Archive for September 13, 2011

South Sudan Job Vacancy: Travel and Events Assistant, Juba

Posted: September 13, 2011 by PaanLuel Wël Media Ltd. in Jobs

Please directly contact the employer if you have any questions.

To anyone of interest, please circulate the following job vacancies:

Please share this with your colleagues and networks. Follow the link below for full information regarding the post as well as access to online submission of application.

For South Sudan Nationals Only.

http://tbe.taleo.net/NA8/ats/careers/requisition.jsp;jsessionid=2291A2DCD418 3FC7C7C1306997B1F287.NA8_primary_jvm?org=MSI&cws=2&rid=2430

Travel and Events Assistant, Juba, Sudan
Location: South Sudan
Description

Project/Proposal Summary:
MSI was awarded a three-year contract with USAID/Sudan on a project named SUPPORT (Services Under Program and Project Offices for Results Tracking), and tasked with the responsibility of executing functions normally associated with USAID’s Program and Communications offices.
As a part of the SUPPORT project, MSI hiring technical and support staff, assisting USAID with logistics, and facilitating VIP visits. For more information on our Sudan project (Services Under Program and Project Offices for Results Tracking –
SUPPORT) please follow this link:
http://www.msiworldwide.com/index.cfm?msiweb=project&p_id=150

Position Summary:
The Travel and Events Assistant will be responsible for planning travel, logistics, and conferences in Sudan and at times may be required to travel with delegations. This is a critical position and the person must be extremely organized, adaptable, and professional.
The Travel and Events Assistant reports to the Travel and Events Coordinator.

**Please note: This is a local position. Only Sudanese nationals are eligible to apply**

Responsibilities:
. Plan travel for MSI teams in Sudan, including lodging, ground transportation and flights . Assist in planning conferences, including preparing checklists, participant lists, nametags, table tents, delivery receipts, etc.; . Develop relationships with air service providers, travel agents, hotel operators and caterers; obtain quotes for services as required; . Track conference inventory and be responsible for MSI conference facility functions; . Track all local hotel reservations, flights, and events; . Check incoming invoices to ensure accuracy and record against relevant tracker . Maintain all files related to travel and conferences; . Other duties as assigned.

Qualifications:
. Prior experience arranging travel and logistics in Sudan required; . High degree of professionalism, adaptability and organization; . Strong sense of self-direction and the ability to carry out tasks with little oversight; . Attention to detail and a willingness to learn; . English fluency required and Arabic proficiency strongly preferred; . Strong IT stills including proficiency

Thanks,
Reec Akuak
Treasurer

The Southern Sudanese Community
Advocating — Mentoring — Nurturing

202.656.TSSC (8772)
Direct/Cell: 202.596.6009
Fax: 202.280.1007

R.Akuak@TSSC.us
http://www.TSSC.us


Please directly contact the employer if you have any questions.

To anyone of interest, please circulate the following job vacancies:

Dear All,

Save the Children is the World’s largest independent children’s organization, making immediate and long-lasting improvements to children’s lives in over 120 countries world wide. We work for a world which respects and values each child, which listens to children and learns, and where all children have hope and opportunity. We’re determined to achieve dramatic change for the world’s most vulnerable children and we have a huge sense of pride in what we do.

SCiSS is currently recruiting suitable Sudanese for the Field Positions of 1- Human Resources Officer to be based in Kapoeta North – Riwoto and 2 – Nutrition Project Officers for ( one for Akobo and one for Waat) Pass this Vacancy Positions to your colleagues at large.
Attached are the Posts.

Alison John
Alison John [alisonministry@gmail.com]

Human Resources Officer
Save the Children
Hai Malakla – Juba
South Sudan Program

Thanks,
Reec Akuak
Treasurer

The Southern Sudanese Community
Advocating — Mentoring — Nurturing

202.656.TSSC (8772)
Direct/Cell: 202.596.6009
Fax: 202.280.1007

R.Akuak@TSSC.us
http://www.TSSC.us

Akobo.pdf
Kapoeta.pdf

South Sudan Job Vacancy: Consultant with IMC

Posted: September 13, 2011 by PaanLuel Wël Media Ltd. in Jobs

Please directly contact the employer if you have any questions.

To anyone of interest, please circulate the following job vacancies:

International Medical Corps is looking for a South Sudanese national to fill the following vacant positions in Tambura:
1-Health Manager
2-Health Officer
3-Finance/Admin Officer
4-Ware house officer

Thanks,
Reec Akuak
Treasurer

The Southern Sudanese Community
Advocating — Mentoring — Nurturing

202.656.TSSC (8772)
Direct/Cell: 202.596.6009
Fax: 202.280.1007

R.Akuak@TSSC.us
http://www.TSSC.us

Job advert Tambura.pdf

South Sudan Job Vacancy #2: Malaria Consortium Recruiting in Northern Bahr el Ghazal

Posted: September 13, 2011 by PaanLuel Wël Media Ltd. in Jobs

Please directly contact the employer if you have any questions.

