Archive for February 17, 2012


By Ulf Laessing

JUBA (Reuters) – South Sudan has started legal steps to track down oil seized and sold by Sudan in a row between the two countries over oil payments, a government spokesman said on Friday.

The landlocked African nation needs to export its crude through Sudan but both nations have failed to agree on a transit fee, prompting Khartoum to seize some southern oil. Sudan has sold at least one oil cargo, industry sources have told Reuters.

South Sudan has responded by shutting down its entire output of 350,000 barrels per day. Juba accuses Khartoum of seizing 6 million barrels since December.

“The ministry of petroleum has notified the ministry of justice and has issued a legal notice internationally through our legal international consultants to track down this oil and has reported that this is stolen oil,” government spokesman Barnaba Marial Benjamin told reporters after a cabinet meeting.

He also said the government was investigating whether Chinese oil firms operating in South Sudan have helped Khartoum to seize oil.

“Once it is proven through an investigation definitely the government of the Republic of South Sudan will take steps,” he said, without elaborating.

State oil firms from China, India and Malaysia own majority shares in the three consortiums extracting oil in South Sudan. China is the biggest buyer of South Sudanese oil and has built the most oil facilities in both countries.

Oil talks between Sudan and South Sudan sponsored by the African Union in Ethiopia will resume on February 23 but Barnaba said Khartoum was undermining negotiations by having bombed a disputed border region this week. Sudan denies this.

Barnaba also said Sudan was trying to secure development loans on international markets using natural resources such as oil and its agricultural potential as guarantee.

“South Sudan is the only country that has no debt … Even the United States they borrow money, Britain borrows so why can’t we borrow?,” he said, without giving a timeframe or targeted volumes.

(Editing by James Jukwey)

http://af.reuters.com/article/worldNews/idAFTRE81G14A20120217?sp=true

Sudan and South Sudan Fail to End Oil Dispute
New York Times
KHARTOUM, Sudan — Negotiations between Sudan and South Sudan over billions of gallons of oil have ended with very little progress, prolonging a dispute that is undermining the fragile economies of both nations and straining the tenuous peace between 


South Sudan
 oil shutdown pushes up prices

UPI.com
JUBA, South Sudan, Feb. 17 (UPI) — South Sudan’s 3-week-old shutdown of its oil industry in a dispute over oil revenues with the fledgling state’s former leaders in Khartoum is likely to drag on and push up global oil prices.
South Sudan: UN supports projects to boost people’s livelihood in volatile state
UN News Centre
Challenges facing South Sudanese include poor harvests, price hikes, conflict and displacement. UN Photo/Isaac Billy The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) is supporting a series of short- and long-term projects to help the people 
South Sudan seeks new oil pipeline
Daily Monitor
With the government in Juba having decided that it will no longer export crude oil through North Sudan, the need for an alternative route to the sea is now more urgent than it has ever been forSouth Sudan. A high level delegation from South Sudan has 
UN provides condoms to South Sudanese military to fight high rates of HIV/AIDS
UN News Centre
The United Nations is working with a non-governmental organization (NGO) to provide condoms to the South Sudanese military in a bid to tackle the high rates of HIV/AIDS among the country’s soldiers. “The military has a big number of young people who 

UN News Centre
Fire guts South Sudan ruling party offices
Africa Review
What remained of South Sudan ruling party head offices after a fire Friday afternoon. MACHEL AMOS | AFRICA REVIEW | By MACHEL AMOS in JubaPosted Friday, February 17 2012 at 20:34 Fire gutted South Sudan ruling party head offices Friday afternoon.


South Sudanese in UAE fear diplomatic limbo
The National
DUBAI // South Sudanese nationals living in the UAE are anxious about an April deadline for obtaining new passports as their young country has yet to open an embassy in the Emirates. A senior Sudanese official said last month that starting on April 8, 

Italy: FAO to help conflict-scattered families feed in South Sudan
Afrique en Ligue
Rome, Italy – The UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) is helping people in the conflict-affected South Sudanese state of Jonglei feed themselves and rebuild their lives through a series of emergency and long-term actions.

