Posts Tagged ‘juba south sudan’


By Dr. James Okuk (Juba, South Sudan)

  “People at the higher stages of moral development not only sympathize with those who are suffering, but take active steps to help alleviate that suffering. They are willing to speak out on behalf of themselves and others when they witness an injustice, and will take effective and well-thought-out action to correct the injustice” – Judith A. Boss.

Looking at the above-mentioned ethical quotation and pigeonhole it into the hot issue of corruption in the Republic South Sudan being tackled sensitively these days, it could be observed that the new state on the planet earth does not lack citizens on high moral ground.

Even the SPLM-controlled National Legislature in Juba has learnt a bit how not to clap for the President of the Republic every time. The SPLM MPs for the first time got the courage to slap the Big Man on the cheeks so that he could wake up and start doing things right. They gave him a parliamentary resolution to take bold action to name directly and prosecute those current and former top government officials and liberation comrades who are suspected of having amassed big monies and properties from public sources using discoverable crooked means.

In their alleged corruption practices, these officials forgot heeding to Kantian moral ought: ” Act only according to that maxim by which you can at the same time will that it should become a universal law”. The scenario is like graduating from being commanders of dignified liberation movements in the bushes of South Sudan (who played a great role of enforcing independence of South Sudan), to turning into shameless commanders of corruption in the capital city and other towns of South Sudan. Indeed this immoral behavior is a violation of the principles of liberation war Southerners fought voluntarily for decades.

“Why do I care for good future of the coming generation? I have already undergone suffering for decades in the bushes of South Sudan as well as in the refuge countries and my time to die is nearing anyway. Thus, I need to enjoy my life now because my kingdom has come and it is up to them with their kingdom that shall come”, some of the embezzlers conspired.

And now as the executive seems to get into loggerhead with the legislative and as the judiciary awaits passionately for its turn to get into the ring as invited by the lawmakers to warm up for the game, these questions may pop up: Who will prosecute the the prosecutor and who is the prosecutor? Is fettered prisons proper places for freedom liberators if found guilty of corruption crimes? How many prison cells does the government of South Sudan needs to build to accommodate the liberators who decided to become commanders of corruption?

The answers to these questions suggest worrying scenarios as we experience the twists and turns about the game of pandemic of corruption in the nascent country. The good work that might have been started may disappear into thin air as there may not be daring mice to risk tying green bells on necks of dangerous black cats. This is analogous to cliches: “I am black, you are white, who is innocent”.

Defense mechanism queries and devil advocates may arise to thrive on the tense situation: Money of which country was embezzled by the commanders of corruption; the money of the Republic of the Sudan or the money of the Republic of South Sudan or the money of the donors?

If the whole saga is about the monies stolen (or disappeared if put diplomatically) between 9th January 2005 to 9th July 2011, then by the de jure principle the government of South Sudan has no case de facto.

But if it is about the public monies that were stolen (or evaporated without proper accounting; if we use another polite language) from 9th July 2011 upwards, then the President of the independent state of South Sudan shall have a genuine case, both de jure and de facto.

An interesting fact to notice: When the commanders of corruption were busy siphoning public fund out of government coffers, they thought it was Jellaba’s monies that should be distributed like humanitarian food and then eaten without much bother of what will come next (i.e., the consequence). They seemed to have been thinking that stealing a Jellaba’s money is not a theft. You can even get rewarded for doing that as we have seen in many job appointments decrees in South Sudan. For them throwing away donors food is not a waste.

This brings me to a metaphysical as well as an epistemological moral question: What are the motives and incentives of corruption that has spread in South Sudan like wild fire of Australian Forests?

The grand answer is greed for quick-and-soon luxury and power. The other answer could be gleaned from lack of respect for government and donors monies; an attitude that has its origin in some tribal mental set-ups in South Sudan that wrongly perceives public good as nobody’s property to be looted freely without any sense of shame.

Further, it could be a reward for the unpaid time of the struggle for liberation from Jellaba bondages. “The Jellaba has eaten and enjoyed our resources and revenues but we rebelled and forced them out of our dearest Motherland. Now it is our proper turn to eat and enjoy to the maximum even more than the Jellaba because we deserve this”, the corruption commanders seemed to have justified their moves.

Furthermore, it could be the intended laxity in financial management and accountability as well as reluctance to put the right mechanisms and systems in place. Even ‘White Men from the West’ who came to South Sudan under pretext of experts got their share of booty here.

And why not, the extended family pressure of livelihood cannot be ignored too. A lot of South Sudanese benevolent duties have been carried out here and there, but in the expense of corruption practices. It is known that in the communitarian lifestyle in Africa the “Haves” are not supposed to eat and enjoy in the loneliness of individualism but share with the ” Have-Nots”, particularly from the members of the extended families and friends, to say the least.

Not to forget, some of the named corrupt good guys may say: “Oh Your Excellency Mr President, we used the unaccounted money to campaign for your election as well as for the election of other SPLM candidates in 2010. It was very tough and had it not been for this money we would have been nowhere than we are today today because the candles of GoSS Presidential candidate, Dr. Lam Akol Ajawin, and the SPLM-DC were lighting everywhere and convincing the citizens to see the light at the end of our dark SPLM tunnel.”

Funniest enough, the South Sudan Anti-corruption Commission (SSAC) is trying to fight corruption, but by wasting public time and money in opening as many offices for awareness instead of prosecution of the suspected corruption criminals if not libelers. The legal charges could be permitted under Chapter XXI, Offenses Related to Acquisition of Property (i.e., Theft and Theft Related Offenses under sections 293 – 314 of the Southern Sudan Penal Code, 2008) though with question marks whether this is relevant any more to the Republic of South Sudan.

However, the SSAC cunning move is in contradiction of the maxim that ignorance of legal knowledge is not a justifiable ground for acquittal from a crime committed. Every citizen and resident has the duty to know the law and does not need any paid-awareness campaign for this. Thus, it could be said that the SSAC is nothing new but a copy-and-paste project from the excellent teacher Kenya imparted to the perfect student South Sudan.

Given this known fake war on corruption by words only, part of necessary steps towards reduction of this cancer in the Republic of South Sudan is to get rid of the unnecessary erected caricature called SSAC so that it is sent back to where it was originally copied from. The other step is to eliminate the political institution called the Ministry of Justice and take back the legal duties it has usurped to the Ministry of Interior and the Judiciary that should rightly be the custodians of application of law, conviction and compensation in South Sudan.

Even if the Chief Justice appeared in courts with red bullying eyes in silent threat to Judges who gather small courage to try big sharks, and warning them that the SPLM’s VIPs cases are “very important”, still the legal procedural anomalies from the Judiciary could be regarded as lesser evil among options of other evils. After all, a totally politicized justice system can never deliver but abort justice at best in a broad daylight as witnessed in few public monies embezzlement cases tried in Juba. If implementation of South Sudan laws to the legal cases is left to the Judiciary alone, at least, a minimum independence and impartiality could be guaranteed.

To the best of my opinion, I could say that the Ministry of Justice is an obstructor of justice in South Sudan and so is the SSAC, especially when the interest of the SPLM big fishes and their friends is at stake. Common sense would suggest that prosecutors cannot prosecute the prosecutors who shift commandership from liberation to corruption. We may be wasting our time in praxis of law without justice, believe me though you may not follow me!

To keep everyone in the warmth, the so-called Civil Society of South Sudan seems to have learnt to play nicely the game of Tom and Jerry perfectly with the top commanders of corruption in South Sudan. Evaluate and see how foxy its hand-picked demonstrating members appeared luxuriously in the premises of South Sudan Legislative Assembly and pretended to be supporting the RSS President regarding the leaked out content of the letter to the 75 alleged thieves of of US$ 4 billion public monies. Some of them were driving Hammers and V-8s and dressed neatly with full stomachs from diversified hotels food. A funny Civil Society!

Notwithstanding, the weak Civil Society did not support the President’s intention. Instead, they complicated the whole game by calling for publication of the concrete names of the big corrupting fishes that were summarized in the number 75 as a tactic to avoid the “devil that comes out from the details” as well as demanding to bring them to Book, but not clarifying whose Book is going to be read to them.

It is known in jurisprudence arenas that there is sometimes conflict in strict application of law and the greatest public interest. If we put the move of President of the Republic who want settlement of the corruption crimes outside courts, you could tell that he is kind enough to the SPLM comrades although some 75-listed suspects want this case settled inside courts so that they can give the government headache of compensations for defamation if not found guilty.

Nonetheless, I think the freedom should be granted to the suspects to choose the best way of how they want to go about this:

1) Return the stolen money secretly into the provided account in Kenyan Equity Bank in Nairobi (South Sudan Stolen Funds Recovery Account #0810299067373) and everything shall confidentially be declared as okay by the President of the RSS and one other official as stated in the leaked letter. If they are afraid to be seen and discovered in the Kenyan Bank premise when returning the stolen money, they may decide depositing the money directly into the pocket of H.E. Mr. President and the other mandated official.

2) Come out into public media to declare that they are among the listed 75 recipients of the RSS President’s letter but with denial that they are thieves as implied, and then threatening to sue whoever thinks otherwise before Judges and Juries rather than at the Kenyan Equity Bank or inside the President’s and his aide’s secret pockets.

Also the distributed letters of the President of RSS can be seen as an exercise of casting hooks into a river full of big fishes but who are only given a tempting choice to swallow what is hanged on the hook or avoid it. Even within the list the target may nor be all but few “Benydits” and “Guandits” who are not supposed to be “Bandits” within the SPLM bush system that usually surprises the whole world unprecedentedly.

It is said that when a trader gets dried up of cash and his shop shelves get empty, he automatically starts looking up for records of those who have borrowed money from him in the past, with hope of quick refund outside or inside courts settlements.

Now that the game is getting complicated with different rules and players appearing on the boxing stage, things may not run smooth as might have been intended by the kind-hearted President of the Republic. From the game of rerun-and-forgiveness it is turning into the game of crime-and-punishment.

The South Sudan National Parliament seems to be reminding the Presidency that “the chief function of punishment is to reduce crime and that the deserved suffering of the quilty is just.” But then comes the problem of politics and “dirty hands” where morality and behavior has to come to terms with the fact that political environments are so often morally corrupt.

The values which politicians find themselves driven to promote, and others find themselves driven to endorse in South Sudan, may be the product of degraded social circumstances and arrangements. We concentrate upon the particular act that will require “dirty hands” and ignore the contingency and mutability of the circumstances that have given rise to it. Yet it is precisely these circumstances which often most deserve moral scrutiny and criticism, and the changes which may result from such criticism can eliminate the ‘necessity’ for those types of “dirty hands” in future since the present is moving and the past is gone.

The Parliament, the Opposition, the Civil Society and many concerned citizens and friends of South Sudan are demonstrating that they could stand on a moral high ground saying: “Mr. President Sir, in the absence of genuine repentance, forgiveness, that is, putting aside resentment, is a vice because it entails accepting the wrongdoer’s degraded view of the victim”.

Are they not justified in slapping and not clapping for the President? Perhaps and who knows. Let’s see in near future! Running after the stolen money but ignoring the thieves is not adding up even if this move can be seen as beyond good and evil; beyond innocence and guilt. Without thieves there will be no notion called “stealing” or “stolen”; a necessary connection even if the President is a kind-hearted man who intend not to displease any SPLM comrade.

I tell you if you invite the UN Secretary-General, Mr. Ban Ki-Moon to South Sudan First Independence Anniversary and ask him to sing “Oyee” again, he may decline to do it as he did proudly and honorably on 9th July 2011.


South Sudan versus Sudan boundary case
Sudan Tribune
This may be taken as marking the beginning of North-South conflict. From 1956 when Sudan attained its independence from colonial rule to 1974 when oil was discovered in South Sudan, North-South borders were never a hot issue and arguably were never the 
Country Gets Fifa Membership
AllAfrica.com
By Matata Safi, 28 May 2012 Juba — South Sudan was officially been admitted into the Federation of International Football Association (FIFA) on the 25th May and will make its first appearance in the international sports scene when Salam football club 
Country and South Sudan Resume Talks Today As Juba Reports Military Assaults
AllAfrica.com
Khartoum — South Sudan has accused Sudan of bombing its territories on the eve of their resumption of negotiations on post-referendum issues under the mediation of the African Union High Level Panel (AUHIP) in the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa.
The Road to South Sudan
AllAfrica.com
By Arne Doornebal, 29 May 2012 Uganda is paving the way to South Sudan, making the Nimule border crossing the only place where a bitumen road leads to a brand-new country. But, as our local correspondent recalls, for many years, the 650-kilometre 
South Sudan claims Sudan attacks Aweil leaving 10 people dead
Sudan Tribune
May 28, 2012 (JUBA) – South Sudan said Monday said 10 people, most of whom were innocent civilians, have lost their lives following an attack allegedly carried out by the armed forces of the neigbouring Sudan. The two nations are due to resume 
Genocide and Starvation in Sudan Is Getting Worse… and There Is Something We 
Huffington Post
As you know, I traveled recently with Reverend Franklin Graham (and Samaritans Purse) to South Sudan and Sudan. In Sudan, home of dictator-president Omar al-Bashir, I saw starvation — people eating bugs and leaves after their own president bombed 
Sudan says will pull troops from oil-rich region
BlueRidgeNow.com
By MOHAMMED SAEED AP Sudan said it would withdraw its army Tuesday from a disputed border region that contains rich oil fields and is contested by neighboring South Sudan. The decision to pull the military out of Abyei comes as Sudanese officials are 
South Sudan Questions Khartoum’s Sincerity as Peace Talks Resume
Voice of America
ADDIS ABABA – A senior South Sudanese official has questioned Sudan’s sincerity in resolving disputes as a fresh round of peace talks gets underway in Addis Ababa. As the talks were about to resume Tuesday, South Sudan’s chief negotiator, Pagan Amum, 
Insight: South Sudan independence still comes at a price
WRNI
By Pascal Fletcher JUBA (Reuters) – South Sudan’s citizens who paid in blood for their independence in a long liberation war are being told freedom carries its own price – in hardship. An oil shutdown from January by the former bush rebels who now run 
Sudan troops moved outside disputed Abyei area-media
Chicago Tribune
KHARTOUM, May 29 (Reuters) – Sudanese troops have left Abyei, a disputed region on the border with South Sudan, the state-linked Sudanese Media Centre said on Tuesday, citing military officials. “The armed forces implemented their deployment outside 

