Posts Tagged ‘SPLM’


The Battle for the SPLM’s Chairmanship Heats Up!!

By PaanLuel Wël

Our former VP and current Deputy Chairperson of the ruling SPLM party, Dr. Riek Machar, has announced that he would “soon hold a press conference to address the nation on the party’s future and other pressing issues in the country.” Specifically, Dr. Machar is going to “unveil resolutions passed against the actions of the party chairperson Salva Kiir, also South Sudan’s president.”

Demo-cracy or Demo-crazy?

Demo-cracy or Demo-crazy?

In the layperson’s language, this is nothing short of reading the riot act to Salva Kiir Mayaardit–the chairperson of the SPLM party and the President of the republic of South Sudan.

Many questions are crying out for answers. Are the disgruntled members of the SPLM-Politburo, many of whom were recently fired from the cabinet, going to gang up behind Dr. Machar and “relieve” the Chairperson of his duties “in the interest of the party and for the sake of the nation”? How will the President, who have of late gone on decreeing spree unperturbed, react to such naked political challenge to his perceived “constitutional authority”?

Will President Kiir back down peacefully (as Dr. Machar did after his dismissal from the government) and take respite from his addictive decreeing habit? Will he ratchet up the political pressure and take on his political opponents?

What leverage do Kiir’s political competitors have over him? What else can the President do other than his recent actions–their dismissal from the cabinet and the dissolution of the SPLM-PB?

However, what most South Sudanese people are wondering over is the final lineup of the factions that would compete, first for the position of the SPLM chairmanship, and secondly, for the office of the President of the country. Some crude form of the factionalization within the SPLM appears to be crystallizing, albeit ambiguously.

First is what seem to be a public knowledge already–Kiir’s detractors in the person of Dr. Machar, Pagan and Nyandeng. While they have been relentless in their opposition to President Kiir for sometime now, the question is whether or not they would eventually succeed to put aside their internal differences (there are many internal contradictions, one of which is whether Pagan and Nyandeng would accept to serve under Dr. Machar given his past) and coalesce into a formidable political force.

That would be a matter of political survival for the duo though, for they could still re-unite with President Kiir just as we saw this week when the President made an unexpected political coup against Pagan & Nyandeng’s camp by (snatching and) appointing Nhial Deng as Pagan’s replacement–Juba’s chief negotiator with Khartoum over the outstanding issues. Dr. Machar’s political rapprochement with President Kiir, though not entirely improbable, is highly complicated by the fact that VP Wani Igga won’t be ready to give him a free ride this time round.

If Machar-Pagan-Nyandeng axis survive its tumultuous infancy and graduated into a fully fledged political force, who will they take on other than President Kiir? Most likely, it would be Kiir-Wani-Lam’s alliance. Yes, Dr. Lam Akol shouldn’t be counted out. Not yet! If you are in Juba, then you must have heard Mach-kuol tales of Lam being groomed as the next National Minister for Environment–replacing the recently dismissed Abdallah Deng Nhial.

All indications point toward that eventuality. Dr. Lam, a long time traitor, was received like a rock star, with all state security and amenities at his disposal, when he recently landed in Juba, after years of self-imposed exile in Khartoum.

After all, politics is the art of possibilities. With Pagan gone, President Kiir would be tempted (if not already convinced) to take in Dr. Lam, killing two birds with one stone in the process.

Firstly, Dr. Lam, who has the absolute loyalty of the Shilluk’s voters (look at the MPs, how many SPLM MPs are from the Shilluk kingdom?) will surely prop up Kiir’s numbers during the Presidential election. Secondly, with Lam in the cabinet, it would be hard for the critics to accuse Kiir of marginalizing the Chollo people.

Of course, many people from the Kiir-Wani’s camp would be aghast at the thought of them sharing political bed and platform with a character like Lam. That is true, except that the Machar-Pagan-Nyandeng’s camp won’t dare to question the credentials of Kiir-Wani-Lam’s camp while they have their own elephant in the room. It is therefore safe, politically, for Kiir to bring Lam on board without the slightest worry of being branded a Khartoumer for associating with Khartoumers. “Those people in the glass house should not be the first to throw the first stone”, Kiir would be telling anyone within ear-reach to emphasize his point.