Sudan begins legal steps to track oil sold by Sudan
Oman Daily Observer
JUBA — South Sudan has started legal steps to track down oil seized and sold by Sudan in a row between the two countries over oil payments, a government spokesman said yesterday. The landlocked African nation needs to export its crude through Sudan 


Riek Machar: South Sudan ‘will survive’ without oil revenues

The vice president of South Sudan, Riek Machar, has told the BBC that his country will survive, despite halting its vital oil production in a dispute with Sudan over oil transit rights.

Oil revenues account for 98 per cent of the government’s income.

James Copnall spoke exclusively to Riek Machar.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-17075197

South Sudan can cope without oil, says Vice-President Machar

Riek Machar: “We hope within 30 months maximum, the oil revenue will flow again”

South Sudan will survive despite halting its vital oil production in a dispute with Sudan, the country’s Vice-President Riek Machar has told the BBC.

Oil revenues account for 98% of income for the country, which gained independence from Sudan last year.

But the two never agreed on the transit fees that Juba should pay for using Sudan’s oil export infrastructure.

Mr Machar said development would be put on hold for several years, but basic services would not suffer.

He said government salaries, including for those for members of the large military, would be paid.

“For a period of 30 months we will definitely freeze our activities on development, but we’ll provide basic services: health, education, water and even some infrastructure projects will go on,” he said.

South Sudan and Sudan fought a bitter civil war for decades in which some 1.5 million people died.

Before halting production last month, South Sudan accused Sudan of stealing oil worth $815m (£518m).

“Unfortunately Khartoum has not co-operated with us, so instead of Khartoum taking the oil, we’d better freeze it until we get alternatives to exporting oil, so that people of South Sudan can enjoy their own resources,” Mr Machar said.

He dismissed the view of Sudan’s President Omar al-Bashir that war between the two nations was closer than peace.

But he admitted there was no immediate prospect of the two countries coming to an agreement on the many issues that divide them.

Satellite image showing geography of Sudan, source: Nasa

The great divide across Sudan is visible even from space, as this Nasa satellite image shows. The northern states are a blanket of desert, broken only by the fertile Nile corridor. South Sudan is covered by green swathes of grassland, swamps and tropical forest.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-17080658

Sudan and South Sudan Fail to End Oil Dispute

By ISMA’IL KUSHKUSH

Published: February 17, 2012

KHARTOUM, Sudan — Negotiations between Sudan and South Sudan over billions of gallons of oil have ended with very little progress, prolonging a dispute that is undermining the fragile economies of both nations and straining the tenuous peace between them after decades of war.

“There was nothing new,” Yahia Hussein, a member of Sudan’s negotiating team, said Thursday after returning from the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, where the negotiations were being held.

Sudan and South Sudan have been locked in a series of talks since the south seceded and became independent last July. The highly volatile issues to be resolved include the demarcation of the border separating the nations, the status of citizens in each country and, most thorny of all, oil.

Most of the oil is in South Sudan, a landlocked nation, so the pipelines and the facilities to export it are in the north, requiring the two sides, which fought one of Africa’s longest and deadliest civil wars, to cooperate.

Both nations depend enormously on the oil revenues, but the distance between them is wide. Sudan is demanding a $36 per barrel fee, citing the costs of processing the oil and various fees and services. South Sudan says that it would pay only the transit fees, putting the cost at $3 per barrel.

Last month, South Sudan stopped its oil production in protest, accusing Sudan of stealing $815 million worth of oil and announcing that it would seek to construct alternative pipelines to Kenya and Djibouti. Sudan argued that it was taking its fees “in kind” because it had not received any payments for transit since July.

Mr. Hussein, the negotiator, stated that the government of South Sudan “was willing to start re-exporting its oil through Sudan on the condition of reaching a final agreement.”

But Nhial Deng Nhial, South Sudan’s foreign minister, appeared to be less optimistic.

“The gulf is still huge,” he said in a statement, according to Agence France-Presse. “I don’t know if it can be bridged.”

