Posts Tagged ‘chief negotiator’


Chief negotiator calls for EU involvement in strengthened UN force to end conflict with Sudan.

South Sudan would like the international community to upgrade its military mission to the country and the EU to contribute troops, its chief negotiator said yesterday.

The call, by Pagan Amum, comes against the backdrop of continuing clashes between Sudan and South Sudan, which seceded from the north in July 2011.

Intermittent clashes since January have in the past month turned into substantial military engagement on the ground, with repeated reports of aerial bombardment by Sudan. Already, roughly half of Sudan’s oil-production capacity appears to have been crippled. There have been warnings that the clashes could turn into a full-scale war, evoking memories of Sudan’s decades-long civil war, which ended only in 2005 and led eventually to South Sudan’s independence.

In an interview with European Voice in Brussels, Amum said that South Sudan was prepared to return to negotiations “without preconditions” and fully accepted the roadmap to peace drawn up on Tuesday (24 April) by the international contact group leading peace-making efforts, the African Union High-Level Implementation Panel (AUHIP).

“We are actually asking to have it strengthened,” he said, with a stronger international force than the UN currently has on the ground. The UN’s secretary-general, Ban Ki-moon, said on 21 April that troops from the UN Interim Security Force in Abyei (UNISFA) were ready to be deployed to the area of the conflict.

UNISFA , which was established last year, comprised 3,716 troops and 83 military observers as of 31 March, drawn from Russia, Ethiopia, Rwanda and Tunisia. Amum said that he would like the EU to contribute personnel.

The EU’s foreign-policy chief, Catherine Ashton, yesterday (26 April) reiterated the EU’s support for the AUHIP roadmap.

Amum discussed two of the thorniest issues in relations between Juba and Khartoum: borders and oil.

He called for international arbitration on settling border disputes, most sensitively in the oil-rich Abyei region, to the west of Heglig.

In March, Juba and Khartoum had reiterated their commitment to discuss oil issues, as part of broader discussions. But Amum said yesterday that South Sudan would not discuss oil, reiterating a statement he made on 23 April that Sudan has made a strategic decision not to pipe oil northward through Sudan in future.

In January, South Sudan turned off the taps to South Sudan – even though it currently has no alternative routes for oil and even though 98% of its official revenues come from oil.

South Sudan cut supplies because, it said, Sudan had siphoned off oil; Sudan said it took the oil as compensation for unpaid transit fees.

Clashes at the border in late March and early April were followed, on 10 April, by South Sudan’s capture of the Heglig oil fields in Sudan on 10 April, a move condemned internationally. On 20 April, a day after a visit by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, South Sudan withdrew – or, South Sudan claims, was forced out. Reports suggest that oil field infrastructure has been so severely damaged that Sudan’s oil-producing capacity (115,000 a day) may have been halved.

Amum said that South Sudan is now developing plans for alternative routes.

Funding for new pipelines – two are being considered – is among the topics that Salva Kiir, South Sudan’s president, is currently raising on a five-day visit to China, which has large economic interests in both South Sudan and Sudan.

Amum’s diplomatic mission to Europe is taking him to Norway and the UK, two of the three members of the international troika of countries most involved in negotiating an end to Sudan’s civil war. (The other member is the US.)

In Brussels, he met the two European commissioners responsible for aid and development, Kristalina Georgieva (international co-operation and humanitarian aid) and Andris Piebalgs (development), and the deputy secretary-general of the European External Action Service, Helga Schmid.

Amum said he would like to see more international engagement in Sudan. Attention has waned, he said, since the signing of a comprehensive peace agreement in 2005, which ended a civil war that began in 1983.

Amum was the official spokesman of the Sudan People’s Liberation Army from 1994 onwards.

http://www.europeanvoice.com/article/2012/april/south-sudan-wants-eu-to-send-troops/74237.aspx

US Officials Press for Sudan-South Sudan Talks
Voice of America
April 26, 2012 US Officials Press for Sudan-South Sudan Talks Michael Bowman | Capitol Hill The simmering conflict between Sudan and South Sudan has yet to escalate into full-scale war, but it threatens to deepen a humanitarian crisis that is already 
Arab League condemns South Sudan ‘aggression’
Seattle Post Intelligencer
CAIRO (AP) — The Arab League on Thursday condemned South Sudan’s “military aggression” against Heglig, saying the oil-rich border region belongs to Sudan. A statement by Arab foreign ministers meeting in Cairo also supported what it called Sudan’s 

The Associated Press
By MAGGIE MICHAEL, AP – 1 minute ago CAIRO (AP) — The Arab League on Thursday condemned South Sudan’s “military aggression” against an oil-rich border region claimed by Sudan while also supporting Sudan’s right to defend itself.

In South Sudan border lands oil brings bombs, not blessings
Reuters
By Hereward Holland | BENTIU, South Sudan (Reuters) – Despite a dozen years of oil extraction inSouth Sudan’s Unity state, the capital Bentiu has little to show for it. Donkeys drag carts bearing oil drums filled with water around the dusty, 
South Sudan wants EU to send troops
European Voice
By Andrew Gardner – Today, 10:12 CET Chief negotiator calls for EU involvement in strengthened UN force to end conflict with Sudan. South Sudan would like the international community to upgrade its military mission to the country and the EU to 
Oxfam: South Sudan refugees face water shortages
San Francisco Chronicle
(04-27) 02:53 PDT NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — An aid agency says tens of thousands of refugees inSouth Sudan’s Jamam camp must be urgently moved to a new site to escape life-threatening water shortages and fatal diseases. Oxfam’s spokesman Alun McDonald 
South Sudan says Sudan-backed militia attacks oil state
Chicago Tribune
JUBA (Reuters) – South Sudan, embroiled in border fighting with its northern neighbor Sudan for the past month, said on Friday that Sudanese-backed rebel militia had attacked a town in the South’s oil-producing Upper Nile state, broadening the conflict 
South Sudan’s application to top EA president’s summit
New Vision
By Nicodemus Ikonko in Arusha Heads of States of East African Community (EAC) will converge in Arusha, Tanzania Saturday in an extra-ordinary meeting to consider, among others, a recommendation on the application by the Republic of South Sudanto the 

