Posts Tagged ‘sudanese army’


South Sudan says Sudan bombs oil region

 By Yara Bayoumy

JUBA | Mon Apr 30, 2012

(Reuters) – South Sudan said on Monday Sudanese war planes bombed an oil region in the newly independent state, a day after Khartoum declared a state of emergency in some border areas as tensions showed no signs of abating.

Weeks of border fighting have raised fears Sudan and South Sudan could return to all-out war, after failing to resolve a string of disputes over oil revenues and border demarcation.

Philip Aguer, spokesman for South Sudan’s army, the SPLA, said Sudanese forces had bombed Panakuach in Unity State.

“There was bombing in Panakuach yesterday. Not less than four bombs were dropped,” Aguer said, adding there had been no reports of casualties.

There was no immediate comment from the Sudanese army.

South Sudan has accused Sudan of using its warplanes to bomb its territories. Khartoum has denied it, though it has said it reserves the right to use air strikes in self-defense.

Unity State has come under repeated bombardment over the past week, and an air strike in its capital Bentiu last Monday killed two people.

Sudanese President Omar Hassan al-Bashir on Sunday declared a state of emergency in some areas of South Kordofan, White Nile and Sinnar provinces bordering South Sudan.

Meanwhile, Foreign Minister Ali Ahmed Karti said Sudan reserved the right to deploy its forces along the border with South Sudan for legitimate protection.

“This is within the borders of Sudan and not outside of Sudan and this is our right, we can deploy our forces anywhere,” he said in Moscow after meeting his Russian counterpart.

“We’re not at all preparing ourselves for war.”

The former civil war foes also accuse each other of backing rebel militias. Each side denies the other’s allegations.

The spokesman for the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North (SPLM-N), a rebel group that has been fighting the Sudanese army in South Kordofan and Blue Nile states since last year, said the group had taken control of the town of Talodi.

He said SPLM-N fighters had pushed out Sudanese forces from the town after government forces killed three civilians in two separate bombings in other areas, but Khartoum’s army spokesman al-Sawarmi Khalid denied those accounts.

“The military forces did wide combing of the area outside Talodi and succeeded in pushing backing SPLM-N forces,” he told Reuters by telephone, saying that was away from Talodi itself.

“There are no clashes inside Talodi and it is under full government control. Any talk of SPLM forces being in Talodi is mere lies,” Khalid said. “The army did not bomb any civilians.”

FOREIGNERS DETAINED

Further raising tensions was Sudan’s arrest of a Briton, Norwegian and South African who it said had illegally entered the disputed Heglig area to spy for the SPLA.

South Sudanese officials have denied these allegations and said the men had been working with United Nations and aid groups clearing mines and had got lost in the remote territory.

The U.N. mission in South Sudan (UMISS) which said one of its officials had been taken to Khartoum with the three other men, was trying to free the group.

“UNMISS has been in contact with the Sudanese authorities to try and secure their release,” said Josephine Guerrero, a spokeswoman for the mission.

The Sudanese foreign ministry said it had held discussions with the ambassadors of the countries of those arrested. In a statement, it said it told the ambassadors that the three were being investigated because they entered Sudan illegally.

“They were in areas of military activity, they possessed military equipment,” the statement said, adding that the detainees were being treated in accordance with the standards of international law and the investigation would be speedy.

South Sudan seceded from Sudan in July, six months after a referendum agreed under a 2005 peace deal that ended two decades of civil war which killed more than 2 million people.

But distrust runs deep between the neighbors, who are at loggerheads over the position of their border, how much the landlocked south should pay to transport its oil through Sudan, the division of national debt and other issues.

The African Union is pushing to bring both sides to the table, giving them an ultimatum of three months to reach a deal. South Sudan has said it accepts the African Union’s seven-point plan, which calls for an immediate cessation of hostilities.

The African Union said in a statement on Monday it looked forward to receiving Sudan’s formal acceptance of the road map so that steps can be taken towards implementing it.

Russia said on Monday a draft U.N. Security Council resolution on Sudan and South Sudan did not amount to a threat of sanctions but that “economic measures” could be taken against the two countries if they failed to comply with calls to stop hostilities.

(Additional reporting by Khaled Abelaziz and Ulf Laessing in Khartoum and Lidia Kelly in Moscow; Writing by Dina Zayed in Cairo; Editing by Andrew Roche)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/04/30/us-sudan-idUSBRE83T0VK20120430

South Sudan Accuses North of Attacks, Khartoun Denies
Voice of America
April 30, 2012 South Sudan Accuses North of Attacks, Khartoun Denies VOA News South Sudan’s army says Sudan has launched attacks along the two countries’ border. SPLA commander General James Gatluak says the Sudan Armed Forces, using artillery and 

South Sudan says Sudan bombs oil region
Reuters
By Yara Bayoumy | JUBA (Reuters) – South Sudan said on Monday Sudanese war planes bombed an oil region in the newly independent state, a day after Khartoum declared a state of emergency in some border areas as tensions showed no signs of abating.

Uganda suggests Joseph Kony getting Sudan support
Fox News
“Kony has always been a pawn in the Khartoum chess game over South Sudan. They have used him before and they hope to use him again to destabilize South Sudan,” Kulayigye said. Abdulla Ali Masar, Sudan’s information minister, denied his government has 

South Sudan and Khartoum should return to the negotiating table and settle 
New Vision
The agreement, which was signed in Kenya, was the basis for last year’s referendum that resulted in South Sudan’s secession from Sudan. But tension has risen between the two nations recently, mainly over disputed oil fields that lie close to unclear 
Sudan Declares State of Emergency as Clashes Continue
New York Times
KHARTOUM, Sudan — Sudan declared a state of emergency on Sunday along much of its border with South Sudan as the momentum toward all-out war continues to build after weeks of clashes over disputed areas and oil. President Omar Hassan al-Bashir’s

Sudan: President Declares State of Emergency in Border Areas
AllAfrica.com
Khartoum — Sudanese president, Omer Hassan al-Bashir on Sunday has declared the state of emergency in some cities of three states neighbouring the Republic of South Sudan. The presidential decree comes after heavy clashes between the Sudanese and 

Sudan state governor expels 12000 South Sudanese
Calgary Herald
KHARTOUM – A governor in a Sudanese border state has set a one-week deadline for 12000 ethnicSouth Sudanese gathered south of Khartoum to leave the country, state news agency SUNA reported on Sunday. “The wali (governor) of White Nile state, 

China to loan South Sudan $8 billion, Juba says
MSN Philippines News
China has agreed to loan oil-rich South Sudan eight billion dollars for infrastructure development, Juba government spokesman Barnaba Mariel Benjamin said on Saturday. “It will fund roads, bridges, hydropower, agriculture and telecommunications 

NPC Takes Paralympics Sports to South Sudan
AllAfrica.com
By Bonnie Mugabe, 30 April 2012 The national Paralympics Committee (NPC) has taken the sport to the world’s newest nation, South Sudan. The NPC chairman Dominique Bizimana held sitting volleyball training and theory sessions with residents of Rumbek 

Political Blotter: Barbara Lee to co-chair Sudan Caucus
San Jose Mercury News
In her news release Tuesday, Lee noted ongoing strife in the Sudanese border areas of South Kordofan, Blue Nile, Abyei, and Darfur, and in Yida and other refugee camps in South Sudan. Civilians are subject to the Sudanese government’s indiscriminate 

South Sudan wins $8B Chinese loan offer
Devex
By Ivy Mungcal on 30 April 2012 A sign at the airport in Juba, South Sudan. China has promised an $8 billion loan for development projects in the country. Photo by: BBC World Service / CC BY-NC China’s promise of an $8 billion loan for infrastructure, 

Sudan’s EAC Membership to Be Decided Later
AllAfrica.com
By Marc Nkwame, 29 April 2012 Arusha — THE five, East African Community’s Heads of state, during their extra ordinary summit meeting in Arusha on Saturday, said they will decide on South Sudan’s application to join EAC in November this year.

On Occasion of Panthou Incident – Will Taib Mustafa Satanic Ambitious Destroy 
AllAfrica.com
 Taib Mustafa had been working against the Comprehensive Peace Agreement, that he was the first Northern Arab who publicly had demanded for separation of South Sudan from old Sudan, calling for pure Arab and Islamic free of African and non-Muslims.

Rebel chief Kony ‘in Sudan-S.Sudan border areas’
AFP
KAMPALA — Fugitive rebel warlord Joseph Kony is operating in volatile border areas between Sudan and South Sudan, as well as the Central African Republic, Uganda’s army chief said Monday. Kony, originally from Uganda, is based in remote regions 

South Sudan police to withdraw from Abyei
Sudan Tribune
April 29, 2012 (LONDON) – South Sudan informed that United Nations Sunday that it intends to withdraw all its police from the disputed Abyei region, which is claimed by both Sudan and South Sudan, a letter from the UN’s newest member told the world 

South Sudan: The Hypocrisy of the Rhetoric of Racism in the War of Blood for 
Tucson Citizen
 continues to employ the language of racism against Republicans and Conservatives, they ignore Sudan President Bashir’s encouraging of the use of ‘slaves” and ‘descendents of slaves” to dehumanize the people of the new nation of South Sudan.

 


Sudan v South Sudan: Close to the brink

Apr 28th 2012 | BENTIU, JUBA AND NAIROBI | from the print edition

THE military build-up is immediately apparent in the barracks in Rubkona, just a few miles south of the disputed border between the two Sudans. It is usually home just to the 4th division of the South Sudanese army, but pickup trucks with mounted machineguns and the logo of the 6th division loll in the shade while the 2nd division puts on a show for visiting journalists. Both units are usually based much farther south. Alcohol laces the breath of a parading soldier early in the morning. Generals, including the army chief of staff and the deputy head of military intelligence, discuss the latest events.

On April 20th South Sudan announced the withdrawal of its troops from the Heglig oilfields north of the de facto border after seizing them ten days earlier. The leaders of the new country, which formally gained independence from the north only nine months ago, had come under intense pressure from the African Union and the UN, which described the advance as an “illegal act”. The north claimed a military victory, saying it had killed hundreds of Southern Sudanese. The truth probably lies in-between: finding it harder than it anticipated to hold on to Heglig, South Sudan retreated under fire. Civilians and soldiers looted anything of value. Oil installations are severely damaged—a big blow to Sudan’s economy, which is already reeling from the south’s secession.

Along the grassy border, even after the southern withdrawal, fighting has continued. There were ground clashes on April 22nd and Sudan conducted a series of air raids. On April 23rd MiG jets roared over Bentiu and Rubkona (see map). Plucky locals, not all in uniform, fired haplessly at them with AK-47s and the odd machinegun. The aircraft tried to destroy a bridge between the two towns, which allows South Sudan to send reinforcements to what is now thought of as “the front”.

One jet also strafed Rubkona’s market, killing at least two people. The next day, farmers and charcoal-sellers were among those wounded when a market in Lalop was hit. A local leader, Taban Deng, claims that well over 80 civilians have been killed in air raids since the beginning of March. Nyaka Tunguar, a teaseller, was the only survivor when a rocket hit her stall. “I was injured and five people died, but they died for their land, so I am proud.” Nationalist sentiment is running high in both countries, though Sudan’s archbishop, Daniel Deng, is probably right when he warns that the two governments are close to starting a war that their people do not need or really want.

Sudan’s leaders deny any cross-border incursions. President Omar al-Bashir was bullish when he visited Heglig after its recapture. “There can be no negotiations”, he said, with the South Sudanese, who understand only “the gun and bullets”. A couple of days earlier he described South Sudan’s politicians as insects to be eradicated. Hardliners in Khartoum, the northern capital, want the army to sweep deep into the south, or at least to take over oilfields beyond the border. More thoughtful types in the top brass realise the northern army is overstretched; it is already engaged in the rebellious regions of Darfur, Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile.

The United States has protested loudly against aggression on both sides. A presidential envoy visited the north and south but had relatively little to offer. The African Union (AU) urged both sides to stop fighting, and said they had three months to sort out their disagreements, which include the exact location of the border, the status of each country’s citizens in the other state and, above all, oil. But the AU has few powers for imposing a resolution.

Some of its members may be better placed to influence events. Ugandan officials have warned that they will respond to a Sudanese attack on Juba, the southern capital, from the air. That is no empty threat: a recent purchase of Russian Sukhoi fighter jets puts Sudan in range. Kenya, like Uganda a big investor in the south, has been more measured in its response, stressing that South Sudan should become a member of the East African Community, a trade block. Kenyan leaders are keen for South Sudanese oil to flow through a proposed pipeline to a new port due to be built on Kenya’s coast near Lamu.

Ethiopia is also involved. Meles Zenawi, the prime minister, has worked hard to build trust on both sides. Ethiopian traders supply many Sudanese in both countries with cheap goods. Mr Meles has previously hosted talks and sent peacekeepers to some parts of the disputed border. He could now decide to withdraw or reinforce them. Ethiopian officials say they are working with Egypt, with which it has had testy relations, to find a common position.

But can outsiders persuade the warring parties to stand down? The north is not very responsive at the moment, whereas southern politicians are sending mixed signals. President Salva Kiir flew to China on April 23rd, another country with influence on both sides, and listened to pleas for peace. But his vice-president, Riek Machar, said back home, “We will defend ourselves. If they continue bombarding, if they continue to attack us, we definitely will retaliate.”