To anyone of interest, please circulate the following job vacancies:

Malaria Consortium has several vacancies within our programme in Northern Bahr el Ghazal. Please see attachments for further details. If you are interested in any of these positions please submit an application in accordance with the requirements in the attached.

Please state clearly which position you are applying for, provide contact details, and send your application to the relevant person (details in attachments)

If you know someone who meets the requirements for any of these positions then do please forward on this email.
Female applicants who meet the requirements for these positions are strongly encouraged to apply.
Kind regards

Mike Ahern

Area Coordinator
Malaria Consortium, Republic of South Sudan
Ayuang, Aweil Town, Northern Bahr el Ghazal

Also NGO Focal Point for Health and Nutrition Cluster, Northern Bahr el Ghazal

Vivacell: + 249 (0) 955628980
MTN Sudan: +249 (0) 927313764
Thuraya: +8821655535760
Email: m.ahern@malariaconsortium.orgSkype: mikeahern3

Reec Akuak
Treasurer

The Southern Sudanese Community
Advocating — Mentoring — Nurturing

202.656.TSSC (8772)
Direct/Cell: 202.596.6009
Fax: 202.280.1007

R.Akuak@TSSC.us
http://www.TSSC.us

Driver.pdf
Logistics Assistant.pdf
SMART survey – surveyor.pdf
SMART survey – Data entry – vf.pdf
SMART survey – Logs Assistant – vf.pdf
Nutrition Programme Officer.pdf
OTP Supervisor.pdf
Field Office Accountant.pdf
HR Officer.pdf

South Sudan Job Vacancy: Malaria Consortium Recruiting in Northern Bahr el Ghazal

Posted: September 13, 2011 by PaanLuel Wël Media Ltd. in Jobs

Please directly contact the employer if you have any questions.

To anyone of interest, please circulate the following job vacancies:

Malaria Consortium has several vacancies within our programme in Northern Bahr el Ghazal. Please see attachments for further details. If you are interested in any of these positions please submit an application in accordance with the requirements in the attached.

Please state clearly which position you are applying for, provide contact details, and send your application to the relevant person (details in attachments)

If you know someone who meets the requirements for any of these positions then do please forward on this email.
Female applicants who meet the requirements for these positions are strongly encouraged to apply.
Kind regards

Mike Ahern

Area Coordinator
Malaria Consortium, Republic of South Sudan
Ayuang, Aweil Town, Northern Bahr el Ghazal

Also NGO Focal Point for Health and Nutrition Cluster, Northern Bahr el Ghazal

Vivacell: + 249 (0) 955628980
MTN Sudan: +249 (0) 927313764
Thuraya: +8821655535760
Email: m.ahern@malariaconsortium.orgSkype: mikeahern3

Reec Akuak
Treasurer

The Southern Sudanese Community
Advocating — Mentoring — Nurturing

202.656.TSSC (8772)
Direct/Cell: 202.596.6009
Fax: 202.280.1007

R.Akuak@TSSC.us
http://www.TSSC.us

ICCM Programme Officer.pdf
ICCM Project Officer.pdf
ICCM Field Officer.pdf
Project Officer HMIS & IECHC.PDF

Why South Sudan prefers Ramciel to Juba as its seat of government

Posted: September 13, 2011 by PaanLuel Wël Media Ltd. in Junub Sudan

An artist’s impression of the proposed new capital city of South Sudan in Ramchiel, Lakes state. The government settled for the new site to ease congestion experienced in Juba and avoid land disputes between it and the local landowners. Courtesy

An artist’s impression of the proposed new capital city of South Sudan in Ramchiel, Lakes state. The government settled for the new site to ease congestion experienced in Juba and avoid land disputes between it and the local landowners. Courtesy

By MACHEL AMOS in Juba

Posted Wednesday, September 14 2011 at 00:00

Whether to start building a new capital on a virgin land where no single structure has ever existed or upgrade the poorly planned infrastructure in Juba has been a nagging dilemma in South Sudan.

Ramciel, savanna grassland on the west of the River Nile in the country’s Lakes state, would be the new seat of government, replacing Juba, which has been the regional capital for more than 35 years before the country’s independence. (Read: Firms ponder next move as S. Sudan plans new capital)

The circumstances through which Juba maintained the crown date back to the colonial period, in which it hosted the chief conference in 1947 to decide the fate of Southern Sudan ahead of the disputed Sudanese independence in 1956.


Tragic death

Juba automatically became the seat of the High Executive Council for Southern Sudan after the signing of the Addis Ababa Peace Agreement in 1972, ending 17 years of guerrilla fighting that erupted in 1955.

“Juba started from a small town to being a capital. And so originally it was not planned to be a big city to include a lot of people, may be two to three million,” Prof Cuir Riak, senior development consultant at African Development Consultancy Firm said.

It was against this unplanned background that the leadership of the ex-rebel group turned ruling party resolved in 2005, under the chairmanship of the late Dr John Garang, to transfer the capital to Ramciel once it gets hold of the south.

