Posts Tagged ‘neighbouring sudan’


Violent demo by ex-Sudanese military from South

AFPAFP – 

Sacked South Sudanese members of the Sudanese military pelted motorists and police with stones and blocked traffic on Wednesday to protest delays in their severance pay, witnesses said.

About 100 protesters gathered on Africa Road, a major artery in the Sudanese capital, shouting “We want our rights!”

Witnesses said the demonstrators were seeking compensation and marched to the multi-lane thoroughfare from a nearby office of theSudan Armed Forces.

Stones thrown by the demonstrators shattered windows of some passing cars, an AFP reporter witnessed.

Riot police wielding batons dispersed the protesters, and there were no apparent arrests or injuries.

The Khartoum government fired ethnic southern members of its civil service last year prior to the July separation of South Sudan, which voted overwhelmingly for independence after decades of conflict with the north that left some two million people dead.

Up to 700,000 ethnic southerners are estimated to remain in Sudan ahead of an April deadline for them to either go south or normalise their status with the Khartoum authorities.

On Sunday, Khartoum and Juba agreed to cooperate in the transfer of ethnic southerners to the new nation, the official SUNA news agency said.

Khartoum’s Social Welfare Minister, Amira al-Fadel Mohamed, signed a memorandum of understanding on the issue with South Sudan’s Minister of Humanitarian Affairs Joseph Lual Achwel, SUNA said, adding the agreement covers road, air and river transport.

Despite the deal, the International Organization for Migration and the UN have said it is logistically impossible for all southerners in Sudan to either move south or obtain official status in the north before the April 8 deadline.

http://news.yahoo.com/violent-demo-ex-sudanese-military-south-130424353.html

Sacked South Sudanese block Khartoum road, hurl rocks

KHARTOUM (Reuters) – South Sudanese fired from their government jobs in neighbouring Sudan blocked a major road in Sudan’s capital Khartoum on Wednesday, hurling rocks at passing cars and demanding severance benefits, witnesses said.

Sudan has ruled out dual nationality for southerners after South Sudan seceded in July under a 2005 peace deal, throwing into legal uncertainty hundreds of thousands of people who have lived in the north for decades.

Khartoum has also dismissed ethnic southerners working for the government and about 100 people who lost their jobs gathered on a main road running past Khartoum’s airport to demand they receive post-service pay, witnesses said.

“We want our rights,” the protesters chanted. Sudanese riot police dispersed the demonstrators and spread out in the area to protect nearby facilities.

Sudan has avoided the mass protest movements that ousted leaders in neighbouring Egypt and in Tunisia, but small demonstrations have broken out over rising food prices and other issues over the past year.

South Sudan took about three quarters of the country’s oil output with it when it seceded, hitting a vital source of foreign currency and fuelling inflation in the northern country.

The two sides are now embroiled in a row over how much South Sudan should pay to export oil using pipelines and facilities in the north. South Sudan shut down its oil output last month after Khartoum started seizing some crude to make up for what it called unpaid fees.

The status of southerners in Sudan is also contentious. Sudan has imposed an April deadline for an estimated 500,000 South Sudanese to choose whether they will return home or regularise their stay in Sudan as foreigners.

The deadline “will represent a massive logistical challenge to both governments and to the international community”, the International Organisation for Migration said on Tuesday.

Some 2 million people died in the civil war between north and south, fought over ideology, ethnicity, religion and oil.

South Sudan oil row with Khartoum hurting China ties

By Ulf Laessing and Hereward Holland

JUBA Feb 15 (Reuters) – South Sudan on Wednesday said its relations with China are being strained by accusations that Chinese oil firms may have cooperated with Sudan in seizing a portion of its oil in a row over transit payments.

South Sudan took three-quarters of Sudan’s oil when it became independent in July under a peace deal with Khartoum that ended decades of civil war.

The landlocked nation needs to export its crude through Sudanese pipelines and the Red Sea port of Port Sudan but both sides have failed to agree on a transit fee.

Last month South Sudan shut down its entire oil production of 350,000 barrels a day after Khartoum started seizing some of its oil in lieu of fees it says are unpaid. Juba accuses Khartoum of seizing 6 million barrels since December.

