Archive for the ‘Dut Deng Kok’ Category


South Sudanese people must not live in fear or believe that all hope is lost despite the raging storm that we are passing through

By Dut Deng Kok, Juba, South Sudan

youth of rss

Tuesday, July 02, 2019 (PW) — Take it or leave it, this is my final warning and admonition to the good people of my beloved country South Sudan. After this I shall watch how things unfold and maintain a studied silence. In the Book of Isaiah 54:15 the Holy Bible says “surely they shall gather but it shall not be of me: whosoever gathers against thee shall be scattered for thy sake. To add to that in the second Book of Timothy 1:7 it says “God has not given us a spirit of fear but of power, love and sound mind”.

It follows that we the South Sudanese people must not live in fear or believes that all hope is lost despite the raging storm that we are passing. Yet despite our strength and confidence in the redemptive and redeeming power and salvation of the Most High God, the Lord of Hosts and the Ancient of Days we must consider our plight and challenges as a nation, share some bitter home truths, understand exactly what is unfolding before our very eyes and what went wrong in our country and forge a consensus about what to do about it. That is the purpose and intent of this contribution.

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By Dut Deng Kok, Juba, South Sudan

President Bush with President Salva Kiir at the Oval Office, White House

Wednesday, June 19, 2019 (PW) —- The SPLM and South Sudan more broadly, always ask questions about the role of the West and the United States in particular during the war of 2013. Beginning in the 1980s, a small group of SPLM backers in Washington helped Dr. John Garang assemble a diverse and bipartisan coalition that would grow to have an outsize, and arguably unprecedented, impact in shaping U.S. foreign policy.

The coalition mobilized popular support for the South’s freedom fighters, punished the Sudanese government for its abuses, and engineered legislation to aid the Southern cause. Bite-size messages helped solidify a narrative about Sudan’s war North versus South, Arab versus African, Islam versus Christianity, and of course abuse: slavery, racism, and the domination of helpless and hungry victims. The themes were based in reality, as no one could deny the horrors being perpetrated against Sudan’s marginalized people. But the complexities of the war and Sudan’s turbulent postcolonial experience were smudged out.

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