Abdelwahab El-Affendi, a professor at the University of Westminster in London, said oil would be the most difficult issue to resolve. “The southern leadership has unleashed powerful nationalist sentiments over the oil issue, which would be difficult to contain and would constrain the leadership’s ability to make concessions in the short term,” Professor El-Affendi said.

Still, negotiations over the borders seem to have achieved some progress. Mr. Hussein said the two sides had agreed to start marking the borders immediately, an process that should take about three months.

Sudan and South Sudan share a long border with a number of disputed areas. Seeking to calm fears of renewed conflict, Sudan and South Sudan signed a nonaggression agreement last Friday, but just days later South Sudan accused Sudan of bombing a border town and killing four soldiers, an accusation Sudan denies.

The two sides must also deal with matters of citizenship. In April, at the end of an initial transition period, South Sudanese who live in Sudan will be classified as foreigners, and vice versa. Tens of thousands of South Sudanese seeking to go south have been stuck in the river city of Kosti, and South Sudanese officials accuse Sudan of hindering their return. Mr. Hussein denied the charge.

The African panel that has been mediating the talks under the leadership of former President Thabo Mbeki of South Africa had helped improve the “mood of talks,” Mr. Hussein said.

“There was less verbal abuse from their side,” he said, smiling.

At some point, Professor El-Affendi said, the negotiators will have to deal with the conflicts in the Sudanese states of Blue Nile and South Kordofan, which share borders with South Sudan and whose leaders have historical ties with the regions.

But, he said, “this war is not even on the agenda in the Addis Ababa talks, since it is regarded as an ‘internal issue’ for the north,” he said. The problem, he noted, is that “when the real issue is not talked about, you cannot hope to resolve other issues.”

Last year, conflict in both states broke out when rebels who previously fought with the south took up arms against the Sudanese government in Khartoum. Sudan accuses South Sudan of supporting them. Without a cease-fire in those conflicts, “not much progress can be hoped for,” Professor el-Affendi said.

A new round of negotiations has been set for the end of this month.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/18/world/africa/sudan-and-south-sudan-fail-to-end-oil-dispute.html

Energy Resources: South Sudan oil shutdown pushes up prices 

Published: Feb. 17, 2012 at 3:04 PM

JUBA, South Sudan, Feb. 17 (UPI) — South Sudan’s 3-week-old shutdown of its oil industry in a dispute over oil revenues with the fledgling state’s former leaders in Khartoum is likely to drag on and push up global oil prices.

“Investors trying to understand why oil prices are so high have long been focused on Iran,” the Financial Times observed. “But rather than looking at supply disruptions stemming from the Strait of Hormuz, they need to turn their eyes to South Sudan.”

Until the Jan. 25 shutdown, South Sudan, which became independent last July 9 after decades of civil war, was producing only 260,000 barrels per day, a mere 0.3 percent of global production last year.

But that tally is deceptive, the Financial Times said.

“South Sudan produces a particular kind of crude sought by Asian importers due to its low sulfur and high waxy content,” the newspaper reported.

“The loss could not have come at a worse time as the demand for the African nation’s two crude oil export grades — known as Dar Blend and Nile Blend — is stronger than ever this year due to power shortages in Japan, which are forcing utilities to burn unrefined crude, and a strong fuel oil market in the Asia-Pacific region.

“The loss of South Sudanese oil has forces China and Japan, traditionally big consumers of the country’s oil, to shop elsewhere, pushing up the premiums of the physical market.”

Oil prices hit a 6-month high of $120 per barrel Wednesday over concerns that Iranian crude exports may be cut off. Iran is the world’s third largest oil exporter after Saudi Arabia and Russia.

With Iran’s oil supplies being steadily eroded by U.S. and European economic sanctions, tightening U.N. measures against Tehran over its refusal to abandon its contentious nuclear program, the Chinese have concentrated on seeking alternative crude suppliers. So have the Japanese and Indians.

Iran has threatened to block the strategic Strait of Hormuz, the gateway to the Persian Gulf, thus threatening to cut one-fifth of the world’s oil supplies and to cut off supplies to European customers.

But, as with South Sudan, an insignificant producer, political instability in Nigeria, which included an attack on oil facilities in the southern Niger Delta region, and even in Yemen, another minor producer whose output is threatened by political upheaval, has caused global jitters about oil supplies.