Unfortunately, Garang died in a tragic plane crash in 2005, three weeks after taking oath of office as vice president of Sudan and president of the Government of Southern Sudan. His then deputy, Salva Kiir, was the heir apparent. Observers and analysts say that although the transfer of the capital did not die with Garang, the emergence of land disputes between Central Equatoria state and the central government fuelled the bid.

“A city capital, among other things should be a place where the national government can spread out its wings freely without being stopped by someone who runs with one piece of a law leaving others hanging,” said Prof Isaiah Abraham.

He said the Bari, who own the land in Juba feel that it is being grabbed while city dwellers feel that they are not welcome in the capital.

If the city were to remain in Juba, an appropriation Act would be required to take hold of lands leased to citizens in attempts of re-planning; a commission would have to be formed to conduct evaluation for the various plots to be appropriated; special fund would need to be created to compensate the people for their land.

“The aggregate of the re-planning and reconstruction costs will be too high if compared to fresh building operations and the period of litigation and court cases from people objecting the appropriation and evaluation of their properties could impair development,” Investment minister Garang Diing said.

As prospects of planned urban development set in, and as the population of Juba increased from an estimated 250,000 in 2005 to more than 500,000 as of 2010, the intent to transfer the capital gained gear.

“This tension added further impediments to the construction efforts of the government and could continue to hamper its focus on the development in the independence era,” National Security minister Oyai Deng Ajak said.

“Furthermore, for the purpose of national security, the government would need a secure area for its installations and development,” he said. “As such, a location would serve a strategic purpose to promote integrated business, industrial development and investment as well as increase security.”

So, a little more than a week ago, the government finally decided to relocate the capital to Ramciel.

“Therefore, the development of a new city would attract significant investment into Southern Sudanese economy leading to increased growth and improvement of lives for its citizens,” said Mr Ajak.

The land is inhabited by the Chiech community of ethnic Dinka (Atuot). Chiech are nomadic pastoralists, unlike the Bari of Juba who are crop farmers. In rainy season, the pastoralists trek to the highlands and in the dry season to ‘toch’ (wet lands along the River Nile) with their cattle.

Lakes state government, in which Ramciel lies, said it has given land to the government without conditions.

Because of the pastoral nature of the life of Chiech, land ownership is more communal than individual. Consequently, if the community agrees to give up land as is the case, it is expected that land disputes would be minimal.

Feasibility study

“Juba is highly congested. It would be difficult to restructure it. It would be very costly to have new water system, new power and many other things that are needed for a capital,” Lakes state governor Chol Tong Mayai said.

“Our main concern is essentially to relief the contention between those who feel their land is being grabbed and those who feel they are not being welcomed in Juba.”

However, a report of a feasibility study conducted in 2006 by Balkan Consultancy concluded that in “the area around Ramciel towards the Nile, the area was swampy and not suitable for proposed development”.

“The experience of observation achieved during the E- exploring on the Internet by the means of the satellite, shows that the certain areas located western from the Nile have terrain depression, where the latitude is for few metres below the level of the river basin. That brings the possible conclusion that during the annual period in different climate seasons, these areas might be flooded,” the report said.

Accordingly, the new site in Ramciel “does not have sufficient and favourable surface capacity to sustain future development and extension of the capital city.”

Moreover, the government believes that moving to the new location “would allow for the creation of a modern city planned for 200 years with absolute flexibility to observe any population growth and technological advancements”.

However, the report has been dismissed as false. “Maybe they studied another place but not the Ramciel we are talking about,” says Marik Nanga, Lakes state information minister.

The new area proposed by the firm lies across the Nile spanning from Rajaf East (mouth of Kit River) in the south and extends eastwards to Ngangala, KhorIngliz, Longairo. It then extends northwards through Lafon to cover southern grasslands of Jonglei state.

To the west it mainly borders the Nile from Rajaf to Mangalla and northwards to Pariak. The city would also have an extended aisle into Lakes state that would broaden deeper into the territories of Ramshiel such as Minkaman, Wunthou and Kalthok. This area is about 19,000 square kilometres and would be curved from the four states of Central Equatoria, Eastern Equatoria, Jonglei and Lakes. An estimated number of 500,000 indigenous population would fall within the premises of this proposed capital, according to a consultant. However, given the centrality of Ramciel and goodwill of the local population, it was chosen as the most ideal location for South Sudan’s capital city.

In Ramciel, the government with aid from donors and loans from the Word Bank and International Monetary Fund would partially meet the cost of building government institutions and the infrastructure in the city during the first phase of its construction.

The cost is not established yet, but Housing and Physical Infrastructure minister JemmaNunuKmuba earlier hinted that it could be $10 billion.

Tired of the mayor

RELATED STORIES

Legislators remain divided over the transfer, with some acknowledging that it is partly the taking of the towns to the people as envisioned by Garang while others expressed concerns over cost the move would incur.

“This is another way of distributing development. Juba is the most developed and transfer will give a quick way to make better infrastructure in Ramshiel,” David Unyo Demey, a Mabaan (Upper Nile state) area representative said.