Juba’s top negotiator Pagan Amum accused unspecified Chinese firms of having played a role in helping Khartoum to seize its oil.

“Our relations with China are beginning but they are of course having difficulties now because of the role of some Chinese companies or individuals covering up some of this stealing,” he told reporters in Juba.

State oil firms from China, India and Malaysia own majority shares in the three consortiums extracting oil in South Sudan. China is the biggest buyer of South Sudanese oil and has built the most oil facilities in both countries.

Amum said oil firms operating in Unity state had helped to block export of the entire output in December and in January.

“We will make them pay the cost or else they are out of the country,” he said, without naming the firms.

Amum also said the Sudanese oil ministry had ordered Malaysian-Chinese pipeline operator Petrodar this week to switch on a tie-in pipeline to divert 120,000 bpd of southern oil to Sudan’s refineries.

He handed out a letter dated Feb. 13, allegedly from Petrodar, informing South Sudan that Sudan had commissioned the tie-in line to transfer crude “unilaterally and by force.”

There was no immediate response from China or Sudan.

Oil talks sponsored by the African Union in Ethiopia will resume on Feb. 23, Amum said, dashing hopes of a quick deal.

“They are stealing and robbing our oil,” he said.

Juba will not sign any deal with Sudan without guarantees by China, India and Malaysia that no more oil seizures by Sudan will be possible in the future, he said.

South Sudan wants Khartoum to release all vessels held at Port Sudan and repay the value of the seized oil, he added. (Reporting by Ulf Laessing and Hereward Holland; Editing by Lisa Shumaker)

http://af.reuters.com/article/commoditiesNews/idAFL5E8DF9M620120215?sp=true


Sudan and South Sudan Fail to End Oil Dispute

By ISMA’IL KUSHKUSH

Published: February 17, 2012

KHARTOUM, Sudan — Negotiations between Sudan and South Sudan over billions of gallons of oil have ended with very little progress, prolonging a dispute that is undermining the fragile economies of both nations and straining the tenuous peace between them after decades of war.

“There was nothing new,” Yahia Hussein, a member of Sudan’s negotiating team, said Thursday after returning from the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, where the negotiations were being held.

Sudan and South Sudan have been locked in a series of talks since the south seceded and became independent last July. The highly volatile issues to be resolved include the demarcation of the border separating the nations, the status of citizens in each country and, most thorny of all, oil.

Most of the oil is in South Sudan, a landlocked nation, so the pipelines and the facilities to export it are in the north, requiring the two sides, which fought one of Africa’s longest and deadliest civil wars, to cooperate.

Both nations depend enormously on the oil revenues, but the distance between them is wide. Sudan is demanding a $36 per barrel fee, citing the costs of processing the oil and various fees and services. South Sudan says that it would pay only the transit fees, putting the cost at $3 per barrel.

Last month, South Sudan stopped its oil production in protest, accusing Sudan of stealing $815 million worth of oil and announcing that it would seek to construct alternative pipelines to Kenya and Djibouti. Sudan argued that it was taking its fees “in kind” because it had not received any payments for transit since July.

Mr. Hussein, the negotiator, stated that the government of South Sudan “was willing to start re-exporting its oil through Sudan on the condition of reaching a final agreement.”

But Nhial Deng Nhial, South Sudan’s foreign minister, appeared to be less optimistic.

“The gulf is still huge,” he said in a statement, according to Agence France-Presse. “I don’t know if it can be bridged.”

Abdelwahab El-Affendi, a professor at the University of Westminster in London, said oil would be the most difficult issue to resolve. “The southern leadership has unleashed powerful nationalist sentiments over the oil issue, which would be difficult to contain and would constrain the leadership’s ability to make concessions in the short term,” Professor El-Affendi said.

Still, negotiations over the borders seem to have achieved some progress. Mr. Hussein said the two sides had agreed to start marking the borders immediately, an process that should take about three months.

Sudan and South Sudan share a long border with a number of disputed areas. Seeking to calm fears of renewed conflict, Sudan and South Sudan signed a nonaggression agreement last Friday, but just days later South Sudan accused Sudan of bombing a border town and killing four soldiers, an accusation Sudan denies.