There is grandstanding on both sides, along with the mobilisation of civilians. Sudan has boosted its Popular Defence Force, a state militia, and the south is telling its people to stop fighting tribal battles and defend the homeland. War is closer than at any time since the 2005 peace deal that ended decades of civil war. This time, there is unlikely to be a winner.

http://www.economist.com/node/21553453

The Sudans at loggerheads

Africa’s next big war?

Less than a year after partition, the two Sudans are close to conflict. China holds the key to peace

Apr 28th 2012 | from the print edition

BADLY drawn imperialist borders that cut across tribes or lumped too many diverse people unhappily together once fuelled much violence in Africa. Half a century after independence full-blown wars are much rarer, even if some borders still irritate. One of the last open wounds appeared to close on July 9th 2011, when the mainly Christian and animist south of Sudan seceded from the predominantly Muslim north. After decades of fighting that killed some 2m people, partition seemed to mark a success for both African and Western mediators.

Yet now that success is overshadowed by the threat of war. Over the past nine months the two Sudanese successor states were supposed to find a way to divide up such things as oil revenues, border posts and the rights of people living on one side of the border who wish to be citizens on the other. Both sides made outsized demands and engaged in extreme brinkmanship. New sparks flew when the south announced plans to build a pipeline to the Indian Ocean, through Kenya to the south-east, which would cut the north out of most of the oil trade. Militias, often proxies of the old rump state or the new southern one, attacked each other. International mediators, vital as brokers of the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement that paved the way for partition, stood aside, though Ethiopia and Egypt organised some talks and the UN proffered advice. Barack Obama last week made a stirring appeal for calm.

On balance, the north has been more obstructive than the south. For years it has repeatedly acted in bad faith, loth even to contemplate independence for the south. But more recently it is the south that has been reckless, sending its troops to capture the Heglig oilfield, which lies clearly to the north of the border. This has turned niggling animosity into a conventional battle for territory. The north recaptured its lost land on April 20th, killing hundreds in the process and bombing a market near the southern town of Bentiu on April 23rd (see article).

Negotiations have completely broken down. Both sides talk darkly of a “declaration of war”. This may be just more brinkmanship, but could tip everyone over the edge. Troops are massing on the border. The south, once a lot weaker in conventional terms, has bought a bazaar of arms, including tanks.

As well as causing untold misery in the Sudans, an all-out conflict could suck in other countries. Uganda’s government has threatened to help South Sudan against the north, which it suspects of funding a Ugandan terror group, the Lord’s Resistance Army. Other governments in the region are keenly aware that the Sudans sit on a fault-line between Muslims and Christians that cuts from east to west across the continent, reaching volatile Nigeria and beyond.

There be dragons

Common sense can and should prevail. Some northerners still want the south to fail as a state; it needs to be spelled out to them that, if this were to happen, the north would suffer badly too. The underlying question is financial: how much should the landlocked south pay the north for using its pipelines and export terminals on the Red Sea to export its oil? The north has been demanding a ludicrous price. But the Sudans need each other: the oil and the pipelines are both worthless by themselves. If the two countries could agree on a way to divide up the spoils, the rest should fall into place.

Outsiders can help break the deadlock. The United States can lean on the south to dissuade it from making foolish cross-border raids. At the same time, the West should make clear that it will lift sanctions currently imposed on the north because of its depredations in Darfur (a separate bloody conflict), but only if the north proves more willing to co-operate on every front, including the pipelines. The UN should also send peacekeepers as a buffer along the north-south border.

Most crucially, the Chinese should step forward. They are best placed of all to secure a lasting peace deal, for they alone have the contacts, the credibility and commercial interests on both sides. Once allies of the northerners, they are now just as close to the south. It was to Beijing that South Sudan’s president, Salva Kiir, flew at the height of the most recent spat.

The Sudans were China’s sixth-biggest source of oil imports in 2011. The fighting has snarled up production. Alive to their own interests, Chinese leaders have started to inch from their longstanding doctrine of non-interference in imbroglios in far-flung places. Keeping the peace in the Sudans could be a showcase of a new Chinese diplomacy—to the benefit of all.

http://www.economist.com/node/21553442

Sudan and South Sudan: Giving divorce a bad name

South Sudan has invaded parts of the north less than a year after its secession

Apr 14th 2012 | KHARTOUM | from the print edition

THE cold war between Africa’s newest neighbours is heating up. South Sudanese troops advanced deep into Sudan on April 10th, capturing its most valuable oilfield, Heglig, in the biggest clash since the south seceded from the north last July. Southern troops claimed to be responding to air and ground attacks from their former master, but the scale of the offensive is unprecedented. A fragile peace process that has survived several bumps in the past few months may now falter. Sudan has suspended its participation in the divorce negotiations in neighbouring Ethiopia. Parliaments in both countries are calling for military mobilisation. The drums of war beat ever louder.

The last straw could be South Sudan claiming Heglig as its own. A ruling by the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague in 2009 appears to put the field in the Sudanese state of Southern Kordofan. But the south now disputes this. “Heglig is deep inside our borders,” says Colonel Philip Aguer, a spokesman for South Sudan’s army, adding that its troops have moved farther north. Sudan will not accept this, and for once it seems to be getting some international support. The African Union is calling on the south to withdraw its soldiers immediately and unconditionally. Sudan has complained to the UN Security Council.

The crisis is a direct result of both sides’ failure to make progress in negotiations over post-secession security arrangements, citizenship rules and oil revenues, among other issues that should have been resolved long ago. Both countries have accused each other of supporting rebels on their territory since before separation. Of the two, the southern rebels in Sudan are by far the stronger. Known as SPLM-North, they supported the decades-long southern fight for independence but found themselves on the wrong side of the border at separation. The group controls much of the Nuba mountains in Southern Kordofan and launches guerrilla raids in Blue Nile state. Sudan says SPLM-North is getting weapons and supplies from South Sudan, and that its fighters go there to rest after battles. The northern rebels in the south are smaller but have sometimes caused havoc in Unity and Upper Nile states. A local oil worker says they previously helped to defend Heglig.

Just as Sudan faces a renewed threat from the south, the long-running civil conflict in its western Darfur region is escalating again. Three years ago, General Martin Agwai, then commander of African Union peacekeeping troops in Darfur, said the conflict was “over” and that banditry was now the biggest problem. But on April 3rd areas around Sortony in North Darfur were hit by aerial bombardments and attacked by pro-government militias on the ground, forcing thousands of civilians to flee and sparking fears that the bad old times are back.

They may be. A dissident report by former UN investigators that has been submitted to the Security Council—but not yet published—documents the recent recruitment of non-Arab militias by the Sudanese Armed Forces. They are accused of ethnic cleansing of the Zaghawa tribe,which is led by Minni Minnawi, a Darfuri rebel who last year withdrew from a peace agreement that had made him a presidential adviser. The report says the use of non-Arab militias marks a “significant evolution”. At least 70,000 civilians appear to have fled new attacks in 2011.

The UN report also documents fresh ammunition deliveries by the Sudanese army to Darfur and reports on a series of air bombardments of civilians in the Zaghawa stronghold of Shangal Tobay in early 2011. A UN arms embargo was apparently violated by the deployment of at least five Sudanese Sukhoi ground attack jets in Darfur and the acquisition by Sudan of new Antonov aircraft of a type that has previously been used in bombing campaigns. One Antonov was photographed next to open crates of bombs.

On the opposing side, Darfuri rebel groups seem to have formed an alliance with South Sudanese troops. Together they call themselves the Sudan Revolutionary Front. A separate report published this month by the Small Arms Survey, a Geneva-based think-tank, says that the two groups have claimed credit for the same attacks around Jau and Tarogi in February and for downing an unmanned Iranian-made plane in Southern Kordofan on March 13th.

The fighting is making life ever harder for the half million South Sudanese who live in the north. “I have been in this country for 43 years but am no longer welcome here,” says one, as he makes plans to leave in a hurry. Following separation, South Sudanese were given until April 8th to sort out their status. But South Sudan has failed to issue identity documents, leaving them in legal limbo. Most are keen to leave, fearing for their welfare.

Only a month ago a solution seemed at hand. Negotiators on both sides initialled a “Four Freedoms” agreement, allowing citizens to move, live, work and own property in either country. But Islamist hardliners in Sudan objected, accusing southerners of being fifth columnists. The loss of Sudan’s main oilfield will not reassure them.

http://www.economist.com/node/21552581


BENTIU, South Sudan (AP) – Sudanese armed forces launched an attack more than six miles inside South Sudan‘s border, an official said Sunday, days after the South announced it was pulling its troops from a disputed border town to avoid an all-out war between the two countries.

Soldiers of South-Sudan’s Sudan People’s Liberation Army leave the Rubkona Military Hospital in Rubkona, South Sudan, on Friday.

Ground troops from Sudan launched three waves of attacks, Deputy Director of Military Intelligence for South Sudan Maj. Gen. Mac Paul said.

A soldier’s body and two wounded soldiers were brought to a hospital, the clinical director at the Rubkona Military hospital, Dr. Zecharia Deng Aleer, said. Aleer said the soldiers were brought in from around the Pariang Junction, in South Sudan’s Unity State.

Paul said it was the first major engagement between the two armies since South Sudan announced it would pull out from the contested border town of Heglig.

Paul said the Sudanese forces “have come deeply in the south” and attacked with artillery and tanks. He said the attack was part of a “continuous provocation from the Sudanese Army.” Paul said Sudan also used “militias” in the attack.

Sudan and South Sudan have engaged in several clashes over the past two weeks around Heglig, which is claimed by both countries. Heglig is the site of a major oil facility, which supplies around half of Sudan’s oil.

Sudan and South Sudan have been drawing closer to a full-scale war in recent months over the unresolved issues of sharing oil revenues and a disputed border.

The international community, led by the U.S., has called for the two countries to stop all military actions against each other and restart negotiations to solve their disputes.

South Sudan broke away from Sudan in July of last year after an independence vote, the culmination of a 2005 peace treaty that ended decades of war that killed more than 2 million people. Despite the treaty, violence between the two countries has been on the rise.

http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/story/2012-04-22/south-sudan-attacked/54473206/1

South Sudan says Sudan attacked with artillery, tanks
USA TODAY
BENTIU, South Sudan (AP) – Sudanese armed forces launched an attack more than six miles inside South Sudan’s border, an official said Sunday, days after the South announced it was pulling its troops from a disputed border town to avoid an all-out war

South Sudan seeks Beijing investment
Financial Times
By Katrina Manson in Nairobi and Andrew England in Johannesburg South Sudan will seek Chinese funds to build an alternative oil pipeline so that it no longer depends on the north to export its oil, a senior official said, ahead of a presidential visit 

South Sudan says Sudan attacked with artillery, tanks
The News Journal
Soldiers of SouthSudan’s Sudan People’s Liberation Army leave the Rubkona Military Hospital in Rubkona, South Sudan, on Friday. / By Adriane Ohanesian, AFP/Getty Images BENTIU, South Sudan (AP) — Sudanese armed forces launched an attack more than six 

Beaver County Times
The church in Khartoum’s Al-Jiraif district was built on a disputed plot of land but the Saturday night incident appeared to be part of the fallout from ongoing hostilities between Sudan and South Sudanover control of an oil town on their ill-defined 

Sudan attacks S. Sudan
WTNH
BENTIU, South Sudan (AP) — South Sudan says it has been attacked by Sudanese Armed forces more than 6 miles inside its border. The attack comes days after South Sudan announced it is pulling its troops from the disputed town of Heglig to avoid an all 
Mob attacks church in Sudanese capital: witnesses
The West Australian
KHARTOUM (Reuters) – Hundreds of Muslims stormed a Christian church complex used by southerners in Khartoum at the weekend, witnesses said, raising fears that recent clashes between Sudan and South Sudan were stoking ethnic tensions in the city.

Obama urges Sudan talks after Heglig ‘withdrawal’
Myjoyonline.com
The presidents of Sudan and South Sudan “must have the courage” to return to the negotiating table and resolve their differences peacefully, says US President Barack Obama. He was speaking after South Sudan said it had ordered its troops to withdraw
Mosaic News 4/19/2012: UN Chief Calls for Expanded Monitoring Mission in Syria
linktv
UN chief calls for an expanded monitoring mission in Syria, Sudan’s al-Bashir vows to “liberate”South Sudan from its ruling party, Tunisians occupy Habib Bourguiba Avenue for a book reading demonstration, and more. Today’s headlines in full: UN chief 

Sudan oil infrastructure hit in border fight: monitor
Reuters
| KHARTOUM (Reuters) – Satellite images show a key part of the oil infrastructure in Sudan’s contested Heglig region was destroyed during recent border fighting with South Sudan, a monitoring group said on Sunday. South Sudan seized Heglig, 

Sudan says Juba pleaded with mediators to prevent bombardment of its troops in 
Sudan Tribune
April 21, 2012 (KHARTOUM) – Sudan’s presidential assistant, Nafie Ali Nafie, has accused South Sudan’s government of deceiving its people by saying that its army withdrew from Heglig. Oil-producing area of Heglig, claimed by both Sudan and South Sudan

Sudan’s army says routed rebel forces around Talodi
Sudan Tribune
April 21, 2012 (KHARTOUM) – The Sudanese Armed Forces (SAF) announced on Saturday that it repulsed fresh attempts by rebels of the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement/Army North (SPLM/AN) to capture areas around Talodi town in South Kordofan’s State.