Oil shutdown pushing South Sudan to end row: Sudan

Alexander Dziadosz and Khalid Abdelaziz, ReutersMarch 25, 2012
KHARTOUM (Reuters) – South Sudan’s shutdown of its crude production in a damaging row with Sudan over oil payments appears to have backfired and put pressure on Juba to soften its bargaining stance, one of Khartoum’s negotiators said on Sunday.Any deal still hinges on whether the two countries can address alleged support for rebels on both sides of the border, but southern officials have a growing incentive to tackle the obstacle, Sabir Hassan told Reuters in an interview.
“In the past, the pressure was all on the north,” he said. “Now both sides are under pressure, so both will be willing to find a way out.”South Sudan’s chief negotiator Pagan Amum said on Saturday his country hoped to end the row within “a month or two”, a time frame Hassan said could be realistic if southern officials were serious about reaching a settlement.South Sudan split from Sudan in July under a 2005 peace deal that ended decades of civil war, but the two have yet to resolve a range of partition-related issues.Although the south took about three quarters of Sudan’s oil output, it still needs to use pipelines, a Red Sea terminal and other facilities in Sudan to export crude. The two nations have wrangled over how much it should pay to do this.In January, South Sudan halted its production of about 350,000 barrels per day in protest after Khartoum started taking some oil as “dues in kind” to make up for what it said were fees Juba had failed to pay since independence.Hassan said the shutdown had put the squeeze on South Sudan to make a deal because oil provides 98 percent of state revenue, in turn vital to an economy based mostly on government salaries.”When they shut down the wells, they stopped the source of their revenues. So they came under pressure,” he said, adding that southern negotiators had later become more conciliatory.Sudan has also suffered from the disruption. Oil contributed about three quarters of Sudan’s foreign exchange and half of state revenue before the south seceded, said Hassan, a former central bank governor who co-chairs Khartoum’s economic negotiations team.

SECURITY FIRST

At least in public, the two sides are still far apart.

Among other ideas, Khartoum has proposed that South Sudan pay a mix of fees amounting to about $36 per barrel, of which about $6 would be transit fees. The rest would cover transport and the use of a marine terminal and processing facilities.

Southern officials said last week they were willing to pay $2.6 billion to help plug Sudan’s budget deficit and would lobby for debt relief. Juba has proposed a transit fee of about $1 per barrel.

Hassan said bridging the gap would be relatively easy once security issues, especially rebel activity on both sides of the long and poorly-drawn border, had been dealt with.

“The key to all this is security,” he said. “Neither of the two countries should support rebels in the other country … oil comes second, actually.”

To reach a deal, Juba must agree to stop supporting rebels in Sudan’s South Kordofan andBlue Nile border states, he said.

The two regions are home to tens of thousands of fighters who sided with the south during the civil war but were left in the north after partition. Fighting broke out again last year, with both sides blaming the other for provoking the conflict.

Resolving the dispute means South Sudan will have to break its “historical tie” with the rebels, Hassan said. “If they succeed in that, if they do have the political will and they succeed, then I think things might work out.”

Sudan’s President Omar al-Bashir is set to meet his southern counterpart Salva Kiir in Juba on April 3 to discuss issues including oil and the conflict in the two border states.

(Writing by Alexander Dziadosz; Editing by Alistair Lyon)

JUBA
South Sudan hopes to end oil row within “a month or two” JUBA – South Sudan hopes to resolve a row over oil and other outstanding issues with Sudan within a month or two, South Sudan’s top negotiator said on Saturday, pointing to an easing of tensions between the two old civil war foes.The new nation also said it would not arrest Sudan’s President Omar al-Bashir, wanted by the International Criminal Court (ICC) on charges of genocide and other crimes, when he visits the southern capital Juba next month.South Sudan seceded from Sudan in July under a 2005 peace deal that ended decades of civil war, but the two have continued to argue over issues including how much the landlocked South should pay to use Sudan’s oil facilities for export.The dispute pushed Juba to shut down its 350,000 barrel per day oil production in January.But the two sides have made some headway in recent weeks, agreeing to provisional deals that allow for protection of citizens residing in one another’s countries and lay out plans to demarcate much of the poorly-drawn border.

Both presidents are set to meet in Juba on April 3 to sign the documents and discuss other unresolved issues including the status of the contested Abyei region and the oil dispute.

“They can proceed in this new positive environment to discuss all the issues and hopefully reach agreement within a very clear time frame, hopefully a month or two,” Pagan Amum, South Sudan’s chief negotiator, told reporters in Juba.

Amum said Bashir would not be arrested during his visit. South Sudan is not a signatory to the ICC’s Rome Statute, which compels members to arrest suspects.

“President Salva Kiir has provided assurance as he is the head of state inviting president Bashir and that in itself is an assurance. You don’t invite somebody as a trick,” Amum said.

Sudan does not acknowledge the ICC and says the accusations are politically motivated.

http://www.portalangop.co.ao/motix/en_us/noticias/africa/2012/2/12/Sudan-hopes-end-oil-row-within-month-two,1567f526-5ae7-4a1c-8d27-c752b5103feb.html

South Sudan demobilizing child soldiers from decades-long civil war
Bikya Masr
Civil war in the Sudan began with independence from colonial rule in the 1950s; SPLA soldier, Juba, South Sudan – photo by Pete Willows for Bikya Masr. CAIRO: South Sudan’s army, the Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) on Saturday denied using child 
Beyond Wristbands: Your wider guide to South Sudan
The Yorker
South Sudan is Africa’s most recently formed independent country, gaining independence from Sudan on 9th July 2011. The recent history of the country is one of internal military conflict and rule. During the twentieth century, two civil wars were 
South Sudan says will not arrest Bashir during visit
AFP
JUBA — South Sudan said Saturday it will not arrest Sudan’s President Omar al-Bashir, wanted by the International Criminal Court for war crimes, during an upcoming visit to the newly independent nation. South Sudan said fears by former civil war foe
South Sudanese opposition rejects Pagan’s acquittal of corruption charges
Sudan Tribune
Two South Sudanese newspapers and Chol were ordered by the court to pay 100000 SSP (US$37000) in damages. Marek said that the media should not be penalised for faithfully reporting on what individuals say. Marek accused the court of not following “all 
Sudan says South Kordofan’s survey proves stable humanitarian situation
Sudan Tribune
March 24, 2012 (KHARTOUM) — Sudan announced Saturday that the humanitarian situation in the troubled region of South Kordofan is stable according to the outcome of a joint survey conducted with the United Nations agencies in state.

Oil shutdown pushing South Sudan to end row: Sudan
Chicago Tribune
KHARTOUM (Reuters) – South Sudan’s shutdown of its crude production in a damaging row with Sudan over oil payments appears to have backfired and put pressure on Juba to soften its bargaining stance, one of Khartoum’s negotiators said on Sunday.

March 24, 2012

JUBA (Reuters) – South Sudan hopes to resolve a row over oil and other outstanding issues with Sudan within a month or two, South Sudan’s top negotiator said on Saturday, pointing to an easing of tensions between the two old civil war foes.The new nation also said it would not arrest Sudan’s President Omar al-Bashir, wanted by the International Criminal Court (ICC) on charges of genocide and other crimes, when he visits the southern capital Juba next month.

South Sudan seceded from Sudan in July under a 2005 peace deal that ended decades of civil war, but the two have continued to argue over issues including how much the landlocked South should pay to use Sudan’s oil facilities for export.The dispute pushed Juba to shut down its 350,000 barrel per day oil production in January.

But the two sides have made some headway in recent weeks, agreeing to provisional deals that allow for protection of citizens residing in one another’s countries and lay out plans to demarcate much of the poorly-drawn border.

Both presidents are set to meet in Juba on April 3 to sign the documents and discuss other unresolved issues including the status of the contested Abyei region and the oil dispute.

