JMEC Chairman Mogae: “We Now Face a Crisis within a Crisis” in South Sudan

Posted: April 26, 2017 by PaanLuel Wël in Junub Sudan, Press Release

Festus Mogae in Malakal

Joint Monitoring and Evaluation Commission (JMEC) Chairperson Festus Mogae visits Malakal.

 April 26, 2017 (SSB) — JMEC Chairman, H.E. Festus Mogae, opened the April JMEC Plenary, in Juba, with a warning that South Sudan now faces a crisis of hunger that is undermining all efforts to make peace.

The Chairman said, “There can be no doubt that we now face a crisis within a crisis. Security is the foundation stone upon which we build economic and social confidence. This foundation stone no longer exists, confidence has evaporated, commerce is seizing up, prices are escalating and as a result we now face a crisis of hunger that is undermining all our efforts to make peace.

“The mothers of South Sudan face a daily struggle with inflation, never knowing if the money in their pocket will be sufficient to feed their family. Insecurity creates food shortages, which in turn drives inflation that in turn results in hunger. A hungry man is an angry man; and angry men do not make peace.

“Food shortages and increasing hunger are now our immediate problems. Out in the country, beyond the reach of government, the situation is increasingly desperate. Instability and hunger has created a surge of survival-criminality that further exacerbates the problem through stealing, looting and the prevention of free-flowing commerce.

On the issue of security, the Chairman said, “Violence and conflict on this level is either centrally directed or locally orchestrated. I fear it is now time to acknowledge that, across the board, among all armed forces and armed groups, central structures of command and control appear to have broken down. Violence around the country is increasingly based on local decisions taken at local level. Armed groups may declare an allegiance to one leader or another, but they seem no longer to take their instructions from them.”

Every month the JMEC Chairman presents his report to the Board members, including representatives of the Transitional Government of National Unity, South Sudanese Stakeholders, IGAD member states, the UN, the Troika (US, UK, Norway), China, EU and International Partners Forum and Friends of South Sudan.

Reports are also received from the Transitional Government of National Unity (TGoNU), Ceasefire and Transitional Security Arrangements Monitoring Mechanism (CTSAMM), Joint Military Ceasefire Commission (JMCC), Joint Integrated Police (JIP), Strategic Defence and Security Review Board (SDSRB) and the National Constitutional Amendment Committee (NCAC).

The Chairman also commented on the humanitarian situation saying, “Twelve aid workers have been killed in South Sudan so far this year. It is simply deplorable that in 2017 we must still plead with a government for the safety of those who deliver humanitarian relief.

“I can only repeat that this humanitarian situation is predominantly man-made and the result of violence, conflict and the deliberate denial of access. Men, women and children are suffering and dying of starvation because the leadership at various levels is failing to prevent it.”

ENDS

 —–

CONCLUDING REMARKS BY CHAIRMAN FESTUS MOGAE DURING JMEC PLENARY MEETING IN JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN

Honorable Ministers, Excellencies, Ladies and Gentlemen;

  1. I believe that we have had a productive JMEC Plenary today.
  2. I thank the representatives of TGoNU for presenting a summary report on the progress the Government has made so far, as well as its stated continued commitment to the implementation of the Agreement, including measures it is undertaking to address the current economic challenges facing the country.
  3. I must also thank the United Nations for providing a humanitarian update, and the various Boards and Institutions for their reports. To all those who made valuable and constructive contributions today, I say thank you.
  4. From our discussions today, it is clear that the humanitarian situation, and with it the complete cessation of violence, remains the most critical challenge facing the people of South Sudan. Whilst concerted efforts are being made to respond to the overwhelming humanitarian needs, many challenges remain that hinder the timely and effective provision of humanitarian relief, particularly at the local level. I welcome the call for enhanced coordination of efforts of all stakeholders and I hope that this can be expedited immediately.
  5. You will forgive me if I reiterate the key message that summarizes our collective approach. It is clear, I am afraid, that little has changed since we last met – we must continue the search for the means to end the violence and stop the fighting; we must continue to coordinate our efforts to end the crisis of hunger; and we must increase our efforts to engage all parties and communities in South Sudan and establish an inclusive National Dialogue.
  6. I cannot emphasize enough, the need for:
    1. the concerted effort by all leaders, civilian and military, inside and outside South Sudan, to assert control over those loyal to you and bring violence and conflict to an immediate end;
    2. a willingness by all to find a comprehensive and inclusive political resolution to the conflict in South Sudan;
    3. a total commitment by all parties to the conflict to guarantee and facilitate access for humanitarian support, and to investigate and hold accountable those responsible for human rights violations including violence against aid workers;

I thank you.

The opinion expressed here is solely the view of the writer. The veracity of any claim made is the responsibility of the author, not PaanLuel Wël: South Sudanese Bloggers (SSB) website. If you want to submit an opinion article or news analysis, please email it to paanluel2011@gmail.com. SSB do reserve the right to edit material before publication. Please include your full name, email address and the country you are writing from.

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