UN official condemns Sudan for “indiscriminate” bombing

Reuters – ‎
By Hereward Holland | JUBA (Reuters) – The UN’s top human rights official on Friday said she was outraged by Sudan’s “indiscriminate” aerial bombing of South Sudan and warned that attacks that hurt civilians could be considered international crimes.
Voice of America – ‎
May 11, 2012 South Sudan Skeptical of Talks with Khartoum, Report Says Gabe Joselow | Nairobi A new report from the Enough Project says South Sudan’s leadership is showing more reluctance than before to engage Khartoum to settle outstanding issues, 
AFP – ‎‎
JUBA — Sudanese air strikes on foe South Sudan could amount to international crimes, the UN rights chief warned Friday, adding that she was “saddened and outraged” at bombing raids that broke a UN ceasefire order. “Deliberate or reckless attacks on 
Mmegi Online – ‎
TABANYA: Sudanese war planes have launched renewed air strikes against South Sudan, violating a United Nations resolution to end weeks of a bitter border conflict. “The Republic of Sudan has been randomly bombarding civilian areas,” said Southern army 
Boston.com – ‎
KAMPALA, Uganda—A Ugandan official says hundreds of South Sudanese have fled into Uganda to escape tribal clashes in South Sudan as well as tension stemming from a border conflict with Sudan. Deputy Relief Minister Musa Ecweru said Friday more than 300 
AFP – ‎‎
By Ian Timberlake (AFP) – 2 hours ago KHARTOUM — Somewhere within the twisted metal of Sudan’s damaged Heglig petroleum complex may lie the evidence to prove who caused the destruction during the 10-day occupation of the region by South Sudanese troops 
Reuters Africa – ‎‎
LONDON May 11 (Reuters) – Kenyan Treasury bill yields tumbled at auctions this week and further declines are expected after inflation in east Africa’s largest economy fell in April for the fifth consecutive month. Little change is expected at next 
Ahram Online -‎
At a time when Heglig, the oil-rich region on the border between Sudan and South Sudan, grabbed the headlines, something else perhaps more sinister was going on. Extremists in Khartoum burned down a church frequented by Southern Sudanese in Al-Juraif 
Asia Times Online –
By Michael T Klare Conflict and intrigue over valuable energy supplies have been features of the international landscape for a long time. Major wars over oil have been fought every decade or so since World War I, and smaller engagements have erupted 
Chicago Tribune –
JUBA/KHARTOUM (Reuters) – South Sudan said on Thursday it was ready to reopen negotiations “any time” on a range of disputes with its northern neighbor Sudan after a spasm of fighting, but Khartoum said there could be no such talks unless the two sides 
Reuters – ‎
The following company announcements, scheduled economic indicators, debt and currency market moves and political events may affect African markets on Friday. – – – – – EVENTS: KENYA – Central Bank of Kenya to issue a statement on the weekly foreign 
Chicago Tribune -‎
JUBA (Reuters) – South Sudan said on Thursday it was ready to reopen negotiations immediately with its northern neighbor Sudan to try to resolve oil, security and frontier disputes that ignited border fighting last month. Minister of Cabinet Affairs 
Salt Lake Tribune –
Africa » The sides that just split in July seem to be gearing up for a major conflict. By JOSH KRON Mayom Wel, South Sudan • On a recent blistering afternoon, this village danced in an open field. Women sashayed, hoisting chairs over their heads.
Zee News – ‎
Khartoum: Sudan’s President has vowed revenge for any attacks by South Sudan against the north’s territory. Omar al-Bashir says his forces will “chop off any hand” trying to take Sudanese land. He pledged “an eye for an eye” policy against South Sudan 
Chicago Tribune – ‎
* Oil accounts for 90 percent of Sudan’s exports * Economy suffers from loss of oil revenues * Turabi says hungry people out in the street soon By Yara Bayoumy KHARTOUM, May 10 (Reuters) – Sudan’s loss of billions of dollars of oil revenues will bring 
Chicago Tribune –
KHARTOUM (Reuters) – Sudan’s loss of billions of dollars of oil revenues will bring down the government as inflation soars, the economy buckles and people grow hungrier, opposition leader Hassan al-Turabi said in an interview. Oil once accounted for 90 
Chicago Tribune – ‎
KHARTOUM (Reuters) – Sudanese President Omar Hassan al-Bashir, locked in a conflict with South Sudan, said on Thursday that unless the two sides resolved a dispute over security, there would be no talks over oil, trade or citizenship.
Newsday – ‎
World Newsday > News > World Print Aa WORLD BRIEFS Published: May 10, 2012 9:45 PM INDONESIA: All 45 on jet feared dead Rescuers discovered the shattered wreckage of a new Russian-made passenger plane Thursday that smashed into the side of a volcano 
Malaysia Star – ‎
JUBA (Reuters) – South Sudan accused Sudan on Wednesday of bombing and shelling seven areas on the southern side of their disputed border in the last 48 hours, calling the acts a violation of a UN-backed ceasefire that should have begun on Saturday.
The Daily Star – ‎
JUBA: Weeks of brutal conflict with its arch-rival to the north have exacerbated South Sudan’s deep economic problems, with fuel shortages worsening and fears rising that the country could run out of cash. After shutting down oil production that 
Bangkok Post –
Neither the United Nations nor the African Union can impose its will on Sudan, President Omar al-Bashir said on Thursday, after fresh fighting along the border with South Sudan. Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir speaks during an event with oil industry 
The Daily Star – ‎
By Pascal Fletcher, Yara Bayoumy JUBA/KHARTOUM: South Sudan said Thursday it was ready to reopen negotiations “any time” on a range of disputes with its northern neighbor Sudan after a spasm of fighting, but Khartoum said there could be no such talks 
Voice of America – ‎‎
May 10, 2012 China Plays Bigger Diplomatic Role in Sudan Conflict Scott Stearns | The State Department China is playing a bigger diplomatic role in trying to end hostility between Sudan and South Sudan. The Obama administration says that could help 
BusinessWeek – ‎‎
By Jared Ferrie on May 11, 2012 South Sudan is negotiating loans to boost the value of its currency and keep its economy afloat as foreign-exchange reserves decline after the country halted oil production, Deputy Finance Minister Marial Awou Yol said.
Daily Monitor – ‎
By Mercy Nalugo (email the author) Lawmakers yesterday cautioned government against taking unilateral action in the ongoing conflict between South Sudan and Sudan, warning that this might threaten the country’s security interests.
News24 – ‎
Khartoum – Neither the United Nations nor the African Union can impose its will on Sudan, President Omar al-Bashir said on Thursday, after fresh fighting along the border with South Sudan. “We will implement what we want and, what we do not want, 
New York Times – ‎May 10, 2012‎
MAYOM WEL, South Sudan — On a recent blistering afternoon, this village danced in an open field. Women sashayed, hoisting chairs over their heads. Barefoot children scampered. Old men, with skin as dry and cracked as the bark of a savanna tree, 
The Citizen Daily – ‎May 10, 2012‎
By Florence Mugarula Dar es Salaam. Visiting Sudanese MPs have accused the West of fanning the conflict between Sudan and South Sudan.Dr Mohamed Yousin Abdallah and Mr Ahmed Abdallahusan Mohamed made the remarks in an exclusive interview with The 
Los Angeles Times – ‎May 10, 2012‎
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa — Just a month after South Sudan announced an austerity budget designed to fend off economic collapse, the struggling country had already failed to meet its targets, a source close to the South Sudanese government 
New Zealand Herald – ‎May 10, 2012‎
Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir. Photo / AP Sudan’s president vowed revenge for any attacks by South Sudan against the north’s territory, saying his forces will “chop off any hand” trying to take Sudanese land. Omar al-Bashir also claimed his 
South Sudan Skeptical of Talks with Khartoum, Report Says
Voice of America
May 11, 2012 South Sudan Skeptical of Talks with Khartoum, Report Says Gabe Joselow | Nairobi A new report from the Enough Project says South Sudan’s leadership is showing more reluctance than before to engage Khartoum to settle outstanding issues, 
Pillay gives mixed review of South Sudan
UPI.com
Kuol Manyang Juuk (left), Governor of Jonglei State, South Sudan, speaks with High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay on hostilities in his country. (UN Photo/Elizabeth Murekio) JUBA, South Sudan, May 11 (UPI) — There have been modest 
Sudanese Refugees Face Rising Challenges As Outflow Grows
AllAfrica.com
Thousands of people have fled Sudan’s South Kordofan and Blue Nile states into neighbouring countries in the last month, putting pressure on existing supplies and services. In western Ethiopia’s Assosa region, nearly 2000 Sudanese refugees have arrived 
South Sudan reiterates readiness to start negotiations with Khartoum
Sudan Tribune
May 10, 2012 (KHARTOUM) – South Sudan said it is prepared to immediately resume stalled negotiations with Sudan on the basis of the African Union (AU) roadmap that was endorsed this month by a Chapter VII United Nations Security Council (UNSC) 
Sudan: Our Women in Kobar and Omdurman Prisons While Arabs From Sudan Who 
AllAfrica.com
The southern IDPS in the north are treated by northerners as if they were not human being, and to make things worse is the imprisonment of our innocent women who ran to Khartoum to save their lives during the war, the south Sudanese who ran to Khartoum 
COUNTRY DIRECTOR SOUTH SUDAN
Reuters AlertNet
War Child Holland in South Sudan has its country office in the capital Juba and field offices inJubaand Torit. Until date, the South Sudan programme has been supervised by a Country Director based inKhartoum. Through this appointment, theSouth 

Official: Hundreds of S. Sudanese flee to Uganda
Columbus Telegram
AP | Posted: Friday, May 11, 2012 9:56 am | (0) Comments A Ugandan official says hundreds ofSouth Sudanese have fled into Uganda to escape tribal clashes in South Sudan as well as tension stemming from a border conflict with Sudan.

South Sudan Says It’s Ready to Negotiate Deal on Oil at Talks
BusinessWeek
By Jared Ferrie on May 10, 2012 South Sudan is ready to negotiate an agreement on an oil dispute with Sudan that prompted the newly independent nation to shut down its crude production, Cabinet Affairs Minister Deng Alor said.
South Sudan Negotiates Loans as Oil-Output Halt Dents Economy
BusinessWeek
By Jared Ferrie on May 10, 2012 South Sudan is negotiating loans to boost the value of its currency and keep its economy afloat as foreign-exchange reserves decline after the country halted oil production, Deputy Finance Minister Marial Awou Yol said.
International Medical Corps Deploying Additional Teams to South Sudan as 
Reuters AlertNet
International Medical Corps is deploying an Emergency Response Team to address the humanitarian needs of returnees arriving from Sudan back into South Sudan. Acute malnutrition and a high level of morbidity have been flagged as risks among the 
Conflict in Sudan
New York Times
Conflict is why hundreds of thousands of people have been internally displaced, and 151000 refugees now face extreme hardship in camps in South Sudan and Ethiopia. In the worst-hit conflict areas, women and children and men face fear, food shortages 
South Sudan withdraws 700 police from Abyei
Sudan Tribune
May 10, 2012 (JUBA) – South Sudan said on Thursday it has withdrawn a significant number of its police forces from the contested border region of Abyei, apparently in compliance with the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) resolution endorsing 
Businesses here helping ‘half a world away’
Omaha World-Herald
By Leia Mendoza Thousands of residents in South Sudan are getting fresh water thanks to the mission of a local nonprofit and the generosity and manpower from several Omaha-area businesses. Aqua-Africa, an Omaha-based organization dedicated to providing 
Ugandan president commissions Gulu-Juba highway
Sudan Tribune
May 10, 2012 (JUBA) – Ugandan President, Yoweri Museveni on Wednesday officially commissioned the long-awaited construction of the Gulu-Nimule highway, which directly links Uganda to the Republic of South Sudan. The construction of the 104km highway, ..
Sudan and South Sudan at odds over talks after fighting
Chicago Tribune
JUBA/KHARTOUM (Reuters) – South Sudan said on Thursday it was ready to reopen negotiations “any time” on a range of disputes with its northern neighbor Sudan after a spasm of fighting, but Khartoum said there could be no such talks unless the two sides 
Country Ready to Resumes Talks With Sudan ‘Anytime’, Vow to Obey AU Roadmap
AllAfrica.com
By Mary Ajith Goch, 11 May 2012 Juba — Despites continues aerial bombardment in South Sudanterritories by the Sudan warplanes, officials in South Sudan has reiterated their readiness to resume negotiation of all the outstanding issues with Sudan if 
IOM Supports South Sudan Demobilization, Reintegration of Former Fighters
StarAfrica.com
GENEVA, Switzerland, May 11, 2012/African Press Organization (APO)/ — A group of 285 formerSouth Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) soldiers this week graduated from vocational training courses designed to reintegrate them into civilian life in 

 


UN Chief Urges Sudan, South Sudan to Resume Negotiations
Voice of America (blog)
UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has called on Sudan and South Sudan to “disengage” and return to negotiations after recent reports of fighting along their border. Speaking to the UN General Assembly in New York Wednesday, Mr. Ban said another element 

TheReporter.com
By AP JUBA, South Sudan (AP) — Sudan resumed its aerial bombardment of South Sudan, violating international calls for a cessation of hostilities between the two countries, a South Sudanese military official said Wednesday. Col.

AU-UN says Sudan halts key mission flights
AFP
KHARTOUM — The African Union-United Nations peacekeeping mission in Darfur said Tuesday that Sudan has suspended flights to its support base in Uganda, a historic ally of South Sudan, but Khartoum denied the move. “The ministry of defence notified us 
African viewpoint: Last of the Nuba?
BBC News
In our series of viewpoints from African journalists, film-maker and columnist Farai Sevenzo considers level playing fields and what the crisis between Sudan and South Sudan means for the Nuba people who are caught up in the middle of the conflict.
South Sudan army continues border recruitment
Sudan Tribune
May 8, 2012 (JUBA) – South Sudan’s army (SPLA) on Tuesday said passed out 830 recruits who underwent intensive basic military training at a military base in Mapel, Western Bahr el Ghazal State, which borders Sudan, as mobilisation of young men into the 
Khartoum bombs Unity State, South Sudan alleges
Sudan Tribune
By Bonifacio Taban Kuich May 8, 2012 (BENTIU) – South Sudan’s army (SPLA) has accused the Sudanese government of bombing oil-rich Unity State on Friday and Saturday in violation of a UN Security Council on May 2 calling for a cessation of hostilities.
Official: Sudan warplanes bomb South Sudan
Daily Herald
South Sudanese military official says Sudan has resumed its aerial bombardment of southern territory, violating international calls for a cessation of hostilities between the two Sudans. Col. Kella Dual Kueth, deputy spokesman for the South Sudan 
Prominent Sudan Journalist Detained Over Comments On Border Fighting
AllAfrica.com
Khartoum — Faisal Mohamed Salih, a Sudanese journalist, was detained on Tuesday by agents of the National Security and Intelligence Services (NISS) after being harassed for weeks over comments he made on fighting in the country’s border state of South 
Fighting continues between Sudan and South Sudan, as economies collapse
Christian Science Monitor
At this time last year, South Sudan was preparing to become Africa’s newest nation. Now the dispute between South Sudan and Sudan may turn both into the latest failed states. By Scott Baldauf, Staff writer / May 9, 2012 A SPLA-N fighter holds up his 
Music video by South Sudanese singer Yaba Angelosi
Christian Science Monitor
The January 2011 referendum is symbolized in this music video by South Sudanese singer Yaba Angelosi. The January 2011 referendum is symbolized in this music video by South Sudanesesinger Yaba Angelosi. François Hollande’s victory may represent change 
Cecafa welcomes South Sudan
SuperSport.com (blog)
by Collins Okinyo 09 May 2012, 16:48 South Sudan has become the 13th member of the Council of East and Central Africa Football Associations (Cecafa). Consequently, Africa’s newest state will be eligible to compete in all regional competitions 
South Sudan Accuses Sudan of More Airstrikes
Voice of America
May 09, 2012 South Sudan Accuses Sudan of More Airstrikes VOA News South Sudan says Sudan has carried out cross-border airstrikes in violation of a United Nations-backed cease-fire. Military spokesman Kella Dual Kueth on Wednesday accused Sudan of 
South Sudan accuses Khartoum of more border attacks
Arab News
By REUTERS JUBA: South Sudan accused Sudan yesterday of bombing and shelling seven areas on the southern side of their disputed border in the last 48 hours, calling the acts a violation of a UN-backed cease-fire which should have begun on Saturday.
India’s Karuturi eyes Ethiopia exports to S.Sudan, Kenya
Reuters
“Everything is for Ethiopia, but we will also export to South Sudan and Kenya,” Karuturi said. Official data shows annual land rental rates for foreign firms ranged from $12.8 per hectare to just $1.15, one of the cheapest in the world.
Sudan offers tribe in disputed region citizenship
KTAR.com
The offer comes amid an increasingly volatile conflict with the now independent South Sudan. On Wednesday, the South Sudanese military said Sudan resumed aerial bombardment of the south’s territory. In Khartoum, Interior Ministry official Salaheddin 
South Sudan may face fiscal collapse by July, leaked report says
Los Angeles Times
South Sudan could run out of reserves and possibly face “state collapse” as soon as July after shutting off its oil, according to a confidential report leaked to news media that appears to be from the World Bank. The March memo, first reported and 

La Crosse Tribune
Sudan resumed its aerial bombardment of South Sudan, violating international calls for a cessation of hostilities between the two countries, a South Sudanese military official said Wednesday. Col. Kella Dual Kueth, deputy spokesman for the South Sudan 