The two sides must also deal with matters of citizenship. In April, at the end of an initial transition period, South Sudanese who live in Sudan will be classified as foreigners, and vice versa. Tens of thousands of South Sudanese seeking to go south have been stuck in the river city of Kosti, and South Sudanese officials accuse Sudan of hindering their return. Mr. Hussein denied the charge.

The African panel that has been mediating the talks under the leadership of former President Thabo Mbeki of South Africa had helped improve the “mood of talks,” Mr. Hussein said.

“There was less verbal abuse from their side,” he said, smiling.

At some point, Professor El-Affendi said, the negotiators will have to deal with the conflicts in the Sudanese states of Blue Nile and South Kordofan, which share borders with South Sudan and whose leaders have historical ties with the regions.

But, he said, “this war is not even on the agenda in the Addis Ababa talks, since it is regarded as an ‘internal issue’ for the north,” he said. The problem, he noted, is that “when the real issue is not talked about, you cannot hope to resolve other issues.”

Last year, conflict in both states broke out when rebels who previously fought with the south took up arms against the Sudanese government in Khartoum. Sudan accuses South Sudan of supporting them. Without a cease-fire in those conflicts, “not much progress can be hoped for,” Professor el-Affendi said.

A new round of negotiations has been set for the end of this month.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/18/world/africa/sudan-and-south-sudan-fail-to-end-oil-dispute.html?_r=1

Sudan Plans to Resume Oil Talks With South Sudan By Month-End

BusinessWeek
15 (Bloomberg) — Sudan expects to resume talks with South Sudan by the end of this month to try to end a dispute over oil payments after failing to make a breakthrough at the latest round of discussions, a negotiator from the north said.

Sacked South Sudanese block Khartoum road, hurl rocks
Reuters Africa
KHARTOUM (Reuters) – South Sudanese fired from their government jobs in neighbouring Sudan blocked a major road in Sudan’s capital Khartoum on Wednesday, hurling rocks at passing cars and demanding severance benefits, witnesses said.

Priests Released amid Wave of Abductions in Sudan
ChristianNewsToday.com
KHARTOUM, Sudan – Two Catholic priests abducted at gunpoint in Rabak, Sudan last month have been released amid a wave of forcible conscriptions into rebel southern militias. Their captors –South Sudanese militiamen loyal to (north) Sudan’s Islamic 

South Sudan accuses Khartoum of violating Addis Ababa deal
Sudan Tribune
By Ngor Arol Garang February 14, 2012 (JUBA) – South Sudan on Tuesday accused Khartoum of violating the recently signed memorandum of understanding on non-aggression and cooperation, by preventing the movement of barges back to Juba.

   

Sudan Plans to Resume Oil Talks With South Sudan By Month-End

BusinessWeek
15 (Bloomberg) — Sudan expects to resume talks with South Sudan by the end of this month to try to end a dispute over oil payments after failing to make a breakthrough at the latest round of discussions, a negotiator from the north said.

Sacked South Sudanese block Khartoum road, hurl rocks
Reuters Africa
KHARTOUM (Reuters) – South Sudanese fired from their government jobs in neighbouring Sudan blocked a major road in Sudan’s capital Khartoum on Wednesday, hurling rocks at passing cars and demanding severance benefits, witnesses said.

Priests Released amid Wave of Abductions in Sudan
ChristianNewsToday.com
KHARTOUM, Sudan – Two Catholic priests abducted at gunpoint in Rabak, Sudan last month have been released amid a wave of forcible conscriptions into rebel southern militias. Their captors –South Sudanese militiamen loyal to (north) Sudan’s Islamic 

South Sudan accuses Khartoum of violating Addis Ababa deal
Sudan Tribune
By Ngor Arol Garang February 14, 2012 (JUBA) – South Sudan on Tuesday accused Khartoum of violating the recently signed memorandum of understanding on non-aggression and cooperation, by preventing the movement of barges back to Juba.