Lodu Tombe, a representative of Central Equatoria state in the national parliament, posed: “Our priority is not to transfer the city. We are unable to deliver basic services. Why should we waste a lot of money on what is not a priority?”

A trader specialising in shoes welcomes the move to relocate the capital city from Juba to Ramciel.

“We are tired of the mayor chasing us away. We need a city where we could be able to get land to build our shops,” said the businessman.

http://www.businessdailyafrica.com/Why+South+Sudan+prefers+Ramciel+to+Juba+as+government+seat/-/539546/1235708/-/item/2/-/18adw7/-/index.html

Wikileak Cable: Mansour Khalid On SPLM Preparation s for the Party Convention

Posted: September 13, 2011 by PaanLuel Wël Media Ltd. in Junub Sudan

C O N F I D E N T I A L SECTION 01 OF 02 KHARTOUM 000669 SIPDIS DEPARTMENT FOR A/S FRAZER, S/E WILLIAMSON, 
AND AF/SPG NSC FOR PITTMAN AND HUDSON ADDIS ABABA FOR USAU E.O. 12958: DECL: 05/01/2018 TAGS: 
PGOV PREL KPKO UN AU SU 
SUBJECT: MANSOUR KHALID ON SPLM PREPARATIONS FOR PARTY CONVENTION KHARTOUM 00000669 001.3 OF 002 
Classified By: CDA Alberto M. Fernandez, for reasons 1.4 (b) and (d) SUMMARY

1. (C) Everything is on track for the SPLM convention to go 
forward May 10, GOS Presidential Advisor and prominent SPLM 
northerner Dr. Mansour Khalid told CDA and polchief April 29. 
 Khalid expects full support for Salva Kiir as Chairman of 
the party as "no one would dare stand against him."  Khalid 
said Pagan Amun has a good chance of retaining his post as 
*Secretary* General of the party, although Nhial Deng Nhial and 
Abdel Aziz Helou may also be strong candidates.  Khalid 
expressed concern about GOSS Vice President Riek Machar as a 
possible spoiler, describing him as "a man in a hurry." 
Khalid is also worried about the armed militias of Paulino 
Matip and to a lesser extent Riek Machar (both former Nuer 
warlords now ostensibly part of the SPLM/SPLA).  Khalid said 
Paulino may have as many as 1000 armed bodyguards in Juba, 
and didn't discount that it may have been these soldiers who 
perpetrated the armed robberies against INGOs over the last 
two months. Machar's personal force is smaller, in the 
hundreds of men. 

SPLM CONVENTION 
--------------- 

2. (C) Despite rumors that the SPLM convention will be 
postponed, Khalid insisted that it will go forward as planned 
on May 10 in Juba.  "Everyone is ready" and all preparations 
are on track, said Khalid.  He confidently predicted that the 
party will support President Kiir to continue as head of the 
SPLM, as "no one would dare stand against him."  Khalid said 
current SPLM Secretary General and Minister of Cabinet 
Affairs Pagan Amun would likely be re-elected, but 
acknowledged there is a chance that someone else in the party 
may unseat him.  Khalid pointed to battle-hardened commanders 
and well-known SPLM figures who have recently returned to 
Sudan such as Nhial Deng Nhial and Abdel Aziz Helou as 
possible candidates, but noted that although Nhial Deng is an 
"incorruptible" intellectual he is not a good communicator. 
Khalid said that once the Secretary General is identified, 
the next task will be to identify a chairman of the SPLM 
Political Bureau, who will then propose the names of other 
members of the bureau.  (Note: From other sources, we have 
heard that the convention will also produce a new secretary 
general for each state, and that southern state governors may 
lose their current dual role as state-level SPLM secretary 
general. End note.) 

SPOILERS 
-------- 

3. (C) Khalid identified Nuer leader and current GOSS Vice 
President, the scheming Riek Machar and former GNU Foreign 
Minister and SPLM turncoat Lam Akol as possible spoilers, but 
said for now their ability to cause problems is limited. 
Khalid said that during the recent turmoil over whether to 
proceed with the census in the South, the only minister who 
stood with Riek against Kiir was Riek's own wife Angelina 
Teny (GNU Minister of State for Energy and Mines).  "Riek is 
a man in a hurry," observed Khalid, "but he is going to have 
to wait his turn."  However Khalid expressed concern about 
the number of weapons in Juba and suggested that the "private 
armies" of Riek Machar and Paulino Matip (former SSDF 
commander now incorporated into the SPLA) should be disarmed. 
 "Riek is playing on Paulino," said Khalid, and this has 
resulted not just in an increase in crime and instability in 
Juba, but intrigue and instability in the oil-rich Nuer 
heartland of Unity and Upper Nile states.  Khalid said 
Paulino has a personal militia of at least 1000 men in Juba, 
and did not discount that the recent crime wave of armed 
robberies, carried out by gangs of armed men, were 
perpetrated by Paulino's militia. 