Region’s Refugee Nightmare
AllAfrica.com
An upsurge in violence in Somalia, fighting in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), hostilities between Sudan and South Sudan has sent afresh wave of refugees fleeing their countries burdening economies in the East Africa region that can barely take 
S. Sudan launches conflict early warning and response unit
Sudan Tribune
By Julius N. Uma May 9, 2012 (JUBA) – South Sudan has officially launched its long-awaited national Conflict Early Warning and Response Unit (CEWERU); a system earmarked to deepen the government’s ability to pro-actively respond to risks of violent Bombs and hunger haunt Sudan’s Nuba mountains
Reuters – ‎
* Rebels accuse Sudan of bombing civilians, Khartoum denies * South Kordofan is another hotspot in flickering border war * Hundreds hide from fighting in rocky caves in mountains By Hereward Holland NUBA MOUNTAINS, Sudan, May 10 (Reuters) – Leaning on 
New Vision – ‎‎
Colonel Felix Kulayigye said any intervention in the affairs of a neighboring country would be contrary to Uganda’s peacekeeping role in Somalia. According to Voice of America, Kulayigye said allegations Uganda is supporting Sudanese rebels are a ploy 
Independent Online – ‎
By Ian Timberlake Khartoum – Sudan’s army said it fought with South Sudan along the disputed border on Wednesday while the South alleged it came under Sudanese air attack, violating a four-day-old UN-imposed ceasefire. The army in Khartoum said it had 
Myjoyonline.com – ‎‎
South Sudan has accused Sudan of bombing within its territory, in violation of a UN Security Council resolution to end hostilities. Juba’s information minister told the BBC several areas had been targeted in air raids in the last 48 hours.
Bernama – ‎
KHARTOUM, May 10 (BERNAMA-NNN-SUNA) — Sudanese Foreign Minister Ali Karti said Khartoum’s relations with the Arab world have surpassed the stage of political support to one of effective participation by Arab states in implementing economic development 
Reuters Africa – ‎‎
KHARTOUM (Reuters) – Sudanese army troops have pushed out rebels who had seized control of a town in the western Darfur region, a state-linked media website said on Wednesday, the latest violent incident in the troubled area.
News24 – ‎
The UN says bodies lay in the battle-damaged town of Girayda after a brief occupation by rebel troops in the war-plagued Darfur region of western Sudan. Khartoum – The United Nations said bodies lay in the battle-damaged town of Girayda on Wednesday, 
Voice of America (blog) -‎
UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon has called on Sudan and South Sudan to “disengage” and return to negotiations after recent reports of fighting along their border. Speaking to the UN General Assembly in New York Wednesday, Mr. Ban said another element 
Chicago Tribune – ‎
JUBA (Reuters) – South Sudan accused Sudan on Wednesday of bombing and shelling seven areas on the southern side of their disputed border in the last 48 hours, calling the acts a violation of a UN-backed ceasefire which should have begun on Saturday.
Deutsche Welle – ‎‎
South Sudan has claimed that Sudan has resumed a campaign of aerial bombardment against it, violating a UN cease-fire. Meanwhile, Khartoum accuses its neighbor of supporting rebels in the region of Darfur. A military spokesman for South Sudan alleged 
Jakarta Post –
Sudan resumed its aerial bombardment of South Sudan, violating international calls for a cessation of hostilities between the two countries, a South Sudanese military official said Wednesday. Col. Kella Dual Kueth, deputy spokesman for the South Sudan 
Los Angeles Times – ‎
South Sudan could run out of reserves and possibly face “state collapse” as soon as July after shutting off its oil, according to a confidential report leaked to news media that appears to be from the World Bank. The March memo, first reported and 
Pakistan Daily Times – ‎
KHARTOUM: Sudan and South Sudan faced a United Nations deadline on Wednesday to pull troops back from their disputed border, as the South alleged violation of a ceasefire in effect since May 4. Both sides are to establish a “Safe Demilitarised Border 
Voice of America (blog) – ‎‎
A Sudanese news agency says government forces have regained control of the rebel-held town of Girayda in the violence-plagued Darfur region of western Sudan. The semiofficial Sudan Media Center quoted government officials as saying nine soldiers and an 
Ahram Online – ‎
The moment the besieged British king in Shakespeare’s ‘Cymbeline’ defies a far stronger Roman empire to declare his people’s independence is filled with tension in any production. For the South Sudanese troupe putting on the play one chilly spring 
Ahram Online – ‎
Following a short-lived occupation by rebel troops in the Darfur region of western Sudan on Wednesday, Sudan’s army was able to regain control of Girayda town and the surrounding area. The Sudanese Media Center (SMC), which is close to the country’s 
Boston.com – ‎
May 09, 2012|AP A Sudan news agency says Sudanese armed forces have repulsed an attack by Darfur rebels in a town in South Darfur. Nine soldiers and an unknown number of rebels were killed. The semiofficial Sudan Media Center quoted government 
The Australian – ‎
THE United Nations said bodies lie in the battle-damaged town of Girayda after a brief occupation by rebel troops in the war-plagued Darfur region of western Sudan. Sudan’s army regained control of Girayda town and the surrounding area but nine 
The Hindu – ‎
With reference to the editorial The Sudan challenge published in The Hindu on April 28, Omer Elamin Abdalla, Charge d’Affaires, Embassy of the Republic of the Sudan in New Delhi, says: We agree with you totally that the escalation of conflicts between 
Chicago Tribune – ‎
WASHINGTON — In response to numerous requests, Sudan Tribune is making the report used for the story ‘EXCLUSIVE: South Sudan economy on the verge of collapse, World Bank warns’ available to our readers. Yesterday the World Bank issued a statement 
Independent Online – ‎‎
By SAPA Kampala – Uganda says fresh allegations by Sudan that Uganda supports anti-Sudan rebels is a tactic to divert attention from Uganda’s claim that Sudan is sheltering warlord Joseph Kony. James Mugume, permanent secretary at Uganda’s Foreign 
Voice of America –
May 09, 2012 South Sudan Accuses Sudan of More Airstrikes VOA News South Sudan says Sudan has carried out cross-border airstrikes in violation of a United Nations-backed cease-fire. Military spokesman Kella Dual Kueth on Wednesday accused Sudan of 
Aljazeera.com -‎
South Sudan military spokesman says bombing by northern forces amounts to violation of a UN-backed ceasefire. South Sudan has accused Sudan of bombing and shelling areas on the southern side of their disputed border, calling the acts a violation of a 
Washington Post – ‎
KAMPALA, Uganda — Ugandan officials said Wednesday that a fresh allegation by Sudan that Uganda supports anti-Sudan rebels is a tactic to divert attention from Uganda’s claim that Sudan is sheltering warlord Joseph Kony.
Christian Science Monitor – ‎‎
At this time last year, South Sudan was preparing to become Africa’s newest nation. Now the dispute between South Sudan and Sudan may turn both into the latest failed states. By Scott Baldauf, Staff writer / May 9, 2012 A SPLA-N fighter holds up his 
U.S. News & World Report – ‎
By MICHAEL ONYIEGO, AP JUBA, South Sudan (AP) — Sudan resumed its aerial bombardment of South Sudan, violating international calls for a cessation of hostilities between the two countries, a South Sudanese military official said Wednesday. Col.
Independent Online – ‎
By SAPA Juba – Sudanese war planes have launched renewed air strikes against South Sudan, violating a UN Security Council resolution to end weeks of a bitter border conflict, the South’s army said on Wednesday. “The Republic of Sudan has been randomly 
News24 – ‎May 9, 2012‎
The wide appeal of this first dedicated guide to Sudan will satisfy the needs of aid workers,… Was R236.95 Now R201.41 Khartoum – Sudan and South Sudan faced a United Nations deadline on Wednesday to pull troops back from their disputed border, 
Huffington Post – ‎May 9, 2012‎
By MICHAEL ONYIEGO 05/09/12 05:28 PM ET Sudanese soldiers walk in the oil town of Heglig on April 24, 2012. (EBRAHIM HAMID/AFP/GettyImages) JUBA, South Sudan — Sudan resumed its aerial bombardment of South Sudan, violating international calls for a 
Chicago Tribune – ‎May 9, 2012‎
* Rebels intend to topple the Khartoum govt * Attack comes after Sudan and S.Sudan border clashes KHARTOUM, May 8 (Reuters) – Rebels in Sudan’s western Darfur region said on Tuesday they had seized control of a town from Sudanese government troops, 

Bombings reported on South Sudan-Sudan border
KFVS
US employers pulled back on hiring in April for the second straight month, evidence of an economy still growing only sluggishly. The unemployment rate dipped, but only because more people gave up looking for work. US employers pulled back on hiring in 
Bombings reported on South Sudan-Sudan border
OregonLive.com
AP JUBA, South Sudan (AP) — South Sudan’s military spokesman says Sudanese aircraft dropped 10 bombs in an oil-rich region near a military base south of the shared border. Col. Philip Aguer said Friday that the bombs were dropped late Thursday 
Continued Fighting in South Kordofan Brings More Refugees
AllAfrica.com
By Bonifacio Taban Kuich, 3 May 2012 Bentiu — Recent fighting between the Sudan People’s Liberation Army-North (SPLA-N) rebels and the Sudan Armed Forces (SAF) in Julud and Talodi,South Kordofan state has led to an increasing number of people fleeing 
UN rights chief to visit South Sudan
AFP
GENEVA — UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay will make her first visit to South Sudan from May 8 to 12, her office said Friday, as a deadline loomed for a UN-ordered ceasefire with Sudan. Pillay’s spokesman told journalists in Geneva the 
South Sudan pledges “radical policy” to improve educational system
Sudan Tribune
By Ngor Arol Garang May 3, 2012 (MALAKAL) – South Sudan has pledged to implement a policy to improve the country’s education system the Minister of Higher Education said on Wednesday. Minister Peter Adwok Nyaba made the remarks live on the South Sudan 
Tensions Boiling Along Sudan-South Sudan Border
Voice of America
May 04, 2012 Tensions Boiling Along Sudan-South Sudan Border VOA News Renewed accusations and continued distrust are threatening to sabotage a promised cease-fire involving the world’s newest country. South Sudan, which gained independence last July, 
S. Sudan accuses Sudan of bombing in blow to talks
CNBC.com
KHARTOUM (Reuters) – South Sudan accused Sudan on Friday of attacking its military positions in an oil region, imperiling the chances of a promised ceasefire between the neighbours, but Khartoum denied the charge. The 1800 km-long (1200 mile) border 

Chicago Tribune
MALAKAL — South Sudan has pledged to implement a policy to improve the country’s education system the Minister of Higher Education said on Wednesday. Minister Peter Adwok Nyaba made the remarks live on the South Sudan Television and Radio (SSTV), 

UN’s Pillay to visit South Sudan
UPI.com
An injured woman is evaluated prior to evacuation in the aftermath of bombings inSouth Sudan on April 16, 2012. UN Photo/Isaac Billy GENEVA, Switzerland, May 4 (UPI) — The United Nations announced Friday that UN High Commissioner for Human Rights 
Counter-terrorism; South Sudan; Iran; Rights of Indigenous Peoples; and more
UN Dispatch
South Sudan: The United Nations announced today that UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay will visit South Sudan for four days starting Tuesday. Pillay is to meet with South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir and other top government and civil 
Donation gives local Sudan school-building charity a boost
WebsterPost.com
Thanks to a $15000 grant from St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Rochester, the charity can add two new classrooms to one of its school buildings in the nation of South Sudan. Most village children who attend school are forced to sit outdoors while their 
South Sudan accuses Khartoum of new bombings
The West Australian
JUBA (AFP) – Sudanese warplanes and long-range artillery bombarded South Sudanborder regions Thursday, defying a UN Security Council ultimatum to end hostilities or face possible sanctions, the South’s army said. “Their aircraft dropped bombs and 
Sudan agrees to AU roadmap, must meet South Sudan
STLtoday.com
Sudan on Thursday endorsed the African Union’s roadmap to avert an all-out war with South Sudan, though it insisted on retaining the right to self-defense. Based on the seven-point roadmap, the two countries have until next Tuesday to restart stalled 
Clinton seeks Chinese help on challenges with Iran, North Korea, Syria and Sudan
Washington Post
 Hillary Rodham Clinton on Friday urged China to play a responsible role in the world by respecting human rights and helping to deal with challenges posed by Iran and North Korea’s nuclear programs and violence in Syria and Sudan and South Sudan.
Clinton urges Sudan to halt violence
AFP
BEIJING — US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on Friday pressed Sudan for a definitive end to bombings against South Sudan, after Khartoum said it would comply with a UN call to end the violence. “Together we need to keep sending a strong message to 
South Sudan ex- minister survive plane crash in Yambio
Sudan Tribune
The incident took place yesterday at around 10:am in Yambio, capital of Western Equatoria State”, Christopher Ismail, South Sudan’s Director of Aviation said on Thursday. “It was a WFP programme plane 5Y-NGO”, he adds. Ismail stated that the two pilots 
Disarmament Sparks Violence in South Sudan
Inter Press Service
By Jared Ferrie JUBA, May 3, 2012 (IPS) – Civil society groups are calling on the United Nations peacekeeping mission to withdraw support from a disarmament programme they say could spark further violence in South Sudan’s volatile Jonglei state.
South Sudan leaders ‘run to Uganda for help’
Africa Review
By DAVID LIVINGSTONE OKUMUPosted Friday, May 4 2012 at 09:56 South Sudanese leaders have asked for Uganda’s help as war drums continue to be sounded between Africa’s youngest nation and Khartoum, warning a defeat of their military would have adverse 
South Sudan accuses Sudan of bombing in blow to talks
Reuters
By Yara Bayoumy | KHARTOUM (Reuters) – South Sudan on Friday accused Sudan of launching an air strike on one of its oil regions, imperiling the chances of a promised ceasefire between the two former civil war foes, but Khartoum denied the charge.
Some of Cairo’s South Sudanese refugee population were hoping to return home 
Deutsche Welle
Churches are at the center of social life for South Sudanese refugees in Cairo. On a recent Friday, dozens came as usual to All Saints’ Cathedral, but not for the weekly service. They gathered in the courtyard outside instead to talk about the recent 
SUDAN: Free The Slaves
Strategy Page
May 4, 2012: Sudan and South Sudan are once again indicating that they want to avoid another round of intense combat, so the UN-led international mediation efforts to end the war have made some headway. The diplomats are focusing on ending skirmishes 

PRESS RELEASE ON PRESIDENT OF THE REPUBLIC’S ALLEGATION OF LINK OF SPLM-DC TO ARMED GROUP 

Juba, South Sudan, 1st May 2012
 
1.      In St Teresa Catholic Church Cathedral in Juba on 29th April 2012 during the celebration of its Jubilee which was also broadcast live by Bakhita FM Radio, the President of the Republic of South Sudan, Gen. Salva Kiir Mayardit, used the holy pulpit to make an allegation that the SPLM-DC is responsible for an armed attack on  SPLA positions across the river from Malakal town in Upper Nile State on 27th April 2012. This is a very unfortunate development coming as it does at a time when all of us are busy supporting our gallant National Armed Forces of the Republic of South Sudan.
 
2.       We look at it that such a regrettable statement is pouring cold water on the understanding reached by the President of the Republic and the Chairman of our party last September on how to deal with the challenges facing the newly born state. The essence of that agreement was that the SPLM as the ruling party and the SPLM-DC as the Opposition shall work together co-operatively on the issues of nation-building, such as forging national unity, foreign policy, stamping out insecurity in the country, etc. Nevertheless, if the President of the Republic cannot proceed with his commitment with the leadership of SPLM-DC, he could do so in ways we all know in dissolving agreements rather than level such a serious libelous accusation against our party in a prayer place.
 
3.      The SPLM-DC leadership has been re-iterating since its birth in June 2009 that the party has been committed to constitutional and legal obligations in the country, and has never linked itself to any military group. We have been used to hearing such allegations and the motive behind them all is to de-register our party. If some people have personal grudges against some individuals in our party, let them be informed that the party is above individuals and should not be taken responsible for personal matters. The party has its institutions and can only take responsibility for matters decided by them. We repeat for the umpteenth time that we have no armed formations and condemn and denounce the use of arms for political ends.
 
4.      SPLM-DC would like to remind the public of the 19th April 2012 “PRESS CONFERENCE ON THE CURRENT POLITICAL AND SECURITY SITUATION BETWEEN THE REPUBLICS OF SOUTH SUDAN AND THE SUDAN” where the party stated its unwavering support to South Sudan Armed Forces in their national duty to defend the territorial integrity of the country. The leadership of the party did not stop there but also took a lead in mobilizing the people of South Sudan to stand united behind the President of the Republic in order to face the aggression of the Government of the Sudan. Further, the leadership of SPLM-DC has requested and is waiting for an appointment with the President of the Republic so that it could hand him a cheque of contribution of the members of the party for the material support of the gallant Armed Forces of the Republic of South Sudan.
 
5.      The SPLM-DC would like to urge all South Sudan political parties and other stakeholders to stay united at this difficult time the country is undergoing through. It is not the moment for politics of division and dividing. The challenges facing the new country are enormous to the extent that they are impossible to handle single-handedly with exclusive one-party approach. In particular, the SPLM-DC would like to call upon all those who have taken up arms against the government of the new republic, for one reason or another, to resort to dialogue and avoid destruction of dear lives and properties of South Sudanese.
 
6.      It is our conviction that there is no greatest good than peace and reconciliation. Hence, we call upon regional as well as international community to continue pressuring the two ruling parties in the Republics of South Sudan and the Sudan to resolve their current conflicts by way of dialogue without creating unnecessary complications internally or externally. This is the time to close our ranks to defend our country, not to accuse each other and get divided. United we stand but divided we fall.
 