Governor of South Sudan Lakes state replaces deputy
Sudan Tribune
Mayay will announce the rest of his new cabinet next week. Comments on the Sudan Tribune website must abide by the following rules. Contravention of these rules will lead to the user losing their Sudan Tribune account with immediate effect.

Sudan oil infrastructure hit in border fight
Emirates 24/7
Satellite images show a key part of the oil infrastructure in Sudan’s contested Heglig region was destroyed during recent border fighting with South Sudan, a monitoring group said on Sunday.South Sudan seized Heglig, a border region which accounts for 

Analysis: The Sudans put China in a policy bind
Reuters
China’s balancing act between South Sudan and Sudan will take centre stage when the South’s president visits Beijing on Monday, seeking political and economic backing amid escalating tensions with its northern neighbor. President Salva Kiir’s six-day 

Talks on South Sudan membership
News24
Arusha – The presidents of the East African Community’s five member states will hold a summit on April 28 to discuss including newly-created South Sudan, a spokesperson said on Saturday. Juba’s membership in the EAC – which has a free trade area and a 

Muslim mob burns Catholic church in Sudan capital
Albany Times Union
MOHAMED SAEED, AP People cheer during President Omar al-Bashir’s speech in Khartoum, Sudan, Friday, April 20, 2012. Sudan said Friday its forces drove South Sudanese troops from a contested oil town near the countries’ ill-defined border while the 

Sudan criticizes Uganda’s remarks on fighting alongside South Sudan
Sudan Tribune
Sudanese president Omer Hassan al-Bashir warned South Sudan that his goal is now to topple the SPLM-led government in Juba. This was in the wake of Juba’s occupation of Heglig area in South Kordofan last week. On Friday Sudan’s army managed to take it 

Egypt Calls for End to Hostilities Between Sudan and South Sudan
Bloomberg
Egypt called on the governments of Sudan and South Sudan to end hostilities and return to the negotiating table after more than a week of fighting over a disputed oil-rich region in the south of the country, the state- run Middle East News Agency said.

Sudan says repulses rebel attack in border state
Reuters AlertNet
KHARTOUM/BENTIU, South Sudan, April 22 (Reuters) – Sudan said on Sunday it had repulsed a “major” rebel attack on a strategic town in its South Kordofan state, the latest outbreak of violence in its volatile border area with South Sudan.



A map showing South Sudan and Sudan's oil fields

Sudan says its largest oil field is now controlled by South Sudan’s army.

A Sudanese military spokesman told the BBC its forces had been defeated outside Heglig, and retreated north.

South Sudan said its forces had advanced to Heglig, but stopped short of saying its forces actually controlled the oil fields.

Clashes between the two sides started two weeks ago, and are among the worst since South Sudan gained independence last July after a long civil war.

South Sudan ended up with most of the oil fields, although it has to export the oil using pipelines through ports in Khartoum’s territory.

Both sides blame the other for starting the latest fighting along the undemarcated and disputed frontier in the oil-producing Heglig area.

South Sudan’s military spokesman, Philip Aguer, told the BBC the army was responding to air and ground attacks by the Sudanese armed forces.

A Sudanese government statement earlier described the offensive as “severe”, saying its Heglig oil fields were deliberately targeted.

Sudan doesn’t admit to many military defeats, so acknowledging a reverse outside Heglig is already extremely significant.

The fact that Sudan’s biggest oilfield is now apparently in the hands of the South Sudanese army is astonishing.

It is legitimate to wonder why Sudan’s military – which has the advantage of air power and greater weaponry – wasn’t able to stop the South Sudanese advance.

Perhaps the Sudan Armed Forces are simply over-stretched: as well as the South Sudanese army, they are fighting rebel groups in Darfur, Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile. Khartoum alleges the rebels are supported by South Sudan.

Sudan will certainly respond, and a programme showing “martyrs” who “sacrificed themselves for their country” is already being shown on Sudanese TV.

However it is possible the South Sudanese will slip away from the oilfields, with their point proven.

These clashes almost certainly represent an attempt to win ground before negotiations resume.

Several sources, both Sudanese and international, suggest Sudan struck first in this instance, before getting a bloody nose.

The most likely outcome is a continuation of low-level hostilities for some time, but the seriousness of these latest events takes the two countries nearer to a return to outright war.

A Sudanese man who works in the oil industry, who did not want to be named, told the BBC that Sudan began the fighting.

Another source suggested the Sudanese were trying to regain a post on the disputed border they had lost two weeks ago.

Fighting ‘poisoned atmosphere’Col Khalid Sawarmi, the spokesman for the Sudan Armed Forces, said: “Now the [soldiers] from South Sudan they are inside Heglig city, and the oilfield, they conquered the Sudanese army outside of Heglig.

“The South Sudanese attacked our Sudanese army in Heglig, as you know Heglig is not part of South Sudan,” he continued.

In January, South Sudan, which depends on oil sales for 98% of its revenue, shut down all of its oil fields in a row over the fees Sudan demands to transit the oil.

The BBC’s James Copnall in the capital, Khartoum, says oil is at the heart of the disagreements between the two countries, and oil installations are increasingly being targeted militarily.

Nhial Deng, South Sudan’s Foreign Minister, said the fighting had “poisoned the atmosphere” between the two sides.

“But we are committed to finding solutions through dialogue,” he said. “I strongly believe Khartoum’s stance is… to make military gains so they come to the table in a position of strength.”

A presidential summit, which was to have been held in South Sudan’s capital, Juba, at the beginning of April, has been postponed indefinitely because of the recent fighting.

African Union mediator Thabo Mbeki held talks late last week with South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir and his Sudanese counterpart, Omar al-Bashir, amid international fears of a return to full-blown conflict.

Meanwhile, an international weapons monitoring group, Small Arms Survey, says it has gathered enough evidence to show that both South Sudan and Sudan are providing arms to rebels and militia groups in each other’s territory.

Both sides have often made and denied such claims of support.

A map showing South Sudan and Sudan's oil fields
SPLA claim seizure of South Kordofan’s oil area of Heglig

April 10, 2012 (BENTIU) – South Sudan Army, SPLA, forces claimed the capture of Heglig town yesterday afternoon after repulsing an attack by the Sudan Armed Forces (SAF) .

According to the . SPLA division four commander James Gatduel Gatluak, Sudanese Army forces launched yesterday air and ground attacks that forced them to engage fighting with the Sudanese troops to and to take the control of Heglig on Tuesday.

The SPLA general further alleged that their troops are advancing about 30 kilometer north of Heglig oil field.

In Khartoum, Sudan Tribune failed to reach SAF spokesperson. However military sources requesting anonymity said the oil workers were evacuated and the army was ordered to withdraw from the oil area.

Sudanese President Omer Hassan al-Bashir will hold a press conference with the visiting Nigerian president. He is expected to speak about these developments..

http://www.sudantribune.com/SPLA-claim-seizure-of-South,42191

South Sudan Accuses Sudan of Attacks on Oil-Rich Border Region

By Jared Ferrie on April 10, 2012

Sudan’s military has attacked a town in an oil-producing border area of South Sudan, according to that country’s information minister, Barnaba Marial Benjamin.

Two brigades belonging to the Sudanese Armed Forces attacked the town of Abiemnhom in South Sudan’s Unity state, injuring four civilians, including a child, Benjamin said today by phone from Juba, the southern capital.

Al-Sawarami Khaled, a spokesman for Sudan’s army, and foreign affairs spokesman al-Obeid Murawih didn’t answer calls made seeking comment today.

South Sudan seceded from the north in July, assuming control of about three-quarters of the formerly unified nation’s daily oil production of 490,000 barrels. The north and south fought a two-decade civil was that ended in 2005.

“They have been trying to move into Unity state with the intention of occupying the oil fields,” Benjamin said. “South Sudan condemns the bombardment and calls on the Republic of Sudan to withdraw its forces.”

To contact the reporter on this story: Jared Ferrie in Juba at jferrie1@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Antony Sguazzin at asguazzin@bloomberg.net

http://www.businessweek.com/news/2012-04-10/south-sudan-accuses-sudan-of-attacks-on-oil-rich-border-region

Airstrikes, artillery bombardment on Sudan-S.Sudan border

By Hannah McNeish (AFP) 

TASHWIN, South Sudan — Sudan on Tuesday carried out new airstrikes inside South Sudan, as rival armies exchanged artillery fire in the latest round of bloody fighting in contested border regions.

An AFP correspondent in the South Sudanese frontline village of Tashwin heard heavy artillery shelling and multiple airstrikes lasting for around an hour, with one bomb dropped by aircraft landing less than a kilometre (mile) away.

The bombing follows border fighting that erupted two weeks ago between the two neighbours, the most serious unrest since Juba’s independence, and prompted international fears of a return to full-blown conflict.

Southern Information Minister Barnaba Marial Benjamin said that Sudanese airplanes “bombarded Abiemnom, well within the sovereign territory of South Sudan.”

“Initial reports confirmed that four civilians have been wounded, including a small child,” Benjamin told reporters in the Southern capital Juba.

Clashes last month broke out along the undemarcated and disputed frontier in the oil producing Heglig area, with each side blaming the other for starting the bloody fighting.

The dusty village of Abiemnom in Unity state is some 40 kilometres (25 miles) south of the border with Sudan, but also lies on a strategic road to the contested Abyei region, some 10 kilometres (six miles) away to the west.

“The intended target was a strategic bridge in Abiemnom,” leading to Abyei, Benjamin added.

Military officials in Sudan were not immediately available to comment.

African Union mediator Thabo Mbeki held talks late last week over the crisis with South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir and his Sudanese counterpart Omar al-Bashir, but tensions remain high between the two sides.

Benjamin claimed northern troops, backed by tanks and proxy militia forces were advancing towards the South’s Unity state, where key oil fields are located.

“Two brigades of Sudan Armed Forces, backed by 16 tanks and accompanied by members of the mujahedeen and other militia loyal to Khartoum, are currently moving towards Unity state with the intent to capture and occupy the oil fields,” he added.

“The Republic of South Sudan condemns the bombardment of innocent civilians, and calls on Sudan to immediately withdraw from the sovereign territory of South Sudan.”

He did not clarify whether northern troops had crossed the border.

Large Southern Sudanese troops movements were seen close to the frontier, with convoys heading up to the frontline.

Despite the violence on the border, Juba ordered Tuesday that Sudanese nationals living in the newly independent country be treated with respect, after a deadline requiring them to formalise their status expired.

“All nationals of the Republic of Sudan are declared foreigners as of 9 April 2012,” South Sudanese Interior Minister Alison Magaya said in a statement.

“Sudanese nationals shall be accorded fair treatment and full respect in regard to their human rights.”

An April 8 time limit ended a grace period after South Sudan separated last July in the wake of an overwhelming “yes” vote in an independence referendum that followed Africa’s longest civil war.

Tens of thousands of Sudanese are believed to live in the South — although the exact figure is not known — significantly fewer than Southerners in Sudan.

Over 370,000 Southerners have returned from Sudan since October 2010, but an estimated 500,000 others remain in the north.

Those seeking to apply for northern residence need documents from South Sudan but many cannot afford a trip South to get the relevant papers.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5iyKtK0dqUofKPma_lkorx4Q-oQsA?docId=CNG.cb4770974eab911d9a2c05f1ffc24871.691

Thousands Of South Sudanese Marooned In Sudan
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April 09, 2012 Thousands Of South Sudanese Marooned In Sudan Alsanosi Ahmed | Khartoum One day after Sudan’s April 8 TH deadline expired, the government began registering Southern Sudanese as foreigners. Majority of them have been stripped of their 
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Members of South Sudan’s government visited their oil fields in February after production was halted due to a dispute with Sudan. South Sudan’s oil resources are being dwarfed by other finds in east Africa. Photo: Pete Muller, Associated Press In 

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By Bonifacio Taban Kuich April 8, 2012 (BENTIU) – South Sudan’s vice president, Riek Machar, is urging Warrap, Unity and Lakes state governors to come to the table with their grievances and improve the security situation in northern/central region of 

Aid Reaches Displaced in South Sudan
The Media Line
After missing their harvest and seeking shelter in impoverished South Sudan, tens of thousands of refugees from the disputed Abyei region have been given food and agriculture aid by the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) to help them 

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Khartoum — The Sudanese president Omer Al-Bashir has encouraged the government of South Sudan to reach a deal on security with his country, saying that such step will pave the way for resolving other points of contention between the two neighbors.

Sudan Stops South Sudanese Leaving
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By NICHOLAS BARIYO KAMPALA, Uganda—Sudanese authorities have prevented hundreds ofSouth Sudanese citizens from returning to their country, officials said Tuesday, underscoring deteriorating relations between the two formerly-united oil-rich countries.

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By ANDREW GREEN/Special to The Washington Post WAU, South Sudan — Teresa Adut Akol’s new home is a small patch of concrete floor in a railway station outside this town. She shares the space with her eight children and stacks of their belongings,

South Sudan accuses Sudan of new air strikes

Posted: April 5, 2012 by PaanLuel Wël in Junub Sudan
Tags:

Written by ReutersThursday, 05 April 2012

altSouth Sudan accused Sudan of launching air strikes in the border region hours after the postponement of talks aimed at defusing the worst clashes since the South seceded.
The Sudanese army denied any attack.

