Posts Tagged ‘aggression pact’


A picture taken on March 3, 2012 shows environmental damage caused by bombs which hit El Nar oil field in Unity State, South Sudan on February 29.

Photo: AFP
A picture taken on March 3, 2012 shows environmental damage caused by bombs which hit El Nar oil field in Unity State, South Sudan on February 29.

Talks between Sudan and South Sudan broke down in a shouting match late Tuesday, not long after the U.N. demanded the countries take steps to avoid war.

A participant in the talks said that the talks stopped after the sides could not agree on the wording of a draft agreement over citizenship issues.  Negotiations are scheduled to continue Wednesday.

Earlier, the U.N. Security Council demanded that Sudan and South Sudan take steps to reduce hostility amid bitter disputes involving oil, and accusations that each side supports the other’s rebel groups.

Ambassador Mark Lyall Grant of Britain, which holds the rotating Council presidency, said Tuesday the Council is gravely concerned about reports of troop movements and airstrikes along the border.

He urged the countries to respect a non-aggression pact they signed less than a month ago. “The Security Council demands that all parties cease military operations in the border areas and put an end to the cycle of violence,” said the ambassador.

The Council also demanded that Sudan and South Sudan “take no action that would undermine the security and stability of the other.”

The statement came as Sudan and South Sudan began the scheduled 10 days of talks in Addis Ababa.  The African Union is trying to mediate disputes centered on oil revenue sharing, the undemarcated border, and citizenship questions raised by South Sudan’s independence in July.

The south took over most Sudanese oil production but is refusing to pay what it considers excessive transit fees to use northern pipelines.  The landlocked south needs the pipelines to send the oil to international markets.

The dispute prompted South Sudan to shut down all oil production, a move analysts say is likely to hurt both countries financially.

The sides are also in disagreement over borders of the oil-producing Abyei region, and the status of southerners living in the north.

A previous round of talks last month yielded no progress, except for the non-aggression pact.

When Sudan was a unified country, the north and south fought a bloody 21-year civil war.

http://www.voanews.com/english/news/africa/UN-Demands-Stop-to-Sudanese-Violence-141603693.html

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JUBA, Sudan—South Sudanese officials say that Sudanese armed forces bombed two oil wells inside South Sudan and Sudanese troops are massing near the disputed border.

The spokesman for South Sudan’s armed forces said Thursday that two Sudanese planes dropped 6 bombs in Pariang county, along the north-south border on Wednesday afternoon. Col. Philip Aguer says at least one well had been damaged and was leaking into the ground, polluting drinking water.

He says Sudan has also been massing ground forces in a nearby town.

Sudanese Foreign Ministry spokesman Al Obeid Merwah did not answer calls for comment.

South Sudan became independent from Sudan in July but many issues remain unresolved, including the demarcation of the border and the sharing of oil revenues.

© Copyright 2012 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
Posted Thursday, March 1st, 2012

Officials in South Sudan have accused neighboring Sudan of bombing oil wells, the latest sign of rising tension between the countries.

Several officials, including government spokesman Barnaba Marial Benjamin, say Sudanese warplanes dropped bombs Wednesday in an area of Unity State, about 75 kilometers from the two countries’ contested border.

The officials say the bombardment destroyed two oil wells.

A spokesman for Sudan’s military, Sawarmi Khaled Saad, dismissed the accusations as false.

Marial said the attack violated a non-aggression pact Sudan and South Sudan signed in Ethiopia last month.

“…this is actually a violation of the non-aggression treaty that we signed two weeks ago and with the nature of Sudan’s government, they always don’t respect what they signed with anybody. We are not surprised.”

The south has repeatedly accused the north of violating its territory, and both sides have accused each other of supporting the other’s rebels.

The two countries are locked in a dispute over oil revenues. The south took over three-fourths of Sudanese oil production when it became independent last July but relies on northern pipelines and facilities to send the oil abroad.

The north seized millions of barrels of oil after the south refused to pay what it considered excessive transport fees. The south has reacted by shutting down oil production, a move analysts say is bound to hurt both countries.

The dispute and simmering tensions over the border have raised fears the two Sudans are headed toward war. In the former unified Sudan, the north and south fought a bloody civil war that lasted 21 years.

Marial said Thursday that South Sudan will file a complaint about Sudan with the United Nations Security Council. Sudan filed a complaint about the south with the Security Council on Tuesday.

http://blogs.voanews.com/breaking-news/2012/03/01/south-sudan-accuses-north-of-bombing-oil-wells/

South Sudan accuses Khartoum of air strikesMarch 01, 2012 02:14 PM

Agence France Presse

JUBA: Sudanese fighter jets have bombed oil and water wells deep inside South Sudan and its ground troops have crossed into contested oil-rich border regions, South Sudan officials said Thursday.

“They have flown into our territory 74 kilometres (46 miles) and are violating South Sudanese airspace,” Information Minister Barnaba Marial Benjamin said of the air strikes, which he said took place at noon Wednesday.

Sudanese ground troops had also moved 17 kilometres inside South Sudan’s oil-rich Unity state, army spokesman Philip Aguer said.

Khartoum and Juba dispute areas along the undemarcated border.

South Sudan — which declared independence from Khartoum in July — has accused the north of carrying out several recent bombing raids in frontier regions, but the claims were denied by the Sudanese army.

“Two MiG (fighter jets) bombed Panakuat in Pariang county,” Aguer told AFP on Thursday, adding two bombs struck an oil well and a drinking water well.

“Khartoum… have been bombing South Sudan since last year, but thus is the first time MiGs have come,” Aguer said, adding that previous attacks had been far less accurate bombs rolled out the back of Antonov aircraft.

The region borders Sudan’s Southern Kordofan state where rebels — once part of the ex-guerrilla turned official South Sudanese army — are battling the Khartoum government forces.

Border tensions have mounted since South Sudan split from Sudan in July after decades of war to become the world’s newest nation, with each side accusing the other of backing proxy rebel forces against it.

“They say that we are supporting wars in their territory and it’s simply not true,” Benjamin said.