       
          Sisto Olur Erisa,
         Acting Secretary-General of SPLM-DC,
         Juba, South Sudan.

JUBA, South Sudan (AP) – The Arab League said Thursday it would hold an emergency meeting over the increasing violence between Sudan and South Sudan. The south reported new skirmishes even as Sudan’s president increased his threats of war toward the south.

Sudan President Omar al-Bashir said the recent violence has “revived the spirit of jihad” in Sudan. South Sudan said it had repulsed four attacks from Sudan over a 24-hour period as fighting on the border showed no signs of slowing.

Acting on a request by Sudan, the Arab League scheduled an emergency meeting of foreign ministers in Cairo next week to discuss the violence, Deputy Arab League Secretary-General Ahmed bin Helli said. The league earlier called on South Sudan to withdraw from the oil-rich Heglig area that southern troops invaded and took over last week.

Despite the threats from Sudan, a southern government spokesman said South Sudan was only defending its territory and considers Sudan a “friendly nation.”

South Sudan military spokesman Col. Philip Aguer said three of the attacks were on Wednesday and one was on Thursday. He did not give a death toll.

South Sudan broke away from Sudan last year after a self-determination vote for independence. That vote was guaranteed in a mediated end to decades of civil war between the two sides. But the sides never fully agreed where their shared border lay, nor did they reach agreement on how to share oil wealth that is pumped from the border region.

Instead, the two countries have seen a sharp increase in violence in recent weeks, especially around the oil-producing town of Heglig. Both sides claim Heglig as their own. It lies in a region where the border was never clearly defined.

Aguer said southern troops repulsed one attack by Sudanese troops near Heglig on Wednesday and two attacks in Northern Bahr el Ghazal state. One was repulsed in Western Bahr el Ghazal state early Thursday, he said.

Sudan President Omar al-Bashir on Wednesday threatened to topple the South Sudan government after accusing the south of trying to take down his Khartoum-based government.

Al-Bashir continued his hardline rhetoric on Thursday in an address to a “popular defense” brigade headed to the Heglig area. The ceremony was held in al-Obeid, in northern Kordofan.

“Sudan will cut off the hand that harms it,” said al-Bashir, a career army officer who fought against the southern army, the Sudan People’s Liberation Army, during the 1983-2005 civil war. Al-Bashir seized power in a 1989 military coup.

The capture of Heglig by the South Sudanese “has revived the spirit of jihad and martyrdom among the Sudanese people,” he told the brigade’s 2,300 men, according to the official Sudan News Agency.

In Khartoum, the pro-government Sudanese Media Center said late Wednesday that fighting broke out between the two nations in the Al-Meram area in South Kordofan, with northern troops driving away what it called “remaining elements” of the SPLA. It said northern troops chased away SPLA fighters who fled across the border into South Sudan.

It said the fighting left an unspecified number of dead and wounded among the SPLA forces but gave no precise figures.

South Sudan government spokesman Barnaba Marial Benjamin said South Sudan does not consider itself at war with Sudan, but he said the south is defending territory it believes it owns based on borders outlined in 1956 by British colonialists.

“Up to now we have not crossed even an inch into Sudan,” Benjamin said. He added: “The Republic of South Sudan considers the Republic of Sudan to be a neighbor and a friendly nation.”

Benjamin said that southern forces would withdraw from Heglig if the African Unionguarantees a cessation of hostilities, an agreement on border demarcation, and the withdrawal of Sudanese forces from the nearby border region of Abyei, with Ethiopian troops moving in as peacekeepers.

Benjamin said that al-Bashir is carrying out “genocide” against Sudanese people in the Darfur, South Kordofan and Blue Nile regions of Sudan. He said al-Bashir’s words Wednesday were a warning that he would like to do the same in South Sudan.

“Can they quote one war fought by the Republic of Sudan fought with any foreign country? They have always used their military artillery to kill the innocent people of Sudan as well as South Sudan,” Benjamin said.

The International Crisis Group said in a new analysis on Thursday that Sudan and South Sudan are “teetering on the brink of all-out war from which neither would benefit.” It said an immediate cease-fire is needed, then solutions to the unresolved post-referendum issues.

“Increasingly angry rhetoric, support for each other’s rebels, poor command and control, and brinkmanship, risk escalating limited and contained conflict into a full-scale confrontation,” the group said. “Diplomatic pressure to cease hostilities and return to negotiations must be exerted on both governments by the region and the United Nations Security Council, as well as such partners as the U.S., China and key Gulf states.”

The U.S. played a large role in brokering the 2005 peace accord between the two sides. China is a big player in the two countries’ oil industry.

http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/story/2012-04-19/sudan-violence/54417280/1

Sudan president Omar Hassan Al-Bashir threatens South with war over oil field

Published On Thu Apr 19 2012
Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir waves to the crowd during a visit to the Northern Kordofan town of El-Obeid to address a rally of freshly-trained paramilitary troops.Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir waves to the crowd during a visit to the Northern Kordofan town of El-Obeid to address a rally of freshly-trained paramilitary troops. EBRAHIM HAMID/AFP/GETTY IMAGES
Khalid Abdelaziz and Ulf LaessingReuters

KHARTOUM/JUBA — Sudan’s President Omar Hassan al-Bashir all but declared war against his newly independent neighbour on Thursday, vowing to teach South Sudan a “final lesson by force” after it occupied a disputed oil field.

South Sudan accused Bashir of planning “genocide” and said it would fight to protect its people.

Mounting violence since Sudan split into two countries last year has raised the prospect of two sovereign African states waging war against each other openly for the first time since Ethiopia fought newly-independent Eritrea in 1998-2000.

Both are poor countries — South Sudan is one of the poorest in the world — and the dispute between them has already halted nearly all the oil production that underpins both economies.

Appearing in a medal-spangled military uniform at a large rally, Bashir danced side-to-side, waved his walking stick in the air and made blistering threats against the leadership of the South, which seceded last year after decades of civil war.

“These people don’t understand, and we will give them the final lesson by force,” the burly military ruler told the rally in El-Obeid, capital of the North Kordofan state. “We will not give them an inch of our country, and whoever extends his hand on Sudan, we will cut it off.”

China, a major investor in the oil industry in both countries, expressed “serious concern” about the increase of tensions and called on both sides to stop fighting, “maintain calm and exercise maximum restraint”.

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said South Sudan’s seizure of the oil field was an “illegal act” and called on both countries to stop fighting.

South Sudan separated from the rest of Sudan with Bashir’s blessing last July under the terms of a 2005 peace deal. But since then violence has steadily escalated, fuelled by territorial disputes, ethnic animosity and quarrels over oil.

Last week, South Sudan seized Heglig, a disputed oilfield near the border between the two countries, claiming it as its rightful territory and saying it would only withdraw if the United Nations deployed a neutral force there.

Sudan’s armed forces spokesman Al-Sawarmi Khalid said by phone the army was now fighting “inside Heglig.”

South Sudan’s army (SPLA) said it had repulsed a large attack on Heglig on Wednesday evening, stopping Sudan’s forces about 28 kilometres from the territory.

“The SPLA maintained its position,” spokesman Philip Aguer said. He also accused Sudan of launching another attack in the border regions of South Sudan’s Western Bahr al-Ghazal state.

In a sign of the conflict widening, the Justice and Equality Movement (JEM) — considered the most militarily potent of the rebel factions in Sudan’s western Darfur region — claimed it had launched an assault on the al-Kharsana oil region near Heglig.

“We are surrounding the Sudanese army in the main military base in al-Kharsana,” JEM spokesman Gibreel Adam Bilal said by phone. Heglig is hundreds of kilometres away from JEM’s bases in Darfur but the group has fought in the Kordofan region in the past.

The Sudanese army spokesman, Khalid, denied JEM’s statement, saying there was no fighting in the al-Kharsana area.

Limited access for independent journalists to Sudan’s remote conflict zones makes it difficult to confirm the often contradictory claims issued by all sides.

African states have often waged war on each other’s territory, but it is extremely rare for them to talk openly of fighting against government forces of sovereign neighbours.

Bashir’s address to the rally on Thursday followed a fiery speech to party supporters on Wednesday, when he vowed to “liberate” South Sudan from its ruling party, which he repeatedly referred to as “insects”, in a play on its Arabic name.

South Sudan’s Information Minister Barnaba Marial Benjamin responded on Thursday with outrage.

“Mr. President, we are no insects and if you are launching your genocide activities to the Republic of South Sudan to kill the people of South Sudan . . . we can assure you we will protect the lives of our citizens.”

However, he also said South Sudan was willing to resume talks immediately on all outstanding issues.

“The Republic of South Sudan is not in a state of war, nor is it interested in war with Sudan,” he said.

In both speeches, Bashir vowed to retake the Heglig oilfield, which he said was part of Sudan’s Kordofan region. But he also said that alone would not end the conflict.

“Heglig is not the end, but the beginning,” he said in Thursday’s speech.

Global powers have voiced alarm at the escalation of violence and urged the two to stop fighting and return to talks.

“China has worked hard to ameliorate the problems between the two Sudans, and we will continue to work with the international community at mediation efforts,” Foreign Ministry spokesman Liu Weimin told a daily news briefing in Beijing.

Some 2 million people died in Sudan’s civil war, fought for all but a few years from 1955 to 2005 over disputes of ideology, ethnicity and religion.

The countries remain at odds over issues including the border, how much the landlocked South should pay to transport its oil through Sudan and the division of national debt.

Both countries accuse each other of waging proxy war through militia operating on each other’s territory.

Sudan’s military — with an air force, tanks and artillery — is far better equipped than the former guerrilla fighters who make up the South Sudan army. In addition to the civil war in the south, Sudan has also fought long-simmering rebellions in Darfur and its South Kordofan and Blue Nile border states.

Bashir is wanted by the International Criminal Court in the Hague for alleged war crimes in connection with the Darfur conflict, charges he rejects as political.

The south has tens of thousands of fighters under arms, with decades of experience in guerrilla conflict.

http://www.thestar.com/news/world/article/1164358–arab-league-calls-emergency-meeting-on-2-sudans-violence-al-bashir-ups-war-rhetoric


BY ALAN BOSWELL

MCCLATCHY NEWSPAPERS

JUBA, South Sudan — The U.S. special envoy to Sudan and South Sudan acknowledged in an interview Wednesday that the two countries are at war and warned that the conflict will likely spread if South Sudan does not withdraw from a disputed oil town that it captured from Sudan last week.

So far, however, South Sudan has refused to do so, and the South Sudanese military has said it plans to continue its offensive north. On Sunday, a McClatchy Newspapers correspondent was among the first journalists to visit Heglig, the captured town, now an edgy command post for South Sudan’s army and allied rebels from Sudan’s Darfur region.

The statement comes as the United Nations Security Council mulls putting sanctions on Sudan and South Sudan in an effort to stop the hostilities, which could spoil a decade of intense diplomacy for peace.

U.S. special envoy Princeton Lyman said he had been meeting with South Sudanese officials in an effort to persuade them to withdraw. “We felt it was extremely dangerous (to enter Heglig) and that they should withdraw,” Lyman said, characterizing the American position. “That’s been the basis of my discussions here.”

“This is beyond self-defense,” Lyman said of South Sudan’s offensive, adding that without a South Sudanese withdrawal, the fighting could spread “well beyond Heglig” and the war would get “nastier and nastier.”

The conflict has put Washington in a difficult position. U.S. policy has long favored South Sudan over Sudan, partly in response to a pro-South Sudan lobby in the U.S. that sees South Sudanese as victims of Sudan’s northern, Arab elites.

But now, South Sudan is its own country, and the country is quickly wearing out its friendly welcome to the international stage, even among its well-wishers.

“Our good friend South Sudan has become extraordinarily impatient. And we think they’ve taken great risks,” Lyman said.

Unofficially, South Sudanese officials have delighted in their capture of Heglig, which they consider a South Sudanese territory that was annexed illegally into the north in the 1970s. At the border itself, there is no talk of withdrawal, only of pushing the front lines further north.

It is not clear who fired the first shot in the battle over Heglig. South Sudan has been adamant that it captured Heglig only after repulsing a Sudanese attack on its side of the de facto border.

One source close to the South Sudanese government claimed that South Sudan was caught off guard by the initial attack, in late March, and said that the next round of fighting a week later was also an act of Sudanese aggression.

But several neutral, well-informed officials noted privately that there is no evidence of who started the fighting, and that there were clear incentives on both sides of the border to begin a war.

For one, South Sudan was already suffering the pains of losing its oil revenue after it shut down production in January over a dispute with Sudan on how much it should be paid for transportation services. Now, by capturing Heglig, South Sudan has robbed Sudan of one of its largest fields – and of the revenue generated by the 55,000 barrels of oil produced there a day.

The U.S. has condemned Sudan for its air bombing raids in South Sudan territory, which have killed civilians. Lyman characterized the Sudanese government as “very belligerent” at the moment. After Juba, he is flying to Khartoum, Sudan’s capital, for talks there.

(Boswell is a McClatchy Newspapers special correspondent. His reporting is underwritten in part by a grant from Humanity United, a California-based foundation that focuses on human rights issues.)

South Sudan rejects UN appeal to withdraw troops

Posted: April 12, 2012 by PaanLuel Wël in Junub Sudan
Tags:

“I told him you do not need to order me because I am not under your command. I am a head of state accountable to my people and do not have to be ordered by someone I do not fall under his direct command. I will not withdraw the troops,” President kiir Mayardit to the UN Chief, Bank Ki Moon.
South Sudan Says Won’t Withdraw Troops
by The Associated Press
JUBA, South Sudan April 12, 2012, 08:27 am ET
JUBA, South Sudan (AP) — South Sudan’s president said Thursday that the nation will not withdraw its troops that this week entered a disputed border region with Sudan.
South Sudan President Salva Kiir spoke to parliament in the midst of escalating clashes along the border with Sudan. He said the country’s military would also re-enter another disputed area, Abyei, currently occupied by Sudan if the United Nations does not urge Sudan to withdraw.
Troops from South Sudan on Wednesday captured the oil-rich border town of Heglig that is claimed by Sudan, whose troops withdrew under the onslaught. Kiir said that South Sudan’s military forces, the SPLA, had also advanced past Heglig after occupying it.
“They pursued them up to the so called Heglig. But these forces did not stop in Heglig, there was not fighting in Heglig,” he said.
Heglig has been the focal point of more than two weeks of clashes between the two nations. Both sides claim the area, but Sudan operates Heglig’s oil facilities, which account for nearly half of the country’s daily production. The town is 100 kilometers (60 miles) east of the disputed region of Abyei, whose fate was left unresolved when South Sudan split last year from Sudan.
Fighting along the north-south border has been near constant over the past two weeks. On Thursday, South Sudan accused Sudan of bombing the capital of Unity State, Bentiu.
SPLA spokesman Col. Philip Aguer said that Antonov aircraft belonging to Sudan dropped five bombs on a bridge linking Bentiu to neighboring Rubkotna. The two towns comprise Unity State’s most populated area.
“This is an indiscriminate bombing,” and according to initial reports one civilian was killed and four were wounded in the attack, Aguer said.
President Kiir said he had received numerous appeals from the international community to withdraw SPLA troops from the disputed territory, including a call from United Nation’s Secretary-General Ban-Ki Moon.
“Last night I never slept because of the telephone calls,” he said. “Those who have been calling me — starting with the U.N. secretary-general yesterday — he gave me an order that I’m ordering you to immediately withdraw from Heglig. I said I’m not under your command,” Kiir said.
The military advance by South Sudan into territory it claims but which is internationally recognized as Sudan’s brought swift condemnation from the United States and Britain. Both nations, along with the U.N. Security Council, urged South Sudan to withdraw from the town of Heglig and condemned the bombings of South Sudan territory by Sudan.
Kiir said he also urged the U.N. secretary-general to re-engage Sudan on the disputed territory of Abyei.
“We withdrew from Abyei. Bashir occupied Abyei and is still there up to today,” Kiir said. “I told the secretary-general that if you are not moving out with this force of Bashir, we are going to reconsider our position and we are going back to Abyei.”
Fighting erupted in Abyei between Sudan and South Sudan May of last year, just months before South Sudan formally declared independence from Sudan.
The region was to hold a referendum in January to decide whether it stays with Sudan or joins a newly independent South. But the vote was postponed indefinitely amid disagreements over who would be eligible to vote.
The fighting has displaced more than 100,000 people, most of whom are still waiting to return.
The continued clashes have dimmed hopes for a resolution between the two countries on a host of issues left over from their July split, including oil-sharing, citizenship issues and the demarcation of the border.
South Sudan president says nation won’t withdraw troops from disputed border region with Sudan
By Associated Press: Thursday, April 12
JUBA, South Sudan — South Sudan’s president said Thursday that the nation will not withdraw its troops that this week entered a disputed border region with Sudan.South Sudan President Salva Kiir spoke to parliament in the midst of escalating clashes along the border with Sudan. He said the country’s military would also re-enter another disputed area, Abyei, currently occupied by Sudan if the United Nations does not urge Sudan to withdraw.
Troops from South Sudan on Wednesday captured the oil-rich border town of Heglig that is claimed by Sudan, whose troops withdrew under the onslaught. Kiir said that South Sudan’s military forces, the SPLA, had also advanced past Heglig after occupying it.“They pursued them up to the so called Heglig. But these forces did not stop in Heglig, there was not fighting in Heglig,” he said.Heglig has been the focal point of more than two weeks of clashes between the two nations. Both sides claim the area, but Sudan operates Heglig’s oil facilities, which account for nearly half of the country’s daily production. The town is 100 kilometers (60 miles) east of the disputed region of Abyei, whose fate was left unresolved when South Sudan split last year from Sudan.Fighting along the north-south border has been near constant over the past two weeks. On Thursday, South Sudan accused Sudan of bombing the capital of Unity State, Bentiu.