The neighbours have fought repeatedly in the past few days along the poorly marked 1,800-km (1,200-mile) border, the worst direct confrontation since the South split away in July under a 2005 peace deal that ended decades of civil war.

Western nations fear the clashes could reignite a full-blown war between the mainly Muslim north and the Christian and animist South, with rival claims on oil resources a key part of the conflict, Reuters reports.

South Sudan’s top negotiator, Pagan Amum, said Sudanese MiG-29 jets bombed the garrison town of Panakuach in Unity state after talks sponsored by the African Union had been postponed with no deal signed and no indication of progress.

“One (jet) has been shot down in Panakuach. This is very clear, it’s war-mongering that made them not to sign,” he said.

Sudanese army spokesman Sawarmi Khalid Saad denied there had been an air strike or that a plane had been lost.

“Today it was quiet,” he said.

The charges came as talks between the two countries were postponed after Khartoum asked for more time to consider an African Union proposal to ease tensions.

The proposal called for an immediate cessation of hostilities, the withdrawal of armed forces from each other’s territories and preparations for a meeting of the two presidents.

Pagan told Reuters his country had accepted the proposal.

But Sudanese Defence Minister Abdel Raheem Muhammad Hussein told reporters on his return home that Khartoum needed more time to discuss the proposal.

He said Juba needed to stop supporting rebels in Sudan’s border states of South Kordofan and Blue Nile. Juba denies any support for rebels of the SPLM-North, which has been fighting the Sudanese army in the two states since last year.

Sudan analysts see little chance of any breakthrough in the talks after Sudanese President Omar Hassan al-Bashir called off an April 3 summit with his southern counterpart Salva Kiir following the violence.

Apart from marking their border, the two sides are also at odds over oil, the lifeline of both economies.

Juba inherited three quarters of Sudan’s output but failed to agree how much it should pay to export crude through Sudan.

In January, Sudan said it was taking southern oil in lieu of what it called unpaid transit fees. In response, Juba turned off the oil taps even though crude accounts for 98 percent of South Sudan’s state revenues.

http://www.defenceweb.co.za/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=24782:south-sudan-accuses-sudan-of-new-air-strikes&catid=49:National%20Security&Itemid=115


South Sudan
 says it shoots down Sudanese jet

The Associated Press
By MICHAEL ONYIEGO, AP – 1 minute ago JUBA, South Sudan (AP) — South Sudan says it shot down a Sudanese fighter jet Wednesday after two military planes dropped bombs around its oil fields, but Sudan denied it had lost such an aircraft.
Sudan Ethnically Cleanses Its Christians
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ABUJA, Nigeria, April 4, 2012/African Press Organization (APO)/ — The talks between Sudan andSouth Sudan, facilitated by the African Union High Level Implementation Panel (AUHIP), preparatory to an extraordinary meeting of the Joint Political and 
South Sudan Says It Shot Down Sudan Jet Amid Clashes
New York Times
KAMPALA, Uganda — South Sudan said that it shot down a north Sudanese fighter jet in its territory on Wednesday, as the two national armies continue to clash in a dispute that international observers worry may be inching closer to war.

Mankatoans on a vision quest in South Sudan
Mankato Free Press
By Brian Ojanpa Free Press Staff Writer MANKATO — Chuol Yat’s humanitarian trip to his nativeSouth Sudan has enhanced the gift of sight for hundreds of his countrymen. The Mankatoan has returned from a six-month visit to the new African nation, 

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By the CNN Wire Staff Sudanese Defense Minister Abdelrahim Mohamed Hussein speaks to the press upon his return from Ethiopia on April 4. Addis Ababa, Ethiopia (CNN) — In a dangerous escalation of border violence, South Sudan accused rival Sudan of war 

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South Sudan accuses Sudan of new air strikes
defenceWeb
South Sudan accused Sudan of launching air strikes in the border region hours after the postponement of talks aimed at defusing the worst clashes since the South seceded. The neighbours have fought repeatedly in the past few days along the poorly

Military spokesman: South Sudan shoots down a Sudanese military jet over South 
570 News
South Sudan’s military said it shot down a Sudanese fighter jet Wednesday after two Sudanese military planes dropped bombs around South Sudanese oil fields. Military spokesman Col. Philip Aguer identified the downed plane as a Sudanese MiG-29 jet 

Hereward Holland and Ulf Laessing ReutersMarch 31, 2012

JUBA/KHARTOUM (Reuters) – South Sudan said on Saturday the Sudanese army had bombed its positions in the oil-producing border area, resuming a conflict that had eased earlier this week, just hours ahead of new talks.

Trading accusations, Khartoum said South Sudan had supported a rebel attack on a border town in South Kordofan state and was building up troops at the poorly-marked frontier where fighting flared on Monday and Tuesday.

Those skirmishes ended when southern troops moved out of the disputed Heglig oil field, on the Sudan side of the border, where they had gone in response to what they said was Khartoum’s bombing of southern oil fields.

It was the worst direct confrontation between the neighbors since South Sudan became independent in July under a 2005 agreement that ended decades of civil war.

Both sides are to resume talks in Addis Ababa on Saturday but diplomats see no breakthrough after Sudan’s President Omar Hassan al-Bashir called off a summit with his southern counterpart Salva Kiir due to the violence.

Philip Aguer, spokesman for South Sudan’s army, the SPLA, said on Saturday the Sudanese army had bombed SPLA border positions.

“They have been bombing our positions since yesterday at 5 p.m. Their target seems to be to invade Unity (state) oil fields. They are the ones bombing our forces in different places and pushing southwards,” he said.

South Sudan’s Information Minister Barnaba Marial Benjamin said the clashes were “minor” and did not amount to an escalation.

NEW TALKS

Sudanese army spokesman Sawarmi Khaled Saad accused the SPLA of helping rebels of the SPLM-North conducting an assault on the border town of Talodi in South Kordofan.

“South Sudan supported the rebels with tanks and artillery,” he told state news agency SUNA late on Friday, adding that rebels had failed to take the town and had fled to regroup.

He also said the SPLA army was amassing troops at the border south of Heglig. “The goal is to attack the Heglig area another time,” Saad said.

Aguer denied the SPLA had supported the rebel attack.

The Heglig field is key to Sudan’s economy because it produces around half of the country’s oil output of 115,000 barrels a day.

The field was awarded to Sudan by the Permanent Arbitration Court in 2009 but some southern officials have laid claim on it.

The border states of South Kordofan and Blue Nile are home to populations which sided with the south during the civil war but were left on the Sudan side of the border. The Sudanese army has been fighting SPLM-North in both states since last year.

(Writing by Uf Laessing; Additional reporting by Khaled Abdelaziz; Editing by Robin Pomeroy)

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/sns-rt-us-sudan-fightingbre82u08j-20120331,0,999110.story

Sudan and South Sudan accuse each other of border attacks

ReutersBy Hereward Holland and Aaron Maasho | Reuters
 

JUBA/ADDIS ABABA (Reuters) – Sudan and South Sudan have accused each of launching further attacks in the oil-producing area straddling their border, dashing hopes for a new round of talks designed to end the dispute.

Clashes first broke out on Monday in the worst direct confrontation between the two since South Sudan became independent in July 2011 but died down two days later when South Sudanese troops moved out of the disputed Heglig area, inside Sudan.

But on Friday Sudan launched an aerial bombardment on South Sudanese army border positions, according to South Sudan’s army. A Sudanese army spokesman in Khartoum said it attacked with artillery, not aircraft, and only in response to an earlier South Sudanese artillery attack on Heglig.

The United Nations and the United States have both warned that the clashes could reignite a civil war that stretched for decades between the mainly Muslim north and the Christian and animist South.

The Heglig field is key to Sudan’s economy because it accounts for around half of the 115,000 barrels of oil Sudan produces each day. The field was awarded to Sudan by the Permanent Arbitration Court in 2009 but some southern officials have laid claim on it.

At the African Union headquarters in Addis Ababa, the first set of talks since violence erupted were due to begin on Saturday but would now not take place until at least Sunday, diplomats there said.

“We are here and we are ready to talk,” Idris Abdelgadir, head of Sudan’s negotiation team, told Reuters as he arrived, but his counterpart accused Khartoum of delaying.

“We are still waiting for talks but they never showed up,” Juba’s top negotiator Pagan Amum told Reuters. “That’s because they are planning to carry out more attacks on South Sudan.”

Diplomats see no breakthrough after Sudan’s President Omar Hassan al-Bashir called off an April 3 summit with his southern counterpart Salva Kiir, due to the violence.

A diplomat and Sudanese source said Khartoum was ready to talk about rescheduling the presidents’ summit but nothing had been decided yet.

GUERILLA ATTACK

Sudanese army spokesman Sawarmi Khaled Saad said the SPLA, South Sudan’s army, was also supporting rebels of the SPLM-North in an attack on the town of Talodi in South Kordofan by covertly slipping regular soldiers over the border.

Philip Aguer, spokesman for the SPLA denied it was supporting the rebel attack.

The Sudanese states of South Kordofan and Blue Nile are home to populations which sided with the south during the civil war but were included in Sudan when the border was drawn. The Sudanese army has been fighting SPLM-North rebels in both states since last year.

Sudan holds air superiority over South Sudan and has greater land firepower than the SPLA – an army drawn from former rebel militias created during the civil war.

(Writing by Ulf Laessing; Additional reporting by Khaled Abdelaziz; Editing by Ben Harding)

http://news.yahoo.com/sudan-south-sudan-accuse-other-border-attacks-204436226.html

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WXEL
By Hereward Holland and Ulf Laessing JUBA/KHARTOUM (Reuters) – South Sudan said on Saturday the Sudanese army had bombed its positions in the oil-producing border area, resuming a conflict that had eased earlier this week, just hours ahead of new talks
Top Sudan officials head for crisis talks with South in Addis Ababa
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(Reuters) By AFP Top Sudanese security officials headed to crisis talks in the Ethiopian capital on Saturday after a delay threw negotiations into uncertainty following fresh fighting allegedly backed by South Sudan, the foreign ministry said.

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Chicago Tribune
JUBA/KHARTOUM (Reuters) – South Sudan said on Saturday the Sudanese army had bombed its positions in the oil-producing border area, resuming a conflict that had eased earlier this week, just hours ahead of new talks. Trading accusations, Khartoum said

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Telegraph.co.uk
Sudan’s army accused South Sudan of backing a rebel attack on the strategic town of Talodi on Friday, the eve of planned crisis talks between the two nations after earlier clashes caused global alarm. “They came supported by tanks and cannons from

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euronews
By Hereward Holland and Ulf Laessing JUBA/KHARTOUM (Reuters) – Sudan and South Sudan are expected to resume talks on Saturday, with leaders of the former civil war foes playing down the risks of a war after the most violent border clashes since the


Young men herd cattle through the mud-caked streets of Pibor, as cattle raiding between some of the south's dozens of tribes plagues South Sudan. (File Photo)

Photo: AP
Young men herd cattle through the mud-caked streets of Pibor, as cattle raiding between some of the south’s dozens of tribes plagues South Sudan. (File Photo)

The South Sudanese Army is being readied to deploy on a small-arms disarmament program in Jonglei state. The government hopes to disarm groups of cattle raiders that have made 2012 a violent year for the new country.

The Southern People’s Liberation Army is being set to deploy in areas of Jonglei state this week, in an attempt to disarm and collect some 20,000 small arms from the Murle and Lou Nuer tribes.

Both groups have been involved in a violent string of retaliatory cattle rattles, which the United Nations says has affected more than 120,000 people.

The disarmament campaign was initiated by South Sudan President Salva Kirr. He plans to use the Army to collect the weapons either voluntarily or by force.

The SPLA spokesperson Phillip Aguer says the goal is peaceful, but the army is ready to use force, if necessary.

“In case there are people who are dodging and trying to hide their weapons, the army will intervene and do the fighting or, if they are running from the army and the police, we will go in,” said Aguer.

South Sudan has received criticism from both the United States and the United Nations. They feel conducting the campaign now will only increase tensions and that the government should strive for reconciliation before disarmament.

But Aguer says the time is now.

“If you wait for the population to achieve it’s goals and objectives, you will have people attacking themselves and dying,” said Aguer. “So it’s better to do the same process concurrently.”

Jonah Leff is a consultant for the Small Arms Survey – an independent organization monitoring international weapons trafficking – and has recently been on the ground in Jonglei state. He feels the campaign will certainly end in violence.

“I’ve heard from leaders of both communities, both the Lou Nuer and the Murle, that they will resist a forcible disarmament, which means that they will fight back,” said Leff. “So I would expect the SPLA to respond with technicals [technological advanced weapons]. They’ll have greater manpower, such as heavy machine guns and possibly even tanks.”

Leff also fears the possibility of disarming the tribes unevenly, which may leave some vulnerable to attack.

“Without proper security provision by the SPLA or security forces, the rival tribe would most likely come in and take advantage of the situation,” said Leff.

In the past, disarmament programs in the area have resulted in violence and have proved to be largely unsuccessful.

