, 28 January 2012 – The President of the Republic H.E Gen. Salva Kiir Mayardit arrived in Addis Ababa the capital of Ethiopia on Friday January 27th, 2012 to participate in two important meetings one of which was the 20th Extra-ordinary summit of the IGAD Heads of State and Government, and the other being the African Union Summit.
Before the IGAD summit H.E Kiir held closed door talks with President of Sudan El-Bashir at Sheraton Hotel in the presence of Kenyan President Mwai Kibaki and the Ethiopian Prime minister Meles Zenawi. The meeting mainly focused on the current oil crisis between Juba and Khartoum but the parties came out with no any tangible agreement.


H.E Kiir in the 20th IGAD Summit.
[Photo:Thomas Kenneth]
After the meeting the four presidents in the evening of 27th January, 2012 joined the closed talks of the 20th Extra-ordinary summit of the IGAD to discuss three main agendas as disclosed by the IGAD Meles Zenawi. The first agenda was acceleration of the integration of IGAD infrastructure; the second was Somalia issues; while the third agenda was on the oil crisis between Juba and Khartoum.
Shortly after the summit, Hon Zenawi announced in a press conference that IGAD Extra-ordinary summit has made some progress in the first two agendas without giving details but concerning the oil crisis between Juba and Khartoum the summit came out without reaching a final agreement. He explained that the summit advised the two parties to continue with negotiations under the AU/HIP umbrella.


Reported by Thomas Kenneth from Addis Ababa

Talks on oil crisis between Juba and Khartoum reaches deadlock

ADDIS ABABA, 28 January 2012 – The Secretary General of the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement (SPLM), who is also the chairperson of the South Sudan negotiating team on the oil crisis in Addis Ababa Mr. Pagan Amum Okec announced in a press conference yesterday evening at the Sheraton Hotel, Addis Ababa that the IGAD facilitating talks to help the AU/HIP on the oil crisis arising from the fact that the Government of Sudan took unilateral action of stealing the oil belonging to the Republic of South Sudan have reached a deadlock.
Mr. Amum explained that the talks have failed because the Sudan Government insists to continue stealing the oil of South Sudan and has refused the proposals made by the Government of South Sudan as a way forward to return the talks and the situations to normal. He said that the proposals:

  1. The Government of Sudan is requested to immediately release the detained ships loaded with sold oil of RSS, and are now in Port Sudan;
  2. The Sudan Government must compensate the value of the stolen oil of RSS, which was sold by the Sudan Government (was sold to the United Arab Emirates and Singapore);
  3. Sudan Government must pay all the damages caused by their actions, particularly the ships detained in Port Sudan; and
  4. The Government of Sudan must commit itself not to divert and steal again any oil of RSS going through the territories of Sudan on transit.


SG. Amum talking to the press at Sheraton Hotel, Addis Ababa.
[Photo:Thomas Kenneth]

Mr. Amum reassured the press that the oil production will not resume unless the above proposals are put into action by the Sudan government. He asserted that the shutdown operation will soon be completed.
Meanwhile the RSS is negotiating with Kenya and Ethiopia to build alternative pipelines, which he described as a tough decision but, he said it is in the interest of the people of South Sudan and is to prevent RSS resources from being stolen and robbed by the Khartoum Government on their way to the international markets. Mr. Amum concluded that with all these situations the RSS is committed to continue with talks with Government of Sudan to resolve the outstanding issues.