SPLA spokesman Col. Philip Aguer said that Antonov aircraft belonging to Sudan dropped five bombs on a bridge linking Bentiu to neighboring Rubkotna. The two towns comprise Unity State’s most populated area.

“This is an indiscriminate bombing,” and according to initial reports one civilian was killed and four were wounded in the attack, Aguer said.

President Kiir said he had received numerous appeals from the international community to withdraw SPLA troops from the disputed territory, including a call from United Nation’s Secretary-General Ban-Ki Moon.

“Last night I never slept because of the telephone calls,” he said. “Those who have been calling me — starting with the U.N. secretary-general yesterday — he gave me an order that I’m ordering you to immediately withdraw from Heglig. I said I’m not under your command,” Kiir said.

The military advance by South Sudan into territory it claims but which is internationally recognized as Sudan’s brought swift condemnation from the United States and Britain. Both nations, along with the U.N. Security Council, urged South Sudan to withdraw from the town of Heglig and condemned the bombings of South Sudan territory by Sudan.

Kiir said he also urged the U.N. secretary-general to re-engage Sudan on the disputed territory of Abyei.

“We withdrew from Abyei. Bashir occupied Abyei and is still there up to today,” Kiir said. “I told the secretary-general that if you are not moving out with this force of Bashir, we are going to reconsider our position and we are going back to Abyei.”

Fighting erupted in Abyei between Sudan and South Sudan May of last year, just months before South Sudan formally declared independence from Sudan.

The region was to hold a referendum in January to decide whether it stays with Sudan or joins a newly independent South. But the vote was postponed indefinitely amid disagreements over who would be eligible to vote.

The fighting has displaced more than 100,000 people, most of whom are still waiting to return.

The continued clashes have dimmed hopes for a resolution between the two countries on a host of issues left over from their July split, including oil-sharing, citizenship issues and the demarcation of the border.

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/middle_east/south-sudan-president-says-nation-wont-withdraw-troops-from-disputed-border-region-with-sudan/2012/04/12/gIQAOaaYCT_story.html

President Salva Kiir dismisses secretary-general’s request to withdraw from Heglig and says his forces may enter Abyei.
 
12 Apr 2012
South Sudan’s president has said his nation will not withdraw its troops that this week entered a disputed border region with Sudan.Salva Kiir, president of South Sudan, spoke to parliament on Thursday in the midst of escalating clashes along the border with Sudan and the bombing of a bridge outside Beintu in which one soldier was killed and two others injured.”[The UN Secretary General] gave me an order,” Kir said. “He said I order you to immediately withdraw from Heglig. I said I’m not under your command.”Kir also said the country’s military would also re-enter another disputed area, Abyei, currently occupied by Sudan if the UN does not urge Sudan to withdraw.Al Jazeera’s Nazanine Moshiri, reporting from Juba, the South Sudanese capital, said that South Sudan wants an international mechanism in place before they withdraw from Heglig.

“The president of South Sudan is not going to budge on this,” she said. “If bombardment continues, the South Sudanese will go into the tow on Abyei, and this is of extreme concern to the international community.”

On Wednesday, troops from South Sudan captured the oil-rich border town of Heglig that is claimed by Sudan, whose troops withdrew under the onslaught.

Kiir said that South Sudan’s military forces, the SPLA, had also advanced past Heglig after occupying it.

“They pursued them up to the so-called Heglig. But these forces did not stop in Heglig, there was not fighting in Heglig,” he said.

Sudanese warplanes attacked a major South Sudanese town at dawn, bombing the capital of the oil-producing Unity border state, according to South Sudan officials.

The aircraft targeted a strategic bridge on the Rubkhona airstrip just outside Beintu town close to a UN compound, which lies about 60km from the frontier as clashes between the recently separated nations continued for a third day.

One soldier was killed and two others injured in the attack.

‘Choosing the path of war’

Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir accused South Sudan of “choosing the path of war,” following days of intensifying clashes on their shared border.

“Our brothers in South Sudan have chosen the path of war, implementing plans dictated by foreign parties who supported them during the civil war,” Bashir told reporters, referring to decades of conflict before the South’s independence last year.

“War is not in the interest of either South Sudan or Sudan but, unfortunately, our brothers in the South are thinking neither of the interests of Sudan or of South Sudan.”

The military advances by South Sudan and the Sudanese air raids brought condemnation from the UN Security Council as UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon called on both sides to withdraw from the other side’s territory and said he was “alarmed by the escalation in fighting”.

Daffa-Alla Elhag Ali Osman, Sudan’s ambassador to the UN, said he had filed a complaint to the Security Council condemning the “heinous attack” on Heglig.

“We will decide to retaliate, and retaliate severely, deep inside South Sudan if the Security Council doesn’t address the situation”, Ali Osman told reporters.

A statement on Khartoum’s official SUNA news agency warned of “destruction” in South Sudan.

Focal point of fighting

Heglig lies along the disputed border between the two African nations and has been the focal point of nearly two weeks of clashes between their armies, which have prompted the collapse of African Union-mediated talks.

The region is home to oil fields that account for about half of Sudan’s oil production, a critical source of income for the country’s flagging economy.

The two rivals fought a civil war that lasted decades, and never reached a deal to share the region’s oil resources or delineate their exact border during negotiations which led to South Sudan’s cessation last year.

A 2009 ruling by the Permanent Court of Arbitration in the Hague placed Heglig in Sudan’s Southern Kordofan region. But South Sudan has disputed the ruling, asserting that the region is in South Sudan’s Unity State.

South Sudan’s army said it moved into Heglig on Tuesday after repelling an attack launched by Sudanese Armed Forces against a position near the border town of Teshwin.

Bashir was scheduled to visit South Sudan for a summit April 3, but the talks were scrapped in the wake of the clashes.

Barack Obama, the US president, earlier this month called Kiir to ensure that South Sudan’s military exercised maximum restraint and was not involved in, or supporting, fighting along the border.

In a statement, the African Union called upon both countries to resolve all outstanding issues “in a peaceful way in accordance with the overriding principle of establishing two viable states in Sudan and South Sudan”.

http://www.aljazeera.com/news/africa/2012/04/2012412141645572913.html


South Sudan Says Won’t Withdraw Troops
by The Associated Press
JUBA, South Sudan April 12, 2012, 08:27 am ET
JUBA, South Sudan (AP) — South Sudan’s president said Thursday that the nation will not withdraw its troops that this week entered a disputed border region with Sudan.
South Sudan President Salva Kiir spoke to parliament in the midst of escalating clashes along the border with Sudan. He said the country’s military would also re-enter another disputed area, Abyei, currently occupied by Sudan if the United Nations does not urge Sudan to withdraw.
Troops from South Sudan on Wednesday captured the oil-rich border town of Heglig that is claimed by Sudan, whose troops withdrew under the onslaught. Kiir said that South Sudan’s military forces, the SPLA, had also advanced past Heglig after occupying it.
“They pursued them up to the so called Heglig. But these forces did not stop in Heglig, there was not fighting in Heglig,” he said.
Heglig has been the focal point of more than two weeks of clashes between the two nations. Both sides claim the area, but Sudan operates Heglig’s oil facilities, which account for nearly half of the country’s daily production. The town is 100 kilometers (60 miles) east of the disputed region of Abyei, whose fate was left unresolved when South Sudan split last year from Sudan.
Fighting along the north-south border has been near constant over the past two weeks. On Thursday, South Sudan accused Sudan of bombing the capital of Unity State, Bentiu.
SPLA spokesman Col. Philip Aguer said that Antonov aircraft belonging to Sudan dropped five bombs on a bridge linking Bentiu to neighboring Rubkotna. The two towns comprise Unity State’s most populated area.
“This is an indiscriminate bombing,” and according to initial reports one civilian was killed and four were wounded in the attack, Aguer said.
President Kiir said he had received numerous appeals from the international community to withdraw SPLA troops from the disputed territory, including a call from United Nation’s Secretary-General Ban-Ki Moon.
“Last night I never slept because of the telephone calls,” he said. “Those who have been calling me —starting with the U.N. secretary-general yesterday — he gave me an order that I’m ordering you to immediately withdraw from Heglig. I said I’m not under your command,” Kiir said.
The military advance by South Sudan into territory it claims but which is internationally recognized as Sudan’s brought swift condemnation from the United States and Britain. Both nations, along with the U.N. Security Council, urged South Sudan to withdraw from the town of Heglig and condemned the bombings of South Sudan territory by Sudan.
Kiir said he also urged the U.N. secretary-general to re-engage Sudan on the disputed territory of Abyei.
“We withdrew from Abyei. Bashir occupied Abyei and is still there up to today,” Kiir said. “I told the secretary-general that if you are not moving out with this force of Bashir, we are going to reconsider our position and we are going back to Abyei.”
Fighting erupted in Abyei between Sudan and South Sudan May of last year, just months before South Sudan formally declared independence from Sudan.
The region was to hold a referendum in January to decide whether it stays with Sudan or joins a newly independent South. But the vote was postponed indefinitely amid disagreements over who would be eligible to vote.
The fighting has displaced more than 100,000 people, most of whom are still waiting to return.
The continued clashes have dimmed hopes for a resolution between the two countries on a host of issues left over from their July split, including oil-sharing, citizenship issues and the demarcation of the border.

South Sudan’s President Kiir refuses to pull out troops from Heglig

April 12, 2012 (JUBA) — South Sudan President Salva Kiir Mayadrit brushed aside calls to withdraw his army from the oil-rich region of Heglig after being asked to do so in order to avoid a return of war with the north.

JPEG - 29.9 kb
Salva Kiir

Kiir was reacting to international calls from the African Union (AU), United Nations (UN) and United States and . Ban Ki-moon, UN Secretary General also called him on Wednesday requesting the same.

In a remarkable shift from his “no return to war” previous stances, Kiir told the members of South Sudan parliament he would not order a withdrawal.

Kiir said that this message was delivered to all world leaders who contacted him including UN chief whom he said gave him “an order”.

“I told him you do not need to order me because I am not under your command. I am a head of state accountable to my people and do not have to be ordered by someone I do not fall under his direct command. I will not withdraw the troops,” he said

Kiir argued to Ban that the international community does not equally give same concern when Khartoum assaults them and gave an example when the Sudanese army moved into Abyei it in May 2010.

The South Sudan leader said he told Ban that if Khartoum does not pull out its army from Abyei he would send his troops to fight them.

He went on to recount events that led to Heglig’s occupation.

“I want to tell you clearly what happened at border. I think you all know that a summit was supposed to be held here in Juba on 3 April, 2012 but this did not take place because there were voices in Khartoum who felt the south Sudan was not secure. I told them no. South Sudan was more secure than any other country in the world for president Bashir”, Kiir said

He explained that he rejected international pressure calling upon him at the time to arrest Bashir if he comes to South Sudan because he could not see any logic to do so.

“I asked them why and they said because he is wanted by the international criminal court for war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide in Darfur for killing of 300,000 people. I told them why would I arrest Bashir for 300,000 people killed in Darfur while the international community did not bother to indict him for crimes he committed in the South where he killed over 2 million people”, Kiir told the house.

He said the conflict in Heglig began when Sudan Armed forces collaboratively with militia forces launched an attack on April 1st with the intention to extend tie-in pipe line to Unity state but that they were repulsed by the SPLA forces and were followed into Heglig.

“They went back to regroup and launched another attack on April 10th. They were again repulsed and followed into Heglig and the SPLA took control of the town. The SPLA are now in a complete control of the Heglig and beyond. They will not pull out. They will remain there so that this issue is resolve once and for all even though we did not want war as a resolve”, Kiir told the house amid applause chatting “SPLA, SPLA, SPLA”.

He said he did not sleep last night because he was receiving a lot of international calls asking him to consider withdrawing troops from the contested area but rejected them.

(ST)

http://www.sudantribune.com/South-Sudan-s-Kiir-refuses-to-pull,42219

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Washington Post
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Sudan halts talks with South after new clashes
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Sudan’s parliament has called a halt to negotiations with South Sudan, official radio reported, as the foreign ministry accused Juba of the worst violation of its territory since independence in the oil-rich border region of Heglig. Duration: 01:05.
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South Sudan troops capture disputed oil town of Heglig as battles rage on 
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PHNOM PENH, April 11 (Xinhua) — Cambodian military police and military medics will leave Cambodia on April 16 on a peacekeeping mission in South Sudan, the United Nations Development Program- Cambodia said in a press release on Wednesday.

BusinessWeek
By MICHAEL ONYIEGO and MOHAMED SAEED After a day of fierce fighting, troops from South Sudan captured an oil-rich border town that is claimed by Sudan, whose troops withdrew under the onslaught, a Sudanese government minister said Wednesday.

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Today, children in South Sudan are eager to learn, but the new country, which celebrated independence in July 2011, lacks resources to establish schools in the nation. To help the desperate situation in South Sudan, Emma Labovitz, a sophomore at 
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The African Union has expressed concern over the conflict on the border between Sudan and South Sudan. Sudan and South Sudan edged more closely to all-out war on Wednesday than at any time since the South seceded last year, amid border clashes and 

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By Bonifacio Taban Kuich April 11, 2012 (BENTIU) – Unity state’s information minister, Gideon Gatpan Thoar, told Sudan Tribune on Wednesday that South Sudan’s forces now are not only in control of Heglig but have advanced 23km north of it.

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South Sudan’s President Salva Kiir rejected calls Thursday to pull out from contested border regions, but said he did not want war with Khartoum, whose warplanes bombed a Southern town for the first time. Three days of heavy fighting between rival 

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SOUTH SUDAN FORCES WILL STAY IN DISPUTED OIL PRODUCING AREA OF HEGLIG UNTIL THREAT OF ATTACK BY KHARTOUM RECEDES – OFFICIAL.

South Sudan troops move into disputed oil town as battles rage on disputed border

By Associated Press, Wednesday, April 11

JUBA, South Sudan— Troops from South Sudan moved into an oil-rich border town claimed by Sudan as fighting intensified between the countries over who controls the area, officials said Wednesday. A South Sudan official said the fighting is “spreading all over.”The two sides fought a civil war that lasted decades, and any increase in sporadic border clashes raises the risk of a return to all-out war.

Sudanese army spokesman Col. Sawarmy Khaled told the official Radio Omdurman that the South’s army attacked the border oil town of Heglig twice in the past 24 hours. Heglig is located about 100 kilometers (60 miles) to the east of the disputed region of Abyei, whose fate was left unresolved when South Sudan split last year from Sudan.South Sudan officials would not confirm whether their troops are in control of the oil fields.

“Fierce battles are still going on and the situation has not yet been resolved,” said Khaled, promising the Sudanese people their side will be victorious.

Hostilities between Sudan and South Sudan have grown in recent months, even as the south has said it is trying to avoid a return to war. The two sides never reached a deal to share the oil resources in the region or the exact location of the border, adding to the tensions.

South Sudan’s army — the SPLA — said it moved into Heglig on Tuesday after repelling an attack launched by Sudanese Armed Forces against an SPLA position near the border town of Teshwin.

SPLA spokesman Col. Philip Aguer said several Sudanese MiG-29 fighter jets bombed the area on Monday and Tuesday. Aguer said several SPLA soldiers were injured in the attack but would not say how many.