“In 2006 and 2008, they collected a fraction of the weapons and quickly thereafter, the communities had rearmed anyways,” said Leff. “So I’m not sure that, if they don’t provide any alternative security, they can collect as many weapons as they want and the communities will go and rearms themselves and the situation will be as it is.”

For now, the rural skirmishes continue to trouble the new country

http://www.voanews.com/english/news/South-Sudanese-Army-set-to-Deploy-on-Disarmament-Program-in-Jonglei-141556393.html

South Sudanese Army to Implement Jonglei Disarmament Program
Voice of America
March 06, 2012 South Sudanese Army to Implement Jonglei Disarmament Program Alex Pena | Nairobi The South Sudanese Army is being readied to deploy on a small-arms disarmament program in Jonglei state. The government hopes to disarm groups of cattle 

Hundreds flee fresh violence on Sudan-South Sudan border
Reuters AlertNet
GENEVA, March 6 (UNHCR) – Hundreds of people have been fleeing to South Sudan’s Upper Nile state and western Ethiopia to escape renewed fighting in disputed border areas between Sudan andSouth Sudan. Last week, UNHCR staff registered 2287 new arrivals 

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AllAfrica.com
According to Nafie Ali Nafie, presidential assistant and NCP’s deputy chairman, Washington persuaded the rebel SPLM-N that it can make Kadugli “Sudan’s Benghazi” and transform the SouthKordofan’s town to make it the capital for rebels who will 

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San Francisco Chronicle (press release)
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AllAfrica.com
By Nahla Abu-Eissa, 5 March 2012 Khartoum, Sudan — After months of living in limbo, some 1400 southern Sudanese recently started the long journey to South Sudan on board the year’s first southbound train from the Sudan capital of Khartoum.

South Sudanese in Khartoum’s camps of no return
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By Prince Ofori-Atta and Goeff Magga More than 7000 South Sudanese refugees, mostly women and children seeking to return to their recently independent country are living in severe conditions in camps in and around Khartoum and need “urgent assistance”.

Museveni wants S Sudan crude pipeline to Kenya’s Port Lamu to go through Uganda
Platts
Uganda’s President Yoweri Museveni has said that it would be better if South Sudan’s proposed oil pipeline to transport the country’s crude to Port Lamu in Kenya passes through Uganda, Uganda’s local media reported Tuesday.
South Sudan army vows to remove illicit firearms from civil population
Sudan Tribune
By Ngor Arol Garang March 5, 2012 (JUBA) – The South Sudan army, the Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) has announced its readiness to conduct the ”peaceful” collection of illegal arms from the civil population across the country but primarily in 
Petronas denies South Sudan oil theft claim
Business Times – Malaysia
Malaysian state-owned oil giant Petronas today denied any knowledge of alleged oil theft by the consortium it belongs to which is in the middle of a bitter dispute between Sudan and South Sudan. Petronas is a major shareholder in Petrodar along with 
Student presents research at UN
K-State Collegian
The research, which explored literacy rates in South Sudan, will be applied as a part of program on improving the system of education in the African country. Pearson came to K-State from New York City, where she was teaching at a school in Harlem.

KHARTOUM, Feb. 27 (Xinhua) — Sudan on Monday indicated a possibility of using military options against South Sudan in response to what Khartoum terms as “repeated aggressions” by the south on Sudan’s territories.

“Sudan maintains military and security options that can be used to respond to South Sudan’s attack on Buhairat Al-Abiyad in South Kordofan State,” Mustafa Osman Ismail,the Sudanese presidential adviser, told reporters Monday.

Ismail held South Sudan government responsible of the attack on Buhairat Al-Abiyadarea, reiterating that all options, including the military and security ones, were open before Sudan to respond to the “aggression.”

“South Sudan bears the full responsibility in this attack. South Sudan governmentshould stop refuting and lying. It should acknowledge if it has enough courage to bear the responsibility and its consequences,” said Ismail.

“We were attacked and we will no doubt respond to this aggression to defend our land.We will adopt all steps and there is no closed course for us. We will file complaints tothe UN Security Council, the African Union and the committee supposed to monitor thesecurity agreement recently signed between the two countries on refraining fromattacking the border.”

Sudanese army said Sunday that armed clashes broke out between its forces andSouth Sudan forces at Jao area on the border.

“An alliance bringing together South Sudan’s army and rebels from South Kordofanand Darfur on Sunday morning attacked Buhairat Abiyad at Jao town,” said Sudanesearmy in a statement.

The statement accused South Sudan of planning a full attack against the area, pointingout that the fighting was still continuing.

However, South Sudan’s Foreign Minister Nhial Deng on Monday refuted Sudan’saccusations that South Sudan was supporting the armed movements in Sudan.

“South Sudan has nothing to do with what is going on in Sudan,” Deng told reporters inJuba, adding that South Sudan, after gaining its independence, was willing for peacefulcoexistence with neighboring countries.

Sudan and South Sudan signed a security agreement on Feb. 10 to avoid armedconflicts between the two sides.

The agreement, which was reached under the mediation of the African Union in AddisAbaba, stipulated that the two sides should respect sovereignty and territorial integrityof each other, avoid intervention in each other’s internal affairs, reject the use of forceand observe common interests and peaceful coexistence.

Sudan and South Sudan have so far failed to demarcate their joint borders, includingthe affiliation of border areas such as Jao.

Battles Erupt Between SAF, SPLA as the Latter Launches Attacks within Sudan Territory
Khartoum– Fierce fighting broke out Sunday between the Sudanese Armed Forces (SAF) and the Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) after the latter advanced 6 km into Sudanese territories.Statements issued by SAF indicated that the SPLA plans to carry out attacks on Sudanese territories began two days ago in the areas of Al-Dar and Dabakaya.SAF lashed out against South Sudan, describing the attacks as a violation of Sudan’s sovereignty.

For its part, the Sudanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs has issued similar statement condemning the attack, describing it as violation of the Sudanese sovereignty, security and stability.

Sudan reserves the right to retaliate in the manner it deems fit, it said.

Spokesperson of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ambassador Al-Obeid Murawah, told Sudan Vision that the Sudanese Government would lodge a complaint to the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) and the African Union (AU).

“We have asked the South to desist from these acts,” he said, adding “Sudan will launch diplomatic efforts to brief the relevant international organizations and diplomats in Khartoum on the developments.”

SAF spokesperson, Col. Al-Sawarmi Khaled, who read the statement, said the SPLA launched a direct attack from within the southern territories on Buhayret Abyat area and advanced inside Sudanese territories.

The statement accused South Sudan leadership of supporting insurgency in South Kordofan and the Blue Nile as well as Darfur rebels, citing continued link of the SPLA with Divisions (9) and (10) in South Kordofan and the Blue Nile.  The support to the rebellion is in the form of supplies and salaries for the two Divisions.

The statement pointed out that South Sudan had sponsored a conference for unification of efforts of rebels in South Kordofan and Blue Nile including Darfur rebels in the town of Bor Yomi on 15 and 16 February.

Col. Al-Sawarmi said SAF has been closely monitoring plans and moves of the South Sudan against Sudan.

“The South Sudan Government assembled Darfur rebels in the area of Manga and Faryang in the Unity State despite Sudan’s call on the South to cease these acts, which are in breach of the recent non-aggression agreement”

“Forces from South Sudan and rebels from South Kordofan attacked at 3 a.m. in the area of Baheyret al-Abayd,” Sudan’s military spokesman Al-Sawarmi Khalid said, according to reports.

“Fighting continues,” he said. “The government in the South is not abiding by the deal.”

In a further sign of continued unrest, the Darfur-based rebel Justice and Equality Movement (JEM) said it had taken control of Jau, a region claimed by both sides, in a joint attack with forces of the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement/Army (SPLM/A).
By Mona Al-Bashir and Al-Sammani Awadallah, 1 day 7 hours ago

Related Reading

Juba: Rebel groups in Sudan said on Monday they had captured a Sudanese army garrison near the border with South Sudan in an operation that Khartoum blamed on the south’s army.

The rebels said in a statement they killed 130 members of the government forces in the attack. The figure could not be independently verified.

The South Sudan government said none of its forces were involved, but the assault fuelled tensions between the neighbours already at odds over oil exports and border disputes. Any involvement of southern forces would have violated a non-aggression pact signed by the two sides this month.

A helicopter crash is seen in Al-Faw, an area of Sudan’s Gedaref state. Reuters

The clashes on Sunday took place in the South Kordofan province on Sudan’s side of the ill-defined border with South Sudan, a flashpoint between the two countries.

The newly formed rebel umbrella group Sudan Revolutionary Front (SRF) said its forces were behind the assault on the military post around Lake Obyad, which lies near the boundary.

The SRF was formed last year between the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North (SPLM-N), who operate in South Kordofan and Blue Nile states, and the Justice and Equality Movement (JEM), based in Darfur in the west of Sudan.

“It is a victory, the first victory under the umbrella of the SRF to have two forces fighting together,” SRF spokesman Arnu Ngutulu Lodi told Reuters by telephone.

The SPLM-N’s fighters fought alongside the forces of what is now the south’s ruling SPLM during Sudan’s civil war that ended with a peace deal in 2005 and led to southern secession in 2011.

The SPLM-N says it cut ties with the South after independence, but Khartoum accuses Juba of continuing to provide military and financial support to the rebels.

According to Lodi, the SRF captured hundreds of machine guns, dozens of heavy artillery and 200 vehicles from the Sudanese Armed Forces (SAF), although he said it was too early to provide a number of casualties from either side.

Both countries trade accusations of supporting insurgents in each other’s territory. Tensions have also mounted in a dispute over how much Juba should pay Khartoum to export its oil.

Authorities in landlocked South Sudan say Sudan has since December stolen over $800 million worth of oil, which has to be exported via a pipeline through the north. Sudan says it seized the crude in lieu of what it calls unpaid transportation fees.

Sudan has threatened to file a complaint about what it says are the south’s violations of the non-aggression pact to the United Nations Security Council and the African Union, although the South said its forces were not involved.

“Those battles that have been fought for the last 72 hours are completely within the republic of Sudan and are between SAF and (SRF) and we are not party to that,” South Sudan’s army spokesman Philip Aguer said.

In turn, he said Khartoum violated the pact by bombing the South’s army at Jau the day after the security deal was signed. That is a charge that Sudan has denied.

“It is the government of South Sudan that should complain to international bodies like the Security Council,” Aguer said.

The United States has warned that South Kordofan could face famine conditions if Khartoum continues to deny aid agencies access to civilians in rebel-held areas.

Reuters

http://www.firstpost.com/fwire/sudan-rebels-claim-they-killed-130-army-members-227199.html

Sudan rebels say behind attack on Sudanese army

Mon Feb 27, 2012 6:24pm GMT
 By Hereward Holland

JUBA (Reuters) – Rebel groups in Sudan said on Monday they had captured a Sudanese army garrison near the border with South Sudan in an operation that Khartoum blamed on the south’s army.

The rebels said in a statement they killed 130 members of the government forces in the attack. The figure could not be independently verified.

The South Sudan government said none of its forces were involved, but the assault fuelled tensions between the neighbours already at odds over oil exports and border disputes. Any involvement of southern forces would have violated a non-aggression pact signed by the two sides this month.

The clashes on Sunday took place in the South Kordofan province on Sudan’s side of the ill-defined border with South Sudan, a flashpoint between the two countries.

The newly formed rebel umbrella group Sudan Revolutionary Front (SRF) said its forces were behind the assault on the military post around Lake Obyad, which lies near the boundary.

The SRF was formed last year between the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North (SPLM-N), who operate in South Kordofan and Blue Nile states, and the Justice and Equality Movement (JEM), based in Darfur in the west of Sudan.

“It is a victory, the first victory under the umbrella of the SRF to have two forces fighting together,” SRF spokesman Arnu Ngutulu Lodi told Reuters by telephone.

The SPLM-N’s fighters fought alongside the forces of what is now the south’s ruling SPLM during Sudan’s civil war that ended with a peace deal in 2005 and led to southern secession in 2011.

The SPLM-N says it cut ties with the South after independence, but Khartoum accuses Juba of continuing to provide military and financial support to the rebels.

According to Lodi, the SRF captured hundreds of machine guns, dozens of heavy artillery and 200 vehicles from the Sudanese Armed Forces (SAF), although he said it was too early to provide a number of casualties from either side.

Both countries trade accusations of supporting insurgents in each other’s territory. Tensions have also mounted in a dispute over how much Juba should pay Khartoum to export its oil.

Authorities in landlocked South Sudan say Sudan has since December stolen over $800 million worth of oil, which has to be exported via a pipeline through the north. Sudan says it seized the crude in lieu of what it calls unpaid transportation fees.

Sudan has threatened to file a complaint about what it says are the south’s violations of the non-aggression pact to the United Nations Security Council and the African Union, although the South said its forces were not involved.

“Those battles that have been fought for the last 72 hours are completely within the republic of Sudan and are between SAF and (SRF) and we are not party to that,” South Sudan’s army spokesman Philip Aguer said.

In turn, he said Khartoum violated the pact by bombing the South’s army at Jau the day after the security deal was signed. That is a charge that Sudan has denied.

“It is the government of South Sudan that should complain to international bodies like the Security Council,” Aguer said.