Meantime, Libya’s production is well below the level of 1.6 million barrels per day it was producing before the uprising against Moammar Gadhafi erupted Feb. 17, 2011, although it’s recovering steadily.

Libya’s low sulfur crude is also highly prized at refineries in Europe, Libya’s main oil customer. That’s added to the growing shortage of this category.

China has secured supplies of low-sulfur crude from Angola, Africa’s top producer, while Japan has gone to Vietnam for its Su Tu Den crude, adding to the upward pressure on prices.

“The market is bracing for a long-lasting disruption” in South Sudan, the Financial Times noted.

Even if South Sudan and Khartoum do manage to reach an agreement on revenue-sharing following the south’s secession, and given the hostility between them that’s a distant prospect, it will take weeks to get the pipeline system that carries southern crude northward to the Port Sudan terminal on the Red Sea functioning again.

South Sudan’s national oil company says it could restart production in a few days but reinstating the 1,000-mile pipeline is a more complicated process.

“Oil traders involved in South Sudanese crude say the country would need between three and five months to restart production, as at a cost of $300 million,” Financial Times Commodities Editor Javier Blas reported Monday.

The International Energy Agency, the Western consumers’ watchdog, estimates that South Sudan’s pre-shutdown won’t recover until the fourth quarter of 2012 at the earliest.

“Traders fear a more lasting disruption, with South Sudan production running at zero for the remainder of the year,” Blas reported.

Saudi Arabia, which has pretty much all the spare global production capacity, has said its maximum output is 12.5 million bpd, enough to cover any shortfall. But the IEA said in its latest monthly report for February that the kingdom’s maximum output was 11.88 million bpd because of declining oilfield production.

That may not seem much of a difference but it will be if a major supply crisis occurs.

Read more: http://www.upi.com/Business_News/Energy-Resources/2012/02/17/South-Sudan-oil-shutdown-pushes-up-prices/UPI-53871329509073/#ixzz1mgo8R32C


February 15, 2012 (JUBA) – Chinese oil companies operating in South Sudan face the possibility of expulsion if it is proven that they are complicit in stealing the country’s oil, a senior official said here today.

JPEG - 28 kb
President of Sudan Omer Hassan al-Bashir and Chinese President Hu Jintao listen to the national anthems during a welcoming ceremony at the Great Hall of the People on June 29, 2011 in Beijing, China (AFP)

The newborn state which became independent last July is locked in a row with its northern neighbour over oil and transporting it through the pipeline that runs through Sudan’s territory.

Khartoum wants Juba to pay $36 per barrel of oil it exports using Sudan’s infrastructure. But South Sudan says the fair fee should be around $1. An African Union (AU) panel tasked with mediating in this dispute among others has tabled a number of proposals that were rejected.

The Sudanese government frustrated with the lack of progress of the oil talks started seizing part of the crude exported saying that this would be to make up for unpaid invoices owed by Juba. The latter retaliated by suspending oil production altogether.

South Sudan also warned that it will sue any party that is proven to have facilitated or bought oil “stolen” by Khartoum.

Today the country’s chief negotiator in the oil talks Pagan Amum went further in this regard and singled out Chinese companies.

“Our relations with China are beginning but they are of course having difficulties now because of the role of some Chinese companies or individuals covering up some of this stealing,” Amum told reporters in Juba according to Reuters.

“We will make them pay the cost or else they are out of the country,” he added, without naming the firms.

State oil firms from China, India and Malaysia own majority shares in the three consortium’s extracting oil in South Sudan. China is the biggest buyer of South Sudanese oil and has built the most oil facilities in both countries.

Amum also said the Sudanese oil ministry had ordered Malaysian-Chinese pipeline operator Petrodar this week to switch on a tie-in pipeline to divert 120,000 bpd of southern oil to Sudan’s refineries.

He handed out a letter dated 13 February, allegedly from Petrodar, informing South Sudan that Sudan had commissioned the tie-in line to transfer crude “unilaterally and by force”.

