Archive for December, 2018


By Mabil Manyok Nhial, Gweru, Zimbabwe

Corruption genesis

Sunday, December 30, 2018 (PW) — I have, with an iota of audacity and unflinching certitude, been telling a plethora of my cronies that this world is sadly standing in between a black devil and a deep blue sea of aversion. It has always been my strong conviction that there is no shortcut to modernity as our young people hurriedly take a dim lit path to what they wantonly call ‘civilisation.’ I am not always ashamed of vetoing anything that touches morality, which is supposedly a fulcrum of secular values. Being a strict defender of morality has given me a laudatory epithet ‘RIGID MORALIST’ as my colleagues oftentimes dub me.

Human life militates against three pillars namely culture, religion and most importantly, the law. These three pilasters on which every society leans, must, as a matter of  living truth, be jealously observed with a hefty amount of reverence. A society, which doesn’t live up to these three stanchions has indubitably triturated itself with a kamikaze effrontery. It is trite that our own world is getting mad every day in every way as a society so chooses to bend or even jettison one or all its standing stones; the societal values. Hasn’t it opted to be in a devilmaycare state?

The definition of marriage has traditionally been silhouetted. Marriage has since time immemorial been defined as a legally or socially recognised union between a man and a woman, which establishes rights and obligations between those spouses. This means that any definition that falls outside the ambit of this classical definition is as good as anything placed on nothing! (more…)


By Malith Alier, Perth, Australia

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Friday, 28 December, 2018 (PW) — Not very many days of 2018 are left to write or at least say something economic, religious, or somehow political to the people of South Sudan, Africa or the wider world at large.

These are indeed turbulent times. Omar El Bashir is struggling with the bread and butter price rises all over his country that has been in the grip of NCP since 1989. Yoweri Museveni is fighting young people who are tired of his long rule since 1986. The new generation he often referred to as “bazukulu” or grandchildren have had a voice through Bobi Wine, the musician turned politician who combines music and politics to combat dictatorship in Uganda.

Better things are right now happening in Ethiopia, a country that had peacefully witnessed transfer of power to young people in the person of Abiy Ahmed. Ahmed has made it a priority to make peace within and without specifically Eritrea. Political prisoners are freed, political parties are allowed to join the legitimate political activities at the same level as the ruling party and above all women groups have began to have their fair share and presidents of the country and high court appointed. These measures maybe are what a country like Ethiopia needed to have total peace. (more…)

THE SUFFERING RING OF 2018

Posted: December 25, 2018 by PaanLuel Wël Media Ltd. in Junub Sudan, Zack Mayul

By Zack Mayul, Juba, South Sudan
Tuesday, December 25, 2018 (PW) — Recently, a friend of mine asked me if it’s possible for her to walk into a jewelry store and buy herself a suffering ring to symbolize her 2018 as an odd year from the rest. She has been going through some sh*ts this year. I liked the idea even though I didn’t want to tell her that I might as well opt for the same choice since I have been going through some deep sh*ts of my own as well.
By the way, ours could not be as bad as yours or weighs heavily than yours. But hey, my buddy and I are soon going for this before the year clocks to zero. Are you interested to wear a suffering ring too to differentiate your 2018 and learn how to deal with your New Year in style? Come and we buy them at a discounted price.
There are many ways to suffer.
Perhaps, not just the economic raging that is touching all of us on private parts, neither is it the political scavenging that has resulted into the death of thousands of innocent South Sudanese, nor is it the unfair justice practice by some well paying NGO organizations that employs people with less knowledge in some fields of studies but focus on the sharpness of their slated tongues or recruiting team figure eight and twelve. (more…)

Unraveling the economically Besieged Omar Al Bashir`s regime of Sudan! Let the Khartoum Demonstrations rage on!!!

By Kerubino Kocrup Makuach, Nairobi, Kenya

Tuesday, December 25, 2018 (PW) — After the Independence of South Sudan on 9th July 2011, Sudan has never experienced peace and stability. For the last 8 years, Sudan has been characterized by many difficulties, economic crisis, and hyper-inflation, high level of unemployment, famine, raging wars and ethnic violence across the nation.