With all things considered, it is Kiir-Wani-Lam camp vs Machar-Pagan-Nyandeng group that would possibly define political trend in the country. Who will carry the day in the contest for the SPLM chairmanship and for the highest office in the land–the presidency? Will it be the former or the latter group? Will it be two camps as posited above or will more factions spring up?
Will these political camps usher in the politics of personality and tribalism or of ideological struggle? What is Kiir’s vision for the country? What is Dr. Machar’s, Pagan’s, Nyandeng’s etc.? And the voters: should we sympathize with them or are they simply getting the government and the leaders they deserves, to paraphrase the Hon. Mansour Khalid? The jure is still out there! The voter will decide, or so consoles the myth!!
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PaanLuel Wël (paanluel2011@gmail.com) is the Managing Editor of PaanLuel Wël: South Sudanese Bloggers.
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By Tearz Ayuen

For democracy, the real democracy—d-e-m-o-c-r-a-c-y—not just the written, sung or spoken democracy that frequently flies out of our politicians’ mouths, to be realized, enjoyed, seen, smelled, tasted, felt, drunk or even eaten by all the people of the Republic of South Sudan, including the mute, deaf, amputees, blind and the one-eyed, the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement’s top leaders must be incited against each other. A seed of discord must be sown amongst them now and quickly. Confuse them; Make them poke out each other’s eyes! Let a rain of political teargas canisters rain on their Headquarters at Juba’s Thongpiny area. With watery and itchy eyes, let them grasp for fresh air. Like what little boys do in preparation for a fight, make them roll up their pants and sleeves to break each other’s jaw politically.

In a plain language, our educated uncles and aunts describe Democracy as a regime where the rule is determined by the people. A democratic government is a government for the People by the People and of the people, meaning that the people run the government and the government is made to protect the people. Now be sincere to yourself and your country, does South Sudan fit in the above description? Is the government democratic?

On this planet earth, every child is born into some screwed up group and it is up to him or her to fight his or her way out of it or remain loyal, depending on the mindset and level of intellectuality, both natural and academic or even the borrowed brains, he or she attained during his or her transition from childhood to adulthood. With my father being a member of SPLM/A Battalion 105 aka Ashara-kamsa or Koriom, and my mother pregnant with me during the civil war in the late eighties, I was automatically born into the SPLM. That means I am an SPLM by birth. And since none of the opposition parties has what it takes to win my admiration, and as a good citizen, I have only two things to do and they are, one, to remain in the SPLM and two, to fight it from within. And here goes my bullet.

Let me begin with the word that I loathe the most – sycophancy, a word beautifully tattooed on many faces in the country. You need an extra eye to see the tattoo though. A sycophant is a servile self-seeker who attempts to win favor by flattering influential people. That’s it. The ruling SPLM party is a sycophant-fortified city. Back in the day, in the bush, sycophancy was a necessity. It was an air, a ticket for survival. This was because the movement’s leadership was debatably tyrannical, militaristic, and vampiric. It had no time to play with dissidents. It was zero-tolerant to criticism. Those who dared object to any decision made by the Late John Garang and seconded by his loyalists were frowned at and frog-marched to frog-ponds for punitive drowning. Some rot in dungeons. On the battle grounds, hardliners were ‘shot in the back of their heads’ after they compulsorily led their respective infantries to frontlines. You can put that together.

The SPLM members who are actually the liberators, the ruling elite or even the gods of life are suffering from two diseases, chronic ones: highly exaggerated sycophancy and empty loyalness. The two diseases are viral and hereditary and they are the root cause of the irresoluteness in the government, the very reason it is weak-kneed. Being loyal is not bad. But the saddest part of it is that SPLM loyalists got addicted to their role until they transformed into sycophants.

Inarguably, the country is in the pocket of a cultish group of the much-hyped influential figures, namely: Salva Kiir, Riek Machar, Wani Igga, Pagan Amum, Kuol Manyang, Rebecca Nyandeng, Hoth Mai, Gier Chuang plus some underpublicized souls, most of whom are wealthy businesspeople. They are all SPLM. What they agree on is final, regardless of its potential impact on the common man. What they do, or fail to do, unveils their real faces. It indicates the exactitude of their unspoken intentions – to rid the country of the poor, which make up to 70 percent of the total population. That’s why they hardly criticize each other publicly. They are all indebted to each other. Since I woke up from the teenage coma a couple of years ago, I have never heard or read any of them engaging each other in a decent disagreement over any national issue in the media.