China has attempted to reconcile differences between the two sides and last year dispatched its special envoy to Africa for that purpose but has met little success.

Despite being the country with the largest stake in the oil, Beijing has remained mostly silent in recent weeks amid escalation of rhetoric between Khartoum and Juba and warnings from the two sides on the possibility of reverting back to war.

(ST)

http://www.sudantribune.com/South-Sudan-threatens-to-expel,41616


South Sudan
 oil shutdown pushes up prices

UPI.com
JUBA, South Sudan, Feb. 17 (UPI) — South Sudan’s 3-week-old shutdown of its oil industry in a dispute over oil revenues with the fledgling state’s former leaders in Khartoum is likely to drag on and push up global oil prices.
South Sudan: UN supports projects to boost people’s livelihood in volatile state
UN News Centre
Challenges facing South Sudanese include poor harvests, price hikes, conflict and displacement. UN Photo/Isaac Billy The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) is supporting a series of short- and long-term projects to help the people 
South Sudan seeks new oil pipeline
Daily Monitor
With the government in Juba having decided that it will no longer export crude oil through North Sudan, the need for an alternative route to the sea is now more urgent than it has ever been forSouth Sudan. A high level delegation from South Sudan has 
UN provides condoms to South Sudanese military to fight high rates of HIV/AIDS
UN News Centre
The United Nations is working with a non-governmental organization (NGO) to provide condoms to the South Sudanese military in a bid to tackle the high rates of HIV/AIDS among the country’s soldiers. “The military has a big number of young people who 

UN News Centre
Fire guts South Sudan ruling party offices
Africa Review
What remained of South Sudan ruling party head offices after a fire Friday afternoon. MACHEL AMOS | AFRICA REVIEW | By MACHEL AMOS in JubaPosted Friday, February 17 2012 at 20:34 Fire gutted South Sudan ruling party head offices Friday afternoon.

South Sudan's decision to shut off its oil wells in a dispute with Sudan has sparked fears of economic hardship and war.A policeman has patrol duty at Petrodar, a consortium responsible for oil production in South Sudan. The South Sudanese government has shut off its oil wells in a dispute with Sudan. (Hannah McNeish, AFP/Getty Images /February 16, 2012
The move stems from a dispute over Sudan’s oil transit fees. South Sudanese say they are prepared for hardship, but outsiders warn it could mean another war.
By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles TimesFebruary 16, 2012,
Reporting from Juba, South Sudan— 
To outsiders, the move appears suicidal, a recipe for ruining the economy and possibly returning to war.But on the streets of Juba, the capital of South Sudan, the decision to turn off the flow from oil wells that produce 98% of the government’s revenue has triggered bursts of defiance and national pride.”The oil was shut down because it’s our oil. We need our rights,” said truck driver Nimeiry Thomas, 30, his face dripping with sweat in Juba’s Konyo Konyo market.One of the world’s poorest countries, South Sudan made the move last month in an escalating dispute with northern neighbor Sudan, from which it seceded in July. South Sudan took with it about three-quarters of the former country’s oil reserves, but the only route to market is a pipeline that runs across Sudan.Since the secession, the two countries have continued to quarrel over issues that include borders and the transit fees Sudan charges to get the South’s oil to market. South Sudan’s decision to shut off the oil seriously damages both countries’ economies and has stirred fear of renewed fighting. Both presidents talk openly of war.None of that appears to have damped the mood in Juba. Among government ministers, citizens and soldiers, the talk is of a willingness to endure what it takes to break the hated economic lifeline through Sudan. They survived a 22-year civil war with the north, they say, and they are prepared to suffer again for what they see as their rightful share of the oil wealth.”Every time people dismissed us, every single battle, we have won,” declared Pagan Amum, the country’s chief negotiator on the oil dispute, his eyes flashing.

The country is united, he said. “The South Sudanese will rally around their government. South Sudan is going to emerge as a strong nation in this region with a strong economy.”

Outside experts are not so sure. They warn that once the shutoff begins to bite, life will get even worse in a country where half the people live in poverty and three-quarters are illiterate. There is concern that parents will no longer be able to afford school fees for the trickle of uniformed children plying the dirt roads on their way to class. Food and medicine will be harder to come by.