South Sudan challenges Khartoum to produce backup for high fees demanded
Sudan Tribune
By Ngor Arol Garang February 15, 2012 (JUBA) – South Sudan on Wednesday said the government of neighboring Sudan has “failed” to produce genuine reasons that support their demand for high charges in return for using the oil pipelines passing through 

Sudan Oil Talks End With Recriminations, Large Rift
Voice of America
February 15, 2012 Sudan Oil Talks End With Recriminations, Large Rift Peter Heinlein | Addis Ababa, Ethiopia South Sudan has threatened to keep the oil pipeline to the Red Sea shut permanently following a failed round of talks on sharing revenues with 

South Sudan denounces barge ban
News24
Juba – South Sudan said on Wednesday Khartoum’s decision to stop the return of hundreds of thousands of Southerners by barge on the White Nile was a looming disaster, and that alternative means were untenable. Sudan early this week halted the use of 

South Sudan: Khartoum Violates Non-Aggression Pact
Voice of America
February 14, 2012 South Sudan: Khartoum Violates Non-Aggression Pact Peter Heinlein | Addis Ababa, Ethiopia South Sudan is accusing neighboring Sudan of bombing southern targets, days after the two sides signed a non-aggression deal…

Little Progress in Sudan, South Sudan Oil Talks
Voice of America (blog)
Talks aimed at ending a bitter oil dispute between Sudan and South Sudan have ended without agreement. The six-day talks in Ethiopia’s capital, Addis Ababa, finished early Wednesday. South Sudanese officials said late Tuesday that the sides remain far 

 

South Sudan challenges Khartoum to produce backup for high fees demanded
Sudan Tribune
By Ngor Arol Garang February 15, 2012 (JUBA) – South Sudan on Wednesday said the government of neighboring Sudan has “failed” to produce genuine reasons that support their demand for high charges in return for using the oil pipelines passing through 

Sudan Oil Talks End With Recriminations, Large Rift
Voice of America
February 15, 2012 Sudan Oil Talks End With Recriminations, Large Rift Peter Heinlein | Addis Ababa, Ethiopia South Sudan has threatened to keep the oil pipeline to the Red Sea shut permanently following a failed round of talks on sharing revenues with 

South Sudan denounces barge ban
News24
Juba – South Sudan said on Wednesday Khartoum’s decision to stop the return of hundreds of thousands of Southerners by barge on the White Nile was a looming disaster, and that alternative means were untenable. Sudan early this week halted the use of 

South Sudan: Khartoum Violates Non-Aggression Pact
Voice of America
February 14, 2012 South Sudan: Khartoum Violates Non-Aggression Pact Peter Heinlein | Addis Ababa, Ethiopia South Sudan is accusing neighboring Sudan of bombing southern targets, days after the two sides signed a non-aggression deal.

Little Progress in Sudan, South Sudan Oil Talks
Voice of America (blog)
Talks aimed at ending a bitter oil dispute between Sudan and South Sudan have ended without agreement. The six-day talks in Ethiopia’s capital, Addis Ababa, finished early Wednesday. South Sudanese officials said late Tuesday that the sides remain far 

Newly founded South Sudan says northern neighbour is stealing oil and charging too much for access to it pipelinesSouth Sudanese people

South Sudanese people turn out to hear a speech by their president, Salva Kiir. The South has announced the suspension of oil exports through Sudan. Photograph: Reuters

South Sudan official has said it is shutting down more than 900 oil wells after accusing neighbouring Sudan of stealing its oil.

Pagan Amum, the secretary general of South Sudan’s ruling party, said the shutdown would have a big impact on the new nation, which relies heavily on oil revenues, but he would rather see the oil stay in the ground than lose it to Sudan. “That is even worse,” he said.

At the centre of the dispute are pipeline fees being charged by Sudan. All of South Sudan’s oil currently runs through Sudan’s pipelines to Port Sudan for export. Khartoum has asked for $32 per barrel but South Sudan has called this extortion and offered $1 per barrel, which it says is the highest in the world.

The landlocked South on Sunday started to halt oil production after accusing Sudan of stealing $815m worth of its oil. South Sudan broke away from Sudan in July 2011 to form the world’s newest country but the neighbours did not agree on oil transit fees.