The Transitional Constitution of the Republic of South Sudan which was brought to existence by some of the clique’s learned members prohibits them from dealing in any profit-making projects, a trashy provision they seemingly smilingly dust off their shoulders. It decrees that:

“The President, Vice President, Presidential Advisors, Ministers, and Deputy Ministers of the National Government, Governors, state Advisors, state Ministers, and other constitutional office holders shall, during their tenure of office, neither practice any private profession, transact commercial business, nor receive remuneration or accept employment of any kind from any source other than the National Government or a state government as the case may be.”

Who amongst the senior civil servants is not running a commercial business, in or outside the country or both? The person who made that a law wasn’t foolish. He knew what it is like to mix civil service with personal business programs. When you’re a businessman, honesty flies out through the roof. You become vulnerable to cheating. Pillage becomes your hobby.

In February this year, a dubious written order exempting Vivacell, the largest mobile telephony company, from paying taxes for a period of about ten years got leaked:

“….the licensor hereby ensures to the licensee that the license is granted tax exemptions for a period of ten years at least, such tax exemption include custom duties, income taxes, sale taxes, etc. or any other taxes which may be imposed in the near future such as Value Added Taxes and the Licensor undertakes to indemnify the license in full in that respect. As such, the excise tax is not applicable on Vivacell.”

Why would the government free such an income generating company from taxes? Who owns Vivacell anyway? Is he an ordinary businessman or a senior government official, a South Sudanese or a foreign national?

On Wednesday, the Finance minister, after being fried, roasted and tossed around by the Parliamentary Public Accounts Committee over misappropriated millions of dollars he disbursed to some company, rightfully snitched on His Excellency:

“Yes, the money was disbursed, no contract agreement, the disbursement was based on the strength of the letter of H.E the President,”

Very freaking unbelievable!! Did the President actually sign that paper himself or someone forged his signature? Or did someone lure the old man into such a self-degrading act?

In November 2008, a Lebanese paper carried a story about high-profiled SPLA generals on a visit to Beirut. The Generals, who are currently holding ministerial positions in the government, went to check out the progress of their 25 companies that they had created some years back. Beirut Business Weekly quoted a Lebanese official as saying:

“This significant visit will definitely help bring the two trading partners businessmen closer and also help strengthen the trading ties between Lebanese Businessmen and SPLA generals… Lebanese foreign trade with SPLA reached US 11.085 million in 2006 to 2007. There are 25 SPLA companies operating in Beirut and are registered with the Chamber.”

Are those companies public or private? Ain’t Lebanon the pit latrine where the SPLA soldiers’ salaries were intentionally dumped into, forcing the freedom fighters to become herbivorous, mango and grass eaters?

If SPLM wasn’t a group of freemasons, who among them would need a degree in rocket sciences in order to see the deliberate violations of the law by his or her colleagues? If the SPLM wasn’t an acephalous organization of hardcore official criminals whose members find pleasure in crimes they do without fear of rebuke and severe punishment, who among them would hesitate to condemn the crimes committed by his colleagues; crimes that crippled and continue to cripple the young nation and its citizens?

Unless an internal democratic war erupts within my beloved party, the SPLM, never shall the country get democratic. I don’t have an idea what would cause such a war but I am very hopeful that it will happen. If it does break out, each influential official with presidential aspirations will civilly walk away and form his or her own political party with a manifesto, aimed at attracting all South Sudanese, despite tribal marks, height, weight, belly-size and et cetera.