“The government is in a position to protect its citizens and territory, but it will not be dragged back to a senseless war.”

South Sudan took three quarters of Sudan’s oil reserves, but all pipeline and export facilities are controlled by the north.

The South halted oil production in January — stopping the flow of the resource that accounts for 98 percent of government revenue — after Juba accused Khartoum of stealing $815 million worth of crude oil.

Last month the two sides signed a non-aggression pact agreeing to “respect each other’s sovereignty and territorial integrity” and to “refrain from launching any attack, including bombardment.”

Juba accused Khartoum of breaking the accord by bombing border regions just days later.

Last month UN chief Ban Ki-moon warned that tensions between the two nations could escalate if the oil crisis is not resolved.

The South has demanded that any deal includes settlement on the undemarcated border, parts of which cut through oil fields, as well on Abyei, a Lebanon-sized region claimed by both sides but occupied by northern troops

Read more: http://www.dailystar.com.lb/News/Middle-East/2012/Mar-01/165165-south-sudan-accuses-khartoum-of-air-strikes.ashx#ixzz1nt4TlIpG
(The Daily Star :: Lebanon News :: http://www.dailystar.com.lb)


Juba: Rebel groups in Sudan said on Monday they had captured a Sudanese army garrison near the border with South Sudan in an operation that Khartoum blamed on the south’s army.

The rebels said in a statement they killed 130 members of the government forces in the attack. The figure could not be independently verified.

The South Sudan government said none of its forces were involved, but the assault fuelled tensions between the neighbours already at odds over oil exports and border disputes. Any involvement of southern forces would have violated a non-aggression pact signed by the two sides this month.

A helicopter crash is seen in Al-Faw, an area of Sudan’s Gedaref state. Reuters

The clashes on Sunday took place in the South Kordofan province on Sudan’s side of the ill-defined border with South Sudan, a flashpoint between the two countries.

The newly formed rebel umbrella group Sudan Revolutionary Front (SRF) said its forces were behind the assault on the military post around Lake Obyad, which lies near the boundary.

The SRF was formed last year between the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North (SPLM-N), who operate in South Kordofan and Blue Nile states, and the Justice and Equality Movement (JEM), based in Darfur in the west of Sudan.

“It is a victory, the first victory under the umbrella of the SRF to have two forces fighting together,” SRF spokesman Arnu Ngutulu Lodi told Reuters by telephone.

The SPLM-N’s fighters fought alongside the forces of what is now the south’s ruling SPLM during Sudan’s civil war that ended with a peace deal in 2005 and led to southern secession in 2011.

The SPLM-N says it cut ties with the South after independence, but Khartoum accuses Juba of continuing to provide military and financial support to the rebels.

According to Lodi, the SRF captured hundreds of machine guns, dozens of heavy artillery and 200 vehicles from the Sudanese Armed Forces (SAF), although he said it was too early to provide a number of casualties from either side.

Both countries trade accusations of supporting insurgents in each other’s territory. Tensions have also mounted in a dispute over how much Juba should pay Khartoum to export its oil.

Authorities in landlocked South Sudan say Sudan has since December stolen over $800 million worth of oil, which has to be exported via a pipeline through the north. Sudan says it seized the crude in lieu of what it calls unpaid transportation fees.

Sudan has threatened to file a complaint about what it says are the south’s violations of the non-aggression pact to the United Nations Security Council and the African Union, although the South said its forces were not involved.

“Those battles that have been fought for the last 72 hours are completely within the republic of Sudan and are between SAF and (SRF) and we are not party to that,” South Sudan’s army spokesman Philip Aguer said.

In turn, he said Khartoum violated the pact by bombing the South’s army at Jau the day after the security deal was signed. That is a charge that Sudan has denied.

“It is the government of South Sudan that should complain to international bodies like the Security Council,” Aguer said.

The United States has warned that South Kordofan could face famine conditions if Khartoum continues to deny aid agencies access to civilians in rebel-held areas.

Reuters

http://www.firstpost.com/fwire/sudan-rebels-claim-they-killed-130-army-members-227199.html

Sudan rebels say behind attack on Sudanese army

Mon Feb 27, 2012 6:24pm GMT
 By Hereward Holland

JUBA (Reuters) – Rebel groups in Sudan said on Monday they had captured a Sudanese army garrison near the border with South Sudan in an operation that Khartoum blamed on the south’s army.

The rebels said in a statement they killed 130 members of the government forces in the attack. The figure could not be independently verified.

The South Sudan government said none of its forces were involved, but the assault fuelled tensions between the neighbours already at odds over oil exports and border disputes. Any involvement of southern forces would have violated a non-aggression pact signed by the two sides this month.

The clashes on Sunday took place in the South Kordofan province on Sudan’s side of the ill-defined border with South Sudan, a flashpoint between the two countries.

The newly formed rebel umbrella group Sudan Revolutionary Front (SRF) said its forces were behind the assault on the military post around Lake Obyad, which lies near the boundary.

The SRF was formed last year between the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North (SPLM-N), who operate in South Kordofan and Blue Nile states, and the Justice and Equality Movement (JEM), based in Darfur in the west of Sudan.

“It is a victory, the first victory under the umbrella of the SRF to have two forces fighting together,” SRF spokesman Arnu Ngutulu Lodi told Reuters by telephone.

The SPLM-N’s fighters fought alongside the forces of what is now the south’s ruling SPLM during Sudan’s civil war that ended with a peace deal in 2005 and led to southern secession in 2011.

The SPLM-N says it cut ties with the South after independence, but Khartoum accuses Juba of continuing to provide military and financial support to the rebels.

According to Lodi, the SRF captured hundreds of machine guns, dozens of heavy artillery and 200 vehicles from the Sudanese Armed Forces (SAF), although he said it was too early to provide a number of casualties from either side.

Both countries trade accusations of supporting insurgents in each other’s territory. Tensions have also mounted in a dispute over how much Juba should pay Khartoum to export its oil.

Authorities in landlocked South Sudan say Sudan has since December stolen over $800 million worth of oil, which has to be exported via a pipeline through the north. Sudan says it seized the crude in lieu of what it calls unpaid transportation fees.