“The war is widened,” said South Sudan Information Minister Barnaba Marial Benjamin. “The battle is raging. It is spreading all over.”

Heglig lies along the ill-defined border between the countries and has been the focal point of nearly two weeks of clashes between the armies. The region is home to oil facilities that account for around half of Sudan’s oil production, a critical source of income for the country’s flagging economy.

A 2009 ruling by the Permanent Court of Arbitration in the Hague placed Heglig in South Kordofan, Sudan. But South Sudan has disputed the ruling, asserting that the region is in South Sudan’s Unity State.

The Khartoum government in the north warned in a Tuesday statement that it will use “all legitimate means” to respond to the alleged aggression. Sudan also said that if South Sudan resorts to war, it would only reap “failure and destruction.”

Aguer said South Sudan’s forces are pushing through the area to prevent further attacks from forces there.

“Our main goal is to secure the territories of South Sudan and protect its people,” said Aguer. “Sudan and its allies, militiamen that have been trained in Heglig and Karsana, have been attacking us from there for last two years.”

South Sudan’s move into Heglig follows separate alleged attacks in South Sudan’s Unity state, near Abiemnom.

Aguer said a series of bombing attacks by Sudan on Tuesday wounded four civilians. Benjamin said the target was a “strategic bridge” linking Unity with neighboring Warrap state.

Abiemnom has not been a recent site of conflict between the two countries

The continued clashes have dimmed hopes for a resolution between the two countries on a host of issues left over from their July split, including oil-sharing, citizenship issues and the demarcation of the border.

Sudan President Omar al-Bashir was scheduled to visit South Sudan for a summit on April 3 but the talks were scrapped in the wake of the clashes at the border.

President Barack Obama earlier this month called South Sudan President Salva Kiir to ensure that South Sudan’s military exercises maximum restraint and is not involved in or supporting fighting along the border.

Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/middle_east/sudan-says-battles-raging-along-south-sudan-border-after-southern-army-attacked-oil-rich-town/2012/04/11/gIQAYFis9S_story.html

South Sudan accuses Sudan of new attack
Reuters
KHARTOUM, April 10 (Reuters) – South Sudan said on Tuesday that Sudan had attacked a disputed oil-producing border region with warplanes and artillery, in the latest flare-up of violence that has delayed a summit between the former civil war foes.
Govt Imports Chinese Military Trucks
AllAfrica.com
By Maureen Mudi, 9 April 2012 A CONSIGNMENT of military trucks has left the port of Mombasa forSouth Sudan, five days after they arrived by sea from China. The consignment was offloaded on Wednesday last week at the G-Section of the port, 
Sudan Stops South Sudanese Leaving As Border Clashes Resume
Wall Street Journal
KAMPALA, Uganda (Dow Jones)–Sudanese authorities have prevented hundreds of South Sudanese citizens from returning to their country as clashes along the nations’ oil-rich border resumed Tuesday, underscoring deteriorating relations between the former 

South Sudan launches attack on Sudan border oil field
China Daily
KHARTOUM – The Sudanese army announced on Tuesday that troops from South Sudan had launched a large-scale attack on a strategic oil filed on the borders between the two countries. The Sudanese Armed Forces (SAF) said in a statement that troops of the 

Mosaic News 4/9/2012: Iraqis Have No Democracy or Security Nine Years After 
linktv
Iraqis have neither democracy nor security nine years after the fall of Baghdad, thousands of South Sudanese in Sudan at risk of becoming stateless, Egypt’s former intelligence chief accused of attempting to steal the revolution, and more.
South Sudan faces challenges providing maternal and child health care
UNICEF (press release)
By Kun Li TORIT, South Sudan, 10 April 2012 – It was a busy morning in the maternity ward of Torit Civil Hospital, Eastern Equatoria State. Three newborns were welcomed into the world, all in good health. Surrounded by family members, Lugina Michael 
Achievement of household food security in South Sudan
Sudan Tribune
By Jacob K. Lupai April 10, 2012 — South Sudan is made up of ten States which grew out of the previous three southern provinces of Upper Nile, Equatoria and Bahr el Ghazal. As history shows the people of South Sudan have had a long bloody struggle for 

Nutributter shipment arrives in South Sudan
Reuters AlertNet
A shipment of 39 metric tons of life-saving Nutributter® has arrived in Wau, South Sudan. Humanitarian aid organization World Concern will distribute the peanut-based ready-to-eat food supplement to 7800 children, ages 6 to 24 months, to help prevent 

RDF Deploys in South Sudan
AllAfrica.com
By Felly Kimenyi, 10 April 2012 The Rwanda Defence Forces (RDF) will today begin to deploy in the new independent state of South Sudan as part of a newly created UN-backed stabilisation mission there. The first group of the Rwandan contingent, 

Sudan vows response after surprise loss of oil-rich town to SPLA
Sudan Tribune
April 11, 2012 (JUBA) – The Sudanese Armed Forces (SAF) on Tuesday acknowledged that it has lost control of the oil-rich town of Heglig following what it said was an attack by South Sudan’sPeople Liberation Army (SPLA) and “mercenaries”.

Sudan says battles raging along South Sudan border after southern army 
Washington Post
KHARTOUM, Sudan — Sudan said battles were raging Wednesday along its border with South Sudan after southern troops attacked an oil-rich town in the area. The fighting raised the specter of an all-out confrontation between the two countries already 

Sudan accuses South of assaulting oil area
WRNI
KHARTOUM (Reuters) – Sudan said on Wednesday it would use “all legitimate ways and means” to oppose what it said was South Sudan’s assault on an oil-producing border region disputed between the two countries and long marred by clashes.
South Sudan receives military trucks from China: report
Sudan Tribune
April 10, 2012 (KHARTOUM) – South Sudan received a shipment of military hardware from China that were loaded via the Kenyan port of Mombasa, according to a news report. The Nairobi-based ‘The Star’ newspaper said in its Monday edition that the 

Battles raging on disputed border, 2 Sudans say
The Times Herald
By MICHAEL ONYIEGO AP JUBA, South Sudan (AP) — Battles raged Wednesday along the disputed border region between Sudan and South Sudan, officials from both countries said, and aSouth Sudan official said the fighting is “spreading all over.

Sudan: No Talks With South Sudan After New Clashes
Voice of America (blog)
Sudan says it is pulling out of talks with South Sudan, as the two countries’ forces clash in a disputed border region. The announcement Wednesday came as South Sudan’s army claimed control of the oil-producing town of Heglig.

RDF Peacekeepers Head to South Sudan
AllAfrica.com
By James Karuhanga, 11 April 2012 One hundred and fifty Rwanda Defense Force (RDF) peacekeepers left Kigali International Airport aboard a Rwandair plane this morning on their way to the world’s new state of South Sudan. Rwanda which has over 3200 

South Sudan: Shortage of Hard Currency Hits Businesses in Juba
AllAfrica.com
Yussif Ahmed a hard wire trader in Juba market said, they are selling in south Sudanese pounds hence the shortage of dollar had made it difficult for them to go and bring other stocks becausesouth Sudanese pounds can’t be accepted in any other country 

By MICHAEL ONYIEGO Associated Press

JUBA, South Sudan April 4, 2012 (AP)
South Sudan’s military spokesman said Wednesday the south’s military shot down a Sudanese fighter jet in its territory after two Sudanese military planes dropped “many” bombs around South Sudanese oil fields.

Col. Philip Aguer said South Sudan’s Air Defense Forces shot down a Sudanese MiG-29 jet fighter Wednesday afternoon in South Sudan’s Unity State. Aguer said he was present for the confrontation and that the downed Sudanese MiG was one of two flying over the Naar and Toma South oil fields. He said the two MiGs had dropped “many” bombs since morning.

South Sudanese forces shot down the MiG with an anti-aircraft gun, he said.

The Sudanese “don’t know that we have the capacity. They underestimate the SPLA,” he said, referring to South Sudan’s forces, the Southern People’s Liberation Army.

The downing of the MiG threatens to push the two countries closer to all-out war. Aguer said southern officials are expecting Sudan to counterattack in retaliation for the shoot-down.

South Sudan split off from Sudan last year after decades of civil war. But the two sides never agreed on where exactly the two countries’ border is, and how to share oil revenues. The south now has most of the oil but must pump it through a pipeline that runs through Sudan.

South Sudan says that Sudan stole much of its oil, and the south shut down production earlier this year, depriving both countries of needed government revenue.

Hostilities between the two sides have grown in recent months, even as the south has said it is trying to avoid a return to war. A planned meeting between the presidents of Sudan and South Sudan scheduled for Tuesday was canceled by Sudan.

Aguer was part of a delegation led by South Sudanese Oil Minister Stephen Dhieu Dau to see a tie-in pipeline allegedly being built by Sudan. The south says the tie-in pipeline is a way for Sudan to steal South Sudan’s oil.

Dau said the incomplete pipeline would be able to pump between 15,000 and 30,000 barrels of oil per day if linked up to Sudan’s oil fields.

“They want take our oil even when we are shut down,” Dau said.

This is not the first tie-in pipeline that has been unilaterally built by Khartoum. Another was built in January to link a pipeline in South Sudan operated by oil-consortium PetroDar to refineries in Khartoum. The pipeline was revealed shortly after Khartoum announced it would take oil “in kind” from South Sudan in lieu of an agreement on how much South Sudan should pay to use Sudan’s pipelines.

In late January South Sudan accused Khartoum of stealing nearly all of its oil and ordered oil fields to halt operations.

According to Dau, the new tie-in pipeline was discovered just over a week ago during the border clashes between the two nations. Dau said SPLA forces found the pipeline when they pushed Sudanese Armed Forces back from Teshwin into the Heglig area on March 26.

“The pipeline was less than 10 kilometers (6 miles) from being complete,” said Dau.

Wednesday’s bombings are the latest in a series of open confrontations between Sudanese and South Sudanese troops that have world leaders on edge. President Barack Obama urged South Sudanese President Salva Kiir earlier this week to exercise maximum military restraint.

But according to Aguer, the fighting has been “a daily thing here on the front line” since the initial confrontation. Aguer said that almost 80 people have been killed — mostly military forces — since the fighting began.

While the region has been quiet since the downing of the MiG plane earlier, the border is tense. According to Aguer, South Sudan is “expecting ground troops to attack at any time.”

http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/south-sudan-shoots-sudanese-jet-16071805#.T3ySD79SRv0

South Sudan says it shoots down Sudanese jet

Boston.com – ‎
By Michael Onyiego AP / April 4, 2012 JUBA, South Sudan—South Sudan’s military spokesman said Wednesday the south’s military shot down a Sudanese fighter jet in its territory after two Sudanese military planes dropped “many” bombs around South Sudanese 
Fox News – ‎‎
JUBA, South Sudan – South Sudan’s military spokesman said Wednesday the south’s military shot down a Sudanese fighter jet in its territory after two Sudanese military planes dropped “many” bombs around South Sudanese oil fields. Col.
BusinessWeek – ‎
By Jared Ferrie on April 04, 2012 South Sudan shot down a Sudanese MiG jet fighter while it was flying over its Unity state, a sign of heightening tensions between the former civil war foes. “This is proof of what we were talking about for the past 
Aljazeera.com – ‎
An oil pipeline on the South Sudan-Sudan border has come under attack by fighter jets and Antonov aircraft, belonging to the Sudanese government. Al Jazeera’s Nazanine Moshiri witnessed Wednesday’s air raids that took place near the town of Heglig, 
Newsday – ‎
Nation Newsday > News > Nation Print Aa Military spokesman: South Sudan shoots down a Sudanese military jet over South Sudan territory Published: April 4, 2012 12:33 PM By The Associated Press JUBA, South Sudan – (AP) — Military spokesman: South Sudan 
MSN NZ News – ‎
Sudan’s military has denied that one of its jets has been shot down, as its neighbour South Sudan alleged. “What media reported, that we lost a fighter plane in Unity state, we confirm that is completely incorrect,” Sawarmi Khaled Saad, the Sudanese 
Catholic Culture – ‎‎
The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) and Catholic Relief Services (CRS) are asking Catholics to call upon Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to intensify her efforts on behalf of the Sudanese people. “The long-term peace and 
South Sudan Says It Shoots Down Sudanese Jet
ABC News
South Sudan’s military spokesman said Wednesday the south’s military shot down a Sudanese fighter jet in its territory after two Sudanese military planes dropped “many” bombs around South Sudanese oil fields. Col. Philip Aguer said South Sudan’s Air 
Sudan: China’s New Courtship in South Sudan
AllAfrica.com
Following its oil interests and other opportunities to Juba, China is building a new relationship withSouth Sudan but finds itself drawn into a dangerous dispute that risks bringing the Sudans back to conflict. China’s New Courtship in South Sudan 
Sudan: Report Summary: China’s New Courtship in South Sudan
AllAfrica.com
The future of Beijing’s dual engagement, and the kind of relationship that emerges in the South, will depend in part on how the oil standoff – and this broader reform agenda – are confronted. As South Sudan prepared for its 2011 self-determination 
A Success Worse Than Failure? Lessons From Activist Campaigns in South Africa 
Huffington Post (blog)
A deeper examination reveals that two of history’s more prominent and similar activist movements — those against South Africa’s apartheid regime and Sudan’s NCP government — may have have produced just such contradictory campaigns.


Zuma Condemns Fighting in Sudan, South Sudan

AllAfrica.com
The military confrontation took place in the disputed border region between Sudan and South Sudan. This recent military confrontation has the potential to worsen the humanitarian crisis in the affected region, leading to further civilian casualties, 
Local media under pressure in South Sudan
Bikya Masr
CAIRO: The recent fines slapped on two South Sudanese newspapers for allegedly defaming a senior member of the country’s ruling party cited in a $30 scam will deter journalists from further investigating corruption-related cases in the country, 
South Sudan: Sudan Is Waging War, Thwarting Peace Talks
Voice of America (blog)
South Sudan is accusing Sudan of waging war and thwarting African Union peace talks aimed at stopping rising border clashes. During talks in Addis Ababa Sunday, South Sudan’s chief negotiator Pagan Amum accused Khartoum of conducting air strikes for a 

Jerusalem: South Sudanese refugees protest deportation
Jerusalem Post
COM STAFF Dozens of South Sudanese refugees protested outside Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu’s house in Jerusalem on Sunday, in response to a recent state decision to deport them toSouth Sudan if they did not leave the country by April 1, 2012.

Sudan’s Aerial Bombing Aims at Churches in Nuba Mountains
ChristianNewsToday.com
JUBA, South Sudan – After Khartoum denied that it had bombed civilians earlier this month, Sudanese aerial strikes last week were aimed at church buildings and schools in Kauda, South Kordofan state, a humanitarian aid worker said.

South Sudan accuses Sudan of fresh attacks
Oman Tribune
ADDIS ABABA South Sudan on Sunday accused Khartoum of launching fresh attacks along their disputed border, stalling peace talks in Addis Ababa, a senior South Sudanese official said. “We are here to attempt to make peace; the Government of Sudan is 

Push to bring Sudan, South Sudan into crisis talks
Capital FM Kenya
ADDIS ABABA, Apr 1 – Crisis talks between Sudan and South Sudan were stalled on Sunday as the two nations traded accusations over responsibility for recent clashes. “We are here … to attempt to make peace; the Government of Sudan is waging war on

No simple answers in South Sudan, refugees flood the region
Mission Network NEws (press release)
Food for the Hungry is helping the refugee crisis in South Sudan. You can help FH help the local church do the work. South Sudan (MNN) ― The rumors of war continue to make their way across Sudan and South Sudan as conflict continues.