The United States has warned that South Kordofan could face famine conditions if Khartoum continues to deny aid agencies access to civilians in rebel-held areas.

http://af.reuters.com/article/topNews/idAFJOE81Q06320120227?sp=true

South Sudan says has foreign exchange reserves for up to 1 year
Ahram Online
South Sudan, which has stopped shipping crude oil exports, has enough foreign exchange reserves to cover imports for up to one year, the deputy Finance Minister said on Monday. In January, South Sudan shut down its entire oil production of 350000 
US lawmaker pleads for action after Sudan trip
AFP
WASHINGTON — A US congressman pleaded Monday for action to bring food to thousands inSudan’s South Kordofan state, accusing the Khartoum government of “ethnic cleansing” after a visit to the region. Representative Frank Wolf said he went last week to 
Lost Boys of Sudan find hope, success
Rochester Democrat and Chronicle
It could be 20 years before the new government in South Sudan can turn its attention to building the new school system the country so desperately needs, says Sebastian Maroundit, who knows only too well that education is the key, not just to prosperity 
Rising numbers of Sudanese fleeing to Kenya – UN
Reuters AlertNet
The Sudanese government has accused the south’s dominant Sudan People’s Liberation Movement (SPLM) of being behind the violence in Blue Nile and South Kordofan, while the SPLM-North, the movement’s branch in Sudan, has blamed Khartoum.
Sudan rebels say behind attack on Sudanese army
Reuters Africa
By Hereward Holland JUBA (Reuters) – Rebel groups in Sudan said on Monday they had captured a Sudanese army garrison near the border with South Sudan in an operation that Khartoum blamed on the south’s army. Juba said none of its forces were involved, 

South Sudan army in full control of Jau after heavy fighting with SAF – official
Sudan Tribune
Feburay 26, 2012 (BENTIU) – The Sudan People Liberation Army (SPLA), which is South Sudan’sofficial army has fully captured disputed Jau area on Sunday from the Sudanese Armed Forces (SAF), an official in the Unity state told Sudan Tribune.

Sudan rebels say behind attack on Sudanese army
Reuters
South Sudan denies involvement in assault * Khartoum, Juba at odds over oil exports, border disputes By Hereward Holland JUBA, Feb 27 (Reuters) – Rebel groups in Sudan said on Monday they had captured a Sudanese army garrison near the border with 

Sudan rebels say key area seized
AFP
KHARTOUM — Rebels fighting along Sudan’s disputed border with the breakawaysouth on Monday said they had seized the key area of Taruje, near the southern border, clearing a path for refugees fleeing the fighting. “Taruje is now liberated by SPLM,” 

Sudan rebels say behind attack on Sudanese army

Reuters – ‎
* South Sudan denies involvement in assault * Khartoum, Juba at odds over oil exports, border disputes (Adds rebels’ figure on casualties) By Hereward Holland JUBA, Feb 27 (Reuters) – Rebel groups in Sudan said on Monday they had captured a Sudanese 
Africasia – ‎
Rebels fighting along Sudan’s disputed border with the breakaway south on Monday said they had seized the key area of Taruje, near the southern border, clearing a path for refugees fleeing the fighting. “Taruje is now liberated by SPLM,” since Sunday 
Reuters Africa – ‎
By George Obulutsa ARUSHA, Tanzania Feb 27 (Reuters) – South Sudan, which has stopped shipping crude oil exports, has enough foreign exchange reserves to cover imports for up to one year, the deputy Finance Minister said on Monday.
Ahram Online – ‎
South Sudan, which has stopped shipping crude oil exports, has enough foreign exchange reserves to cover imports for up to one year, the deputy Finance Minister said on Monday. In January, South Sudan shut down its entire oil production of 350000 
News24 – ‎
Khartoum – Khartoum threatened retaliation on Sunday after accusing breakaway South Sudan of backing a rebel attack inside its territory, adding to tensions which have sparked international concern. Rebels in a “revolutionary front” aimed at toppling 

Map of Sudan and South Sudan

Photo: VOA
Map of Sudan and South Sudan
 
South Sudan: Khartoum Violates Non-Aggression Pact

Peter Heinlein | Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

South Sudan is accusing neighboring Sudan of bombing southern targets, days after the two sides signed a non-aggression deal. The allegation threatens already troubled talks on sharing oil revenues.

South Sudan’s chief negotiator at the African Union-mediated talks, Pagan Amum, said Sudanese jets bombed an area in the south’s Unity state, not far from the two countries’ disputed border. He gave few details, saying word of the attack had just been received.

The bombing, if confirmed, would be the first violation of a non-aggression agreement signed Friday at the beginning of a round of talks on oil and other contentious issues. Amum accused Khartoum of continuing its attempts to destabilize the border.

“That is a bad sign that the government of Sudan is not serious to non-aggression, but we expressed our hope the government of Sudan would now end its attacks on South Sudan, particularly areas of bombardment,” said Amum.

Speaking to reporters, Amum said the south is continuing to take a tough line on the main issue in the six days of talks – sharing oil revenues. He said any decision to reopen the pipeline that carries southern oil to international markets would only come after Khartoum pays for oil it took from the pipeline while the payments dispute raged last month.

“There is no way for us to resume unless the government of Sudan pays the south the market value of all the oil they have stolen, which is in excess of $500 million. We cannot export our oil if it is not secure and safe, if the government of Sudan are practicing state piracy. It would be dangerous for us to send even one barrel, not millions,” said Amum.

South Sudan took the bulk of Sudanese oil when it became independent last year, but the oil must pass through the north to reach Port Sudan on the Red Sea.

Khartoum’s negotiators did not speak to reporters as they left the African Union headquarters, where the two sides briefed the AU Peace and Security Council.

The talks, mediated by former South African president Thabo Mbeki, are expected to carry on through at least Wednesday, but diplomats close to the negotiations say they may be extended if there is any sign of a deal that might open the oil pipeline.

Experts say the pipeline shutdown is costing both countries hundreds of millions of dollars a month in lost revenues.

http://www.voanews.com/english/news/South-Sudan-Khartoum-Violates-Non-Aggression-Pact-139299998.html

Sudanese air strike hits S Sudan, breaking pact: army

(AFP) –   

JUBA — Sudanese warplanes dropped several bombs wounding four soldiers in a contested area claimed by South Sudan, breaking a fresh non-aggression pact between the two sides, Juba’s army spokesman said Tuesday.

“Sudanese Armed Forces airplanes bombed the Jau area in Unity state on Sunday, wounding four of our soldiers,” South Sudanese army spokesman Philip Aguer told AFP.

South Sudan — which declared independence from former civil war enemies in north Sudan in July — has accused Khartoum of carrying out several bombing raids in frontier regions of its territory, claims denied by the northern army.

The bombings took place in oil-rich areas along the disputed border with the rump state of Sudan, which both sides claim as theirs. The Jau area has seen several bombings in recent months as well as fighting between the two sides.

“There were several bombs launched from Antonov aircraft,” Aguer said.

The region borders Sudan’s Southern Kordofan state where rebels — once part of the ex-guerrilla turned official South Sudanese army — are battling the Khartoum government forces.

Sudan and South Sudan signed a non-aggression pact late Friday over the disputed border in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa, a move praised by UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon.

However, Aguer said the latest bombings showed the deal had not been taken seriously by Khartoum.

“Nothing has changed, it is business as usual for them,” Aguer said.

Gideon Gatpan, minister of information for Unity state, confirmed there had been “several bombings” on Sunday in the Jau area.

According to the pact, the two sides agreed to “respect each other’s sovereignty and territorial integrity” and to “refrain from launching any attack, including bombardment.”

Border tensions have mounted since South Sudan split from Sudan in July, becoming the world’s newest nation.

South Sudan took three quarters of Sudan’s oil when it gained independence, but all pipeline and export facilities are controlled by the north.

Last month, the South halted oil production — accounting for 98 percent of government revenue — after Juba accused Khartoum of stealing $815 million worth of crude oil.

The latest round of talks between Khartoum and Juba continue in Addis Ababa to resolve the furious oil crisis.

The UN chief last week warned that tensions between the two nations could escalate if outstanding issues are not resolved.

However, the South has demanded that a deal includes settlement on the undemarcated border, parts of which cut through oil fields, as well on Abyei, a Lebanon-sized region claimed by both sides but occupied by northern troops.

At least 105,000 Sudanese refugees have fled into South Sudan since fighting erupted in the states of Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile last year, after Khartoum moved to assert its authority in the wake of southern secession.

The refugees are adding to the woes of the grossly impoverished South, which is reeling from internal crises including a wave of bloody ethnic violence, rebel attacks and severe food shortages.

In addition, Juba is struggling to support over 364,000 people who have returned to their homeland since October 2010 from the north, where they fled during the war.

An estimated 700,000 ethnic southerners remain in north Sudan, where aid officials are increasingly concerned for their future, with an April 8 deadline approaching for them to either register or leave Sudan.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5gQMkFvUoOaLtq_M7H3FxDw9HyZbQ?docId=CNG.f403ea8aad2faad073236239e9b0c0df.a01

South Sudan Accuses Sudan of Air Attack

Posted Tuesday, February 14th, 2012 

South Sudan has accused Sudan of carrying out airstrikes on a disputed border town, just two days after the neighboring countries signed a non-aggression pact.

Authorities in South Sudan say Russian-made Antonov jets dropped several bombs on the town of Jau on Sunday, wounding at least four people.

South Sudan claims Jau is located inside its Unity state, while Sudan puts the town inside its own state of Southern Kordofan.

Disputes over borders and oil have raised tension between the two Sudans, and leaders on both sides have suggested the countries could go to war.

On Friday, an African Union mediation team persuaded the two Sudans to sign a non-aggression pact. The countries have accused each other of supporting the other’s rebels, and the south says the north has bombed its territory on several occasions.

The AU is hosting talks in Addis Ababa aimed at settling the dispute over oil revenues, the biggest source of income for both countries.

South Sudan took 75 percent of Sudan’s oil when it declared independence in July. But the landlocked south must rely on pipelines that run north to an export facility at Port Sudan.

The two sides are embroiled in a battle over how much money South Sudan should pay to use the pipelines and Sudan’s export facilities.

The dispute prompted Khartoum to seize South Sudan’s oil at Port Sudan. South Sudan responded by shutting down all oil production.

http://blogs.voanews.com/breaking-news/2012/02/14/south-sudan-accuses-sudan-of-air-attack/

South Sudan Oil Dispute Raises Specter of War

Gabe Joselow | Juba, South Sudan

South Sudan and Sudan have been engaged in a war of words since the south stopped pumping oil to the north in a dispute about pricing. Both sides have warned that a return to violence is a possibility.South Sudan is retooling its armed forces – working to strengthen the former rebel Southern People’s Liberation Army into a more formal military.

Soldiers here at the Bilpam military base in Juba could be called into battle sooner than expected, if a bitter oil dispute with Sudan turns from a war of words into action.

The south shut off oil flows to the north, claiming Sudan has stolen millions of dollars worth of crude. Khartoum says it confiscated the oil to compensate for unpaid transit fees.

South Sudanese Deputy Defense Minister Major Majak D’Agoot said such actions represent a serious threat to the new nation.

“I don’t want to pinpoint it to any particular source, but anything that tends to threaten our core interests as a nation of course will have to be responded to,” said D’Agoot.

Although Major D’Agoot did not specifically say Sudan was the primary threat to South Sudan, outside his office a statue of former SPLA General John Garang points firmly toward the north.

Amanda Hsiao of the Enough Project says the oil shutdown also could provoke Sudan to take action.

“With the South saying that, one: they’re willing to break of relations completely with the North; two: that they will seek alternative pipelines so that their oil doesn’t have to flow to the north, Khartoum is left with very little options in terms of dealing with its economic situation. Remember it’s a regime that has few friends in the international community,” said Hsiao.

South Sudan declared independence from the North last July, following decades of civil war that killed more than one million people.

Sporadic fighting has continued. In the past year, Sudan has bombed areas near the border where it suspects Southern-backed militias to be active, including an attack on Abyei in May of last year that displaced up to 100,000 people.

The leaders of both nations have said a return to war is a possibility.

On the streets of Juba, a rapidly developing capital, businessmen are nervous about the prospect of violence.

Michael Toma sells automotive supplies at the Jebel market.

“In my own opinion, I for one think war – I don’t want to rule out war because war is inevitable. However, I’d like to ask the two authorities to work together and come into dialogue so we can reach a harmonious conclusion that’s going to benefit either country,” said Toma.

Others, like Simon Gatdier Yieh, say if Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir wants war, he will get it.

“If the Bashir came with the peace then our president will talk to the Bashir in a peaceful manner. If the Bashir wants to fight with the people of South Sudan we are ready, even now we are ready,” said Yieh.

Both countries are dependent on South Sudanese oil and, as a prolonged shutdown continues to drain their two economies, tensions are bound to increase.