Sudan has threatened to file a complaint about what it says are the south’s violations of the non-aggression pact to the United Nations Security Council and the African Union, although the South said its forces were not involved.

“Those battles that have been fought for the last 72 hours are completely within the republic of Sudan and are between SAF and (SRF) and we are not party to that,” South Sudan’s army spokesman Philip Aguer said.

In turn, he said Khartoum violated the pact by bombing the South’s army at Jau the day after the security deal was signed. That is a charge that Sudan has denied.

“It is the government of South Sudan that should complain to international bodies like the Security Council,” Aguer said.

The United States has warned that South Kordofan could face famine conditions if Khartoum continues to deny aid agencies access to civilians in rebel-held areas.

http://af.reuters.com/article/topNews/idAFJOE81Q06320120227?sp=true

South Sudan says has foreign exchange reserves for up to 1 year
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South Sudan, which has stopped shipping crude oil exports, has enough foreign exchange reserves to cover imports for up to one year, the deputy Finance Minister said on Monday. In January, South Sudan shut down its entire oil production of 350000 
US lawmaker pleads for action after Sudan trip
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WASHINGTON — A US congressman pleaded Monday for action to bring food to thousands inSudan’s South Kordofan state, accusing the Khartoum government of “ethnic cleansing” after a visit to the region. Representative Frank Wolf said he went last week to 
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It could be 20 years before the new government in South Sudan can turn its attention to building the new school system the country so desperately needs, says Sebastian Maroundit, who knows only too well that education is the key, not just to prosperity 
Rising numbers of Sudanese fleeing to Kenya – UN
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The Sudanese government has accused the south’s dominant Sudan People’s Liberation Movement (SPLM) of being behind the violence in Blue Nile and South Kordofan, while the SPLM-North, the movement’s branch in Sudan, has blamed Khartoum.
Sudan rebels say behind attack on Sudanese army
Reuters Africa
By Hereward Holland JUBA (Reuters) – Rebel groups in Sudan said on Monday they had captured a Sudanese army garrison near the border with South Sudan in an operation that Khartoum blamed on the south’s army. Juba said none of its forces were involved, 

KHARTOUM (Reuters) – South Sudanese and Sudanese forces clashed in a poorly-defined border area on Sunday, the Sudanese military said, the latest outbreak of violence to put a recently signed non-aggression pact into question.

The Sudanese Foreign Ministry described the clashes as “a direct and blatant attack on Sudan’s sovereignty and security” that violated all international norms, and said it would file a fresh complaint at the United Nations Security Council.

“Forces from South Sudan and rebels from South Kordofan attacked at 3 a.m. in the area of Baheyret al-Abayd,” Sudan’s military spokesman Al-Sawarmi Khalid told Reuters.

“Fighting is still going on,” he said. “The government in the South is not abiding by the deal.”

Khalid was referring to a non-aggression pact signed by both governments earlier this month, brokered by the African Union to allay fears that rising tensions since the South’s secession last July could escalate into war.

In a statement published by the Sudanese state news agency the Foreign Ministry said: “We will file a new complaint to the Security Council and the African Union to inform them of the details of the events and demand that they have a role in deterring any assault on the security and stability of Sudan.”

In a further sign of continued unrest, the Darfur-based rebel Justice and Equality Movement said it had taken control of Jau, a region claimed by both sides, in a joint attack with forces of the South Sudanese Sudan People’s Liberation Movement

(SPLM).

Relations between the two countries have plunged after talks failed to halt an oil export dispute, end violence in border areas and resolve other issues relating to the secession.

CLASHES

Juba and Khartoum routinely trade accusations of sponsoring insurgencies in each other’s territory. In December, the two armies clashed in Jau, which is close to many of the South’s oil fields and abuts the South Kordofan state where Sunday’s clashes occurred.

Earlier this month, the Security Council called on Sudan and rebels in areas bordering South Sudan to grant immediate access for U.N. aid workers to the turbulent region.

Fighting has been raging for months between the Sudanese army and rebels from the SPLM-North, which wants to topple the Khartoum government, in the states of South Kordofan and Blue Nile, adjacent to newly-independent South Sudan.

South Kordofan and Blue Nile are home to tens of thousands of fighters who battled Khartoum as part of the southern army during a civil war that ended in 2005. Khartoum accuses Juba of continuing to back the insurgents, which South Sudan denies.

The fighting in recent months has forced about 417,000 people to flee their homes, more than 80,000 of them to South Sudan, according to the United Nations.

(Reporting by Khaled Abdel Aziz; Writing by Dina Zayed in Cairo; Editing by Sophie Hares)

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/sns-rt-us-sudan-clashestre81p0fp-20120226,0,3673476.story

Sudan rebel front claims attack in South Kordofan


Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North has been fighting in South Kordofan and Blue Nile states

Rebels in a “revolutionary front” aimed at toppling the Khartoum regime on Sunday claimed their first joint attack against government forces, but the army blamed troops from South Sudan instead.

Rebels of the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North (SPLM-N), which for several months has been fighting in South Kordofan and Blue Nile states along the border with South Sudan, combined with Justice and Equality Movement (JEM) insurgents from the western region of Darfur, spokesmen for both groups said.

One analyst has dismissed the Revolutionary Front as “just a name,” but an SPLM-N spokesman said the joint attack — albeit with a small JEM component — showed their commitment to work together.

“We are not just talking. We are doing it,” Arnu Ngutulu Lodi of SPLM-N told AFP.

Last November, both rebel groups joined with factions of Darfur’s Sudan Liberation Army to form the front dedicated to “popular uprising and armed rebellion” against the National Congress Party government in Khartoum.

“This attack is under the umbrella of the Sudanese Revolutionary Front,” JEM spokesman Gibril Adam Bilal told AFP.

He said Sunday’s offensive happened at Jau, a disputed area in an oil-rich region on the poorly defined border.

Sudan Armed Forces spokesman Sawarmi Khaled Saad confirmed that the area had come under attack, but he blamed the forces of South Sudan for the incident.