“They can proceed in this new positive environment to discuss all the issues and hopefully reach agreement within a very clear time frame, hopefully a month or two,” Pagan Amum, South Sudan’s chief negotiator, told reporters in Juba.

Amum said Bashir would not be arrested during his visit. South Sudan is not a signatory to the ICC’s Rome Statute, which compels members to arrest suspects.

“President Salva Kiir has provided assurance as he is the head of state inviting president Bashir and that in itself is an assurance. You don’t invite somebody as a trick,” Amum said.

Sudan does not acknowledge the ICC and says the accusations are politically motivated.

(Reporting by Hereward Holland; Editing by Alexander Dziadosz and Karolina Tagaris)


By Monica Lakes
Before stating the reasons about why Bashir wants to meet Salva Kiir, one would first have to outline that Khartoum has never honoured any agreement since creation. It is their sworn position that they (old and new NCPs) have and will never implement any agreement with infidels or even with muslims who are not of the Arab origin. The proof is that the CPA protocols on Abyei for self determination and popular consultation for Southern Kordofan and Southern Blue Nile were never implemented. This is not to mention the old agreements: Addisababa agreement (1972) and the Khartoum/Fashoda agreements of 1997. There were even more other dishonoured agreements dating back to pre 1956. Anyway, that is history and it is necessary to reflect back those lessons.
We are talking about the recent Addisababa agreement that was initialed by Pagan Amum, the Chief negotiator on behalf of Juba. On the part of SPLM, it can be stated with confidence that there was and still, no hidden agenda about signing the agreement. SPLM initialed the agreement in good faith so that the two sister countries of South Sudan and Sudan live as good neighbours and for the people in both countries to enjoy life and rebuild their livelihoods peacefully.
 However, when it comes to the NCP with its known records of reneging, stalling and abrogating agreements, many things come into consideration. First, let us examine this story before finding the reasons for the NCP in supporting the agreement and what caution that the SPLM government in Juba may need to take.
The story is about a lion that camouflaged itself as a cow and joined a herd of cattle. When the herdsman settled his cows and was tying down the animals into their respective positions for the night, he saw the cow-lion smiling to itself in anticipation of what will happen in the night. The lion imagined that during the dark night, the first victim would be the herdsman himself in which case, the whole herd of cattle will remain as the lion’s property after the elimination of the owner. The herdsman after discovering the plot pretended that he did not see anything. He then made plans that resulted in successfully slaying the beast before it implemented its treacherous intentions.
The negotiating committees have gone to Ethiopia many times to discuss pending CPA issues and with no breakthrough. Then, in what would have been an NCP success story when the AU was supporting the NCP position on oil, the SPLM foiled up everything and concluded the abortion with closure of the oil pipelines. Khartoum pretended that it would not hurt their economy, but the truth is that it bites large chunks of it daily. Like a tired fish that allows itself on a pulling hook so as to gather strength to let go, the NCP found interest in the logic of the SPLM’s sincere position of the “mutual interest” for the people of both countries to be free and live peacefully – Simple and attractive.
Bashir and his NCP are now sure that they have made adequate plans. First, Bashir has made great homework within the AU. The AU believes in them more than in the SPLM. Whatever their manner of work may be, it is just the same approach as the one with Scott Gration when he (Scott) was the USA representative in Sudan. Scott had always believed in the NCP. In addition, the NCP has rallied Eritrea, the new Islamists in Egypt and Libya, and then Chad and Central Africa, on its side. These countries are all working to see to it that there must be a destablised South Sudan through a regime change that will keep the country ungovernable for as long as it can take to erase traces of SPLM in the entire South Sudan and Sudan. Already, the NCP has trained militias that can be deployed to attack South Sudan from their soils. They will provide logistics and material support to the militias.
The NCP has cowed some other neighbouring countries such as Kenya and putting them to dummy status. Ethiopia and Uganda are the two countries the NCP seems to be getting some difficulties with in implementing their treacherous agenda against South Sudan. In its quest for wider influence internationally, the NCP has secured China and Russia (UN veto holders) for protection against economic sanctions and arms embargo. The Islamic Middle East, especially Iran, is fully behind Khartoum in providing military and economic support.
On the military front, Sudan will not defeat SPLA-N because the closure of oil pipelines has denied it of financial income to pay the mercenaries and purchase of arms. Sudan’s short term plan is therefore to accept the agreement so that the pipelines are opened and for them to make a speedy plunder of oil. Recently, Omer Bashir went to China and was advised to accept the agreement and China will help on rapid stealing of the South Sudan oil and delivery of lethal fighter planes to Khartoum to use in its monger war against Southern Kordofan and Southern Blue Nile, and also as deterrent to South Sudan.
The plan by the NCP for the meeting is to buy time so that the NCP makes its treacherous plans against South Sudan complete. It would be advisable to inspect Omer Bashir when he is coming to meet Salva Kiir. He may be carrying explosives. Moreover, the security in Juba must step up vigilance so that the NCP trained terrorists that have infiltrated the city should never get any chance to implement their dirty and treacherous plans.
 
Monica Lakes

Amum said Sudan can take the south’s offer or leave it. “The figures for transit fee is 69 cents. If they don’t, there will be no deal, he said.”

Peter Heinlein | Addis Ababa

A senior Sudanese negotiator said he sees little hope for progress in talks with South Sudan on contentious issues left over from the two countries’ separation last July. Mediators in Addis Ababa are measuring progress in millimeters.

Former Sudanese Central Bank governor Sabir Mohamed al Hassan was blunt Friday when asked whether he thinks the current session of African Union-mediated talks might yield forward movement. “Personally, no. I don’t think so. I’m not really optimistic,” he said.

One track of the talks focuses on oil. The landlocked south must use the north’s pipelines to send its oil abroad. But a dispute over transit fees prompted the south to shut down production, costing both sides hundreds of million dollars per month in income.

Hassan, Khartoum’s lead negotiator in the oil talks, said it would be a victory if the two sides could simply agree to talk in a spirit of compromise.

“That the two parties sit down and negotiate in good faith, negotiate with the objective of reaching a compromise,” Hassan said. “That the two parties move forward to meet each other, not each party standing on its position.”

Pagan Amum, Chief Negotiator of the southern Sudan People's Liberation Movement (L), listens to remarks by Stephen Dhieu Dau, Minister of Petroleum and Mining in South Sudan, at Paloich Airport in Melut, South Sudan, February 21, 2012 Pagan Amum, Chief Negotiator of the southern Sudan People’s Liberation Movement (L), listens to remarks by Stephen Dhieu Dau, Minister of Petroleum and Mining in South Sudan, at Paloich Airport in Melut, South Sudan, February 21, 2012

Speaking to VOA earlier in the week, South Sudan’s chief negotiator Pagan Amum indicated the oil talks are hopelessly deadlocked. The Khartoum side is asking for a package of charges totaling $36 a barrel, while the delegation from Juba is offering a flat rate of 69 cents.