With help from Manchester, Sudanese towns have water
The Union Leader
Kenyang Nhomot and James Abiem are celebrating news that both their hometowns in the Republic of South Sudan have access to clean water. The wells were built this winter by the International Aid Service, a faith-based European organization that helps 


South Sudan
 official says Sudan bombs oil field

Boston.com
By Michael Onyiego AP / March 27, 2012 JUBA, South Sudan—Sudan’s military bombed an oil field in South Sudan on Tuesday, a South Sudan official said, as a dangerous flare-up in border violence appeared to scuttle plans for a presidential summit 

South Sudan official says Sudan bombs oil field
Seattle Post Intelligencer
JUBA, South Sudan (AP) — An official in South Sudan’s Unity State says Sudan’s military has carried out an aerial attack near oil fields. Unity State Minister of Information Gideon Gatpan said Sudan dropped three bombs Tuesday near oil fields in the 

US adds South Sudan to a preferential trade program
Sudan Tribune
“I have determined that the Republic of South Sudan should be designated as a beneficiary developing country under the GSP (Generalized System of Preferences)” said the statement on the White House website. According to the Office of US Trade 

Sudans’ presidential summit canceled after clash
CBS News
JUBA, South Sudan — Sudan’s vice president says a summit planned between the presidents of Sudan and South Sudan has been canceled in the face of new violence along the countries’ shared border. Sudanese Vice President Ali Osman Taha said late Monday 

Saving the lives of south sudanese mothers one midwife at a time
TrustLaw
A woman holds a candle during South Sudan’s independence day celebrations in Juba July 9, 2011. REUTERS/Goran Tomasevic By Andrew Green* JUBA, Mar 24, 2012 (IPS) – Martha Borete Angela’s gaze sinks to the ground as she admits neither of her two 

South Sudan, Sudan Clash Along Tense, Disputed Border
Voice of America
March 27, 2012 South Sudan, Sudan Clash Along Tense, Disputed Border VOA News South Sudan is accusing Sudan of launching a second day of airstrikes on oil-rich territory along their disputed border, one day after a rare direct military confrontation 

Weapons link South Sudan’s White Army to prominent rebel groups
Christian Science Monitor
Support for South Sudan’s White Army is complex. Some say backing comes from a diaspora of armed youth, local politicians eager to stoke violence, and militias, writes a guest blogger. By Annette LaRocco, Guest blogger / March 27, 2012 • A version of 

South Sudan Delegation in Luanda
AllAfrica.com
Luanda — A delegation of South Sudan, led by its Minister of President’ Cabinet Affairs, Deng Alor Kuol, arrived this Tuesday in Luanda, for an official three-day visit in the country, under the bilateral cooperation between the two state.

UN Concerned Over Refugee Safety As Fighting Persists Near South Sudan-Sudan 
AllAfrica.com
The United Nations refugee agency today voiced concern over recurring fighting near the Yida refugee settlement in South Sudan, close to the border with Sudan, saying the clashes are putting residents of the camp at risk. “Our concerns are heightened 

ISRAEL: Deportation looms for South Sudan migrants
IRINnews.org
TEL AVIV, 27 March 2012 (IRIN) – Asylum-seekers from South Sudan living in Israel have until 31 March to return “home” or face deportation, but some have asked to stay, saying conditions are not yet conducive for their safe return.

Malaria Takes Center Stage and Center Court as Americans Rally to Save Lives 
MarketWatch (press release)
CHICAGO, March 27, 2012 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ — Since last June, more than 130000 refugees–and counting–have entered South Sudan and neighboring countries to escape fighting on the border of Sudan. As the situation worsens, the United Nations 
President Obama suspends Argentina from trade program, adds South Sudan
The Hill (blog)
Meanwhile, the president also said that the Republic of South Sudan would join the GSP. “The suspension of Argentina’s GSP eligibility is based on a finding that the country is not in compliance with the statutory GSP eligibility criteria set by 
Brent crude stays above $125 on Fed comments, Iran
Reuters
* Bernanke comments indicate easy monetary policy to continue * Investors’ appetite for riskier assets boosted * Sudan president suspends meeting after clashes with South Sudan By Florence Tan SINGAPORE, March 27 (Reuters) – Brent held steady above 
Sudan Suspends Summit with South Sudan Following Clashes
Voice of America (blog)
Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir has suspended an upcoming summit with South Sudanfollowing a series of fresh clashes between the two countries on Monday. President Bashir had been set to travel to Juba on April 3 to discuss disputes about oil 

The Fulfilled Drama of South Sudan Benydit and Guandit Not Bandit
Sudan Tribune
The thorny crown was prepared inside the chamber of the South Sudan Legislative Assembly, especially with the provocation that emanated fromthe summoning of Mr. Uncle Commander Elijah Malok, former Governor of the Bankof Southern Sudan who has his 

Race for South Sudan
Mint
India?s ONGC is in talks to build refining infrastructure in South Sudan. But Mint?s Utpal Bhaskar says that with other countries also eyeing the opportunity, India will face stiff competition.

South Sudan says Sudan bombs oil fields in border region
Reuters UK
JUBA (Reuters) – South Sudan said the Sudanese air force had bombed the main oil fields in Unity state near the border with Sudan on Tuesday, as violence between the two escalated. “This morning as you called I heard the Antonov hovering over Bentiu 

US drops trade preferences for Argentina
BusinessWeek
Nearly all the world’s countries get the US preferences, which as of Monday apply as well to the Republic of South Sudan, Kirk announced. That leaves Argentina in the company of Syria, Belarus and the rest of Sudan as the only countries not eligible,  

China in a tug of war between two Sudans
Washington Post
Juba, South Sudan — Soon after South Sudan became independent last year, China opened an embassy here, eager to protect its oil interests. It quickly dispatched its foreign minister and began discussing a huge aid package for this destitute land.
China walks political tight rope in Sudan’s oil fight
Washington Post
High-stakes feuding between Sudan and the new nation of South Sudan has cut off a source of oil to fuel China’s booming economy, while putting at risk billions in Chinese investments. Source: BP Statistical Review of World Energy, June 2011.
Protecting the Children of South Sudan
SOS Children’s Villages (press release) (blog)
March 23, 2012: There was a time in history when some children in Sudan were disfigured for their own protection. This is no longer the case, but child protection inSouth Sudan is still as important as ever. Akwoch Ayang, SOS Village Director with a
Jonglei peace to begin soon: South Sudan Archbishop says
Sudan Tribune
March 23, 2012 (ST) The committee presented Jonglei governor, Kuol Manyang, with the President of South Sudan’s, plans on how the committee should approach peace in the conflict torn state, where a disarmament campaign is taking place.

Relations with South Sudan needs improvement
AngolaPress
Luanda – The relations between Angola and South Sudan need to be strengthened in various domains, due to the poor or non-existing bilateral co-operation, Angop learnt. This was said by the head of the Sub-Saharan department of the Angolan Foreign 

South Sudanese in Israel no longer refugees’
Jerusalem Post
By BEN HARTMAN South Sudanese child slave turned refugee turned Israel advocate and Coney Island lifeguard says South Sudanese are no longer refugees, but should be given more time to return home. By Courtesy Now that they have their own state South 

Central Africa: AU to Send 5000 Soldiers to Pursue Uganda’s LRA Rebels
AllAfrica.com
The newly established unit will be comprised of 5000 soldiers from Uganda, South Sudan, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Central Africa Republic (CAR). These are the nations that have been most affected by more than two decades of LRA 
African Union launches US-backed force to hunt Kony
Reuters
The AU force aims to coordinate soldiers already hunting for Kony from South Sudan, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Central African Republic (CAR) and Uganda with logistical and intelligence help from Washington. In October, US President Barack 

China walks political tightrope in Sudan’s oil fight

High-stakes feuding between Sudan and the new nation of South Sudan has cut off a source of oil to fuel China’s booming economy, while putting at risk billions in Chinese investments. Read related article.

China walks political tightrope in Sudan
Source: BP Statistical Review of World Energy, June 2011. The Washington Post. Published on March 23, 2012, 9:21 p.m.
China in a tug of war between two Sudans

Sudarsan Raghavan/The Washington Post – In early March, Sudan allegedly bombed a remote oil field at El Nar, nine miles from the jagged, contested border between Sudan and South Sudan, sending Chinese and other foreign oil workers scattering for their lives.

By Sudarsan Raghavan and Andrew Higgins, Published: March 23

Juba, South Sudan— Soon after South Sudan became independent last year, China opened an embassy here, eager to protect its oil interests. It quickly dispatched its foreign minister and began discussing a huge aid package for this destitute land.Just a few months later, Beijing finds itself trapped in a bitter wrangle between South Sudan and its former rulers in Sudan, with both countries pressing Beijing to take their side.

The dispute has cut off a significant source of oil to fuel China’s booming economy and imperiled billions of dollars in Chinese investments. It has also threatened Beijing’s diplomatic and economic relations with both the countries and strained the boundaries of a long-standing Chinese policy of noninterference in the internal affairs of other nations.“This new reality has left China uncomfortably stuck in the middle of a tug of war,” said Zach Vertin, a Sudan analyst with the International Crisis Group, a nonprofit think tank. “Both sides have attempted to leverage the Chinese oil interest and draw them in line with their own interests.”

The saga playing out in one of the world’s poorest regions highlights the troubles an increasingly prosperous China faces as it tries to adjust to tumultuous change: from Sudan to Libya, Syria and Burma, Beijing has resisted what it portrays as Western-style meddling. But by staying on the sidelines, China has jeopardized its interests and image as a friend of the developing world. Many Arab nations, for example, were furious when China joined Russia in blocking United Nations action on Syria.

At the center of the struggle between the two Sudans is oil, which until last summer was controlled by Khartoum but which now lies mostly within the borders of the world’s newest state, the Republic of South Sudan. China is the biggest player in the oil industry on both sides of the frontier: It holds big stakes in the main oil fields in the south and in pipelines and other infrastructure in the north.

After years of providing diplomatic cover and weapons to a regime in Khartoum ostracized by the West, China must face up to a simple fact, said Pagan Amum, the secretary general of South Sudan’s ruling party: “The master has changed. It was Khartoum. Now it is Juba.”

China’s efforts to shift gears in Sudan began in 2005, with the signing of a peace deal between Khartoum and southern rebels. The agreement ended what was Africa’s longest civil war and paved the way for South Sudan’s independence in July. But officials today say that the Chinese have not done enough to erase suspicions rooted in Beijing’s long support for Sudan’s president, Omar Hassan al-Bashir, an indicted war-crimes suspect who used Chinese-supplied arms in trying to prevent the south from seceding.

South Sudan, which depends on oil for 98 percent of its revenue, insists that it wants to remain partners with China. But South Sudanese officials warn that if Beijing does not align its interests with their country, they will seek out U.S. and Western oil companies.

In testimony before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee this month after a trip to South Sudan, Hollywood star George Clooney, a longtime critic of Bashir’s regime, noted that China’s massive investment in Sudan makes Beijing crucial to settling continuing violence in the region. China, he said, has invested about $20 billion, but “right now they are getting nothing from this” because of feuding between Khartoum and Juba. Clooney and several members of Congress were later arrested during a protest at the Sudanese Embassy in Washington.Khartoum, which depends heavily on Chinese investment, trade and aid, is determined to keep Beijing on its side. The government dispatched a senior envoy to Beijing last month and has exerted influence over Chinese-led oil consortiums, which pump most of their oil in the south but still need the north to get it to China.

The south has refused to pay hundreds of millions of dollars in royalties for using Sudan’s pipelines, saying that the fees were exorbitant. Sudan responded by seizing oil tankers carrying South Sudanese crude and imposed a blockade on the export of the oil. Last month, South Sudan shut down its oil production, roughly 350,000 barrels a day, after accusing Sudan of stealing $815 million worth of its oil.South Sudan says it will pay less than $1 a barrel in fees to transport oil through the north’s pipelines. Khartoum says it wants $36 a barrel and $1 billion in back payments. The two sides are even fighting in a London court, as South Sudan seeks to recover money from the sale of the seized crude.

South Sudan said recently that it intends to build a pipeline that would head south to Kenya. It is not clear who would fund such a massive project, but, if built, the pipeline would sharply reduce Juba’s dependence on the north — and the value of China’s huge investment in existing pipelines to Sudan’s Chinese-built oil export terminal on the Red Sea.

An old alliance under threat

It was inevitable that China would get tangled in the dispute. The state-owned China National Petroleum Corp., or CNPC, has a big stake in most of the biggest oil concessions. The oil from both Sudans represents at least 5 percent of China’s global crude imports.

This is much less than what China imports from Angola but is still important, especially as it is produced mainly by Chinese companies that are controlled by the state and, thus, in Beijing’s view, are more reliable. Angola’s oil, by contrast, is largely pumped by Western companies.

China also has great leverage over Sudan. Beijing provides massive loans to the north; oil and trade bring in billions more in foreign currency, vital to run Sudan’s economy and to buy weapons.

CNPC, whose boss in Beijing is appointed by the ruling Communist Party, declined to comment for this report. The company requested and received written questions but did not respond. In public comments, Chinese officials have sought to maintain neutrality, saying that both Sudans “can only achieve common development through peaceful co-existence.”

In Juba, officials stressed that China should make greater efforts to persuade Khartoum to accept South Sudan’s position. “We are not asking China to help us. We are asking China to help itself with its friend,” Amum said. He made clear that Juba would no longer tolerate China’s alliance with Khartoum.“They are used to looking north,” he said. “They are now being told to turn around, southward.”

There are signs that China’s previously rock-solid support for Khartoum might be softening. In a recent interview with Qatar’s al-Raya newspaper, Bashir complained that Beijing had cancelled a loan to his government for a big agricultural development project. China pulled out, the Sudanese president said, because Khartoum was due to repay the money with oil shipments, which had been disrupted by the south’s independence.Even so, it is unlikely, analysts said, that China would jilt Khartoum for Juba — that would probably alarm other repressive and corrupt regimes, such as those in Angola and Equatorial Guinea, where China has forged highly profitable oil relationships.

“The Chinese are not going to throw away old friends,” Vertin said. “They won’t abandon Sudan. That would be a bad precedent for them.”

Sudan also has some powerful and so far loyal friends in Beijing, though how long this lasts may depend as much on the labyrinthine internal politics of the Communist Party as events in Africa. One of Khartoum’s biggest backers in Beijing for years has been Zhou Yongkang, a member of the party’s Politburo Standing Committee responsible for security. In recent days, however, rumors — all unconfirmed — have swirled in Beijing that Zhou is in deep political trouble after the purge last week of a senior party official with whom he is thought to have been allied.

Zhou used to be the head of CNPC, the state oil company, and led its push into Sudan’s oil sector in the 1990s after American and other Western companies pulled out. He has visited Khartoum repeatedly.

China’s predicament

Amid mounting anger in Juba over China’s continuing coziness with Khartoum, South Sudan on Feb. 20 expelled Liu Yingcai, the head of Petrodar, a consortium that is majority owned by CNPC.

In a letter, the Juba government accused Liu of colluding with Khartoum to steal South Sudan’s oil and of not fully cooperating with orders to shut down oil production. Petrodar, in a statement, denied the allegations. The consortium said it had ordered staff members “not to comply with the forced lifting” of oil, which it said was done by members of Sudan’s national security forces.

Now, South Sudan has launched an investigation of Petrodar to determine the extent of its role in the oil theft. Juba is also probing the actions of the Greater Nile Petroleum Operating Co., an oil consortium that is 40 percent owned by China and that also may have helped Khartoum steal oil. If the consortiums are found sufficiently guilty, Amum said, their contracts could be terminated.

“It will be an opportunity for others, with possibly even better technology, to come in,” Amum said. “If the Chinese are not with us, we will have another very good story, too. With the Chinese or with others, we will prosper.”

As tensions between the two Sudans grow, China’s predicament becomes more precarious. Last month, Sudan allegedly bombed an oil field at El Nar in South Sudan, nine miles from the jagged, contested border between the two countries, sending Chinese and other foreign workers maintaining the oil wells scrambling for their lives.

“They bombed this place because of the oil,” said Miakol Lual, a local tribal chief. The attack destroyed portions of the oil infrastructure.

“It’s a message to all foreigners: ‘You deal with us, not the other side,’ ” said a foreign supervisor who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he was not allowed to talk to the media. Khartoum has denied attacking the field.

In Juba, Chinese expatriates are growing anxious. In January, rebels linked to South Sudan kidnapped 29 Chinese workers in Sudan, releasing them last month. The Chinese Embassy has ordered all its nationals to stay in at night and not discuss anything sensitive with locals.

“Everyone is worried about the situation,” said a Chinese telecommunications worker who spoke on the condition of anonymity because he feared he would get fired. “If things get worse, we have made preparations to move out of here.”

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/africa/china-in-a-tug-of-war-between-two-sudans/2012/03/07/gIQAQUUrWS_story_2.html


Dreams fading in South SudanA man collects water from the Nile in Juba, South Sudan. Many people arriving from the north set up temporary shelter along the riverbank. (Adriane Ohanesian, AFP/Getty Images / February 28, 2012
By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times

March 21, 2012, 5:32 p.m.

 
Reporting from Juba, South Sudan—
The nation’s creation last year was greeted with hope and celebration. Now residents see only corruption and an uncaring government.

With a gnarled hand, the elderly widow picks up a rock and taps it with another rock until it shatters. Then she tosses the pebbles into a small pile.