Reported by Thomas Kenneth from Addis Ababa-Ethiopia

http://goss.org/

Sudan to free South Sudan oil shipments: official
AFP
After talks between Sudan and South Sudan over oil transit broke down Friday, South Sudan’schief negotiator said there could be no deal until Khartoum agreed to stop stealing their oil. Sudan later said says it would release oil shipments belonging to 

South Sudan, Sudan fail to agree on oil dispute
Newsday
Click here South Sudan, Sudan fail to agree on oil dispute Published: January 28, 2012 4:38 AM By The Associated Press (AP) — A South Sudan official says negotiations to end an oil dispute between South Sudan and Sudan have failed…

Sudan says to release ships seized from South Sudan
Reuters
By Aaron Maasho | ADDIS ABABA (Reuters) – Sudan said on Saturday it would free tankers carrying cargoes of South Sudanese crude it had seized earlier this month, in a push to defuse a row over transit fees between former civil war foes that both depend 

First Annual South Sudanese Music Award Launched
Oye! Times
The South Sudanese Music Awards’ main objective is to promote South Sudanese artists and their music both locally and internationally. Speaking to the media on Thursday in De’ Havana Restaurant, the Chief Executive Officer for the firm, Bol Sultan Tem 


January 27, 2012, 2:00 PM EST

By William Davison and Paul Richardson

Jan. 27 (Bloomberg) — South Sudan’s president, Salva Kiir, and Sudanese leader Umar al-Bashir failed to reach an agreement to end an oil dispute between the two countries that led South Sudan to start shutting down its crude production.

The negotiations are expected to continue at the Jan. 29-30 summit of the 54-nation African Union in Addis Ababa, Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi told reporters today in the capital.

“In general terms I believe there is quite a lot of progress, but not enough for us to be able to clinch a deal now,” Meles said. The failure of the talks means South Sudan’s shutdown of oil production will continue, he said.

South Sudan has accused Sudan of seizing oil that passes through its territory to an export terminal on the Red Sea and has demanded $32 a barrel in transportation fees. South Sudan offered $1 a barrel. Sudan says it is diverting the crude to cover unpaid bills. Kiir said on Jan. 23 Sudan has “looted” $815 million worth of his country’s oil.

South Sudan took control of about three-quarters of Sudan’s output of 490,000 barrels a day when it gained independence from its northern neighbor in July. The crude is pumped mainly by China National Petroleum Corp., or CNPC, Malaysia’s Petroliam Nasional Bhd. and India’s ONGC Videsh Ltd.

The talks came after the African Union submitted a proposal, backed by the U.S. and China, to both leaders suggesting ways to end the dispute.

Chinese Imports

China imported about 250,000 barrels a day, or more than 65 percent of total Sudanese oil exports, accounting for 5 percent of the nation’s imports in 2010, according to data from the U.S. Energy Department.

South Sudan said on Jan. 25 that it has stopped output at more than 300 wells and there is “reduced production” at 600 more, cutting production to about 135,000 barrels per day from 275,000 barrels previously.

South Sudan’s “unilateral decision” to halt production “can only be stopped if there is an agreement,” Meles said.

The shutdown of output so far in South Sudan may have halted CNPC-operated production in Unity state, equivalent to about 150,000 barrels per day, Philippe de Pontet, Africa Director at New York-based Eurasia Group, said in a research report yesterday.

South Sudan’s chief negotiator at the talks, Pagan Amum, said the shutdown of the country’s output would be completed by tomorrow. Any agreement with Sudan would depend on the release of detained vessels ferrying “stolen” South Sudanese oil, and compensation for the siphoned crude, he said.

Once an agreement is reached, it will take about a week to bring production back to pre-shutdown levels, Amum said.

South Sudan says its government depends on oil for about 90 percent of its revenue.

–Editors: Karl Maier, Emily Bowers

To contact the reporters on this story: William Davison in Addis Ababa at wdavison3@bloomberg.net; Paul Richardson in Nairobi at pmrichardson@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Andrew J. Barden at barden@bloomberg.net

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2012-01-27/sudan-south-sudan-end-talks-on-oil-dispute-without-accord.html

South Sudan oil shutdown continues after talks fail

Yara Bayoumy and Aaron MaashoReuters

1:02 p.m. CST, January 27, 2012

ADDIS ABABA (Reuters) – The presidents of Sudan and South Sudan failed Friday to resolve an oil dispute that has led to the shutdown of the South’s crude output and threatened both countries’ economies.The row centers on how much landlocked South Sudan, which became independent last year, should pay to send its oil exports through Sudan to a Red Sea port.Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir, using a walking stick, and South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir met on the sidelines of a meeting of East African officials in Ethiopia.The two discussed a deal that “would have frozen the situation and reverses the unilateral actions that had been taken by both,” a source close to the talks told Reuters on condition of anonymity.