“This attack was completely planned and sponsored by the government of South Sudan,” he said.

“The fighting is going on now.”

Neither side could immediately give casualty figures.

Access to the state is restricted, making independent verification difficult.

Adam said the rebels had overrun the Sudanese position and seized weapons from them at Jau, “and now we are surrounding them in Taruje,” about 20 kilometres (12 miles) north of Jau.

The Sudanese army spokesman said the attack came six kilometres inside Sudan and originated from South Sudan’s Unity state.

In December, Sudan accused the South Sudan army of attacking the Jau region, but Juba’s military insisted its troops were defending an area on their side of the frontier.

Two weeks ago, Juba said Khartoum had bombed the same area from the air, violating a memorandum on non-aggression and cooperation signed this month.

Juba has accused Khartoum of several air raids in border districts but Sudan denied the attacks.

South Sudan broke away in July last year after an overwhelming vote for independence following more than two decades of war that killed two million people.

Border tensions have since flared, with each side accusing the other of supporting rebels within its territory, while a major dispute over oil transit fees remains unresolved.

UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has warned that the crisis between the neighbours has become a major threat to regional peace and security, and Britain this month expressed “grave concern at the recent build-up of forces and escalation of tensions in conflict-affected border areas.”

The ethnic minority insurgents from SPLM-N had previously fought alongside the former rebels now ruling in Juba.

Lodi, the SPLM-N spokesman, said Sunday’s joint attack followed formalisation last week of the Revolutionary Front’s structure. The Front named as its chairman Malik Agar, who is also chairman of SPLM-N. Another SPLM-N figure, Abdelaziz al-Hilu, is the Front’s military commander.

JEM and SPLM-N had fought together once before, in August, and now that the alliance structure has been formalised more joint operations will occur “when appropriate,” Lodi said.

http://www.africasia.com/services/news_africa/article.php?ID=CNG.f93648e502555ea3e976efe113d96c98.341

Sudan rebel front claims first attack in South Kordofan

KHARTOUM: Rebels in a “revolutionary front” aimed at toppling the Khartoum regime on Sunday claimed their first joint attack against government forces, but the army blamed troops from breakaway South Sudan.

Rebels of the Justice and Equality Movement(JEM), from the western region of Darfur, combined with insurgents from the SudanPeople’s Liberation Movement-North (SPLM-N), which for several months has been fighting in South Kordofan and Blue Nile states along the border with breakaway South Sudan, said JEM spokesman Gibril Adam Bilal.

Last November, the two rebel groups joined with factions of Darfur’s Sudan Liberation Army to form the front dedicated to “popular uprising and armed rebellion” against the National Congress Party government in Khartoum.

“This attack is under the umbrella of the Sudanese Revolutionary Front,” Adam said.

He said Sunday’s offensive happened at Jau, a disputed area on the poorly defined north-south border.

Sudan Armed Forces spokesman Sawarmi Khaled Saad confirmed that the area had come under attack but he blamed the forces of South Sudan.

“This attack was completely planned and sponsored by the government of South Sudan,” he said.

“The fighting is going on now.”

Neither side could immediately give casualty figures.

South Sudan split from Sudan in July last year after an overwhelming vote for independence following more than two decades of war that killed two million people.

Border tensions have since flared, with each side accusing the other of supporting rebels within its territory, while a major dispute over oil transit fees remains unresolved.

UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has warned that the crisis between the neighbours has become a major threat to regional peace and security, and Britain this month expressed “grave concern at the recent build-up of forces and escalation of tensions in conflict-affected border areas.”

The ethnic minority insurgents from the SPLM-N had previously fought alongside the former rebels now ruling in the South.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/world/middle-east/Sudan-rebel-front-claims-first-attack-in-South-Kordofan/articleshow/12043952.cms


Sudanese Economy Reels With Loss of Oil Income
Jakarta Globe
Khartoum, SudanSudan has lost billions of dollars in oil receipts since the south gained independence last year and is plagued by soaring prices and a weakening currency, with no economic solution in sight for the bankrupt nation, analysts say…

Clashes break out in Sudan’s South Kordofan
Emirates 24/7
South Sudanese and Sudanese forces clashed in a poorly-defined border area on Sunday, the Sudanese military said, the latest outbreak of violence to put a recently signed non-aggression pact into question. “Forces from South Sudan and rebels from South 

Battling Sudan’s Bombs With Videos
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It was Boyette who smuggled me into the Nuba Mountains, driving his Toyota Land Cruiser on a rutted dirt track from South Sudan, at one point just a couple of miles from Sudanese military lines. He has set up a network of local citizen journalists who

UN int’l staff return to restive Sudan region
Sacramento Bee
AP KHARTOUM, Sudan — The United Nations in Sudan says its international staff is returning to a disputed region on the border with south Sudan, after a nearly half-year absence from the restive area. The UN office in Khartoum said in a statement 

Sudanese Rebels Sign Deal for Aid in Two Embattled States

BusinessWeek – ‎
By Jared Ferrie Feb. 24 (Bloomberg) — A Sudanese rebel group said it signed an agreement with the government to allow aid into rebel- controlled areas in two border states where the US says half a million people may face famine conditions.
Bloomberg – ‎
A Sudanese rebel group said it signed an agreement with the government to allow aid into rebel- controlled areas in two border states where the US says half a million people may face famine conditions. The accord, signed on Feb.
Shanghai Daily (subscription) – ‎
KHARTOUM, Feb. 26 (Xinhua) — The Sudanese government on Sunday announced its decision to file an complaint to the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) and the African Union (AU) against South Sudan regarding an attack in Al-Abiyad border area.
Shanghai Daily (subscription) –
KHARTOUM, Feb. 26 (Xinhua) — The Sudanese army on Sunday said armed clashes broke out between its forces and South Sudan forces at Jao area on the border between Sudan-South Sudan. “An alliance bringing together South Sudan’s army and rebels from 
Sudan Tribune –
February 25, 2012 (KHARTOUM) – The Sudanese presidential assistant Nafie Ali Nafie blasted those who are sympathetic with the rebel alliance saying they don’t represent any weight within the Sudanese society. Nafie made the remarks while addressing the 
Sudan Tribune – ‎‎
By Ngor Arol Garang February 25, 2012 (JUBA) – A South Sudanese opposition groups has criticised austerity measures introduced by government to adjust the loss of oil revenues, after the young country stopped exporting its oil through north Sudan…
Truck Drivers End Three-day Barricade of S. Sudan Border
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Border traffic to and fro South Sudan has resumed after a three-day strike by truck drivers from Kenya, Somalia and Tanzanaia that paralysed movement in the area. The heavy truck drivers have been protesting what they called ‘unfair treatment’ by South
Farming getting tough in South Sudan
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By Ngor Arol Garang February 25, 2012 (JUBA) – A South Sudanese opposition groups has criticised austerity measures introduced by government to adjust the loss of oil revenues, after the young country stopped exporting its oil through north Sudan.