Amum said Sudan can take the south’s offer or leave it. “The figures for transit fee is 69 cents. If they don’t, there will be no deal, he said.”

Diplomats following the talks say the atmosphere had been frigid since this 10-day negotiating session began with a shouting match over the sensitive issue of nationalities – specifically, the fate of southerners in the north, and northerners in the south.

A member of the African Union mediation team urged patience, noting that the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement that ended the Sudanese civil war took four years to negotiate.

The main sticking point in the nationalities track of the talks is the fate of 35,000 women and children the south says were abducted by the north during the long civil war.  Briefing VOA on condition of anonymity, a senior South Sudan official said any agreement must refer to these people as “abductees.”

Khartoum flatly rejects such a characterization. Northern negotiator Hassan blames the south for adopting an uncompromising position when it would be easy to refer the matter to a high-level commission.

“I don’t know how to say it, but the way, the approach, was not constructive,” Hassan said. “We said, let us set up the committee, give it the power to look into the situation of all nationalities, without exception, but they insisted, no.”

Analysts watching the talks say breaking the deadlock is critical because of the degree to which both sides financially depend on oil. The south in particular has no other significant source of foreign revenue.

The nationalities issue is considered equally critical. With the south’s independence looming last year and no solution in sight, the two sides agreed to allow another six months for a settlement. Those six months are up April 8. After that date, hundreds of thousands of people on both sides of the border could become illegal aliens in their own homes.

http://www.voanews.com/english/news/africa/Hope-for-Progress-Dim-in-Sudan-South-Sudan-Talks-142084643.html


18th February 2012
NCP Sudan ground and air attack on the Republic of South Sudan
Since Monday 13th February 2012, the Sudan Armed Forces (SAF) has been attacking SPLA positions inside the Republic of South Sudan by air and ground forces in Jaw (Unity State) and Kofra Kingi (Western Bhar el Ghazal state). The NCP government in Khartoum is committing this heinous crime while having signed a non-aggression agreement with SPLM Chief Negotiator, Cde Pagan Amum, in Ethiopia.
Description: F:\Bol Makueng10.JPG
Comrade Bol Makueng
SPLM Secretary for Information, Culture and Communication
Picture by Comrade Larco Lomayat
Why does the Sudan government sign a non-aggression agreement with SPLM and then wages war on the Republic of South Sudan?
· The NCP leaders are pathological liars. Their main modus operandi is always deceit, mislead and misinform the public and international community. They have no faith in agreements they make with anybody – SPLM, regional or national and political institutions. At the time the Sudan government delegation was travelling to Ethiopia, the SAF was just preparing to attack the Republic of South Sudan. The objective being to frustrate the discussions so that they continue stealing the oil. In fact, the NCP ordered the oil companies to open the pipelines even after the Republic of South Sudan had ordered the closure.
· Before the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) the NCP government was the sole beneficiary of the oil in Sudan. During the CPA, the NCP dishonoured the wealth sharing formula by taking both the ministry of finance and that of petroleum. This was to steal the oil unchecked and thus Southern Sudan by then was just getting only 20% instead of the agreed 50% of the oil share.
· Now that South Sudan is an independent nation, the NCP continued its theft of oil. The republic of South Sudan caught the NCP red handed. All the deceitful avenues of theft have been exposed. The NCP will not again get money to hire mercenaries and Janjaweed to fight in Southern Kordofan, Southern Blue Nile and the Republic of South Sudan.
· The NCP has refused to implement the CPA protocols popular consultations for Southern Kordofan and Southrn Blue Nile, and self-determination for Abyei, and chooses to wage war against the people of these regions. The NCP thus needs the oil money to pay for arms and mercenaries to fight in these areas.
· The NCP is also having a day dream to reverse the independence of South Sudan and to colonize it again so as to plunder resources. The NCP is investing on the willing South Sudanese fight as soldiers and politicians of fortune on behalf of the NCP.
· The NCP government is not ready to make an agreement with the Republic of South Sudan because it does not want anything legal as they will be made to return the stolen oil money and also pay for damages incurred as a result of the NCP’s subversive and deceitful activities that led to the closure of the oil pipelines.
This information is important for people of South Sudan and the international community to know because the NCP is busy declaring and waging war against the Republic of South Sudan, Abyei, Southern Kordofan, Southern Blue Nile and Darfur on the basis outlined above.
 
Cde. Bol Makueng
SPLM Secretary for Information, Culture and Communication
Attacks, clashes increase on Sudan-South Sudan border to shut down road, rebel group says

JUBA, Sudan – Sudan’s military is carrying out a bombing campaign intended to shut down the main route for refugees fleeing violence in the country’s south, a rebel spokesman said Monday.

A former American aid worker who lives in the region documented five attacks and clashes last week.

Attacks by the Sudanese Armed Forces have been focused along the road leading out of Southern Kordofan, Sudan, into Yida, South Sudan, said Arnu Loddi, a spokesman for the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North, a rebel group inside Sudan.

More than 20,000 refugees have already fled to a camp in Yida to escape the violence, and the United Nations worries that hundreds of thousands more could be on the way.

According to Loddi, Sudanese Armed Forces have been launching missiles from a military base in Kadugli, Sudan into the border region. He said Sudanese forces also launched “an ambush on a lorry carrying civilians going to Yida,” last week. Loddi did not have any information on the number of casualties sustained in the attack.

A Sudanese military spokesman did not immediately answer calls seeking comment about the reports.

“They want to close down the roads,” said Loddi, who is based in Nairobi, Kenya. “Sometimes they ambush, sometimes they bomb it. Since the beginning of this year they have bombed the same area at least five times.”

The rebel SPLM-North was once part of the Southern People’s Liberation Movement, now the ruling political party in newly independent South Sudan.

The SPLM says it cut off relations with the rebels across the border after South Sudan broke away from Khartoum in July. But Sudan claims that the SPLM-North still receives funding and support from Juba and even maintains a presence in refugee camps — including Yida — across the border.

Ryan Boyette, a former aid worker who lives in Sudan and is now leading a team of 15 citizen journalists, said that Sudanese forces carried out at least five attacks last week, including rocket attacks, aerial bombings and a direct attack on a village by troops.

One of the attacks saw Sudanese Armed Forces directly engage South Sudan forces in Jau — along the road to Yida — Loddi said. Four southern troops were injured, he said.

Jau is claimed by both north and south, and the two sides have been on high alert since the attack. South Sudan’s military spokesman Col. Philip Aguer said some 5,000 Sudanese troops have been moved to the region.

“We don’t know their intention,” he said. “We are just watching and waiting.”

Aguer denied that any SPLM-North forces are operating inside South Sudan.

While the two sides jockey for control of Jau and the unmarked border, the humanitarian situation in Southern Kordofan is deteriorating. Sudan has been at war with the SPLM-North since June, frequently employing Antonov aircraft to bomb rebel controlled areas.