However, the source said the talks broke down when Kiir pulled out.

Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi, who chaired the East African meeting, said the two had agreed to sign a deal even though they had reservations on numerous points, according to the source.

“Then Salva said, ‘I regret to say that my delegation is still discussing the deal and I can’t sign’,” the source said.

South Sudan seceded in July under a 2005 peace deal that ended decades of civil war with Khartoum. It took with it about 75 percent of roughly 500,000 barrels per day of oil production.

Both countries depend heavily on oil and have put forward widely differing figures for a possible transit fee. Sudan has publicly proposed $36 per barrel, while South Sudan has listed figures under $1 per barrel.

The dispute heated up this month when Sudan said it was confiscating some oil exports from South Sudan to make up for what it called unpaid fees. In response, South Sudan said on January 20 it was shutting down its output.

WELLS SHUT DOWN

South Sudan’s oil minister Stephen Dhieu Dau said Friday that his country was continuing to shut down its oil output in protest at Sudan seizing part of its oil shipments.

“Now 50 percent of the wells are off,” he told reporters during a visit to the Palouge oil field in Upper Nile state. However, he did not say whether he was referring to the whole country or Upper Nile fields only.

In a sign of continuing acrimony, Dau also said Khartoum may have been diverting some oil from the fields which lay on the southern side of the border to feed its refinery in Khartoum. There was no immediate response to the accusation from Sudan.

An official at Petrodar, a consortium of mainly Chinese and Malaysian firms that produces much of South Sudan’s oil output, said the company had shut down around 250 of its wells, and expected to finish the shutdown in three days.

“The progress is going very smoothly and safely. The program is expected to finish in three more days,” Hago Bakheed Mahmoud, field operation manager for Petrodar, told reporters.

Petrodar was still pumping between 145,000 and 150,000 barrels per day and could resume its operations within three to four days if it was given instructions to do so, he added.

TALKS COLLAPSE

The negotiations that could lead to a reversal of the shutdown “have reached an impasse,” South Sudan’s chief negotiator Pagan Amum told reporters in Addis Ababa.

“The mood was not good because imagine you’re sitting with someone that’s stealing your property,” he said, adding the South’s output would cease by Saturday and that only cleaning and flushing the facilities would remain after that.

Sudan’s negotiators did not immediately comment.

Ethiopian leader Meles said the two sides hadn’t agreed on a deal yet, but oil would stay on the agenda in Addis Ababa, where the leaders of Somalia, Kenya and Ethiopia also met.

“It was agreed that the two parties will continue their negotiations during the summit. We have not come to conclusion as yet,” he told reporters.

Meles said an African Union mediating panel had proposed a “reversal of unilateral measures” taken by both sides, but did not spell out what that meant. “Many of those issues are agreed, but there are some sticking points,” he said.

According to oil industry sources, Sudan has already sold at least one cargo of crude seized from South Sudan at millions of dollars discount, and is offering more.

Sudan’s civil war was fought for most years from 1955 to 2005 over issues of ethnicity, religion, ideology and oil. An estimated 2 million people died in the conflict.

Southerners voted overwhelmingly to secede in a referendum held last year in January.

(Reporting by Aaron Maasho and Yara Bayoumy; Additional reporting by Hereward Holland in Palouge; Writing by Alexander Dziadosz; Editing by David Stamp)

Sudan, South Sudan Oil Talks End Without Agreement

LONDON (Dow Jones)–Negotiations between Sudan President Omar al-Bashir and South Sudan President Salva Kiir to resolve a long-standing dispute of oil transit fees ended without agreement, David Kong, deputy of mission at South Sudan’s embassy in Ethiopia, told Dow Jones Newswires on Friday.