Alex Vines, an analyst with the London-based think tank Chatham House, said north and south have peered into the abyss and eventually will strike a deal. “But there is a danger that the brinkmanship could result in unintended hostilities,” he said.

The African Union, as well as countries such as Britain and energy-hungry China, which gets about 6% of its oil from South Sudan, are trying to broker a settlement. The focus is on setting an agreed transit price for shipping the oil out of South Sudan through the north’s pipeline.

So far, they are not even close. Talks foundered last month after Khartoum took over ships loaded with South Sudan oil, seizing $850 million worth, to cover its claim for a $36-a-barrel transit fee. South Sudan, willing to pay $1 a barrel (which is close to the global norm), called the seizures theft.

The two countries signed a nonaggression agreement Feb. 10 that is supposed to keep the peace until a broader solution is found. But the pact was broken within hours.

Estimates of how long the government’s monetary reserves will last vary wildly, from a few months to perhaps half a year. Government officials promise to give priority to health, education and the army with the 2% of its revenue that remains.

And the government says it has ambitious long-term plans to overcome the crisis: build an alternative pipeline through Djibouti or Kenya (estimated to cost at least $3 billion and take several years), build its own refineries, develop agriculture, mine other resources, cut government waste, reduce the civil service and collect more taxes.

Riek Reath, a 26-year-old soldier, bristles with the defiance that characterizes the country. He became a bush fighter against the northerners when he was 10; he now has a crisp new uniform, boots that display barely a speck of dust and a private’s salary of $215 a month.

“I’d keep working for nothing, even if we don’t get our salary,” he said. “I’ll live like I did when I started, when I didn’t have money.

“People can still eat. People can still survive. We can share with people.”

One Western observer in Juba questioned how deep that sense of solidarity actually goes.

“It’s one thing to say with a lot of bravado that ‘We have gone without in the past,'” the observer said. “In the past, they lived off the people and if the people didn’t give willingly, they took it.”

The long civil war killed more than 2 million people, traumatized survivors and left much of South Sudan in ruins. A peace agreement reached in 2005 set the country on the road to independence, but many questions went unresolved. Still, it held a referendum on independence in January 2011 and seceded months later.

The new country relies on aid organizations to run clinics and its few schools. The United States contributed $400 million last year. An international trust fund has disbursed $500 million of a promised $2 billion. Its main economic hope is oil, most of it lying near the dividing line between the two rivals.

Analysts in Juba say that the African Union, Sudan and others underestimated South Sudan’s anger over Khartoum’s oil seizures and the fledgling country’s determination to end long-term interdependence with a hostile northern neighbor, even at a cost of several years of pain.

The country was nursing other grievances, as well: Juba had watched Khartoum occupy the disputed oil-rich border region of Abyei, ignoring a 2009 arbitration ruling that divided the land. South Sudan also accuses Khartoum of cheating during the five years after the peace agreement, when they were supposed to share oil revenue. Only when it shut down the wells last month did South Sudan realize there were many more pumping oil than Khartoum had said there were.

The World Bank says South Sudan’s shutdown will hurt both sides.

Alex de Waal, who advises the African Union mediation team, wrote that the move had set an “economic doomsday machine” in motion, and that the conflict could reignite the civil war.

South Sudan’s president, Salva Kiir, warned recently that if the conflict over the border and other issues are not settled along with the oil dispute, a new war could break out. Sudanese President Omar Hassan Ahmed Bashir told state television, “The climate now is closer to a climate of war than one of peace.”

South Sudanese journalist Mayom Nyok expressed fear that the north would send militia groups to occupy the oil fields.

Welder Stephen Jada, sitting outside his metal shop as dusk fell and motorcycles buzzed by like mosquitoes, is concerned that with the country’s oil income drying up, no one will buy the bed frames he has stacked for sale.

A year ago, on the cusp of independence, he had grand hopes. Now he worries about how he will pay school fees, or anything else. “Who will buy these things?” he asked, gesturing at his inventory.

Yet the decision to shut down production is surprisingly popular.