The repeated attacks have effectively halted agricultural production in the region, and many humanitarian organizations warn that food is beginning to run out in the Sudanese state of Southern Kordofan. Khartoum has refused to allow relief organizations into the area citing security concerns and fears that aid may be given to rebel fighters.

Last week the U.N.’s top humanitarian official, Valerie Amos, called on both Sudan and the SPLM-North to grant immediate humanitarian access to the region.

“Action is urgently needed to meet the needs of people caught up in the conflict,” she said.

http://www.startribune.com/world/139687153.html


Fire Razes South Sudan Ruling Party Offices
AllAfrica.com
By Machel Amos, 17 February 2012 The fire engulfed the offices of the secretary general and chief negotiator Pagan Amum, turning piles of papers into ash. Officials said an air conditioner busted into flame in the conference hall and the fire swiftly 

Headquarters of South Sudan’s ruling party up in flames
Al-Arabiya
By Al Arabiya The office building of South Sudan’s ruling Sudan People’s Liberation Movement (SPLM) was consumed by fire on Saturday, causing the loss of confidential documents. According to official reports, the fire was due to an electric fault, 

South Sudan-Kenya Oil Pipeline Boost for Growth, Says Lagu
AllAfrica.com
By Wesonga Ochieng, 17 February 2012 THE pipeline to be built from South Sudan to the port of Lamu will play a pivotal economic role between the two countries, the South Sudan government has said. Chief advisor to South Sudan government Joseph Lagu has 

South Sudan: Govt Wants Kenya to Mediate in Abyei
AllAfrica.com
By Wesonga Ochieng, 17 February 2012 South Sudan government wants Kenya to mediate in the conflict between South Sudan and its northern neighbour Sudan over Abyei and Kadugli border areas. Chief South Sudan Presidential Advisor Joseph Lagu said that 

Sudan delays China debt, exports $400 mln of gold
Reuters
KHARTOUM Feb 18 (Reuters) – Sudan has secured a five-year delay on its debts to China, the finance minister said on Saturday, part of efforts to make up for the loss of revenues from the oil-producing south. Ali Mahmoud also told reporters the United 

South Sudan: UN Supports Projects
Scoop.co.nz (press release)
The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) is supporting a series of short- and long-term projects to help the people of South Sudan’s state of Jonglei, where ethnic rivalries often result in bloody conflict, to feed themselves and 

Tribalism for tribalism is just tribalism
Sudan Tribune
By James Adiok Mayik February 17, 2012 — It is genuine that the world knows problems of good governance in Unity State, South Sudan. It is also good to make it known nationwide that the challenges facing the evolution of quality governance in Bentiu 

South Sudan Wants Oil Back
Wall Street Journal
By NICHOLAS BARIYO KAMPALA, Uganda-Newly independent South Sudan has issued a legal notice over the more than 6 million barrels of oil allegedly stolen by its northern neighbor, Sudan, since December last year as the spat over oil transit fees between 

Fire consumes headquarters of South Sudan’s ruling party
Sudan Tribune
February 17, 2012 (JUBA) – A devastating fire broke out on Friday at the headquarters of South Sudan’s ruling Sudan People’s Liberation Movement (SPLM) in Juba, a week a similar incident at the official residence of the country’s president Salva Kiir 

South Sudan on high alert over meningitis outbreak
Africa Review
Director General and Community Health Dr Lul Riek (centre) flanked by WHO and government representatives speak to reporters over a possible outbreak of meningitis in South Sudan. 24 suspected cases have already been recorded so far.
Condoms to South Sudanese military to stem HIV-AIDS
Afrique en Ligue
New York, US – UNFPA provides condoms to South Sudanese military to stem HIV/AIDS. The UN Population Fund (UNFPA) is working with a non-governmental organization (NGO) to provide condoms to the South Sudanese military in a bid to tackle the high rates 

South Sudan begins legal steps to track oil sold by Sudan
Reuters Africa
By Ulf Laessing JUBA (Reuters) – South Sudan has started legal steps to track down oil seized and sold by Sudan in a row between the two countries over oil payments, a government spokesman said on Friday. The landlocked African nation needs to export 

Tanzania plans a railway line to reach South Sudan
East African
By LEONARD MAGOMBA (email the author) Tanzania, Uganda, Burundi and Rwanda have reached a formal agreement to construct a multi-billion dollar railway network, which would also serve South Sudan and tap into the bloc’s growing trade
MFA Accuses South Sudan of Adopting Foreign Agenda
Sudan Vision
State Minister at the Foreign Ministry, Salah Wanasi reviewed, in a meeting with the Japanese Ambassador to Khartoum, developments of relationship with the State ofSouth Sudan, particularly with regard to oil file, pointing out that the State of South 

February 15, 2012 (JUBA) – Chinese oil companies operating in South Sudan face the possibility of expulsion if it is proven that they are complicit in stealing the country’s oil, a senior official said here today.

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President of Sudan Omer Hassan al-Bashir and Chinese President Hu Jintao listen to the national anthems during a welcoming ceremony at the Great Hall of the People on June 29, 2011 in Beijing, China (AFP)

The newborn state which became independent last July is locked in a row with its northern neighbour over oil and transporting it through the pipeline that runs through Sudan’s territory.

Khartoum wants Juba to pay $36 per barrel of oil it exports using Sudan’s infrastructure. But South Sudan says the fair fee should be around $1. An African Union (AU) panel tasked with mediating in this dispute among others has tabled a number of proposals that were rejected.

The Sudanese government frustrated with the lack of progress of the oil talks started seizing part of the crude exported saying that this would be to make up for unpaid invoices owed by Juba. The latter retaliated by suspending oil production altogether.

South Sudan also warned that it will sue any party that is proven to have facilitated or bought oil “stolen” by Khartoum.

Today the country’s chief negotiator in the oil talks Pagan Amum went further in this regard and singled out Chinese companies.

“Our relations with China are beginning but they are of course having difficulties now because of the role of some Chinese companies or individuals covering up some of this stealing,” Amum told reporters in Juba according to Reuters.

“We will make them pay the cost or else they are out of the country,” he added, without naming the firms.

State oil firms from China, India and Malaysia own majority shares in the three consortium’s extracting oil in South Sudan. China is the biggest buyer of South Sudanese oil and has built the most oil facilities in both countries.

Amum also said the Sudanese oil ministry had ordered Malaysian-Chinese pipeline operator Petrodar this week to switch on a tie-in pipeline to divert 120,000 bpd of southern oil to Sudan’s refineries.

He handed out a letter dated 13 February, allegedly from Petrodar, informing South Sudan that Sudan had commissioned the tie-in line to transfer crude “unilaterally and by force”.

China has attempted to reconcile differences between the two sides and last year dispatched its special envoy to Africa for that purpose but has met little success.

Despite being the country with the largest stake in the oil, Beijing has remained mostly silent in recent weeks amid escalation of rhetoric between Khartoum and Juba and warnings from the two sides on the possibility of reverting back to war.