South Sudan president blames Khartoum for insecurity
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February 25, 2012 (BOR) – South Sudan’s president, Salva Kiir Mayardit accused north Sudan – from which the new country seceded last year – attempting to turn the world’s youngest country into a failed state. Even before South Sudan’s referendum on 

Team succeeds with well installation in South Sudan
Marshalltown Times Republican
BY MIKE DONAHEY – Staff Writer (mdonahey@timesrepublican.com) , Times-Republican Editor’s Note: Writer Mike Donahey of Marshalltown was part of a team that traveled to and worked in Old Fangak, South Sudan recently to provide clean drinking water.

Truck drivers end three-day barricade of S. Sudan border
Daily Monitor
The drivers had used heavy trucks to barricade the roads to South Sudan protesting alleged mistreatment by South Sudan officials Border traffic to and fro South Sudan has resumed after a three-day strike by truck drivers from Kenya, 

Map of Sudan and South Sudan

Photo: VOA
Map of Sudan and South Sudan
 
South Sudan: Khartoum Violates Non-Aggression Pact

Peter Heinlein | Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

South Sudan is accusing neighboring Sudan of bombing southern targets, days after the two sides signed a non-aggression deal. The allegation threatens already troubled talks on sharing oil revenues.

South Sudan’s chief negotiator at the African Union-mediated talks, Pagan Amum, said Sudanese jets bombed an area in the south’s Unity state, not far from the two countries’ disputed border. He gave few details, saying word of the attack had just been received.

The bombing, if confirmed, would be the first violation of a non-aggression agreement signed Friday at the beginning of a round of talks on oil and other contentious issues. Amum accused Khartoum of continuing its attempts to destabilize the border.

“That is a bad sign that the government of Sudan is not serious to non-aggression, but we expressed our hope the government of Sudan would now end its attacks on South Sudan, particularly areas of bombardment,” said Amum.

Speaking to reporters, Amum said the south is continuing to take a tough line on the main issue in the six days of talks – sharing oil revenues. He said any decision to reopen the pipeline that carries southern oil to international markets would only come after Khartoum pays for oil it took from the pipeline while the payments dispute raged last month.

“There is no way for us to resume unless the government of Sudan pays the south the market value of all the oil they have stolen, which is in excess of $500 million. We cannot export our oil if it is not secure and safe, if the government of Sudan are practicing state piracy. It would be dangerous for us to send even one barrel, not millions,” said Amum.

South Sudan took the bulk of Sudanese oil when it became independent last year, but the oil must pass through the north to reach Port Sudan on the Red Sea.

Khartoum’s negotiators did not speak to reporters as they left the African Union headquarters, where the two sides briefed the AU Peace and Security Council.

The talks, mediated by former South African president Thabo Mbeki, are expected to carry on through at least Wednesday, but diplomats close to the negotiations say they may be extended if there is any sign of a deal that might open the oil pipeline.

Experts say the pipeline shutdown is costing both countries hundreds of millions of dollars a month in lost revenues.

http://www.voanews.com/english/news/South-Sudan-Khartoum-Violates-Non-Aggression-Pact-139299998.html

Sudanese air strike hits S Sudan, breaking pact: army

(AFP) –   

JUBA — Sudanese warplanes dropped several bombs wounding four soldiers in a contested area claimed by South Sudan, breaking a fresh non-aggression pact between the two sides, Juba’s army spokesman said Tuesday.

“Sudanese Armed Forces airplanes bombed the Jau area in Unity state on Sunday, wounding four of our soldiers,” South Sudanese army spokesman Philip Aguer told AFP.

South Sudan — which declared independence from former civil war enemies in north Sudan in July — has accused Khartoum of carrying out several bombing raids in frontier regions of its territory, claims denied by the northern army.

The bombings took place in oil-rich areas along the disputed border with the rump state of Sudan, which both sides claim as theirs. The Jau area has seen several bombings in recent months as well as fighting between the two sides.

“There were several bombs launched from Antonov aircraft,” Aguer said.

The region borders Sudan’s Southern Kordofan state where rebels — once part of the ex-guerrilla turned official South Sudanese army — are battling the Khartoum government forces.

Sudan and South Sudan signed a non-aggression pact late Friday over the disputed border in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa, a move praised by UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon.

However, Aguer said the latest bombings showed the deal had not been taken seriously by Khartoum.

“Nothing has changed, it is business as usual for them,” Aguer said.

Gideon Gatpan, minister of information for Unity state, confirmed there had been “several bombings” on Sunday in the Jau area.

According to the pact, the two sides agreed to “respect each other’s sovereignty and territorial integrity” and to “refrain from launching any attack, including bombardment.”

Border tensions have mounted since South Sudan split from Sudan in July, becoming the world’s newest nation.

South Sudan took three quarters of Sudan’s oil when it gained independence, but all pipeline and export facilities are controlled by the north.

Last month, the South halted oil production — accounting for 98 percent of government revenue — after Juba accused Khartoum of stealing $815 million worth of crude oil.

The latest round of talks between Khartoum and Juba continue in Addis Ababa to resolve the furious oil crisis.

The UN chief last week warned that tensions between the two nations could escalate if outstanding issues are not resolved.