South Sudan's ruling SPLM party secretary general and head of the South Sudan delegation Amum smiles after a meeting Sudan's President Bashir in Khartoum
South Sudan’s ruling Sudan People’s Liberation Movement (SPLM) party secretary general and head of the South Sudan delegation Pagan Amum smiles after a meeting with Sudan’s President Omar al-Bashir in…
Chief mediator Thabo Mbeki (L) and Pagan Amum (R) Secretary General of the SPLM
Chief mediator for Sudan-South Sudan peace talks, former South Africa president, Thabo Mbeki (L) and Pagan Amum (R) Secretary General of the SPLM (Sudan Peoples’ Liberation Movement) walk out of a …
Sudan People's Liberation Army (SPLA) forces at the frontline in Tachuien, Unity State, South Sudan on Friday, May 11, 2012. In late April,<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
 tensions between Sudan and South Sudan erupted into armed conflict along their poorly defined border. Thousands of SPLA forces have been deployed to Unity State where the two armies are at a tense stalemate around the state's expansive oil fields. Fighting between the armies lulled in early May after the U.N. Security Council ordered the countries to resume negotiations. South Sudan seceded from the Republic of Sudan in July 2011 following decades of civil war. (AP Photo/Pete Muller)
Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) forces at the frontline in Tachuien, Unity State, South Sudan on Friday, May 11, 2012. In late April, tensions between Sudan and South Sudan erupted into armed
Sudan<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
 People's Liberation Army (SPLA) soldiers inspect ordinance dropped by the Sudan Armed Forces (SAF) at a frontline position in Pana Kuach, Unity State, South Sudan. SAF forces regularly employ air strikes, a capability that southern forces lack. In late April, tensions between Sudan and South Sudan erupted into armed conflict along their poorly defined border. Thousands of SPLA forces have been deployed to Unity State where the two armies are at a tense stalemate around the state's expansive oil fields. Fighting between the armies lulled in early May after the U.N. Security Council ordered the countries to resume negotiations. South Sudan seceded from the Republic of Sudan in July 2011 following decades of civil war. (AP Photo/Pete Muller)
Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) soldiers inspect ordinance dropped by the Sudan Armed Forces (SAF) at a frontline position in Pana Kuach, Unity State, South Sudan. SAF forces regularly employ
A Sudan People's Liberation Army (SPLA) commander dons the new insignia of the 4th Division petroleum defense unit in Bentiu, Unity State, South Sudan on Friday, May 11, 2012. In late April, tensions between Sudan<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
 and South Sudan erupted into armed conflict along their poorly defined border. Thousands of SPLA forces have been deployed to Unity State where the two armies are at a tense stalemate around the state's expansive oil fields. Fighting between the armies lulled in early May after the U.N. Security Council ordered the countries to resume negotiations. South Sudan seceded from the Republic of Sudan in July 2011 following decades of civil war. (AP Photo/Pete Muller)
A Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) commander dons the new insignia of the 4th Division petroleum defense unit in Bentiu, Unity State, South Sudan on Friday, May 11, 2012. In late April, tensions
A Sudan People's Liberation Movement Army (SPLA) solider has his hair cut at a frontline position in Pana Kuach, Unity State, South Sudan on Friday, May 11, 2012. In late April, tensions between Sudan and South Sudan erupted<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
 into armed conflict along their poorly defined border. Thousands of SPLA forces have been deployed to Unity State where the two armies are at a tense stalemate around the state's expansive oil fields. Fighting between the armies lulled in early May after the U.N. Security Council ordered the countries to resume negotiations. South Sudan seceded from the Republic of Sudan in July 2011 following decades of civil war. (AP Photo/Pete Muller)
A Sudan People’s Liberation Movement Army (SPLA) solider has his hair cut at a frontline position in Pana Kuach, Unity State, South Sudan on Friday, May 11, 2012. In late April, tensions between Sudan…
Soldiers from the Sudan People's Liberation Army (SPLA) examine a map at the frontline position in Pana Kuach, Unity State, South Sudan, Friday May 11 2012. In late April, tensions between Sudan and South Sudan erupted into conflict along their poorly defined border. Thousands of SPLA forces have been deployed to Unity State where<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />
 the two armies are at a tense stalemate around the state's expansive oil fields. Fighting between the armies lulled in early May after the U.N. Security Council ordered the countries to resume negotiations. (AP Photo/Pete Muller)
Soldiers from the Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) examine a map at the frontline position in Pana Kuach, Unity State, South Sudan, Friday May 11 2012. In late April, tensions between Sudan and …
By Deng Angok

And this, apparently, was done in the name of GOD? Unbelievable!

On the trail of Sudanese warrior

http://www.southsudanhub.com/media/65/On_the_trail_of_Sudanese_warrior/

I can’t help thinking about this timeless song of the SPLM/A:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FUKaUVXX3n0&feature=related

The good news, a befitting consolation to such an unimaginable and indescribable atrocities, is that THEY never succeeded to weaken the will nor the determination of the SPLM/A to realize their stated goal of liberation:

Republic of South Sudan Independence Day – 9th July 2011 – Yei, Central Equatoria

http://www.southsudanhub.com/media/184/Republic_of_South_Sudan_Independence_Day_-_9th_July_2011_-_Yei,_Central_Equatoria/

South Sudan Independence Day in Juba

http://www.southsudanhub.com/media/135/South_Sudanese_Celebrate_Independence/

The history of the war in (South) Sudan:

The Longest War – Sudan

http://www.southsudanhub.com/media/18/The_Longest_War_-_Sudan/

Crossroads Sudan: Sudan’s Tribal Division

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7NQQXB-v0TU

Crossroads Sudan – Profile: John Garang

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H1bL1Qir4AE&feature=relmfu

Al-Tarubi

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eMvoFSCW65k&feature=relmfu

Referendum:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eIZ4wygvt8w&feature=relmfu

Sudan’s tribal division
As the south votes on whether to secede, we take a closer look at the nation’s racial issues behind the divide.
Crossroads Sudan Last Modified: 21 Dec 2010 11:06 GMT
http://www.aljazeera.com/AJEPlayer/player-licensed-viral.swfSudan stands at a crossroads with the people of the south set to vote in January on whether to become an independent nation. This referendum is part of a 2005 peace deal which brought to an end a devastating 22-year civil war which left two million people dead and the same number homeless. Now, with the south likely to secede, Sudan’s borders and history may have to be rewritten.Al Jazeera looks at the racial issues behind the split, the impact of Sudan’s rich resources and the challenge of development ahead.

Profile: Omar Al-Bashir
http://www.aljazeera.com/AJEPlayer/player-licensed-viral.swf

Sudan, with 44 million people Africa largest nation, is rich in diversity and tradition but it is deeply divided along tribal lines.

It is on the verge of splitting in two with a potential for more fragmentation in the months and years ahead – a break up that could quickly deteriorate into another bloody conflict involving nations far beyond its borders.

After gaining independence in 1956, the nation has spent the best part of four decades fighting two civil wars. The most recent resulted in the death of two million people – and officially ended five years ago with the Comprehensive Peace Agreement.

In 2005, Sudan’s leaders agreed a peace deal which offered the people of south Sudan the right to choose whether to stay united, or go their own way.

Few were sure the vote would ever take place, let alone that the south would secede. But today more than four million southerners in the north, in the south and abroad have registered for a vote set to take place on January 9.

And all the signs show they will vote to break away.

Challenges ahead

If they do, an unstable region, cursed by conflict, short on infrastructure and in desperate need of development, will step into new ground.

The UN has illustrated the scale of the tasks ahead by publishing a list of what it called “Scary Statistics”.

Among the most startling are these:
• 92 per cent of women cannot read and write in the south
• One out of every seven children will die before they reach the age of five
• One out of every seven women who become pregnant can expect to die from problems related to their pregnancy

The largely black African, Christian and animist south has suffered decades of neglect by a predominantly Arab, Muslim North. It needs to work hard to build an independent nation.

The route the nation takes will be decided by the people of the south in the January referendum. How it treads the path will be decided by its two leaders, President Omar al-Bashir and Salva Kiir, the south’s president-in-waiting, and the man to lead the south on its route to secession.

Breaking away

Profile: Salva Kiir
http://www.aljazeera.com/AJEPlayer/player-licensed-viral.swf

These two men have a number of thorny issues to negotiate as the country moves forward. One of those is how to delineate the border. Its path still has to be decided.

Sudan is home to a number of nomadic tribes, many of whom cross the line of the proposed border to feed and water their cattle. The question of what they do and where they go has still to be looked at.

Many of the smaller tribes of southern Sudan are concerned about being dominated by the bigger tribes, they fear the hegemony of the Dinka tribe since Salva Kiir and most of the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement (SPLM) leadership are Dinka.

Some tribes are known to be arming themselves, in some cases with the support of the armies of the North and the South.

It creates a series of flashpoints along the line of division, one of the most volatile of which may be Abyei. The state was supposed to get its own referendum to decide whether to become part of the North or the south. But that has failed to materialise and the fate of the region is now in the hands of the politicians.

With the CPA set to expire in July, north and south Sudan would have very little time to agree upon the practical issues of how to separate. If the issues are not solved by then, the two countries would face an uncertain future.

In this episode of Crossroads Sudan, Al Jazeera takes a closer look at the nation’s racial issues behind the divide. We went to find out why the status of Sudan is being watched with interest in Kenya, Egypt and Israel. Plus, the people of Sudan let us know what they really want for the future of their country.

Crossroads Sudan can be seen from Monday, December 20, at 1730GMT, with repeats at 2230GMT, and Tuesday at 0430GMT and 1030GMT.