(ST)

http://www.sudantribune.com/South-Sudan-threatens-to-expel,41616


South Sudan
 oil shutdown pushes up prices

UPI.com
JUBA, South Sudan, Feb. 17 (UPI) — South Sudan’s 3-week-old shutdown of its oil industry in a dispute over oil revenues with the fledgling state’s former leaders in Khartoum is likely to drag on and push up global oil prices.
South Sudan: UN supports projects to boost people’s livelihood in volatile state
UN News Centre
Challenges facing South Sudanese include poor harvests, price hikes, conflict and displacement. UN Photo/Isaac Billy The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) is supporting a series of short- and long-term projects to help the people 
South Sudan seeks new oil pipeline
Daily Monitor
With the government in Juba having decided that it will no longer export crude oil through North Sudan, the need for an alternative route to the sea is now more urgent than it has ever been forSouth Sudan. A high level delegation from South Sudan has 
UN provides condoms to South Sudanese military to fight high rates of HIV/AIDS
UN News Centre
The United Nations is working with a non-governmental organization (NGO) to provide condoms to the South Sudanese military in a bid to tackle the high rates of HIV/AIDS among the country’s soldiers. “The military has a big number of young people who 

UN News Centre
Fire guts South Sudan ruling party offices
Africa Review
What remained of South Sudan ruling party head offices after a fire Friday afternoon. MACHEL AMOS | AFRICA REVIEW | By MACHEL AMOS in JubaPosted Friday, February 17 2012 at 20:34 Fire gutted South Sudan ruling party head offices Friday afternoon.

Oil talks between Khartoum and Juba fail to produce a breakthrough


February 14, 2012 (KHARTOUM) – The current round of talks between north and South Sudan on oil will likely be adjourned and resumed in two weeks time, an official in Khartoum said today.

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Pagan Amum, South Sudan’s chief negotiator (AFP)

The two sides have been unable to reach a middle ground during almost five days of negotiations in the Ethiopian capital that are moderated by the African Union High-Level implementation Panel (AUHIP).

In this round, Khartoum’s delegation tabled a paper detailing its position on oil transit fees and how it should be calculated per barrel of crude exported by South Sudan through the pipelines.

But South Sudan’s negotiating team led by Sudan People Liberation Movement (SPLM) Secretary General Pagan Amum rejected Khartoum’s demand of $36 per barrel saying that this represents no change from previous figures.

In the past, Juba said that the fair fee should be around $1 per barrel of oil.

The Sudanese foreign ministry spokesperson Al-Obeid Marwih said that the two sides will return to the negotiating table by the end of this month. He revealed that a preliminary accord could be signed on other post secession issues such as borders and trade.

Specialised committees from the two countries will convene later this month to continue discussions on trade as well citizenship issues.

In a related issue, SPLM Secretary General said that Khartoum seized 2.4 million barrels of its oil in a continuation of measures implemented by the Sudanese government since late last year, which brings total volume of crude seized to 6 million barrels.

This included 1.2 million barrels taken in December, four shipments totalling roughly 2.5 million barrels in January and another 2.4 million barrels reported this month, according to figures provided to Reuters by South Sudan’s negotiating team in Addis Ababa.

“Yesterday we have been informed that the government of Sudan has again stolen 2.4 million barrels of our best quality crude oil,” Amum said, according to Reuters.

South Sudan took with it three quarters of Sudan’s daily oil production of 500,000 barrels when it seceded in July under a 2005 peace deal that ended more than two decades of civil war between the two sides.

Previous rounds of protracted negotiations failed to yield an agreement on a fair charge to transport South Sudan’s oil through Sudan’s infrastructure, triggering a crisis that saw Khartoum confiscating oil and Juba suspending production all together.

Juba has been insisting that it must be reimbursed for the oil Khartoum says it confiscated to make up for unpaid fees.

Amum said Sudan had released two vessels that had been waiting to load South Sudanese crude at Port Sudan but another six had arrived. Eight in total are now prevented from entering the port, he said.

“Six vessels were ready to come and load oil that they already bought, but they are not allowed to come to Port Sudan,” the senior SPLM official said.

“These companies are not coming because they have been informed that the oil they bought from South Sudan has been stolen by the government of Sudan,” he added.

Last week, Sudanese President Omar Hassan al-Bashir described Juba’s decision to halt oil production is “suicide”.

He accused Juba of seeking to strangle his country economically by this move but he dismissed it saying that his country’s gold exports are booming.

(ST)

http://www.sudantribune.com/Oil-talks-between-Khartoum-and,41608

Sudan Fails to Reach Oil Deal With South Sudan
Wall Street Journal
By NICHOLAS BARIYO Sudan on Tuesday failed to reach a much-awaited deal on oil transit fees with its land-locked neighbor, South Sudan, and seized an additional 2.4 million barrels of oil shipments, officials said late Tuesday.

South Sudan Oil Dispute Raises Specter Of War
Eurasia Review
By Gabe Joselow South Sudan and Sudan have been engaged in a war of words since the south stopped pumping oil to the north in a dispute about pricing. Both sides have warned that a return to violence is a possibility. South Sudan is retooling its armed

SOUTH SUDAN: Briefing ? life without oil
Reuters AlertNet
South Sudan, one of the poorest countries in the world, reliant on oil for 98 percent of its revenues, in January took the drastic step of halting crude production, as a row with former civil war foe Sudan over transit fees hit a deadlock.

South Sudan accuses Sudan of breaking peace pact
KTAR.com
By JOHN HEILPRIN JUBA, South Sudan (AP) – South Sudan is accusing its northern neighbor Sudan of violating a non-aggression agreement between the two nations just hours after it was signed. South Sudanese military officials on Tuesday said Sudan

Asia-Pacific Crude-Pyrenees hits fresh high on tight supply
Reuters Africa
SINGAPORE, Feb 15 (Reuters) – Australian heavy sweet crude surged in Asia on Wednesday with Pyrenees trading at a fresh high in April after storms reduced output and as South Sudan stopped exports. No resolution is in sight for a resumption of output

Bangladesh Officials Discuss Investment With Ministry of Commerce
AllAfrica.com
By Misuk Moses Mule, 15 February 2012 Juba — The Minister of Commerce, Industry and Investment, Garang Diing Akuang and the Bangladesh delegation yesterday discussed plans of investment in South Sudan. The discussion was held at the minister’s office

South Sudan’s VP declares his net worth, urges peers to do same
Sudan Tribune
February 14, 2012 (JUBA) – The Vice President of the Republic of South Sudan, Riek Machar, has officially declared his personal income, assets and liabilities while calling on all constitutional post-holders in the country to do the same.