Most of Sudan`s regions have been engulfed by an orgy of violence and humanitarian crisis. Given an example of the ongoing resurgence of war in Southern Kordonfan, Blue Nile and Darfur regions which were the epicenter of genocide a few years back. Sudan is now teetering on the brink of collapse! It has entered in the annals of history as a failed State.

Since 1989 when Gen. Omar Al Bashir took over the government militarily, there have been coup d’état attempts but thwarted by his security apparatus. Omar has been ruling Sudan through iron -fist well- known of dictatorial regime. Sudanese have been having cataclysmic confrontations and hostility towards his government. This is because the government has been unable to provide the people with basic necessities which they enjoyed in the Old Sudan. (more…)


By Lucy Ayak Malek, Nairobi, Kenya

Madam Rebecca Nyandeng, speaking to the media after her arrival with SPLM_leaders team in Juba, 22 December 2018, to join President Kiir in the revitalization process of the 2015 peace agreement. 

Madam Angelina Teny, speaking to the media after her arrival with SPLM-IO team in Juba, 20 December 2018, to join President Kiir in the revitalization process of the 2015 peace agreement. 

Sunday, December 23, 2018 (PW) — I salute all of you the gallant and brave people of South Sudan all over the world. I call us brave because over the decades we have faced all sorts of unimaginable challenges, lost so much in life and property, sacrificed more than we possibly could, but we have not allowed our spirits to be broken down. Despite all that we have gone through as a nation before and after independence, we remain a strong spirited people, and for that I couldn’t be more proud to call myself a South Sudanese. And so I once again, salute our strong resolve and pray that the spirit of resilience continues to endure among us.

We have fought many wars, some of them forced on us (the SAF-SPLA wars of 1856-1972 and 1983-2005), and some of them self-afflicted (December 2013-todate). Many foreign actors have jumped into our wars, all for their respective reasons and interests and sometimes (quite correctly I must add), we have blamed them for everything we have had to go through as a country. But I want to believe that we, the people of South Sudan, still have the choice to either continue to perpetuate war or to make peace, I believe we still possess the power to decide our destiny.

We do have many brave warriors who have fought gallantly whenever there has been a call to arms, but I also believe a warrior’s worth is not only determined by his abilities at war, but also by his capacity to make peace. As the bible says, “there is time for everything …..a time to sow and a time to harvest, …..a time to be born and a time to die, ……a time to wage war and a time to make peace”. And so it’s my humble call as we go through the festive season and towards the end of year, that let this be the time for us to make peace.

(more…)


By John Deng Diar Diing, Mombasa, Kenya

peace-for-south-sudan

Wednesday, December 19, 2018 (PW) — As said by many writers and political commentators including myself in many occasions, the war of 2013 should have never occurred, it should have never been fought and should never have been authorized. We are all aware that there had been mismanagement and feeling of marginalization by some communities within the government of South Sudan since 2005. It was and still is a fact that is evident statistically in terms of jobs distribution and access to national cake.

And yes, some communities have been deliberately kept out of reach of national cake. Nonetheless, it did not and it does not warrant war. Therefore, it is good that some semblance of peace has been signed. It should be embraced and promoted. All these holdout rebels should just give this peace a chance. There is no better war among brothers whatsoever. We need peace; our people need peace. No one is justified to wage war; be it government or rebel.

The way forward should be to give comrade chairman, Gen. Salva Kiir a benefit of the doubt that he might have been hijacked by perpetual detractors of liberation who never rested for 22 years of the just war. And that, he might have realized where the wheel lost the track. If it is anything to go by, then his SPEECH in Lobonok can be taken as a reflection of this intention. Since the spirit of comradeship has been signaled in that audacious speech, he should be allowed to make good of his missteps as he endeavors to reunite the ranks. (more…)


By Tong Kot Kuocnin, Juba, South Sudan

Burnt oil tanker along the Nimule-Juba road, Sept 2016.jpg

Burnt oil tanker along the Nimule-Juba road, Sept 2016.jpg

  1. Introduction

Thursday, December 18, 2018 (PW) — On World Environment Day celebrated on the 5th day of the Month of May 2018, First Vice-President Taban Deng Gai presided over the launch of the country’s State of Environment and Outlook Report, a first for the country. The publication is the result of a joint study by UN Environment and the Ministry of Environment and Forestry.