However, the South has demanded that a deal includes settlement on the undemarcated border, parts of which cut through oil fields, as well on Abyei, a Lebanon-sized region claimed by both sides but occupied by northern troops.

At least 105,000 Sudanese refugees have fled into South Sudan since fighting erupted in the states of Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile last year, after Khartoum moved to assert its authority in the wake of southern secession.

The refugees are adding to the woes of the grossly impoverished South, which is reeling from internal crises including a wave of bloody ethnic violence, rebel attacks and severe food shortages.

In addition, Juba is struggling to support over 364,000 people who have returned to their homeland since October 2010 from the north, where they fled during the war.

An estimated 700,000 ethnic southerners remain in north Sudan, where aid officials are increasingly concerned for their future, with an April 8 deadline approaching for them to either register or leave Sudan.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5gQMkFvUoOaLtq_M7H3FxDw9HyZbQ?docId=CNG.f403ea8aad2faad073236239e9b0c0df.a01

South Sudan Accuses Sudan of Air Attack

Posted Tuesday, February 14th, 2012 

South Sudan has accused Sudan of carrying out airstrikes on a disputed border town, just two days after the neighboring countries signed a non-aggression pact.

Authorities in South Sudan say Russian-made Antonov jets dropped several bombs on the town of Jau on Sunday, wounding at least four people.

South Sudan claims Jau is located inside its Unity state, while Sudan puts the town inside its own state of Southern Kordofan.

Disputes over borders and oil have raised tension between the two Sudans, and leaders on both sides have suggested the countries could go to war.

On Friday, an African Union mediation team persuaded the two Sudans to sign a non-aggression pact. The countries have accused each other of supporting the other’s rebels, and the south says the north has bombed its territory on several occasions.

The AU is hosting talks in Addis Ababa aimed at settling the dispute over oil revenues, the biggest source of income for both countries.

South Sudan took 75 percent of Sudan’s oil when it declared independence in July. But the landlocked south must rely on pipelines that run north to an export facility at Port Sudan.

The two sides are embroiled in a battle over how much money South Sudan should pay to use the pipelines and Sudan’s export facilities.

The dispute prompted Khartoum to seize South Sudan’s oil at Port Sudan. South Sudan responded by shutting down all oil production.

http://blogs.voanews.com/breaking-news/2012/02/14/south-sudan-accuses-sudan-of-air-attack/

South Sudan Oil Dispute Raises Specter of War

Gabe Joselow | Juba, South Sudan

South Sudan and Sudan have been engaged in a war of words since the south stopped pumping oil to the north in a dispute about pricing. Both sides have warned that a return to violence is a possibility.South Sudan is retooling its armed forces – working to strengthen the former rebel Southern People’s Liberation Army into a more formal military.

Soldiers here at the Bilpam military base in Juba could be called into battle sooner than expected, if a bitter oil dispute with Sudan turns from a war of words into action.

The south shut off oil flows to the north, claiming Sudan has stolen millions of dollars worth of crude. Khartoum says it confiscated the oil to compensate for unpaid transit fees.

South Sudanese Deputy Defense Minister Major Majak D’Agoot said such actions represent a serious threat to the new nation.

“I don’t want to pinpoint it to any particular source, but anything that tends to threaten our core interests as a nation of course will have to be responded to,” said D’Agoot.

Although Major D’Agoot did not specifically say Sudan was the primary threat to South Sudan, outside his office a statue of former SPLA General John Garang points firmly toward the north.

Amanda Hsiao of the Enough Project says the oil shutdown also could provoke Sudan to take action.

“With the South saying that, one: they’re willing to break of relations completely with the North; two: that they will seek alternative pipelines so that their oil doesn’t have to flow to the north, Khartoum is left with very little options in terms of dealing with its economic situation. Remember it’s a regime that has few friends in the international community,” said Hsiao.

South Sudan declared independence from the North last July, following decades of civil war that killed more than one million people.

Sporadic fighting has continued. In the past year, Sudan has bombed areas near the border where it suspects Southern-backed militias to be active, including an attack on Abyei in May of last year that displaced up to 100,000 people.

The leaders of both nations have said a return to war is a possibility.

On the streets of Juba, a rapidly developing capital, businessmen are nervous about the prospect of violence.

Michael Toma sells automotive supplies at the Jebel market.

“In my own opinion, I for one think war – I don’t want to rule out war because war is inevitable. However, I’d like to ask the two authorities to work together and come into dialogue so we can reach a harmonious conclusion that’s going to benefit either country,” said Toma.

Others, like Simon Gatdier Yieh, say if Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir wants war, he will get it.

“If the Bashir came with the peace then our president will talk to the Bashir in a peaceful manner. If the Bashir wants to fight with the people of South Sudan we are ready, even now we are ready,” said Yieh.

Both countries are dependent on South Sudanese oil and, as a prolonged shutdown continues to drain their two economies, tensions are bound to increase.

