Archive for December 6, 2018

President Kiir’s Speech at the SPLM Retreat at Lobonok, South Sudan

Posted: December 6, 2018 by PaanLuel Wël Media Ltd. in Junub Sudan

Full speech of the chairman, Lobonok County, jubek state, RSS.

Dear Comrades,

Thursday, December 6, 2018 (PW) — I welcome all of you to our first SPLM leadership retreat since the events of December 2013 that divided our historical party. As we gathered today in our village, Lobonok, to reflect on our liberation journey, we do this without the fear of Antonov hovering over our heads, a clear sign of our liberation success. We are free citizens in our country able to meet at a place and time of our choosing without the fear of being bombed aerially. Today comrades, I want to take you back to the archives of our liberation struggle and the phases we have passed through that brought us to the present moment.

Our hero, Dr. John Garang de Mabior used to tell us that the reason rams appear retreating when they are fighting is to gather more strength and thrust to use its own power and the power of elements to crash the opponent. I believe this retreat has the same objective, which is to enable us to reflect on our achievements and challenges and to give us the inspiration that allows us to gather more strength and momentum to propel our party and our country forward. While I am fully aware that all of you in this gathering have the knowledge of our liberation journey, pardon me to arrogate to myself the privilege of refreshing your memories.

Why did we take arms in 1983? The SPLM was established to fight gross injustice, marginalization, and oppression of our people just because they happened to be black Africans who have their own beliefs and did not have power. While our brothers in Africa were fighting racism, colonialism and settler capitalists that marginalized majority owners of the land and subjugating them to subhuman treatments across the continent, the people of South Sudan were fighting an internal colonial power that was built on Arab and Islamic identity to the exclusion of the many, who professed other religious beliefs and who clearly had no Arabic genealogy. (more…)