KHARTOUM DYNAMICS 
----------------- 

4. (C) Khalid said that, ironically, the only person in the 
GNU who currently appreciates the role of the SPLM is Ahmed 
Harun (ICC indictee and current State Minister of 
Humanitarian Affairs).  Khalid said Harun had engaged 
sincerely on Abyei and other issues.  Khalid described 
Presidential Advisor Dr. Mustafa Osman Ismail as "cynical" 

KHARTOUM 00000669  002 OF 002 

and discounted Vice President Taha as being "kept out of the 
picture."  However, he said Taha has not given up hope of 
undermining President Al-Bashir's hold on the military and on 
the NCP's own armed militia.  "He is working on these people" 
by appealing to the religious side of the regime.  Khalid 
said the regime is still nervous about opposition Popular 
Congress Party leader Hassan al Turabi, who originally 
organized the National Islamic Front movement (the foundation 
of the NCP) and still appeals to the true believers in the 
NCP.  Khalid observed that all of the oil money flowing into 
Khartoum had done nothing to consolidate the regime and had 
only provided financing for pay-offs. 

ELECTIONS 
--------- 

5. (C) When asked how committed the SPLM is to elections, 
Khalid did not answer directly. He noted that the SPLM is 
beyond challenge in the South and could form strong national 
alliances with other marginalized groups such as the Beja in 
the East, or even with middle of the road parties such as the 
DUP (Mirghani faction).  However, he said an alliance with 
both is not possible because the Beja are against the 
Khatemia Sufi sect (from which DUP/Mirghani hails).  Khalid 
predicted that Salva Kiir will not run for President.  "The 
CPA was created with John Garang in mind" and Salva is not 
comfortable with northern politics, where he feels "like an 
alien."  Unlike Kiir who spends all of his time in 
Juba where he is more comfortable, Garang could direct things 
in the South from Khartoum and knew how to interact with 
northern political parties.  On a positive note, Khalid 
predicted that if Salva gets a second term as GOSS President, 
he is unlikely to stay on beyond that and "is not going to 
become a Mugabe, or even a Museveni."  CDA pointed out all of 
the positive things that Kiir hasQQAQvide and rule policies of the North 
or the divisive intrigues of some in the SPLM like Riek. 

COMMENT 
------- 

6. (C) A former Foreign Minister who threw in his lot with 
John Garang's rebels, Khalid's observations about 
destabilizing elements in the South such as Riek Machar and 
Paulino Matip are familiar and credible.  Other observers 
have suggested that Paulino Matip's ill-disciplined militia 
may be responsible for the recent and very disturbing series 
of armed robberies by groups of up to twenty men in Juba.  If 
this is true, the GOSS will need to act swiftly to bring 
justice to those responsible, contain this serious security 
threat (not just for NGOs, but also for the regime) and 
either better integrate these soldiers into the SPLA or 
disarm them.  Khalid's comments regarding the SPLM convention 
appear to be on the mark, but there are sure to be some 
surprises and we don't discount that there may be a 
significant adjustment in the SPLM leadership coming out of 
the convention. He is one of many senior SPLM officials 
uncomfortable about elections that could be easily 
manipulated by the NCP. 
FERNANDEZ

South Sudan’s Greenbelt

Posted: September 13, 2011 by PaanLuel Wël Media Ltd. in Economy

Can tapping agriculture assets become the new nation’s economic elixir?

September/October 2011

Astrid R.N. Haas and Sarah Armstrong | SUDAN/SOUTH SUDAN

img desc

CREDIT: REDENTO TOMBE

Farmer James Sworo with the maize he planted two months earlier in Kajo Keji County, South Sudan

image descr

CREDIT: REDENTO TOMBE

Enlarge Image

Esther Dima Kidden, an agriculture extension officer in Yei County, South Sudan, uses her foot to measure correct spacing between newly planted maize crops for the Ngakoyi Farmers Group.

Despite South Sudan’s severe poverty, lack of infrastructure, almost total economic reliance on the oil sector, and a nearly complete absence of private sector employment, the new nation has a very important and promising asset—vast amounts of uncultivated, arable land with excellent potential for agricultural productivity.

Though larger in land mass than France, only 4 percent of South Sudan is currently being cultivated, according to Anne Itto, South Sudan’s caretaker minister of agriculture and forestry.

Agricultural yield per hectare for cereals (maize, sorghum, millet, and rice) averages only approximately 0.5 metric tons in South Sudan. In comparison, the average yield in Africa is more than 1 ton per hectare, and more than 2.3 tons per hectare in South Africa and South Asia.

By improving productivity and ex­panding the area under cultivation, the new government aims to raise annual staple-food crop production from 700,000 metric tons to more than 1 million metric tons by 2013, which would enable South Sudan to reach near self-sufficiency. Neighboring Uganda produced 1.3 million metric tons of maize and 0.5 million metric tons of sorghum in 2009.

Both the South Sudan Government and USAID see agriculture as one of the keys to diversifying South Sudan’s economy, raising household incomes, and improving food security. And the agriculture sector is one of the Agency’s priorities for investment and collaboration with the South Sudanese, other donors, and the private sector.