“We’ll have to go back to agriculture to survive,” said Sandia Martin, 30, an accounting student and market stall owner. “The people of South Sudan were not really benefiting from the oil, so it’s better to shut it down.”

robyn.dixon@latimes.com

Crude Prices Push Higher
Wall Street Journal
By DAVID BIRD NEW YORK—US crude-oil futures settled at a seven-week high, while North Sea Brent traded near an eight-month high as buyers scrambled to line up alternative supplies amid outages in Yemen, South Sudan and worries about near-term flows 
South Sudan struggles to keep promises to citizens
Vatican Radio
Sudan said it would resume talks over oil transit fees with South Sudan in the next two weeks after the two sides failed to reach a deal in the latest round of negotiations. The African Union’s security council yesterday appealed to the two nations to 
In South Sudan, oil shutoff is a matter of national pride
Los Angeles Times
The move stems from a dispute over Sudan’s oil transit fees. South Sudanese say they are prepared for hardship, but outsiders warn it could mean another war. A policeman has patrol duty at Petrodar, a consortium responsible for oil production in South 
South Sudan anti-corruption investigation drive is on track but
Sudan Tribune
By Isaiah Abraham February 15, 2012 — There have been reports in the media about corruption allegations and counter allegations against senior South Sudan politicians. This came about whenSouth Sudan Auditor’s General Report for 2005-2006 qualified 
UNICEF, Gender ministry to develop child protection strategy
Sudan Tribune
By Julius N. Uma February 16, 2012 (JUBA) — South Sudan’s ministry of gender, child and social welfare in collaboration with United Nations Children Fund (UNICEF) on Thursday resolved to develop a framework for strategic plans on child protection in 
Residents Warned On Sudan-Uganda Bombs
AllAfrica.com
By Alex Otto, 15 February 2012 Lamo — The Danish Demining Group in Uganda and Mine Action inSouth Sudan have revealed that the two countries’ border areas are still unsafe for human settlement and other activities as they harbour unexploded ordnances.
From Fargo to Africa: Gathering supplies to help girls in Sudan go to school
In-Forum
FARGO – Deb Dawson’s life would have been much easier if she’d never traveled to South Sudanin 2007 and seen the needs of the people there. In subsequent trips to the area, one concern in particular haunted her: how the orphaned Sudanese girls quit 
Amnesty International calls for humanitarian access to South Kordofan and Blue 
Sudan Tribune
The UN estimates that since the conflict started in Blue Nile in early September 2011 26400 refugees from South Kordofan moved to South Sudan’s Unity State, 78605 from Blue Nile moved to Upper Nile state, and 25256 Sudanese refugees have arrived in 
South Sudan Faces 470000-Ton Grain Deficit, Food Insecurity
Bloomberg
South Sudan faces a grain shortfall of 470000 metric tons this year, close to half the country’s total consumption, that will make more people food insecure, the United Nations’ Food and Agriculture Organization forecast. Cereal output in 2011 fell 19 
South Sudan mired in tribal conflict
France 24
Last July, the world’s youngest country, South Sudan, peacefully seceded from Sudan. Today, women and children are being killed and thousands of cattle stolen as the new country falls prey to inter-ethnic violence. In December, between 6000 and 8000 
South Sudan wants Kenya to mediate in Abiyei
The Star
South Sudan government wants Kenya to mediate in the conflict between South Sudan and its northern neighbour Sudan over Abiyei and Kadugli border areas. Chief South Sudan Presidential Advisor Joseph Lagu said that Kenya being one of the leading African 

AllAfrica.com
London — Amnesty International (AI) has welcomed the UN Security Council’s (UNSC) call forSudanese government and rebels from Sudan People Liberation Movement North (SPLM-N) to allow humanitarian groups access to the border states of South Kordofan ..

Fear and Hunger in Border Region Between Sudans
AllAfrica.com
By Arne Doornebal, 17 February 2012 Refugees who fled Sudan for 
South Sudan have been moved dozens of kilometres further from the border, after four bombs fell near a refugee camp in El Foj last month. The refugees are lacking food while there are