South Sudan in dire need of unity
Borglobe
In a short article entitled ‘the Myth of South Sudan‘, published in Pambazuka News, Issue No. 569 of February 2012, Makol Bona Malwal has the following to say: “Most South Sudanese have little idea what the country stands for, what binds its people


South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir gives a press statement on his reasons for rejecting an African Union proposal to resolve its oil crisis with its northern neighbor, in Juba Feb. 2, 2012. (Reuters)

South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir gives a press statement on his reasons for rejecting an African Union proposal to resolve its oil crisis with its northern neighbor, in Juba Feb. 2, 2012. (Reuters)

By Aaron Maasho

Feb 14 (Reuters) – Sudan has confiscated 2.4 million barrels of South Sudan’s oil, bringing the total volume of crude Khartoum has seized in a row over oil transit fees to more than 6 million barrels since December, a South Sudanese official said on Tuesday.

South Sudan seceded from Sudan in July under a 2005 peace deal that ended decades of civil war. The new nation took with it about three quarters of the country’s oil output but must still pipe crude through Sudan to the Red Sea terminal at Port Sudan to export it.

The two sides have failed to agree how much the South should pay to do this, and Khartoum has started taking southern oil to make up for what it says are unpaid fees.

“Yesterday (Monday) we have been informed that the government of Sudan has again stolen 2.4 million barrels of our best quality crude oil,” South Sudan’s chief negotiator, Pagan Amum, said.

South Sudan last month shut down its roughly 350,000 barrels per day of oil production. Amum did not specify where and how Sudan was able to seize the additional 2.4 million barrels, but Sudanese officials previously said there was oil left in the pipeline even after the shutdown and that Khartoum would continue to confiscate what it considered its fair share until the two sides reached a deal.

They met on Tuesday in the Ethiopian capital of Addis Ababa, but the talks finished again without resolving the dispute.

Sudan’s foreign ministry spokesman could not immediately be reached to comment on the accusation.

Amum said Sudan had released two vessels that had been waiting to load South Sudanese crude at Port Sudan but another six had arrived. Eight in total are now prevented from entering the port, he said.

“Six vessels were ready to come and load oil that they already bought, but they are not allowed to come to Port Sudan,” he said. “These companies are not coming because they have been informed that the oil they bought from South Sudan has been stolen by the government of Sudan.”

EXPORTS

South Sudan claims Khartoum has “illegally loaded” more than 6 million barrels of its oil since late last year.

This included 1.2 million barrels taken in December, four shipments totaling roughly 2.5 million barrels in January and another 2.4 million barrels reported this month, according to figures provided to Reuters by South Sudan’s negotiating team in Addis Ababa.

Correspondence between oil firms and government officials, which South Sudan provided to reporters this month, confirmed that four January cargoes were loaded, but the other seizures could not be independently verified.

Industry sources have said Sudan has sold at least one cargo of confiscated oil is offering more. South Sudan’s negotiators did not specify how much of the other crude was intended for use in domestic refineries and how much was meant to be exported.

Sudanese officials have said the country is entitled to a share of the oil because South Sudan has refused to pay the related fees since it seceded, fuelling inflation and a foreign currency shortage in the northern country. (Writing and additional reporting by Alexander Dziadosz in Khartoum; Editing by Jane Baird)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/02/14/southsudan-oil-idUSL5E8DE7VM20120214


Sudan, South Sudan

Peter Heinlein | Addis Ababa

Sudan and South Sudan have resumed talks on oil revenue sharing and other issues that have raised bilateral tensions to the boiling point. The talks are being held in Addis Ababa under African Union mediation.

A fresh round of negotiations began late Friday at a luxury Addis Ababa hotel.

The Sudanese and South Sudanese defense ministers led the opening session.  A spokesman said the two sides discussed a framework to govern how they would interact on border issues.

Diplomatic observers at Friday’s talks say the preparatory nature of the opening session indicates the deep mistrust between the two sides.  Both Sudan’s President Omar al-Bashir and South Sudanese President Salva Kir have in recent days suggested the neighbors may be close to war.

The last round of talks two weeks ago ended in mutual recriminations, with the south cutting off the flow of the oil that is critical to the economies of both countries.

The south is likely to suffer from the cutoff more because oil generates about 97 percent of its income. But chief negotiator Pagan Amoum emerged from that round of talks saying South Sudan would rather lose all its revenue than allow their oil to be stolen.

“So you are right, South Sudan is losing and stands to lose,” said Amoum. “It is because the government of Sudan is stealing and robbing the resources. That is why we are losing.”

South Sudan’s Oil Minister Stephen Dhieu Dau recently said he believes the Khartoum government is imposing impossible conditions and fees on the oil to punish the south for seceding from the north last July.

“What we need from them is acceptance of the best state practice, the international experience in a case like ours where by the landlocked country is allowed to transit, to pass the commodities based on a reasonable agreed fees between the two countries,” said Dhieu Dau. “But unfortunately Khartoum is introducing punitive fees, discriminatory fees against South Sudan as a penalty for the secession.”

With tensions running high, several international actors are working closely with the African Union mediation team, which is led by former South African president Thabo Mbeki.  The United States, Britain, Norway and China all have senior envoys involved in seeking an agreement.

Amanda Hsiao of the Washington-based Enough Project says urgent action is needed to prevent a further escalation of hostilities.

“To prevent a complete collapse in North-South relations, the international community needs to seize on this next round of negotiations as their last-ditch opportunity,” said Hsiao. “All efforts must be made, all diplomatic levers must be pulled to pull the two sides closer together, to reconcile their differences and to get them to sign a comprehensive agreement.”

With no end to the dispute in sight, South Sudan this week signed a memorandum of understanding with Ethiopia to build an alternative pipeline to the port of Djibouti.  South Sudanese Information Minister Barnaba Marial Benjamin was quoted as saying a U.S.-based company could build the line in six months.

The current round of Addis Ababa talks is expected to last at least a week.  Negotiations on the most contentious issue, sharing oil revenues, are scheduled to begin next Tuesday.

http://www.voanews.com/english/news/africa/Sudan-South-Sudan-Resume-Tense-Talks-on-Oil-Borders-139098099.html


  • Azhari Abdalla, director general of the Sudanese oil ministry's Oil Exploration and Production Authority, points to a map as he briefs journalists in Khartoum, December 19, 2011.
Photo: AFP
South Sudan Accuses Sudan of Stealing Oil

Peter Heinlein | Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

Azhari Abdalla, director general of the Sudanese oil ministry’s Oil Exploration and Production Authority, points to a map as he briefs journalists in Khartoum, December 19, 2011.

South Sudan on Tuesday accused its northern neighbor Sudan of stealing more than 2.1 million barrels of oil, and warned buyers and shippers that they might face prosecution. The accusation has cast a pall over a new round of talks on sharing oil revenues.

South Sudan’s chief negotiator at the African Union-mediated talks accused the Khartoum government of confiscating and selling southern oil, saying it is creating an economic and political crisis.

The oil is shipped from landlocked Southern Sudan by pipeline to Port Sudan, where it is loaded onto ships for export. The two countries produce about 500,000 barrels of oil a day.

Disputed oil transit fees

The Khartoum government this week said it would take part of the south’s oil as compensation for transit fees, pending settlement of their dispute over how much the payments should be.