JUBA DECLARATION ON UNITY AND INTERGRATION BETWEEN THE SUDAN PEOPLE’S LIBERATION ARMY (SPLA) AND THE SOUTH SUDAN DEFENCE FORCES (SSDF)

January 8th 2006

PREAMBLE

The SPLA and SSDF having met in Juba between the 6th and 8th January, 2006 and fully aware of the provisions of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) regarding the status of the Other Armed Groups (OAG’s).

Committed to upholding and defending the Comprehensive Peace Agreement and its full implementation;

Motivated by their desire for peace, reconciliation and unity among the people of Southern Sudan;

Determined to end all forms of conflict and hostilities among themselves, so as to usher a new era of hope, stability and sustainable development in Southern Sudan;

Further determined to build trust and confidence among themselves and to avoid past mistakes that have led to divisions and internecine conflict between themselves and among the people of Southern Sudan in general;

Cognizant of the fact that the SPLM led Government has already included members of the SSDF in the institutions of Government of National Unity, the Government of Southern Sudan and the Governments of the States to ensure SSDF participation;

Acknowledging that the people of Southern Sudan have one indivisible destiny;

Inspired by the struggle and the immense sacrifices and suffering of our people in defence of their land, freedom, dignity, culture identity and common history; and

Remembering our fallen heroes, heroines and martyrs who paid the ultimate price for the freedom of our people and to ensure that these sacrifices are not in vain;

Do hereby make the following Declaration to be known as the Juba Declaration on Unity and Integration:

Complete and unconditional unity between the SPLA and SSDF.
Agree to immediately integrate their two forces to form one unified, non partisan Army under the name of SPLA as stipulated in the Comprehensive Peace Agreement.
Immediate and total cessation of all forms of hostilities and to ensure that all their forces and persons under their control observe and comply with this declaration.
Guarantee freedom of movement of people, goods and services in all areas in Southern Sudan.
Declaration of general amnesty covering any criminal acts committed during the past period of hostilities between the two forces.
Appeal to any armed persons or groups outside the two forces to join the process of unity and reconciliation in order to promote peace, stability and development throughout Southern Sudan.
The unified Movement shall mobilize the people of Southern Sudan behind this agreement and to support its implementation.

IMPLEMENTATION

In implementation of this declaration the two parties agree to form the following committees:

1. High Political Committee

There shall be a High Political Committee to oversee the overall implementation of this unity agreement. It shall be established by the Chairman of the SPLM and C- in – C of SPLA in consultation with Major- General Paulino Matip Nhial, Chief of Staff of the SSDF.

2. Military Technical Committee

There shall be established a Military Technical Committee consisting of equal numbers to implement the terms of this declaration. It shall be established by the Chairman of the SPLM and C- in – C of SPLA in consultation with Major General Paulino Matip Nhial, Chief of Staff of the SSDF. The Joint Military Technical Committee shall report to the High Political Committee and handle inter alia the following issues:

¨ Integration of SSDF into the SPLA and its command structures and all its component units including the Joint Integration Units.
¨ Harmonisation of ranks and deployment of forces and to report to the principals.
¨ Handle issues of demobilisation and downsizing of forces in accordance with the provisions of the CPA.
¨ Report to the High Political Committee on all matters relating to this Unity Declaration.

3. Administrative and Civil Service Committee

This committee shall deal with the integration of non military personnel of SSDF into the Civil Service of the Government of Southern Sudan and the Governments of the States.

v Call on the National Congress Party and the Sudan Armed Forces (SAF)

The Sudan People’s Liberation Movement/Army (SPLM/A) calls upon its partner the National Congress Party (NCP) and the Sudan Armed Forces (SAF) to support this agreement which has been guided by the provision of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement regarding the status of the Other Armed Groups (OAG’s). The decision by the SSDF to be integrated into the SPLA is a legitimate decision which will consolidate peace and security in Southern Sudan and the Sudan at large. The two parties signatory to the agreement call on all other Sudanese political forces to support this declaration.

v Appeal to the International Community

The two parties also appeal to the international community to support this agreement as it will consolidate peace in the Sudan and bring about lasting peace among the people of Southern Sudan.

Signed by:

H.E Lt. General Salva Kiir Mayardit
1st Vice President of the Republic of Sudan,
President of the Government of South Sudan and Chairman of the SPLM
Commander- in-Chief of SPLA.

and

Major General Paulino Matip Nhial
Chief of Staff of Southern Sudan
Defence Force (SSDF)

Witnessed by

Mr. Aaron R. Tuikong S.S.
Chief Executive,
Moi Africa Institute (MAIN)