“No agreement was reached, but our president says negotiations will continue,” Kong said, adding that South Sudan would go ahead with its plans to shut down oil production.

The meeting, which took place in the Ethiopian capital of Addis Ababa on Friday, marked the latest attempt to negotiate an agreement between the two sides in a long-standing dispute over oil transit fees.

South Sudan split from Sudan in July, taking with it some 75% of the former country’s oil production. However, South Sudan lacks the infrastructure to export the oil and has been left dependent on pipelines that flow through Sudan.

The neighbors have been unable to agree on a suitable fee for the use of these pipelines, and the resulting dispute has become increasingly tense, causing severe disruptions to South Sudan’s oil exports.

-By Sarah Kent, Dow Jones Newswires; 44 20 7842 9376; sarah.kent@dowjones.com

http://online.wsj.com/article/BT-CO-20120127-712921.html

Sudan, South Sudan leaders fail to reach oil deal

Fri Jan 27, 2012 5:33pm GMT
South Sudan's President Salva Kiir (L) and Sudan's President Omar Hassan al-Bashir attend the Independence Day ceremony in South Sudan's capital Juba July 9, 2011.    REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya

By Yara Bayoumy and Aaron Maasho

ADDIS ABABA (Reuters) – The presidents of Sudan and South Sudan failed on Friday to resolve an oil dispute that has led to the shutdown of the South’s crude output and threatened both countries’ economies.

The row centres on how much landlocked South Sudan, which became independent last year, should pay to send its oil exports through Sudan to a Red Sea port.

Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir, using a walking stick, and South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir met on the sidelines of a meeting of East African officials in Ethiopia.

The two discussed a deal that “would have frozen the situation and reverses the unilateral actions that had been taken by both”, a source close to the talks told Reuters.

However, the source said the talks broke down when Kiir pulled out.

Ethiopian Prime Minister Meles Zenawi, who chaired the East African meeting, said the two had agreed to sign a deal even though they had reservations on numerous points, according to the source.

“Then Salva said, ‘I regret to say that my delegation is still discussing the deal and I can’t sign’,” the source quoted Zenawi as saying.

South Sudan seceded in July under a 2005 peace deal that ended decades of civil war with Khartoum. It took with it about 75 percent of roughly 500,000 barrels per day of oil production.

Both countries depend heavily on oil and have put forward widely differing figures for a possible transit fee. Sudan has publicly proposed $36 per barrel, while South Sudan has listed figures under $1 per barrel.

The dispute heated up this month when Sudan said it was confiscating some oil exports from South Sudan to make up for what it called unpaid fees. In response, South Sudan said on January 20 it was shutting down its output.

WELLS SHUT DOWN

South Sudan’s oil minister Stephen Dhieu Dau said on Friday that his country was continuing to shut down its oil output in protest at Sudan seizing part of its oil shipments.

“Now 50 percent of the wells are off,” he told reporters during a visit to the Palouge oil field in Upper Nile state. However, he did not say whether he was referring to the whole country or Upper Nile fields only.

Zenawi said the two sides hadn’t agreed on a deal yet, but oil would stay on the agenda in Addis Ababa, where the leaders of Somalia, Kenya and Ethiopia also met.

“It was agreed that the two parties will continue their negotiations during the summit. We have not come to conclusion as yet,” he told reporters.

Zenawi said an African Union mediating panel had proposed a “reversal of unilateral measures” taken by both sides, but did not spell out what that meant. “Many of those issues are agreed, but there are some sticking points,” he said.

According to oil industry sources, Sudan has already sold at least one cargo of crude seized from South Sudan at millions of dollars discount, and is offering more.

Sudan’s civil war was fought for most years from 1955 to 2005 over issues of ethnicity, religion, ideology and oil. An estimated 2 million people died in the conflict.

Southerners voted overwhelmingly to secede in a referendum held last year in January.

http://af.reuters.com/article/investingNews/idAFJOE80Q0BO20120127?feedType=RSS&feedName=investingNews&sp=true