 SOUTH SUDAN – PS to absorb returning workers
PS News
JUBA: 8 February 2012: A plan to employ up to 3000 returning South Sudan workers in Government agencies and institutions, as well as the private sector, has been announced. Chair of the committee tasked with accommodating the returning workers, 
Rick Santorum and Christians in Peril
Huffington Post (blog)
Right now, millions of Christians in Nigeria and Sudan are being bombed, starved, ethnically cleansed, or intimidated. Evidently Santorum wasn’t referring to them, however, because they are black and African, and they don’t have votes in the Republican 
South Sudan officials welcome Israel’s Spacecom
IT News Africa
Israel’s communications satellite company Spacecom, hope recent discussions with South Sudanwill boost their communications and telecommunications industry role in the world’s youngest nation . South Sudan’s Telecommunications Ministry said officials 
South Sudan Accuses Sudan of Air Attack
Voice of America (blog)
South Sudan has accused Sudan of carrying out airstrikes on a disputed border town, just two days after the neighboring countries signed a non-aggression pact. Authorities in South Sudan say Russian-made Antonov jets dropped several bombs on the town 
South Sudan Oil Dispute Raises Specter of War
Voice of America
February 14, 2012 South Sudan Oil Dispute Raises Specter of War Gabe Joselow | Juba, South Sudan South Sudan and Sudan have been engaged in a war of words since the south stopped pumping oil to the north in a dispute about pricing…
Migration group says South Sudanese strike deal with Sudan to resettle by April 8
KSPR
By AP GENEVA (AP) — The International Organization for Migration says Sudan and South Sudanhave signed a deal allowing half a million South Sudanese to choose where they want to live. But IOM spokesman Jumbe Omari Jumbe says the deal sets an April 8 
Obama’s 2013 Budget Includes $2.4 Billion in Possible Debt Relief to Sudan
LoanSafe
The Sudanese government has been intensively pressing the international community to have its external debt canceled as a reward for letting South Sudan secede peacefully last July after recognizing the referendum results conducted in early 2011…
South Sudan’s inflation drops to 48%
Sudan Tribune
By Julius N. Uma February 13, 2012 (JUBA) – South Sudan’s inflation, which in December of last year stood at a whopping 65.6% dropped to 47.8% in January, the country’s national bureau of statistics said in its latest report…
Sudanese air strike hits South Sudan, breaking pact
AFP
JUBA, South Sudan — Sudanese warplanes dropped several bombs wounding four soldiers in a contested area claimed by South Sudan, two days after agreeing to a non-aggression pact, Juba’s military spokesman said Tuesday. “Sudanese Armed Forces airplanes 

Chinese Embassy representatives sign handover papers to receive the body of a Chinese worker killed during a kidnapping, from a Sudanese Red Crescent representative (L) and a Sudanese Foreign Ministry official at the Chinese-run Hawasha hospital in Khartoum February 7, 2012. REUTERS/Mohamed Nureldin Abdallah

By Ulf Laessing and Sui-Lee Wee

KHARTOUM/BEIJING | Tue Feb 7, 2012 11:57am EST

(Reuters) – Sudanese rebels released 29 Chinese workers Tuesday, ten days after kidnapping them in the main oil-producing state of South Kordofan where the army has been fighting insurgents, Sudan’s foreign ministry said.

The incident had been an embarrassment for the Sudanese government, which is trying to boost investment from China, its main political and trade ally, as it seeks to overcome a severe economic crisis.

The rebel SPLM-North group said it had taken the construction workers for their own security after a battle with the Sudanese army in South Kordofan, which borders newly independent South Sudan.

But the workers had apparently become caught up in a dispute between Khartoum and rebels who are trying to attract attention to the plight of 417,000 civilians who have fled fighting in South Kordofan and Blue Nile, another Sudanese border state.

Khartoum has restricted access for aid workers and the United Nations in both states, triggering warnings by the United States that a famine could break out.

The 29 Chinese workers were flown out from Kauda in South Kordofan by the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), the campaign group and Sudan’s foreign ministry said.

“The Sudanese foreign ministry affirms to the government and people of China that Sudan’s government seeks to protect Chinese investments and workers involved in it,” the ministry added in a statement.

The workers later arrived in Kenyan capital Nairobi “safe and sound,” China’s official news agency, Xinhua, said, citing a statement from the Chinese foreign ministry.

SPLM-North rebel spokesman Arnu Ngutulu Lodi declined to comment.

SPLM-North leaders met Chinese officials in Ethiopia last week.

Both South Kordofan and Blue Nile are home to large communities who sided with the south during decades of civil war with Khartoum. Many say they have been marginalized by the Khartoum government since South Sudan declared independence in July under a 2005 peace deal.

The SPLM is now the ruling party in the independent south and dismisses Khartoum’s accusations that it supports SPLM-North rebels across the border.

China is an ally of both north and south and the main buyer of South Sudanese oil as well the biggest investor in Sudan.

Western diplomats say China has the best chance of defusing tensions between Khartoum and Juba, which are locked in a row over sharing oil wealth, dividing up debt and ending violence on both sides of their shared boundary.

CHINESE PRESSURE

The kidnap was the third abduction of Chinese people in Sudan since 2004 and highlighted the risks to China’s expansion in Africa in search of minerals and energy.

Beijing had faced immense pressure to secure the safe return of the abducted workers. State-owned newspapers called for more protection for China’s workers overseas as the world’s second-largest economy expands its investments around the globe.

The workers belonged to state-owned Sinohydro Corporation, a hydropower engineering and construction company.

Khartoum counts on China to boost investment as it seeks to overcome the loss of three-quarters of its oil production, that South Sudan took with it when it seceded.

Most Western firms shun Sudan due to a U.S. trade embargo imposed first in 1997 when Khartoum was hosting prominent militants such as Osama bin Laden.

SPLM-North is one of a number of rebel movements in underdeveloped border areas who say they are fighting to overthrow Sudanese President Omar Hassan al-Bashir and end what they see as the dominance of the Khartoum political elite.

(Writing by Ulf Laessing and Sui-Lee Wee, Editing by Ron Popeski)

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/02/07/us-china-sudan-workers-idUSTRE8160UU20120207

Kidnapped Chinese workers released in Sudan

From Peter Shadbolt, CNN
updated 8:14 AM EST, Tue February 7, 2012
The Sudanese military said rebels in the border region with neighboring South Sudan are responsible for the kidnapping.
The Sudanese military said rebels in the border region with neighboring South Sudan are responsible for the kidnapping.

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • NEW: Chinese hostages are freed in Sudan; they’re now on the way to Kenya
  • NEW: The body of one worker killed in the rebel raid on their camp is returned to Chinese officials
  • The 29 Chinese workers were abducted from a construction site January 28

(CNN) — More than two dozen Chinese construction workers abducted in Sudan have been released, China’s official Xinhua news agency reported Tuesday.

The 29 workers flew out of Sudan aboard a Red Cross plane bound for Nairobi, Kenya, Xinhua reported, citing an unnamed source with the International Committee of the Red Cross. They were to be turned over to Chinese officials there, Xinhua said.

Rebels abducted the workers January 28 from a camp run by China’s Power Construction Corp. in volatile South Kordofan. Eighteen other workers in the camp escaped the raid, which the Sudanese military blamed on the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North — a rebel force in the border region with neighboring South Sudan.

One worker died in the raid, Xinhua said. Sudanese authorities handed over the worker’s body Tuesday, according to Xinhua.

The workers were released after what Xinhua described as “a stream of intensive rescue efforts carried out by the Chinese government in collaboration with the Sudanese government and other parties.”

The Al-Adhdath daily newspaper in Khartoum earlier said theInternational Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) had mediated for the release.

South Sudan became the world’s newest nation last year after decades of conflict with the north.

Nevertheless, violence in South Kordofan and the nearby Blue Nile states has forced hundreds of thousands to flee their homes. While the region is in Sudanese territory, it straddles Sudan and South Sudan’s ethnic and political lines.

China is Sudan’s largest trading partner, while Sudan is China’s third-largest trading partner in Africa. According to the Chinese foreign ministry, trade between the two countries reached $8.63 billion in 2010, an increase of 35.1% compared with the previous year.

The close bilateral cooperation is mainly driven by oil exports from Sudan, which is among the top oil suppliers for China.

http://www.cnn.com/2012/02/07/world/africa/sudan-hostages/index.html

Chinese workers freed in Sudan, flown to Kenya

Police close the door of an ambulance carrying the body of a Chinese worker killed during a kidnapping, after he was handed over to Chinese Embassy representatives by a Sudanese Red Crescent representative and a Sudanese Foreign Ministry official at the Chinese-run Hawasha hospital in KhartoumThe body of the man killed during the attack has been handed over to Chinese authorities in Sudan

A group of Chinese workers kidnapped by rebels in Sudan has been freed and flown to Kenya, officials from both countries say.

The construction workers were released to the International Committee of the Red Cross on Tuesday, 11 days after they were abducted.

They had been held in Sudan’s restive border state of South Kordofan.

A Red Cross plane flew them to Nairobi, where they are to be taken to the Chinese embassy, Sudan says.

Sudan’s foreign ministry spokesman al-Obeid Morawah told the BBC that as far as he was aware 29 Chinese nationals were on the flight, and all were in good health.

The Red Cross plane took off from a small airstrip in the South Kordofan town of Kauda, he said.

The road construction workers were taken captive when rebels from the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North (SPLM-N) stormed their camp on 28 January.

Another 18 people fled the scene, of whom 17 were later found safely.

Map

One man was killed during the SPLM-N attack – his body was earlier handed over to the Chinese embassy in Khartoum.

The SPLM-N – which used to fight alongside the rulers of now independent South Sudan – has been battling government forces in South Kordofan for more than six months.

Correspondents say Beijing is a key supporter of the Khartoum government but the abduction – the third involving Chinese nationals since 2004 – has strained relations.

China buys much of the oil produced in both Sudan and South Sudan and is a major supplier of weapons to Khartoum.

China is trying to mediate a bitter dispute between South Sudan and Sudan over oil, which is produced primarily in South Sudan but runs through pipelines in the north for export.

South Sudan’s new leaders deny Khartoum’s accusations that they are backing the SPLM-N.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-16924184


By JOHN HEILPRIN Associated Press

GENEVA February 3, 2012 (AP)

A U.N. staff member was shot during a clash that broke out as officials met to discuss a weekend cattle raid massacre that left 78 people dead, including many women and children, U.N. officials said Friday.

The Wednesday meeting between U.N. and local officials to discuss the incident was broken up when armed men believed to be members of the South Sudanese Army and the South Sudan Police Service “started shooting indiscriminately,” Kouider Zerrouk, the spokesman for the U.N. peacekeeping mission in Sudan, said.

The staff member wounded in the incident was evacuated along with seven other personnel and is in stable condition in Juba.

There are conflicting reports of the toll of the clash. Lakes state Governor Chol Tong Mayay said 21 security personnel and 3 civilians from Lakes state were killed in the attack. Mayay said an investigation would be launched into the incident.

South Sudan broke away from Sudan in July and is struggling to contain internal violence that has plagued the region for years.

The Saturday attack targeting a cattle camp in Warrap state also wounded 72 people and left nine missing, the U.N.’s High Commissioner for Human Rights said Friday. Most of the killing appeared to have been inflicted by machetes and about three quarters of the dead were reportedly women and children, spokesman Robert Colville said.

The attackers massacre have not yet been identified but crossed over from Unity state, apparently targeting another tribe, Colville said. The area’s remoteness and insecurity make it “very hard to investigate” such incidents, he said.

The Warrap attack was the latest in a series of cattle raids since December. Ongoing raids between Nuer, Murle and Dinka communities have killed hundreds and the United Nations estimates over 120,000 people have been affected in Jonglei state alone.

————

Michael Onyiego contributed to this report from Juba, South Sudan.

http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/cattle-raiding-south-sudan-massacre-15507027

UN Says Cattle Raiding Behind South Sudan Massacre
ABC News
The Wednesday meeting between UN and local officials to discuss the incident was broken up when armed men believed to be members of the South Sudanese Army and the South Sudan Police Service “started shooting indiscriminately,” Kouider Zerrouk,

Dozens dead in shootout at South Sudan peace meeting
AFP
JUBA — Dozens of people were killed in South Sudan in a shootout at a peace meeting to resolve disputes about stolen cattle, with some reports claiming as many as 37 deaths, officials said Friday. “These guys just started shooting everywhere,” said

Food for South Sudan refugees runs scarce
Al Jazeera
Recent tribal fighting in South Sudan has left thousands of people with little to no source of food and the UN says the situation appears to be getting worse. Aid organisations have warned donors that the country is facing a humanitarian emergency.

Total Plans to Resume Exploration in South Sudan’s Block B
BusinessWeek
3 (Bloomberg) — Total SA, France’s biggest oil company, said it plans to resume exploration work in South Sudan’s Block B. The company, based in Paris, will submit a “preparatory work program” to South Sudanese authorities for their approval,

Aid Groups ask US to Consider Cross-Border Aid Effort in Sudan
Voice of America
“First and foremost, it urges the US government to continue to engage the government of Sudan in trying to get [it to] allow international humanitarian aid workers and aid assistance into South Kordofan and Blue Nile. Second, and most importantly,

S.Sudan oil shutdown to increase food aid dependence-UN
Reuters
* Oil revenues make up 98 percent of South Sudan’s income * UN warns of “longer season of hunger” in 2012 By Hereward Holland PIBOR, South Sudan, Feb 3 (Reuters) – South Sudan’s decision to shut down its oil output will make many more people dependent

Dozens dead in shootout at South Sudan peace meeting
AFP
JUBA — Dozens of people were killed in South Sudan in a shootout at a peace meeting to resolve disputes about stolen cattle, with some reports claiming as many as 37 deaths, officials said Friday. “These guys just started shooting everywhere,” said

Top of the Morning: Security Council Possibly Watering Down Syria Resolution
UN Dispatch
(VOA http://bit.ly/wVdQvM) The OCHA chief is in South Sudan and she does not like what she sees. “Valerie Amos told a news conference in Juba, the capital, that South Sudan’s recent threat to shut down all oil production would spell a more severe

AlterNet
Dozens of people were killed in South Sudan in a shootout at a peace meeting to resolve disputes about stolen cattle, with some reports claiming as many as 37 deaths, officials said Friday. A herdsman from the Nuer tribe stands among his cattle at a


By the CNN Wire Staff
January 30, 2012 — Updated 1031 GMT (1831 HKT)
The visit to Beijing by President Omar al-Bashir (L) last year was a sign of the growing ties between Sudan and China.
The visit to Beijing by President Omar al-Bashir (L) last year was a sign of the growing ties between Sudan and China.

STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • The workers are in good condition, the news report says
  • It did not mention the fate of the other 56 workers who were also kidnapped
  • The attack took place at a construction site in a remote area

(CNN) — The Sudanese army has freed at least 14 Chinese nationals who were kidnapped in the volatile South Kordofan state, the official Sudan News Agency said Monday.

The news agency quoted Ahmed Haroun, the state governor, as saying the workers were taken to neighboring North Kordofan and were in good condition.

The report did not mention the fate of the other 56 construction workers who militants had also captured when they attacked a construction site in a remote area Saturday.

At the time, Alsawarmi Khalid, spokesman for the Sudanese armed forces, blamed the attacks on the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement -North, a rebel force in the border region with neighboring South Sudan. Khalid said a total of 70 workers were kidnapped in the incident — a mix of local and foreign workers.

China’s Xinhua news agency confirmed the release, but reported that 17 — and not 14 — Chinese workers were evacuated to “safe places” by Sudanese forces. That leaves 12 Chinese workers unaccounted for, the Chinese embassy in Sudan told Xinhua.

It was unclear why the two official accounts varied in the number of Chinese nationals freed.

South Sudan became the world’s newest nation last year after decades of conflict with the north.

International concern has grown over the violence in South Kordofan and nearby Blue Nile states, which has forced hundreds of thousands to flee their homes.

The region is a Sudan territory, but straddles Sudan and South Sudan’s ethnic and political lines.

China is Sudan’s largest trading partner, while Sudan is China’s third-largest trading partner in Africa. According to the Chinese foreign ministry, trade between the two countries reached $8.63 billion in 2010, an increase of 35.1% compared to the previous year.

The close bilateral cooperation is mainly driven by oil exports from Sudan, which is among the top oil suppliers for China.

http://edition.cnn.com/2012/01/30/world/africa/sudan-missing-workers/?hpt=hp_t2


January 29, 2012 (KHARTOUM) – A group of 700 military officers from Sudan’s Armed Forces (SAF) confronted president Omer Hassan al-Bashir and his defense minister Abdel-Rahim Mohamed Hussein with several demands that focused on military and political reforms, Sudan Tribune is told.

JPEG - 26.4 kb
FILE – Sudanese President Omer Hassan al-Bashir (C) and Defense minister Abdel-Rahim Mohamed Hussein (L) salutes at a military function in Khartoum (AFP)

Multiple army sources who all spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the issue said that the officers included those stationed in the Sudanese capital Khartoum and other parts of the country.

The message was delivered last week to Bashir and Hussein during their briefing sessions with SAF senior army officers who listened to the pair calling on them to prepare for the possibility of a full-scale war with South Sudan.

But the sources said that the SAF officers at the briefing were all but appalled at the prospects of heading to war with Sudan’s southern neighbor given the state of the military at this point.

The officers called on Bashir and Hussein to urgently address the challenges faced by the SAF emphasizing that the army has been unable to decisively overcome the rebels in the border states of Blue Nile and South Kordofan.

The Sudanese army is battling rebels from the Sudan People Liberation Movement North (SPLM-N) in the two states since June 2011 in South Kordofan and September 2011 in Blue Nile. Khartoum persistently accuses Juba of providing aid to the rebels but South Sudan routinely denies the charge.

This week the second Vice-President of Sudan, Al-Haj Adam Youssef was quoted by local media as threatening to go after SPLM-N rebels even if they had to go all the way to Juba.

“If necessary, Juba is not far,” he told the paper during celebrations of Sudan’s independence in the central state of Al-Jezira.

SAF needs “tremendously huge efforts” in order to prepare for future dangers particularly at a time when there is talk about foreign intervention, Bashir and Hussein were told.

The officers also urged Bashir and Hussein combat “rampant” corruption within the army and gave an example of 200 battle tanks that were bought in early 2010 but most of it turned out to be defective and a large number had to be sent to neighboring countries for repairs.

They noted that several senior officers objected to the “subpar deal” involving these tanks before they were bought which led to the sacking of Hussein’s chief secretary Maj. General Al-Na’eem Khidir and other senior officers including Maj. General Ahmed Abdoon who headed the Nyala army division and Maj. General Al-Tayeb Mosbah of El-Fasher army division.

The SAF officers also implored on Bashir and Hussein to implement segregation between the ruling National Congress Party (NCP) and the army so that the latter does not shoulder the mistakes of the NCP and become vulnerable to volatility of the Sudanese politics.

Furthermore, they said that is imperative that the system of government be reformed because the status quo jeopardizes the country’s national security.

One of the sources underscored that the current political climate in the form of tensions between the Islamists and the NCP has spread into the army but declined to provide details.

He described Bashir and Hussein as “rattled” by the officers’ complaints.

Eric Reeves, a researcher at Smith College who writes extensively on Sudan, believes oil is a major factor in this move.

“This may well be a dismayed response to the clear possibility that Khartoum never wanted to make a deal about oil revenues with Juba. Rather, the goal was to create a casus belli, by which the army would seize the oil regions of the South and restore all oil revenues to a northern economy that continues in a politically dangerous tailspin” he said.

This month a number of memos have surfaced allegedly sent by the Islamist base calling on the NCP to implement political reforms and fight corruption.

One of them was presented in late 2011 by Bashir’s adviser Ghazi Salah al-Deen in his capacity as the leader of the NCP parliamentary bloc.

The Sudanese president responded vaguely to some of the demands contained in Ghazi’s memo while saying that it is “premature” to address the others.

Sudan is facing a growing economic crisis that was aggravated by the secession of the oil-rich south which took with it 75% of the country’s crude reserves.

Since then, Sudan’s oil revenues, which used to make up 90 percent of the country’s exports and were the main source of hard currency inflows, have largely dried up.

The government has already banned many imported items to preserve its foreign currency supply.

The Sudanese pound lost a significant amount of its value against the dollar as a result and the black market has flourished despite government warnings.

Khartoum is trying to walk the fine line between the need to cut government spending and cutting subsidies on basic goods and petroleum products which they fear might trigger social unrest.

Last year the governor of Sudan’s central bank Mohamed Khair al-Zubeir said that fuel subsidies need to be removed because they are a huge burden on the economy.

“Subsidies are a big burden for the state. The biggest subsidy is for fuel,” al-Zubeir said, adding that a barrel of fuel was sold locally at $60 compared to a market price of $100.

“So far we didn’t notice the difference, subsidies were no problem because the country had oil … [but] we cannot pay this anymore,” he added.

The landlocked South Sudan has been in talks with Khartoum on the fair fee that should be assessed for using the north’s refineries and pipelines. It has been reported that Sudan asked for $32 per barrel for the service, something which South Sudan vehemently rejected saying it is excessive compared to international norms.

Sudan retaliated to the slow pace of talks and decided to seize part of South Sudan’s oil as payment in kind for the exporting service. Juba responded by shutting down its oil production.

(ST)

http://www.sudantribune.com/EXCLUSIVE-Sudan-army-officers-warn,41444

Sudan frees South Sudan’s oil tankers; dispute continues
Reuters
JUBA/DUBAI (Reuters) – Sudan released tankers loaded with South Sudanese oil that had been held at Port Sudan in a row over export transit fees, days after Khartoum seized crude from its new neighbor and offered it at a steeply discounted price.

Sudan-South Sudan Dispute Dominates African Summit
Voice of America (blog)
South Sudan has followed through on its threat and shut down all oil production as its dispute with Sudan shows no sign of resolution. The leaders of both countries held talks in Addis Ababa late last week on the sidelines of the annual gathering of 

Report: Sudanese army free 14 kidnapped Chinese workers
CNN International
By the CNN Wire Staff The visit to Beijing by President Omar al-Bashir (L) last year was a sign of the growing ties between Sudan and China. (CNN) — The Sudanese army has freed 14 Chinese nationals who were kidnapped in the volatile South Kordofan 

Ki Moon calls for peaceful resolution to Sudan oil row
Sudan Tribune
By Julius N. Uma January 30, 2012 (JUBA) — Ban Ki-moon, the United Nations Secretary General on Sunday urged leaders in both Sudan and South Sudan to reach an agreement on how to share their oil wealth after series of counter accusations forced the 

Sudan oil crisis ‘threatens peace’
News24
Addis Ababa – South Sudan and Sudan could face a “major humanitarian crisis” if they fail to solve a running oil dispute, a top US envoy said on Sunday as African heads of state converged in Ethiopia’s capital for an African Union summit…

South Sudan clamps oil shutdown, seeks border deal
Business Recorder (blog)
South Sudan has fully shut down oil output in a row with Sudan over export transit fees and will only restart after a broader deal on issues including border security and the disputed region of Abyei, its oil minister said on Sunday…

Brent drops below $111/barrel; EU, Iran eyed
Reuters
 Tan | SINGAPORE (Reuters) – Brent crude fell on Monday as investors cautiously eyed a European Union summit for a resolution to the region’s debt crisis, but prices hovered near $111 per barrel on concerns over supply from Iran and South Sudan

China says contact cut with workers held in Sudan
Reuters Africa
BEIJING (Reuters) – China’s embassy in Sudan has lost contact with 29 Chinese construction workers held by rebels in the strife-troubled border state of South Kordofan, the official Xinhua news agency reported on Monday. The rebel Sudan People’s 

Supply concerns keep Brent above $US110
Sydney Morning Herald
Brent crude edged down on Monday as investors cautiously eyed a European Union summit for a resolution to the region’s debt crisis, but prices stayed above $US111 per barrel on concerns over supply from Iran and South Sudan. EU leaders are expected to 

The South Sudan dream is turning sour
The Guardian (blog)
It is now a year since the people of South Sudan voted overwhelmingly for independence from Khartoum. But the vision of a new era of peace and co-operation between north and south, endorsed at the time by President Omar al-Bashir and the southern 

South Sudan ethnic clashes claim 74 lives
Daily Nation
A May 2011 handout photo showing displaced South Sudanese waiting for relief supplies in Warrap State. Fresh fighting has claimed more than 74 lives as ethnic clashes continue to convulse the new country. PHOTO | AFP By MACHEL AMOS in Juba At least 74 

AU Commission Chair Urges Sudan, South Sudan to Reach Agreement
Sudan Vision
The birth of South Sudan state was an indication of political maturity and wisdom of the leaders of the two states, Mr. Ping said, and called on the governments of Sudan and South Sudan to arrive at solutions for the outstanding issues…


ReutersReuters 

KHARTOUM (Reuters) – Sudan’s army fought rebels in the oil-producing state of South Kordofan last week, both sides said on Saturday.

The rebels said they had killed nine government troops, but the army denied this.

Fighting has taken place since last June in South Kordofan between the Sudanese army and rebels from the northern wing of the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement, who want to topple the Khartoum government.

Clashes spread to neighbouring Blue Nile state, which also borders newly independent South Sudan, in September.

The violence has already forced about 417,000 people to flee their homes, more than 80,000 of them to South Sudan, the United Nations estimates.

Both Blue Nile and South Kordofan contain large groups who sided with the south in a decades-long civil war, and who say they continue to face persecution inside Sudan since South Sudan seceded in July.

The SPLM is now the ruling party in the independent south and denies supporting SPLM-North rebels across the border.

The SPLM-North rebels said they had killed nine soldiers, destroyed three tanks and seized military equipment in clashes at Tees near the southern border on Monday. They also seized three army vehicles in another attack in the same area on Tuesday, they said in a statement.

Army spokesman Sawarmi Khalid Saad confirmed military operations had taken place in the town of Tees to reopen a road but denied any soldiers had been killed.

“These areas are under army control,” he said.

Events in South Kordofan and Blue Nile are difficult to verify because aid groups and foreign journalists are banned from areas where fighting takes place.

SPLM-North is one of a number of rebel movements in underdeveloped border areas who say they are fighting to overthrow Sudan’s President Omar Hassan al-Bashir and end what they see as the dominance of the Khartoum political elite.

Sudan and South Sudan, who still have to resolve a range of issues including the sharing of oil revenues, regularly trade accusations of supporting insurgencies on each other’s territory.

Their armed forces clashed at Jau in a region claimed by both sides last month in a rare direct confrontation.

Locals have faced air raids and sporadic ground fighting, according to rights groups and refugees, although Sudan denies it is bombing civilian areas.

(Reporting by Khalid Abdelaziz; Writing by Ulf Laessing; Editing by Ben Harding and Peter Graff)

http://news.yahoo.com/sudan-southern-rebels-clash-oil-border-state-203756198.html