 SOUTH SUDAN – PS to absorb returning workers
PS News
JUBA: 8 February 2012: A plan to employ up to 3000 returning South Sudan workers in Government agencies and institutions, as well as the private sector, has been announced. Chair of the committee tasked with accommodating the returning workers, 
Rick Santorum and Christians in Peril
Huffington Post (blog)
Right now, millions of Christians in Nigeria and Sudan are being bombed, starved, ethnically cleansed, or intimidated. Evidently Santorum wasn’t referring to them, however, because they are black and African, and they don’t have votes in the Republican 
South Sudan officials welcome Israel’s Spacecom
IT News Africa
Israel’s communications satellite company Spacecom, hope recent discussions with South Sudanwill boost their communications and telecommunications industry role in the world’s youngest nation . South Sudan’s Telecommunications Ministry said officials 
South Sudan Accuses Sudan of Air Attack
Voice of America (blog)
South Sudan has accused Sudan of carrying out airstrikes on a disputed border town, just two days after the neighboring countries signed a non-aggression pact. Authorities in South Sudan say Russian-made Antonov jets dropped several bombs on the town 
South Sudan Oil Dispute Raises Specter of War
Voice of America
February 14, 2012 South Sudan Oil Dispute Raises Specter of War Gabe Joselow | Juba, South Sudan South Sudan and Sudan have been engaged in a war of words since the south stopped pumping oil to the north in a dispute about pricing…
Migration group says South Sudanese strike deal with Sudan to resettle by April 8
KSPR
By AP GENEVA (AP) — The International Organization for Migration says Sudan and South Sudanhave signed a deal allowing half a million South Sudanese to choose where they want to live. But IOM spokesman Jumbe Omari Jumbe says the deal sets an April 8 
Obama’s 2013 Budget Includes $2.4 Billion in Possible Debt Relief to Sudan
LoanSafe
The Sudanese government has been intensively pressing the international community to have its external debt canceled as a reward for letting South Sudan secede peacefully last July after recognizing the referendum results conducted in early 2011…
South Sudan’s inflation drops to 48%
Sudan Tribune
By Julius N. Uma February 13, 2012 (JUBA) – South Sudan’s inflation, which in December of last year stood at a whopping 65.6% dropped to 47.8% in January, the country’s national bureau of statistics said in its latest report…
Sudanese air strike hits South Sudan, breaking pact
AFP
JUBA, South Sudan — Sudanese warplanes dropped several bombs wounding four soldiers in a contested area claimed by South Sudan, two days after agreeing to a non-aggression pact, Juba’s military spokesman said Tuesday. “Sudanese Armed Forces airplanes 

ReutersBy Aaron Maasho | Reuters – 

ADDIS ABABA (Reuters) – Sudan and South Sudan on Friday signed a security agreement which aims to defuse tensions over oil payments which officials had warned could spark a war between the two countries.

Landlocked South Sudan took three-quarters of Sudan’s oil production — the lifeline of both economies — but needs to sell its crude through northern export facilities.

Both countries have failed to agree on a transit pipeline fee. Juba shut down last month its entire oil output after Khartoum started seizing southern oil as compensation for what it calls unpaid fees.

Sudan’s President Omar Hassan al-Bashir warned last week that the tensions with South Sudan, which became independent in July, could lead to war between the two countries.

Former South African President Thabo Mbeki, who has been trying to mediate an end to the tensions, said the deal was a “non-aggression pact” aimed at avoiding any armed conflict.

“This deal addresses those issues,” Mbeki told reporters when asked whether the agreement would defuse the threat of war.

The security agreement, brokered by the African Union in Addis Ababa, said the two sides agree to “respect each other’s sovereignty and territorial integrity, non-interference in internal affairs, rejection of the use of force, equality and mutual benefit; and peaceful coexistence.”

Apart from oil, Sudan and South Sudan need to find a solution to the disputed border region of Abyei and to mark the joint border. Both countries often accuse each other of supporting rebels on the other’s territory.

(Reporting by Aaron Maasho; Writing by Ulf Laessing)

http://news.yahoo.com/sudan-sudan-sign-security-pact-defuse-tensions-223313494.html

Sudan, South Sudan Sign Treaty of Non-Aggression

VOA News

Sudan and South Sudan have signed a border security agreement that aims to defuse growing tensions over oil revenue payments.

The chief negotiator, former South African President Thabo Mbeki, said Sudan and South Sudan signed the non-aggression pact Friday during a meeting in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa.

Details of the pact were not immediately available.

When South Sudan seceded in July of last year, it took most of the region’s oil fields, but the oil from the landlocked country must transit Sudan to reach ports.

Juba last month halted its production after Khartoum started seizing southern oil as compensation for what it calls unpaid transit fees.

Earlier Friday, natural resource monitoring group Global Witness expressed concern about escalating tensions between the two sides.

Sudan wants South Sudan to pay transit fees of more than $30 per barrel. The industry standard is closer to $1 per barrel.

Tensions have also remained high over disagreements about how to demarcate the border, and accusations that each side is arming the other’s rebel groups.

The dispute has hurt both economies. More than 90 percent of South Sudan’s revenues are derived from oil exports. Sudan is said to have lost more than $7 billion when the South gained independence.

On Thursday, South Sudan announced an agreement with Ethiopia allowing it to build an oil pipeline through Ethiopia to the port of Djibouti

http://www.voanews.com/english/news/africa/Sudan-South-Sudan-Sign-Treaty-of-Non-Aggression-139132599.html


Sven Torfinn for The New York Times

Several development and construction projects in Khartoum came to a standstill. Sudan’s once fast-growing economy has plummeted since July, when South Sudan broke off and became an independent country, taking billions of dollars of oil with it.

By JEFFREY GETTLEMAN

KHARTOUM, Sudan — Sudan and the breakaway nation of South Sudan are locked in an exceedingly dangerous game of brinkmanship over billions of gallons of oil, seizing tankers, shutting down wells and imperiling the tenuous, American-backed peace that has held — just barely — between the two countries after decades of war.

Not for years have north-south relations been so poisonous, with a proxy war between the two nations that has already flared into direct Sudan-South Sudan clashes. The jagged, disputed frontier separating Sudan from its newly independent neighbor is now probably the most incendiary fault line in Africa, with big armies that fought each other for generations massing on either side.

After emergency talks to prevent a full-fledged conflict, the two sides agreed to a non-aggression pact late on Friday, yielding to intense pressure from the African Union, the United States and China — a major oil partner for both sides — to move beyond the language and tactics of mutual destruction. But few analysts see any easy solutions to the heated push and pull over oil.

Both sides desperately need the oil to run their governments, feed their people and stamp out spreading rebellions within their borders. And theoretically, both sides need each other. The conundrum of the two Sudans is that 75 percent of the oil lies in the south, but the pipeline to export it runs through the north. Because of this, oil was once thought to be the glue that would hold the two nations together and prevent a conflict. Now, it seems, oil is becoming the fuse.

When South Sudan broke off from Sudan last year, after years of guerrilla struggle, its independence was heralded as the triumphal capstone ending one of Africa’s deadliest civil wars. But the question of how exactly the two sides would share oil profits loomed ominously over the separation, unresolved. Now that both nations are struggling to make it on their own, the issue has proved to be as prickly — and perilous — as many feared.