The report acknowledges that the ongoing strife in the country “is the major impediment to good governance, the productive use of natural resources and the protection of the country’s environmental assets”. It highlights the lack of effective institutions to resolve disputes over ownership of natural resources peacefully and the challenges of millions of refugees, returnees and internally displaced persons. It also notes that climate change and natural hazards have further complicated the environmental situation facing the country.

The report further highlights how climate change could exacerbate access to safe water, lead to poor sanitation and food insecurity. It adds that “a flourishing agriculture sector, which depends on the viability of land and water resources, is crucial to long-term peace and development”. It also recommends that “disaster risk reduction and climate adaptation measures need to be implemented to build a climate resilient society”. (more…)


By Mayen Dengdit, Denver-Colorado, USA

face of god

Sunday, December 16, 2018 (PW) —- In the early morning of December 16th (according to western conception of night and day), which is the final hours of the night  of December 15th (according to African conception of day and night), I woke up from a strange dream . As human beings, we all have dreams, yet we loose details to tangible life issues and challenges; thereby relegating our dreams into oblivion.

But this dream was different and, according to me at least, worth sharing, since it’s about God and suffering women and children in South Sudan. But more so, because, as my close family member with whom I shared it morning told me: “seeing the face of God is  one of the great blessings of life” to me and the people I dreamed off. Without further ado, this was my dream, which I immediately put down writing.

 I dreamed that I was taking humanitarian aid to the Upper Nile region of South Sudan. I was on a wooden mid-sized boat with a few other people  (we were 9 in total on board), moving on the Nile and our mission was to take food items, including Corn Soya Blend (CSB), to malnourished people (women and children in particular) in isolated islands in the wetlands of Upper Nile. It was after sunset and was getting darker and ominous. (more…)


By Hatem Dhieu Dau, Melbourne, Australia

Twic East Community in the USA

Twic East Community in the USA

Saturday, December 15, 2018 (PW) — The subject of psychology and behaviour is controversial. It is a mixture of unquenchable desire, or as Freud calls it–the urge or drive for a thing or service. But only as through its unconscious realm. This’s intellectual deep. Bottom line, however, is that “behaviour”—whether manifested by a group or by an individual person(s) is the main concern of the science of psychology. Behaviour is the only thing one needs to know, under-stand, and could this also explain: why there is such a thing like Organizational behaviour–simply the behaviour of an idea. All your organs have, each, every one, an individuated behaviour as that organ. Even mere tissues’ excitation can be a big proof—- of its utility and functionality.

In Twi East, we should Trust–in it–nowhere else we can: The Being of us as a place and at the same time as a way of our life, spatially bounded by geographical boundaries, only to know of when Garang’s call for the liberation of the whole Sudan, strategical, tactical, and/or plenary;  for us to choose a direction. Uncle Abel Alier in his major book (1999), “Too Many Agreements Dishonoured” in Sudan could explain the intermittent social and political strifes that have characterized, to a larger extent, the relationship between Sudan’s central government and its far-plunged peripheries.

In fact, by the time that uncle Abel wrote his book, there was only one agreement, the Addis Ababa Agreement, signed between the Southern-based Anya-Nya Rebels and the Khartoum-based Government of Sudan, under president Jafaar Al Neimeri; that agreement ended the First Sudanese Civil War which ran between 1955-1972; it granted the South a Semi-autonomous status. Nimeiri’s regime, which into power through a military coup practised quite contradictory politics reflected in his shifting alliances between political camps. Neimeri’s regime ended a democratic government by the time it came to power. It was later deposed from power through a military coup in Sudan in 1989. (more…)


By Malith Alier, Perth, Australia

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Saturday, December 15, 2018 (PW) — Each of us was born with nothing on hand at the time of birth. This fact needs no one to be reminded about. On equal measure some of us go on not to gain much out of this world in the way of riches.

Nature has adequately endowed my country, South Sudan with natural resources that could make everyone in the country to be adequately catered for but this is not the case. We have abundance of livestock, vegetation, fish and recently oil wealth.