“Agriculture will increasingly be a focus of USAID assistance to South Sudan going forward,” said USAID/South Sudan Mission Director Kevin Mullally. “The potential is great for this assistance to transform South Sudan’s economy and bring many people out of poverty because South Sudan remains an agrarian society, with the vast majority of the population engaged in agriculture to some extent.”

What’s more, he says, is that agriculture assistance can ensure a sustainable domestic food supply, reducing the need for expensive imports and international aid.

Untapped Potential

Approximately 85 percent of South Sudanese rely on agriculture for their livelihood, yet almost all are subsistence farmers. Hence, much of the food found in South Sudan’s urban markets is imported from Uganda, Kenya, and other countries, resulting in higher food prices for the population. In the last three years, South Sudan imports of agricultural produce averaged 700 million Sudanese pounds (approximately $262 million), half of which was fresh vegetables that could be grown locally.

The agriculture sector’s potential has not been fully harnessed for several reasons.

Farmers often had to flee their homes during the nearly quarter century of fighting, so traditional farming knowledge that would have been passed down to the next generation was lost. Moreover, large-scale or commercial farm­ing never took root.

The 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agree­ment that officially ended the war between northern and southern Sudan brought more than 2 million South Sudanese refugees home, but uncertainty about security and the investment climate continued to hamper investment in agriculture. Additionally, the vast majority of South Sudanese farmers who are growing only enough food for their own families lack quality seeds and tools and have limited knowledge about farming techniques, irrigation methods, and how to reduce post-harvest losses.

Revitalizing South Sudan’s Breadbasket

In May 2010, USAID launched a program to revitalize South Sudan’s “greenbelt” zone of the three Equatoria states—Western, Central, and East­ern Equatoria. These states have high agriculture potential with two reliable rainy seasons and fertile soil.

“The goals of the program,” said David Gosney, USAID/South Sudan’s economic growth team leader, “are to begin laying the groundwork for a transformation in agricultural practices. Current practices are extremely rudimentary. Many farmers do not even have access to an ox plow, and very few have any experience with quality seeds, soil fertility practices, or pest management. This is due in part to a near-complete lack of a functional agricultural private sector.

“We therefore hope to first introduce the concept of utilizing commercial farming inputs, then work to facilitate the establishment of seed companies, agro-dealers, commercial famer-based organizations, and consolidators who can both provide inputs to improve productivity and serve as extension agents.”

To do so, the program is training farmers and working with farmer associations and agriculture extension officers. In addition, in February 2011, USAID distributed 75 metric tons of improved maize and sorghum seeds to 132 of these farmers’ groups, benefiting 19,000 people.

“This is just the first small step in a much broader program that we hope will help address issues ranging from key policy reform, development of needed research and human capacity, establishment of agribusiness, and outreach to farmers,” Gosney says.

USAID will help lay the platform for transforming the agriculture sector and increasing agricultural trade, which in turn should lead to higher rural incomes, improved food security, and better economic opportunities for the poor.

James Sworo, chairman of the Julu-kita farmer association in Kajo Keji, Central Equatoria state, participated in one of the USAID-funded training workshops. When he arrived, he was like most other South Sudanese farmers who traditionally plant numerous seeds—as many as 10 in each hole—due to their low germination rates. During the training workshop, however, Sworo learned the seeds from USAID were of higher quality. They also had been treated with insecticides and fungicides.

Sworo set aside half a feddan (0.42 hectares) to test the seeds and follow the instructions from the training. Two months later, the difference was clear—the maize planted from improved seeds was growing higher and healthier than in the other feddans. The results convinced Sworo to fully adopt the one-seed-per-hole rule next season.

“We can stop importing food from Uganda by increasing the food we produce,” Sworo said. “Then we can start selling food to them.”

Esther Dima Kidden, an agriculture extension officer in Yei County, Central Equatoria state, arrived at a USAID-sponsored training with a newborn baby on her back. Despite the responsibilities of motherhood, Kidden has become one of the most successful extension workers in the program. In the past year, she has worked with more than 300 farmers in her county, and has cultivated at least half a feddan with other farmers to help them practice the new techniques and best practices she teaches them.

Women-Centered Approach

Women are a particular focus of USAID’s agriculture efforts as they produce most of Africa’s food. “It is the smallholder farmers, most of whom are women, who will determine whether or not this effort succeeds,” USAID Administrator Rajiv Shah said during a visit to South Sudan in May.

USAID is promoting women’s livelihoods through training and the formation of women’s farmer organizations—there are now 10. USAID is also tracking how training is benefiting women.

But for smallholder farmers, including women, to improve their productivity and income, they need a commercial structure to link to.

In May, USAID, the Netherlands, the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa, and the International Fertilizer Development Center signed a communiqué agreeing to help develop South Sudan’s commercial agriculture sector in collaboration with the government.

Workshops have already been held to craft an outline for a national program to promote commercialization of agriculture and enhanced food security. Plans are in the works to launch a campaign to highlight agricultural opportunities for smallholder farmers and to roll out a voucher program to provide up to 200,000 farmers with high-yielding seeds and fertilizers.