Southern negotiator Pagan Amoum on Tuesday showed reporters documents indicating that the north has seized three oil shipments in recent days worth more than $200 million. He said the action threatens to end the north-south talks.

“The government of Sudan, as we speak, has completed loading the stolen oil onto its vessels that now have cargo of stolen oil of South Sudan. This represents some $140 million of property of the people of South Sudan being taken away. And if you add the 750,000 [barrels] that may be starting to be loading today or tomorrow morning, it will amount to $215 million. This is an act of state piracy,” said Amoum.

Oil-revenue sharing disagreement

As the talks were set to begin on Tuesday, the two sides remained far apart over the amount of oil revenue to be shared. The south has offered to pay a transit fee of less than $1 a barrel; Khartoum is asking for more than $32 a barrel.

Amoum said the north has blocked southern oil from leaving Port Sudan since December 25. He told reporters that Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir is risking a return to war by refusing to negotiate in good faith.

“President Bashir has become a danger to regional peace, and he’s taking all what he wants whenever he wants at whims. This is not the way a responsible state within the international community operates, especially one that is trying to normalize relations with so many of the countries of the world. The government of Sudan has made clumsy pretexts in a thinly veiled attempt to justify its thievery,” said Amoum.

South Sudan’s warning

South Sudan Justice Minister John Luke warned that anyone buying stolen oil would be held responsible. He said investigations have already identified the companies that are purchasing the confiscated oil.

“We also would like to put the companies that are buying this illegally gotten oil of Southern Sudan from the government of Khartoum to a be on legal notice that this is the property of the Republic of Southern Sudan. And by dealing it and purchasing it, they are purchasing property to which the government of Sudan does not have any legal title and for that matter they will be subject to litigation,” said Luke.

Oil is considered the backbone of the economies of Sudan and South Sudan. The south took more than 70 percent of the region’s oil resources when it broke away from the north last July. But the oil can be exported only through the north.

China is the biggest investor in South Sudan’s growing oil sector, and the largest consumer of Sudanese crude.

http://www.voanews.com/english/news/africa/South-Sudan-Accuses-Sudan-of-Stealing-Oil-137520138.html

South Sudan accuses Sudan of stealing 120,000 barrels of oil a day

By Associated Press, Published: January 17

JUBA, South Sudan — South Sudan’s oil minister on Tuesday accused northern neighbor Sudan of stealing massive amounts of the south’s oil, an accusation that comes the same day the two sides are to begin another round of negotiations over their formerly unified oil industry.
South Sudan’s Minister of Petroleum and Mining Stephen Dhieu Dau told The Associated Press on Tuesday that Sudan is each day diverting about 120,000 barrels of oil pumped from the south through a recently constructed “tie-in” pipeline.
“This amounts to nearly 75 percent of the oil of South Sudan” being pumped through the line, Dau said.South Sudan broke away from Sudan in July to become the world’s newest country, and took about three-fourths of what had been Sudan’s 500,000-barrel-a-day oil industry with it.Oil runs both countries’ economies, and the south’s oil must run through Sudan’s pipelines to get to port. But the two sides are nowhere near a deal on how to share revenues.

Dau’s accusation comes just days after the government of Sudan announced that it was taking southern oil in lieu of pipeline transit fees it says the south is not paying. Oil officials in Khartoum said they began taking southern oil in December, but would not specify how much oil was being taken.

Dau said the seizures at Port Sudan coupled with the oil taken from the new pipeline amounted to nearly all of South Sudan’s shares of oil pumped from its territory.

“This is a crime and it is a threat to peace and security,” said Dau.

The two countries were to begin negotiations on Tuesday in Ethiopia primarily over the transit fees that South Sudan will pay to use the northern pipelines. South Sudan has offered to pay an average of $0.70 per barrel for the use of the two pipelines, but Khartoum has asked for $36 per barrel.

Khartoum’s chief negotiator Sabir Mohammed Al-Hassan said Sunday the figure includes other fees that South Sudan will be required to pay, such as transportation fees, a transit fee, and a marine terminal fee.

But South Sudanese officials say the levies amount to theft. Dau warned that the south would take legal action against any foreign oil companies caught buying “the stolen oil.”

Pagan Amum, the secretary general of South Sudan’s ruling party, said on the sidelines of scheduled oil talks in Ethiopia that the theft of billions of dollars worth of oil by Sudan would probably cause the talks to collapse.

“Sudan should take note that the south’s patience is close to reaching its expiration period,” Amum said.

Amum said that Sudan is stealing oil “that would be the equivalent of purchasing two new pipelines a year, every year.” Amum said an oil company on Monday alerted the south’s government of another 750,000 stolen barrels worth $140 million.

Amum said the north has repeatedly threatened oil companies to load southern oil into its vessels. Copies of letters that backed these claims were distributed to journalists at a news conference.

Despite the difficulties, South Sudan is trying to expand its oil industry. Last week it signed its first post-independence oil deals with the state petroleum companies of China, India and Malaysia for oil-producing concessions in Unity and Upper Nile states. The agreements replaced exploration and production agreements made previously with the government of Sudan.

___

Associated Press reporter Luc van Kemenade in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia contributed to this report.

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/middle-east/south-sudan-accuses-sudan-of-stealing-120000-barrels-of-oil-a-day-talks-open-in-ethiopia/2012/01/17/gIQA4nAE5P_story.html

Sudan – South Sudan Negotiations Resume

Written by: 

January 17, 2012

Economic issues, primarily the division of oil revenues, are expected to dominate today in Addis Ababa the negotiations between Sudan and South Sudan on the issues left unresolved since independence in Juba, said the minister and presidential adviser Mohamed Abdul-Gadir.

According to the Sudanese representative, quoted by the official press “SUNA” during talks mediated by the African Union, South Sudan will be asked to pay six billion dollars in arrears to the use of pipelines oriented toward the Red Sea.

The division of Sudan in July last year has necessitated a new compromise on oil revenues after the expiry of the peace accords of 2005 which provided for a division on an equal basis.

The oil is mostly concentrated in the southern oil fields, but it can only be sold and delivered to international markets via the pipelines linking the oil to the north.

Khartoum is seeking payment of a transit fee of USD35 per barrel, while Juba is offering 74 cents with the addition of an initial allocation of two and a half billion dollars.

The tensions between the ‘Sudans’ grew over the past weekend, with Khartoum announcing that it had taken and sold 650,000 barrels from the south. In addition to oil, in the Ethiopian capital until next Monday, there will be a discussion over foreign debt and trade agreements.

A key issue on a humanitarian level risks being ignored, in a period characterized by a series of other armed clashes. The enduring conflict along the borders of two countries: the legal status of some 700,000 South Sudanese migrants, who, in the absence of an agreement, in April could be expelled from Khartoum and other northern regions where they have worked and lived or years.

About the author:MISNA, or the Missionary International Service News Agency, provides daily news ‘from, about and for’ the ‘world’s Souths’, not just in the geographical sense, since December 1997.http://www.eurasiareview.com/17012012-sudan-south-sudan-negotiations-resume/