Despite abundance of the above natural wealth and the low population people remained extremely poor compared to neighbouring countries. Some of the reasons why people remained poor include; war, tribal or internal conflicts and lack of general productivity by organisations and individuals alike.

War alone has the greatest potential to imposed displacement and destitution on the country. The 1983-2005 and the 2013 – 2018 upheavals are the best examples for South Sudan. (more…)


By Dut Deng Kok, Juba, South Sudan

pagan and wani

VP James Wani Igga greeting Pagan Amum in New York

Wednesday, December 12, 2018 (PW) — The reunification of SPLM party’s members is the only fundamental solution to solving the country’s differences and it will open up government data to citizens, public institutions will become more transparent and accountable to the people of south Sudan. As stipulated in Article 4.1.1 in Revitalized agreement on the conflict resolutions stated that; political leaders and stakeholders shall ensure that the RTGoNU is transparent and accountable, with legal, institutional, policies and procedures fully functional for sustainable development.

By encouraging available and shareable data. The government of the people can help, and promote innovative citizens -centric services when the members of the party come together and should develop a code of ethics and integrity for public officials emphasizing the value of honesty and integrity to expand spirit the nationalism and promote respect for public property.

The unity provides the opportunities to involve innovators from inside and outside the country to create innovative way to tackle new and existing problems. This will be a potential way of increase public sector efficiency and effectiveness. The unity of the party will also highlights new opportunities emerging for public sector innovation and raising awareness on some of the main implications that need to be tackled to successfully attain the benefits of the citizens of South Sudan. (more…)


By Yanta Daniel Elisha, Juba, South Sudan

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Tuesday, December 11, 2018 (PW) — Waging war is voluntary just like peacemaking so it is not surprising that peacemaking is gaining momentum in South Sudan. However, determining that there is relative sustainable peace in South Sudan is still very difficult because the yardstick seems too short to measure it instantly.

Peacemaking and war waging depend on people’s will. How do we measure the will of the political leadership or management of South Sudan?

I am coming to answer such a question and more, later in the discourse. For now, let us understand what yardstick is and what peace is. Is peace a concrete noun to be measured by a yardstick? What is used for determining an abstract noun like peace?

Yardstick according to the Wikipedia is a straightedge used to physically measure lengths of up to one yard (3.0 feet or 0.9144 meters long) high. Yardsticks are flat boards with markings at regular intervals. In the metric system, a similar device measuring up to one metre is called a metre-stick. (more…)

President Kiir’s Speech at the SPLM Retreat at Lobonok, South Sudan

Posted: December 6, 2018 by PaanLuel Wël Media Ltd. in Junub Sudan

Full speech of the chairman, Lobonok County, jubek state, RSS.

Dear Comrades,

Thursday, December 6, 2018 (PW) — I welcome all of you to our first SPLM leadership retreat since the events of December 2013 that divided our historical party. As we gathered today in our village, Lobonok, to reflect on our liberation journey, we do this without the fear of Antonov hovering over our heads, a clear sign of our liberation success. We are free citizens in our country able to meet at a place and time of our choosing without the fear of being bombed aerially. Today comrades, I want to take you back to the archives of our liberation struggle and the phases we have passed through that brought us to the present moment.

Our hero, Dr. John Garang de Mabior used to tell us that the reason rams appear retreating when they are fighting is to gather more strength and thrust to use its own power and the power of elements to crash the opponent. I believe this retreat has the same objective, which is to enable us to reflect on our achievements and challenges and to give us the inspiration that allows us to gather more strength and momentum to propel our party and our country forward. While I am fully aware that all of you in this gathering have the knowledge of our liberation journey, pardon me to arrogate to myself the privilege of refreshing your memories.

Why did we take arms in 1983? The SPLM was established to fight gross injustice, marginalization, and oppression of our people just because they happened to be black Africans who have their own beliefs and did not have power. While our brothers in Africa were fighting racism, colonialism and settler capitalists that marginalized majority owners of the land and subjugating them to subhuman treatments across the continent, the people of South Sudan were fighting an internal colonial power that was built on Arab and Islamic identity to the exclusion of the many, who professed other religious beliefs and who clearly had no Arabic genealogy. (more…)