It was South Sudanese oil that drove Sudan’s economic boom of the past decade and made the repression by Sudan’s Islamist government (which is still heavily penalized by the United States) tolerable to many Sudanese. When South Sudan declared independence, it took billions of dollars’ worth of oil with it, gutting Sudan’s economy and creating one of the deepest crises that President Omar Hassan al-Bashir has faced in his more than 20 years in power.

Mr. Bashir is now battling high inflation, a shrinking economy, student protests and several simultaneous rebellions — in Darfur, the Nuba Mountains and Blue Nile State — as well as genocide charges related to the massacres several years ago in Darfur, and stiff American sanctions.

At the same time, South Sudan, one of the poorest countries on earth, is facing a major food crisis and heavily armed ethnically based militias that have been sweeping parts of the countryside, killing hundreds and making a mockery of the South Sudanese security forces.

Stoking the tensions, Sudan and South Sudan are covertly backing rebels in each other’s backyards, leading to border clashes and relentless aerial bombings. The more than 1,000-mile border between them is now effectively closed, with millions of pounds of emergency food and just about all trade held up in a two-way stranglehold.

Before the emergency accord on Friday, the situation was so precarious that many saw only violent outcomes. “I, personally, expect full-fledged war,” said Mariam al-Sadiq al-Mahdi, a leading opposition politician in Khartoum, Sudan’s capital. “This is like the previews before a film.”

In the fight over oil, the south has refused to turn over royalties for using Sudan’s pipelines. Sudan upped the ante in late December by seizing oil tankers filled with South Sudanese crude. Then, the south took the drastic step of abruptly shutting down all of its oil wells, which could quickly bring the economies of both north and south to their knees. South Sudanese officials have admitted that they are using their oil to squeeze Khartoum to make concessions on all sorts of issues, including the disputed area of Abyei, insisting that oil production, about 350,000 barrels a day, will resume only after “ all the deals are signed.”

The south has even threatened to sit on its oil for years while it builds an alternative pipeline through Kenya. But it is not clear how the new country would survive that long; oil provides about 98 percent of government revenue. Experts question whether the Kenya pipeline is even feasible. It would have to run uphill, requiring many expensive pumping stations, and most likely slice across Jonglei, a South Sudanese state that, with all its marauding militias, is essentially a war zone these days.

In Khartoum, many people are still struggling to swallow the fact that the south is gone. Nobody likes the new map of Sudan. It used to be Africa’s biggest country. Now it looks as if it has been crudely amputated, with the ragged edges of a raw wound.

“I still can’t get used to it,” said Nada Gerais, a sales manager in Khartoum. “It looks, looks …,” she struggled for the right word. “Weird.”

Mrs. Gerais is a perfect example of the nose dive Sudan’s economy has taken. She works in a meticulously polished Nissan dealership that used to sell 50 cars a month. Now, sometimes, it is down to five. She is thinking of switching to pharmaceuticals or food.

“People can stop buying cars, but they can’t stop eating,” she explained.

During the past decade, Sudan’s oil wealth fueled new factories, roads, countless shish kebab joints and plans for a futuristic minicity, a billion-dollar airport and the entire reconfiguring of this capital to include a breezy promenade along the Nile.

But so many of these plans have been shelved. High-rise buildings stand half-finished, and the plummeting value of the Sudanese pound has pushed electronics, books and even tomatoes out of reach for many.

Officials in Khartoum say the south owes them nearly $1 billion in pipeline fees, money needed to keep their economy from collapsing, and they recently sold some of the oil from the seized tankers before releasing them. South Sudan’s president, Salva Kiir, said the amount Khartoum wanted, $32 per barrel, was “exorbitant” and “completely out of international norms.”

Sabir M. Hassan, a Sudanese government negotiator, said that the north was willing to be flexible, but that the southerners were “too emotional” and still saw themselves as rebels.

“If you give them two choices, they’ll choose the one that hurts the north, not the one that helps the south,” Mr. Hassan said.

South Sudanese leaders say the same about Khartoum, which has blockaded roads leading south and recently held up humanitarian shipments, all to punish the south at the cost of millions of dollars in lost business.

Many political analysts wonder whether Mr. Bashir will be able to survive all these crises. But it is hard to see who would replace him.

Sudan’s political opposition is deeply divided and run by white-bearded septuagenarians. The rebel movements do not have much support in Khartoum. Sudanese students started an Arab Spring-like movement last year, but they failed to gain any traction. The security forces were quick to arrest protesters and string them up from ceiling fans.

And Sudan has a resilience that transcends the turmoil. Every Friday, in a dusty ring on Khartoum’s outskirts, hundreds of Nuban men gather to watch traditional wrestling. Ethnic Nubans are leading the rebellion against Khartoum in the Nuba Mountains. But there is little evidence of that here.

“Things are fine,” said one elderly spectator.

Just as he was about to elaborate, a young wrestler scooped up his opponent and body-slammed him in the dirt.

“You see that!” the old man hollered. “My God, I love this.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/11/world/africa/sudan-and-south-sudan-edge-closer-to-brink-in-oil-dispute.html?pagewanted=2&_r=1

INTERVIEW-Olympics-South Sudan race to compete at London Games
Reuters
Declared independent last July, South Sudan also wants to send a wheelchair basketball team, made up of amputees injured in the conflict in the country, to the Paralympics, Cirino Hiteng Ofuho told Reuters in an interview. “Right now we are discussing 

Russian, Chinese arms sales propel Sudanese conflict
Catholic Online
Ukraine has reported to the UN register that it exported 90 tanks to Sudan in 2010. Both Russia and the Ukraine have also supplied military equipment to South Sudan, he added. Amnesty International said an estimated 70000 people were displaced from 

Two Sudans Near Brink in Oil Dispute
New York Times
KHARTOUM, Sudan — Sudan and the breakaway nation of South Sudan are locked in an exceedingly dangerous game of brinkmanship over billions of gallons of oil, seizing tankers, shutting down wells and imperiling the tenuous, American-backed peace that