The shutdown came a day after South Sudan and Kenya signed a memorandum of understanding to build a pipeline from South Sudan’s oil fields south to Lamu, on the northern Kenyan coast, where a new port is planned.

The project has been a matter of speculation for the last few years, but South Sudan’s oil minister, Stephen Dhieu Dau, said planning would begin as soon as possible. “We do not know exactly when, but the pipeline is a priority for the government,” he said.

Amum said the oil shutdown would be completed within two to three days. He said South Sudan was also approaching Ethiopia about developing a new pipeline that would eventually go to port through Djibouti.

While South Sudan is losing large amounts of money by shutting down its oil industry, Sudan is losing money as well and risks losing future revenue if South Sudan completes new pipelines out if its territory.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/jan/26/south-sudan-shuts-oil-wells?newsfeed=true

South Sudan puts its army on maximum alert in oil row escalation

By Ngor Arol Garang

January 25, 2012 (JUBA) – South Sudan on Wednesday said it has put its troops on maximum alert, amid growing tensions with Khartoum over the ongoing oil wealth sharing dispute and reports of air bombing by Sudan inside its borders.

JPEG - 13.9 kb
Soldiers guard a South Sudanese oil refinery, 2009 (AFP)

Yesterday the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees(UNHCR) condemned aerial bombardment of areas hosting Sudanese refugees in South Sudan.

The bombing which took place on Monday in the Upper Nile state reportedly left one child injured and 14 other people missing. Upper Nile borders Blue Nile state in Sudan, where the Khartoum government is engaged in conflict with rebels.

On Wednesday the spokesperson for the French foreign ministry Bernard Valero condemned the air raid saying it not only endangered civilians living “in dramatic situation” but also United Nations (UN) and International Organisation for Migration (IOM) staff working there.

“This aggression is a violation of international humanitarian law and involves the lives of civilians and humanitarian workers. This is unacceptable,” the French official said.

Valero also said that France is “very concerned” about recent decisions “taken unilaterally” by both Khartoum and Juba which “go against the spirit of friendship and cooperation which they had been able to demonstrate from January to July 2011”.

Valero urged both parties to “demonstrate responsibility” and to reach an agreement at theIntergovernmental Authority on Development special summit, based on the African Union High-level Implementation Panel proposals.

Speaking at a press briefing in Juba International airport upon arrival from Addis Ababa on Wednesday, Majak D’Agoot, South Sudan’s deputy minister of defence said the Government of South Sudan (GoSS) was aware that Khartoum is mobilising support for militia groups operating along the borders with South Sudan.

Agoot said South Sudan’s troops are on maximum alert, to counter any Khartoum-backed aggression.

The South Sudan official said the talks he attended in Ethiopia with Khartoum were fruitless because of the reluctance of the Sudanese delegation to engage “in honest and meaningful discussions”.

Khartoum has been confiscating South Sudanese oil as what it considers payment for arrears in unpaid transit fees. Juba considers the charge of around US$32 per barrel in fees suggested by Khartoum as exorbitant, but it is landlocked and currently has no other pipeline, other than the one under Khartoum’s control, which terminates at Port Sudan.

Juba claims Khartoum has “looted” US$815 billion worth of its oil. Khartoum is demanding around US$1 billion in unpaid fees since July 2011.

As a result of dispute South Sudan has stopped output at more than 300 wells and has reduced production at 600 more.

According to the South’s chief negotiator in talks being held in Addis Ababa, Pagan Amum, output is expected to be reduced from 275,000 to 135,000 barrels per day. He also said US$2.6 billions would be disbursed to Sudan within four years after separation and that US$2.8 billion in South Sudanese arrears be forgiven.

As South Sudan relies on oil revenues for 90 per cent of its economy, the prohibitive costliness and time consuming nature of constructing an alternative pipeline through neighbouring Kenya to the coast at Lamu, the stalemate is unlikely to be tenable for long.

Aleu Ayeny Aleu, a member of the National Assembly from Warrap commended the decision to reduce oil production.