A U.S.-South Sudan partnership in higher education will produce graduates trained in agriculture, support and develop knowledge through research and testing, and create a quality university-based outreach program that addresses South Sudan’s long-term agricultural and natural resource-management needs. Participating schools are the University of Juba, Virginia State University, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech), and Catholic University of Sudan.

“Higher education in agriculture in South Sudan is experiencing tremendous challenges, including lack of equipment and laboratories for soil and water sciences, lack of qualified instructors, and no collaborative research with international and regional partner institutions,” said Ambassador R. Barrie Walkley, the U.S. consul general in South Sudan. “We must all work together to help address some of these issues, including post-conflict reconstruction and development.”

USAID is also working with Citi­bank, the International Finance Corporation, the Corporate Council on Africa, and others to help the new nation market and attract private capital and investors in key sectors, including agriculture. The Agency will partner with the World Bank, African Development Bank, European Union, and Japan to organize sector-specific private investor conferences, including one on agriculture.

“Developing a vibrant agriculture industry in South Sudan is critical to moving this war-decimated country down the path toward recovery and, eventually, prosperity,” said David Hughes, chief of party of the USAID-funded Food, Agribusiness, and Rural Markets (FARM) Project. “Agricultural revitalization does not entail any single project, but encompasses everything from building farming skills, to securing high-quality tools and materials, to working with the private sector to develop markets, to cultivating a knowledge base and infrastructure to ensure that progress is sustained.”

http://www.usaid.gov/press/frontlines/fl_sep11/FL_sep11_SUDAN_AGRICULTURE.html

Sudan’s new war zone

Posted: September 13, 2011 by PaanLuel Wël Media Ltd. in Junub Sudan

Sudan’s new war zone

Sudan’s new war zone

Published on : 13 September 2011 – 3:10pm | By RNW Africa Desk (RNW)

Nuba Mountains

The Nuba Mountains are mainly inhabited by ethnic African peoples. Most of the two million Nuba’s are Muslim. The region of South Kordofan – where the Nuba Mountains are – is Sudan’s main oil area. The other oil fields are now in South Sudan which became independent on 9 July.

The Nuba’s struggle used to be closely connected to the war in the non-Islamic South Sudan. In 1989, the Nuba rebels entered into alliance with the South- Sudanese Liberation Army, SPLA. In the 2005 peace agreement between President Omar Al-Bashir’s government and the SPLA, the provinces of Blue Nile and South Kordofan were promised “popular consultations” to determine their constitutional future within north Sudan.

These consultations have never taken place. Ahmed Haroun of Al-Bashir’s ruling party was elected governor of the region in disputed elections in May. Haroun is wanted by the International Criminal Court (ICC) for war crimes committed in Darfur.

They come to the Nuba Mountain region every day, the Sudanese government planes. “They dropped three bombs,” says Yasamin in the village of Koleli, “two women were killed and several children wounded.” The young man sits near a Baobob tree, which has been split in two by the bombardments. At the end of Ramadan last month, the bombs were followed by a ground attack by Sudanese government forces. “They took some of our possessions, they raped women and abducted several young men,” Yasamin continues. “They shouted: ‘you are SPLM, we are going to finish you.”

By Koert Lindijer, Koleli

Koleli lies near the town of Dilling, which is controlled by government forces. But in the countryside around the town, the northern rebel group the Sudanese Peoples Liberation Movement North (SPLM/N) has a free hand. The rebels are not stationed right in Koleli – their camps are always a little bit removed from the population centres.

The new South
Civilians have now become the targets in a new war that has broken out in northern Sudan. Fighting began in June in the Nuba Mountains, then spread this month to the neighbouring Blue Nile state. “The new southern Sudan”, the residents call their area, referring to the 50 years of civil war in South Sudan which separated from the north in July. What all these areas have in common is that they are inhabited by black Africans, in contrast to the Arabs and Arabic people elsewhere in the north. “They tried to exterminate us Africans and take our land,” says SPLM/N commander Logli Drod.

Many Nuba’s have seen it all before, when they fought alongside the southern Sudanese against the government between 1989 and 2002. But now the rebels also control large areas west of the Nuba Mountains, a region where they not previously active. And here, where the population have no experience of war, the bombardments instil the most fear.

Afraid of the dark
Hakama Adam offers a plate offers a plate of food to her granddaughter Amona. Together with her 100-year-old husband, she lives with several families in a cave. For three months she has been hiding here, because of the terror from the air. Amona bites her nails. “I want to go back to school. I am afraid of the dark here and there are so many snakes.” Her school at the foot of the mountain was also hit by bombs.

Thousands of Nuba’s are thought to have taken shelter in the caves over the last few weeks. They fled the towns after a wave of arrests of SPLM/N supporters. They say that Nuba’s, including those who are members of the governing National Congress party, are being dismissed from government jobs, arrested and killed. “It is genocide against us,” says Kula Mayon, a teacher who escaped from the town of Lagowa.

Run behind the bomb
Government troops have set up roadblocks around the towns and the rural people are not allowed in to trade or to buy food. Many have been unable to plant their crops because of the bombardments and famine looms on the horizon. Foreign aid agencies have been refused access by the government.

