Archive for July 17, 2019


Governor Maker Thing Maal of Jonglei State has announced his new government with 53% of the portfolios from Bor County, 26% from Twic East County and 21% from Duk County. In comparison, the previous government of Governor Philip Aguer Panyang was composed of 53% for Bor County, 27% for Twic East County and 20% for Duk County.

By PaanLuel Wel, Nairobi, Kenya

Wednesday, July 17, 2019 (PW) – Here (below) is the tribocratic analysis of the new government of Jonglei state, announced by Governor Maker Thiong Maal.

(a) Summary of Governor Maker Thiong Maal’s New Government of Jonglei state
County Position per County Percentage share per County Jur/Locality Position per Jur Percentage share per Jur
Bor 10 52.6% Juor-Gok 6 31.5%
Juor-Athooch 4 21.1%
Twic East 5 26.3% Juor-Lith 4 21.1%
Juor-Roor 1 5.3%
Duk 4 21.1% Hol Dinka 3 15.7%
Nyarweng Dinka 1 5.3%
Total 19 100% 19 100%
(b) Summary of Governor Philip Aguer Panyang’s Previous Government of Jonglei state
County Position per County Percentage share per County Jur/Locality Position per Jur Percentage share per Jur
Bor 8 53.3% Juor-Gok 6 40.0%
Juor-Athooch 2 13.3%
Twic East 4 26.7% Juor-Lith 3 20.0%
Juor-Roor 1 6.7%
Duk 3 20.0% Hol Dinka 2 13.3%
Nyarweng Dinka 1 6.7%
Total 15 100% 15 100%
           

Below is the tribocratic analysis of the new government of Jonglei state, announced by Governor Maker Thiong Maal.

(c) Governor Maker Thiong Maal’s New Government for Jonglei State
County Jur S/No. Name Position Payam Community
Bor (52.7%) Juor-Gok (31.6%) 1 Hon. Maker Thing Maal Governor Anyidi Palek
2 Hon. Agot Alier Leek Special Affair Advisor Anyidi Palek
3 Dr. Mach Majier Ghai Mayor of Bortown Anyidi Palek
4 Hon. John Dut Kuch Minister for Agriculture Makuach Ater
5 Hon. Rachael Amuor Pach Minister for Gender and Social Welfare Makuach Koch
6 Hon. Ayom Mach Jok Minister for Physical Infrastructure Kolnyang Abii
Juor-Athooch (21.1%) 7 Hon. kwai Deng Kwai Minister for Health Baidit Angakuei
8 Hon. Ajok Jacob Kuot Minister for Finance Baidit Pathuyith
9 Hon. Isaac Mamer Ruuk Peace Advisor Jalle Alian
10 Hon. Lith Aluong Kang Social Welfare Advisor Jalle Aboudit
Twic East (26.4%) Juor-Lith (21.1%) 1 Hon. Diing Akol Diing (Diing-Malak) Deputy Governor Kongor Kongor
2 Hon. Deng Ajang Duot Political Affairs Advisor Kongor Kongor
3 Hon. Abel Manyok Ajak Minister for Education Lith (Wernyol) Adhiok
4 Hon. Dut Achuek Lual Minister for Labor & Public Service Nyuak Dachuek
Juor-Roor (5.3%) 5 Hon. Deng Alier Mading Minister for Youth & Sport Pakeer (Maar) Pakeer
None None Ajuong (Paliau) Ajuong
Duk (21.1%) Hol Dinka (15.8%) 1 Amb. Manyang Awuol Padiet Speaker of the state Assembly Duk Padiet Hol
2 Hon. Atong Kuol Manyang Minister for Information Duk Padiet Hol
3 Hon. Jacob Akech Dengdit Youth Affairs Advisor Duk Padiet Hol
Nyarweng Dinka (5.3%) 4 Hon. Elijah Maduk Yuang Minister for Local Government Duk Payuel Nyarweng

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The wheel of justice moves dangerously slow, even slower than the weakest tortoise in South Sudan

By Dut Deng kok, Juba, South Sudan

Hybrid Court of South Sudan
Hybrid Court of South Sudan

Wednesday, July 17, 19 (PW) — Aside the fact that South Sudan is generally viewed as a paradox of a nation because of the inability of the nation – state to deploy the enormous natural and human resources to scale up the deteriorating standard of living and better the society for the benefit of all, it is also seen as such because of the dangerous collective amnesia that afflicts majority of the citizenry.

Few years back, at around 2013, a scholar was quoted as saying that most South Sudanese when pushed to the wall, rather than fight back, would drill a hole through the wall and escape. Most South Sudanese seem to like persons who lack the courage of conviction to fight since it is generally assumed in South Sudan that only the living can fight a second time.

This unfortunate mindset has led many South Sudanese to allow the society to go to the dogs and the institutions of State are now headed by persons who lack the necessary competences and skills to facilitate South Sudan’s arrival at the doorstep of 21st century compliant fast moving computer age. South Sudan is stocked in the pre-medieval or rather Stone Age mentality of survival of the fittest whereby even those appointed into offices believe and practice the theory that says MIGHT IS RIGHT.

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The Office of the President under the Transitional Constitution, 2011 (Amended 2015): Is it a Cultivation of a Hegemonic Presidency in South Sudan?

By Tong Kot Kuocnin, Juba, South Sudan

President Kiir's Bahr el Ghazal tour, Feb 2019
President Kiir’s Bahr el Ghazal tour, Feb 2019

I. Introduction

Wednesday, July 17, 2019 (PW) —- A country’s constitution plays the major role in ensuring constitutionalism since it creates and allocates powers to the institutions of government and also seeks to control and/or restrain the exercise of such powers. It is noteworthy that state institutions comprise the Executive; the Judiciary and the Legislature.

This article analyses the role of the constitution in checking the powers of the president (who heads the Executive) in order to achieve constitutionalism in a democratic state. It singles out the office of the president (presidency) as it yields more powers compared to the other institutions and hence has crucial impact on constitutionalism, good governance and the rule of law. The article discusses and focuses on the office of the president under the TCSS, 2011 (Amended 2015) to highlight how the unchecked presidential powers which continue to stifle constitutionalism in South Sudan. 

This article first gives the general introduction and background before analyzing the office of the president as enshrined under the Interim Constitution of Southern Sudan, 2005 and the TCSS, 2011 (Amended 2015). It will also discuss to ascertain whether or not the office of the president (presidency) is a hegemonic presidency. However, before it concludes, the article will discuss and examines the cultivation of a hegemonic office of the president (presidency) under the constitution of South Sudan, 2011 in correlation to the Interim Constitution of Southern Sudan, 2005.

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