“Nothing much has changed. The standoff on oil have not been resolved”, Agoot told journalists on Wednesday in Juba, but expressed South Sudan’s willingness to negotiate “a fair deal” with Khartoum.

While still at the Addis Ababa summit Agoot told Sudan Tribune that his “profound” knowledge of the Sudanese government made the Sudanese defence minister, Abdel-Rahim Mohammed Hussein reluctant to hold discussions with his delegation.

Agoot served as deputy National Intelligence and Security Service (NISS) in Khartoum during the interim period, before he was appointed as South Sudan’s deputy defence minister after secession on 9 July 2011.

Agoot was accompanied by the general chief of staff of the Sudan People’s Liberation Army, James Hoth Mai.

(ST)

http://www.sudantribune.com/South-Sudan-puts-its-army-on,41406

Enhancing trade: Kenya and South Sudan sign oil pipeline deal
ntvkenya
http://www.ntv.co.ke The government of Kenya has signed an agreement with the government ofSouth Sudan that will allow for the construction of an oil pipeline connecting the two countries. The agreement was signed this morning in Juba.

South Sudan: Dr Marial Receives Report On Restructuring the Ministry of 
AllAfrica.com
He also said the report touched on the case of South Sudanese officials who returned from Khartoum and the Diaspora. Responding to the presentation, Dr Marial said that the report has come at the right time when South Sudan is embarking on a 

South Sudan: Unity State to Screen Workers in Its Payroll
AllAfrica.com
Juba — The unity state government yesterday subjected over 300 workers to investigation in what is attributed to their names appearing twice in the finance payroll. Gideon Gatpat, the state spokesperson revealed this to the Citizen newspaper over 

South Sudan: The Independent Country Between the Rule of Communities and 
AllAfrica.com
In the last part of this article, the author had raised question asked by some citizens of this country about the real rulers of contemporary South Sudan, whether it is the government or the communities. That question was directed to the people of 

South Sudan: The Young Need Sports Especially Football
AllAfrica.com
A few days ago the sports clubs spread throughout South Sudan especially in the capital Juba where filled to their capacities because their members were watching and applauding the opening matches by member countries of Africa Cup of nations.

Aid agencies sound warning in South Sudan
Al Jazeera
Intense tribal conflict in South Sudan’s Jonglei state has resulted in thousands of deaths and many more injuries, despite the launch of one of the most expensive humanitarian interventions in the region’s history, The UN is confident that enough food 

SudanSouth Darfur’s unrest escalates
Sudan Tribune
According to Sudan Tribune’s sources, the protestors are demonstrating against the appointment of the new governor and in favor of reinstating his predecessor, Abdul Hamid Musa Kasha. At least three people were killed in the continued demonstration on 

South Sudanese women call for greater participation in constitutional review
Sudan Tribune
By Ngor Arol Garang January 25, 2012 (JUBA) – A South Sudanese women’s alliance on Wednesday said the National Constitution Review Commission (NCRC) did not fully represent their interests after its swearing ceremony on Tuesday.

Ban: UN Ill-Equipped…
Talk Radio News Service
By Staff|1/25/2012 11:07 PM United Nations peacekeepers in South Sudan don’t have enough resources to prevent acts of violence against the country’s civilian population, UN Secretary General Ban Ki Moon said at a press conference Wednesday outlining a 

South Sudan: Foot-soldiers and armed corruption
The Africa Report
By Geof Magga In its efforts to fight corruption, the South Sudanese government has come up with an ambitious plan to audit all government institutions. But the country’s informal traders have suggested that it might be an impossible task.

Remember South Sudan
German Marshall Fund (blog)
Add to this volatile mix national elections in the United States, France, and elsewhere and it is easy to forget one of the landmark events of 2011: the July 9 th independence of South Sudan. Moreover, although remembrance of the new nation’s founding 
Two Sudans’ oil dispute deepens as South shuts down wells
The Guardian
South Sudan official has said it is shutting down more than 900 oil wells after accusing neighbouring Sudan of stealing its oil. Pagan Amum, the secretary general ofSouth Sudan’s ruling party, said the shutdown would have a big impact on the new