“We are being strangled,” says Hassan, who works for a local NGO. He tries to teach the Nuba how to protect themselves when the bombs fall. “Lie flat on the ground, don’t run. He shows me an area where what the SPLM/N claims was a chemical bomb has fallen. Fumes rise from a pool of water in the small bomb crater that irritate the eyes and the nose. “When this type of bomb falls, I advise you to cover your mouth with your T-Shirt. And run behind the bomb, against the wind.”

http://www.rnw.nl/africa/article/sudan%E2%80%99s-new-war-zone-0

Juba accuses Khartoum of blocking trade routes

Posted: September 13, 2011 by PaanLuel Wël Media Ltd. in Junub Sudan

JUBA — South Sudan on Tuesday accused Khartoum of blocking its trade routes, saying that was the major cause of runaway inflation that has become a major challenge for the newly-created nation.

"Khartoum has suddenly blocked our borders" from where "we used to get most of our manufactured goods," Information Minister Barnaba Marial Benjamin told reporters in Juba.

He said the flow of goods had been reduced to a trickle, and that South Sudan had been forced to seek imports from neighbouring East African countries.

South Sudan proclaimed independence from Sudan, Africa’s largest nation, on July 9, when it became the world’s newest nation.

Two months after independence, it is not not only grappling with security but also with runaway inflation. The price of a kilogram of sugar has increased from about $1.8 to $3, three times more than an average person’s total daily budget.

A report by the South Sudan Centre for Statistics and Evaluation earlier this year said that an ordinary South Sudanese citizen spent less than a dollar a day.

However, Benjamin said that South Sudan did not expect to face the current high rates of inflation for long.

"For us we say we will suffer for six to seven months," he said.

"When our trade improves with neighbouring countries, the gap which is there will definitely go down," Benjamin added.

He said South Sudan was resolving the issue by opening "our trade effectively with the neighbouring countries like Uganda, Kenya, Democratic Republic of Congo and Ethiopia in order to circumvent the border closure by north Sudan."

He said South Sudan will also benefit from lower tariffs, leading to lower prices, once it becomes a member of regional trade bodies such as the Common Market for East and South Africa (COMESA) or East African Community (EAC).

http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5gUJd-ik8SgvOz9nz8mT0PJjELovQ?docId=CNG.77591e6bbe1ccd5c2f79f962f82a47ec.551

What the Arab Spring Means for Sudan

Posted: September 13, 2011 by PaanLuel Wël Media Ltd. in Junub Sudan

John Prendergast

John Prendergast

The level of violence in Sudan since South Sudan seceded has few parallels in the world right now. The instigator and party most responsible for the death and destruction is the regime in Khartoum. A 22-year dictatorship, it is deeply entrenched, and until recently changing the status quo was almost unthinkable. But the secession of South Sudan, a growing armed and unarmed coalition inside Sudan seeking fundamental change, the eruption of the Arab Spring throughout a number of Sudan’s key neighbors, and international success in protecting civilians in places like Libya and Ivory Coast has provided a window of opportunity for historic change in Sudan.

In my policy essay on this moment of opportunity, I try to make the case that the Obama administration should shift its policy away from trying to negotiate a series of deals with regional actors, an approach which played right into Khartoum’s divide and rule approach to governing, and move toward support for Sudanese efforts to change the status quo. In the first instance, U.S. and allied efforts should promote a comprehensive peace deal involving all parties in conflict with the government, alongside democratic elections. If that peaceful route is refused by the regime, then more forceful policy options should be employed.

My Enough Project colleague Omer Ismail recorded a video discussing some of these needed changes.

Take action in support of the Sudanese people and their aspirations for peace and democracy.

John Prendergast is co-founder of the Enough Project and co-author of Unlikely Brothers.

Follow John Prendergast on Twitter: www.twitter.com/EnoughProject

World Bank Country Director for Sudan and South Sudan Visits Khartoum

Posted: September 13, 2011 by PaanLuel Wël Media Ltd. in Junub Sudan

World Bank Country Director for Sudan and South Sudan Visits Khartoum

29d1713e-e3fa-db54.jpg

Khartoum – World Bank Country Director for Sudan and South Sudan, Ms. Deborah Bella Bird, stated its visit to Khartoum to review development opportunities and challenges.
She will hold meetings with the officials of the government’s concerned institutions, Donors, UN Partners and World Bank Staff in Khartoum.
Ms. Bird will present a comprehensive report on the World Bank’s programme in Sudan, especially in poverty reduction and sustainable development.
She will discuss the progress in rehabilitation efforts in Sudan financed by the Donors Fund under the supervision of the World Bank, besides discussing the continuous government efforts to confront the post-secession challenges and the arrangements of poverty reduction strategy.
It is to be noted that Ms Bird was appointed recently as Country Director in Sudan and South Sudan.

By Shadia Basheri, 19 hours 38 minutes ago

http://news.sudanvisiondaily.com/details.html?rsnpid=199088