The tap-tap of stone on stone echoes like drips in a cave as women pound stones to pebbles in the blasting heat of Rock City, on the outskirts of Juba, capital of the new nation of South Sudan.

Davidka Clement made the long trek to Juba from her village a few years ago. She had heard that South Sudan, which fought for decades for independence from Sudan, would soon become an independent country with its own leaders, who would care about people like her.

The country became a reality in July, to momentous celebration, but it changed nothing for Clement or the other pebble women of Rock City. She sits in her small square of shade, beneath a shelter of sticks and plastic, pounding stones.

It takes 10 days to make a pile about two feet high, but there are many pebble sellers in Rock City and few buyers. Much of the business goes to a nearby quarry, where people buy gravel by the truckload for road building and construction.

Clement makes about $1 a day.

“There’s nothing,” she says. “What do you do? You just come and do your work. I go home, my body is in pain. I cry, but I come back.”

Freedom wasn’t supposed to be like this.

Long marginalized by the Sudanese government in Khartoum, the southern part of the country was one of the most destitute, least developed places on Earth, with just a few miles of paved road. But last year’s peaceful secession sparked a surge of hope among South Sudanese. With their own flag, their own government, their own oil, they would build a decent country.

Instead, the government has taken the well-worn path of many other rebels-turned-leaders. Corruption and nepotism are pervasive, public services are negligible, and on a recent visit to Juba there was more evidence of demolition than of reconstruction.

In January, the government suspended oil production, which accounts for 98% of its revenue, in a dispute with Sudan over transit fees for shipping crude through the north by pipeline.

The joy of independence is a distant memory. Austerity is the new refrain.

Clement reaches for another rock.

“I left everything and I came to the city because they were saying: ‘Government, government, government. They want to help the poor people who are suffering.’ That’s why I came here,” says Clement, who wears a ragged, grimy dress. “But the government doesn’t want to help.”

Juba has about 370,000 inhabitants and the exhilarating atmosphere of a place in a hurry, with hotels made of shipping containers and thrown-together humanitarian compounds on nearly every street. New roads unfurl across the landscape like runaway rolls of paper.

Hotels are full of chattering oil analysts, government advisors, workers for charitable organizations and freelance journalists, waiting expectantly, like birth attendants in a delivery room, to see whether the newborn will live or die.

The bustle cannot soften the bleakness of the place. Red dust makes every surface look rusty. Plastic water bottles lie heaped in gutters. Tick-infested dogs poke their noses into garbage piles, and women cook pancake-like breads over charcoal fires on the roadside.

On every corner, motorcycle taxis sit waiting for fares. The sickening thunk of a car colliding with a motorcycle is heard several times a day.

The promise of a better life in Juba, made possible by South Sudan’s oil money, drew not only Clement, but thousands of Kenyans and Ugandans. They work as drivers, cooks and waiters, serving beers and burgers to the army of aid workers who keep the country’s hospitals and schools running.

Even in the capital, the main hospital is scruffy and grim; in rural areas, schools and medical facilities are scarce.

With the government slow to open clinics in Juba, private ones have sprung up. On the edge of Rock City, a half-finished clinic looms above the street, with patients lined up on benches, waiting to see a doctor.

The prices in South Sudanese pounds are scrawled on the wall: Admission: £20 ($6.25) Consultation: £15 ($4.60) Blood sugar: £10 ($3.12) Ultrasound: £40 ($12.48).

Last year, Hassan Awule, head of the clinic, was full of optimism: He would build an operating theater, a pediatrics unit and a morgue. Today, his ambitions have shrunk and the second story of the clinic is just a shell.

He was realistic enough not to expect help from the government or aid agencies, but he believed that with oil, South Sudan’s economy would grow enough to employ people who could afford to use private clinics.

“Even this month, there’s a danger this business could collapse,” Awule says. He has just held a crisis meeting with his senior staff members to decide how to save it: Raise prices, lay off some of the 48 personnel or slash salaries.

“There’s not enough money coming in to pay the staff,” Awule says.

Then there’s the cost of basic services the government doesn’t provide: Water has to be trucked in, and electricity comes from noisy diesel generators.

Awule fears that conditions will deteriorate further with the suspension of oil production. Corruption is an equally serious problem, he says.

“The management has failed. They’ve taken [oil] for personal benefit. Some politicians have millions while other people have nothing. It’s wrong.”

At the Juba market nearby, people complain that the government is busy dismantling one of the few institutions that provide decent livelihoods.

The air rings with the sound of hammering, but it’s not the sound of creation. Muscled men with mallets are tearing apart shabby little shops with dirt floors and sheet-metal walls.

Dust from the demolition rises like smoke. Dried corn and beans are scattered like confetti in the skeleton of one shop. When a women rescues a wooden box, a large spider scuttles away and crawls into a crack in the wall, but it won’t escape the demolition for long.

The government says it is upgrading the place, but shopkeepers say it’s just a pretext to kick them out and put officials’ friends in a rebuilt market.

“They say this is fourth-class,” says welder Wami Martin, 47, standing in the ruins of the shop he ran for 13 years, now reduced to twisted metal and broken planks. “They did not say what class they want it to be. We don’t know if they want it to be second- or third-class, but they want it to be built out of concrete and zinc sheet.”

Like most of the other shopkeepers, Martin has only a temporary ownership document and no money to rebuild to the government standard.

“What I fear is that land has become big business. Government officials can take the land and rent it out to other people. It’s happened many times. Our worry is that we might not get back our land.”

A tall man wearing sunglasses eavesdrops conspicuously on Martin’s complaints. The conversation ends.

In Rock City, Davidka Clement sits with eight big piles of pebbles, waiting for customers.

Looking back on her life, all she remembers is work. She started as a child, carrying water and making food. None of the girls in her village went to school. They all worked.

She is surprised to learn that not every woman worked as a girl.

“Didn’t your mother show you how to do those things?” she asks incredulously, pounding on a rock.

She talks of her marriage to a man chosen by her parents, and of her 10 children, all of whom, she says, either died or left home.

She strikes the rock harder.

“I wish the government would look at me as someone who’s poor and ask me to come and do some work, so I can survive,” she says.

“We have our new country, yes. But if you stay without work, it’s no good.”

robyn.dixon@latimes.com

http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-south-sudan-rock-city-20120322,0,954321,full.story

South Sudan’s dreams slipping away already

Los Angeles Times -‎
The nation’s creation last year was greeted with hope and celebration. Now residents see only corruption and an uncaring government. A man collects water from the Nile in Juba, South Sudan. Many people arriving from the north set up temporary shelter 
Daily Monitor -‎
By Machel Amos (email the author) Major international companies are in South Sudan for a three-day submit aimed a showcasing the new country’s investment potentials. At the conference, which started on Tuesday and will continue until Friday, 
Business Daily Africa
Co-operative Bank House along Nairobi’s Haile Selasie Avenue in Nairobi. The bank, which follows in the footsteps of KCB, and Equity into Africa’s newest state will spend at least Sh860 million to buy a 70 per cent stake in a bank to be opened in Juba, 
Ahram Online – ‎
South Sudan is planning to build about half a dozen hydropower and thermal power plants to help end almost permanent blackouts across the country and attract investment to manufacturing industries, an electricity official said on Wednesday.
Business Daily Africa – ‎Mar 20, 2012‎
Photo/File KCB headquarters in Nairobi: South Sudan accounted for 80 per cent of profits generated by Kenyan banks’ subsidiaries in Juba. By GEORGE NGIGI (email the author) The South Sudan market accounted for 80 per cent of profits generated by KCB’s 
Sudan Tribune –
March 21, 2012 (JUBA) — The newly independent Republic of South Sudan is set to receive a $9m grant from the World Bank as part of efforts to enhance job creation and increase access to finance for entrepreneurs, particularly youth and women, 
Bikya Masr – ‎Mar 20, 2012‎
CAIRO: The Under Secretary for Investment in the Ministry of Commerce, Industry and Investment, Simon Nyang Anei announced that South Sudan will host an investor conference in Juba later this month. He made the announcement at a press conference in 

After years in exile during the war, the son of an independence fighter returns to Juba, capital of South Sudan. It isn’t always comfortable, but it is his home.

Young South Sudanese return to homelandNuer Maker Benjamin gave up a comfortable life in London to return to his homeland, newly independent South Sudan, one of the least developed countries. (Robyn Dixon / Los Angeles Times)
Reporting from Juba, South Sudan— 
Just as war chewed up his country, it gnawed away at Nuer Maker Benjamin’s relationship with his father.From half a world away, the young man knew his father only by reputation: a heroic figure and southern Sudanese independence fighter. As he grew older, relatives urged him to make an effort to get to know the man.But his father, like his country, had grown a little forbidding and wary.Benjamin, 29, had left what is now South Sudan as a child, brought up by various relatives in different countries, cut off from his parents by the long, destructive independence war. Coming home, Benjamin did not expect things to be easy. He was leaving London for a dusty, traumatized African city.”I knew there’d be a culture shock,” he said of his return to Juba, the new country’s capital. “I was open to a lot of things. I always knew I was going to come to South Sudan.”He arrived two years ago, anticipating the country’s independence (which happened to tumultuous celebration in July). He had to learn to speak and behave differently. Shaking hands was in, swearing was out.

“Things that are not offensive in London are highly offensive here. People are very proud, so anything can be insulting to them, and you can misunderstand each other most of the time.”

For young South Sudanese such as Benjamin who returned from the diaspora in America, Australia, Europe or other parts of Africa, Juba isn’t always what they hoped. Many of those who remained here during the 22-year independence war resent those who left and have come back with their degrees and worldly experience. Government jobs go to those who did their bit for the war, and their proteges.

But for all its deprivations and anxieties, Juba is the only place that is, finally, home.

As one returnee, Winnie Lado, put it, “I’ve never felt the kind of belonging that I have felt here.”

Beneath, there is unease, for some. South Sudan is one of the least developed countries in the world, and returnees with children know they could give them a better life in another country.

The traumas of war echo in niggling daily tension, brittle relationships or sudden explosions of violence.

“People seemed very rude, the way they related,” Lado said. “The reason is these people are traumatized. All they’ve seen is war, conflict and running around. They don’t know anything else.”

Benjamin had the uncertain, confusing childhood of a refugee. He saw his mother only a few times before her death in 2009 and didn’t meet his father until he was in his early 20s.

From age 9 to 15, he lived with relatives in Cairo, where boys taunted him with names like Chocolada and Konga Bonga. In London, where he studied film, the racism was more subtle, but the frequent police harassment was equally disturbing.

Coming home, Benjamin knew there was some risk that South Sudan could collapse into a failed state or go back to war. He came anyway.

Benjamin is the son of a senior government official and former rebel fighter, George Maker Benjamin, who fought in the war against Sudan. He grew up hearing of his father’s distant deeds.

“He had a good reputation,” he said. “He was a hard-core politician and he had a habit of not combing his hair.”

Benjamin didn’t meet his father until a 2004 visit to Dallas, where his father was working on the resettlement of a group of Sudanese child soldiers called the Lost Boys of Sudan.

He’d been waiting years to meet his father, but when the moment came, he felt strangely vacant and cold.

“We shook hands, as if it was just another man,” he said. “I didn’t feel anything.”

The childhood distance between him and his father chilled Benjamin’s emotions.

“He has sacrificed a lot of his life and time to the movement, based on what he saw. It turned him cold and emotionless. It’s difficult to drop what you saw and felt, and suddenly be a father. He has his own burdens and issues to deal with.”

In Juba, the scars of the 22-year war play out in small daily encounters.

“I’ve seen people being beaten up. I didn’t know what to think. It was outside of what I knew,” Benjamin said. “Then I began to understand, it’s actually normal for such things to happen. If there’s a car accident, people see mob violence as a way to punish the guy who caused the accident. Violence has become part of the culture.”

It took some adjustment, especially his encounters with police and security officials, who can be aggressive or corrupt. But as the country recovers from its bitter past, he is full of plans.

There’s the film festival he’s organizing through his Benjamin Bil Sound Mind Foundation (named after his grandfather).

On the happier side, there’s the wedding he has arranged for his sister, involving many negotiations and formalities in settling the bride price (nominally in cattle), organizing documents and other details.

It’s an important responsibility. Planning the wedding and consulting with his father have anchored him to Juba, and to his father.

“I always understood where my father was coming from. I understood his mind-set and that it would not be easy for him to open up to me. Some of it would be regret that he wasn’t there.

“It’s only now we’re getting closer. He’s opening up to me and telling me more about himself.”

In the jostling streets of Juba, where the prices are high and electricity and water are unreliable, there’s plenty he could be disappointed with. But the down-at-heel city has welded itself to Benjamin’s heart.

“I feel it’s part of my destiny,” he said. “I feel a lot of joy.”

robyn.dixon@latimes.com

Analysis: Sudan, South Sudan back from brink of war
Coastweek
KHARTOUM (Xinhua) — Sudan and South Sudan have achieved a breakthrough in recent negotiations with the drafting of the framework agreements on national status and boundary demarcation. Analysts believed that the progress pulled back the two nations 
A homecoming in South Sudan
Bellingham Herald
By ROBYN DIXON – Los Angeles Times JUBA, South Sudan – Just as war chewed up his country, it gnawed away at Nuer Maker Benjamin’s relationship with his father. From half a world away, the young man knew his father only by reputation: a heroic figure 
Tel Aviv demonstration decries South Sudanese deportation
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
JERUSALEM (JTA)– Hundreds of South Sudanese migrants and their Israeli supporters protested against the migrant’s imminent deportation to their fledgling new country. The protest Saturday night in Tel Aviv was met with a counter protest by city 
South Sudanese man gets to know his father, his country
Chicago Tribune
Reporting from Juba, South Sudan— Just as war chewed up his country, it gnawed away at Nuer Maker Benjamin’s relationship with his father. From half a world away, the young man knew his father only by reputation: a heroic figure and southern Sudanese 
South Sudan’s Chief negotiator in post-secession talks holds dialogue with 
New Sudan Vision
Pagan Amum, Chief Negotiator for South Sudan answers listenerns questions on Friday March 16, 2012. New Sudan Vision photo. (Juba, South Sudan NSV) – Mr. Pagan Amum Okech, who is South Sudan’s chief negotiator in the post-secession talks in Addis Ababa 

George Clooney advocates for Sudanese people against government forces
Reality TV World
Clooney appeared on Fox News Sunday after testifying last week before a Senate hearing about his recent trip to the dangerous border area between Sudan and South Sudan. Violent civil war has plagued the Sudan since South Sudan became an independent 

Sudan's Defence Minister Abdelrahim Mohamed Hussein. Photo: September 2011

The International Criminal Court has issued an arrest warrant for Sudan’s Defence Minister Abdelrahim Mohamed Hussein for alleged crimes in Darfur.JUBA, SOUTH Sudan— South Sudanese officials said Thursday that Sudanese troops were massing near the disputed border and that Sudan’s armed forces had bombed two oil wells in South Sudan.A spokesman for South Sudan’s armed forces said two Sudanese planes dropped six bombs in Pariang county, along the north-south border, on Wednesday afternoon. Col. Philip Aguer said that at least one oil well had been damaged and was leaking into the ground, polluting drinking water.

Sudan has also been massing ground forces in a nearby town, he said.Al-Obeid Merwah, a spokesman for the Sudanese Foreign Ministry, did not return calls seeking comment.South Sudan became independent from Sudan in July, but many issues remain unresolved, including the demarcation of the border and the sharing of oil revenue.

Separately, the International Criminal Court issued an arrest warrant for Sudan’s defense minister, the third senior government official sought by the court over alleged involvement in atrocities in the Darfur region of western Sudan.

The court said it wants Abdelrahim Mohamed Hussein arrested on a warrant containing seven counts of crimes against humanity and six war crimes, including murder, persecution, rape and torture. The charges cover 41 incidents, the court said.

Prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo asked judges for the warrant in December, saying Hussein is among those who “bear greatest criminal responsibility” for atrocities in Darfur from August 2003 to March 2004.

Sudan does not recognize the court and refuses to hand over suspects, including President Omar Hassan al-Bashir, who is accused of genocide in Darfur. His government in Khartoum had denounced Moreno-Ocampo’s request for a warrant for Hussein.

At the time covered by the charges, Hussein was interior minister and the Sudanese government’s special representative in Darfur. He is accused of overseeing a state-sponsored plan to attack villages in western Darfur.

Sudan’s government is accused of unleashing Arab militias on civilians — a charge the government denies. The United Nations estimates that 300,000 people have died and 2.7 million have been displaced in the conflict.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/africa/sudanese-troops-massing-near-border-south-sudan-says/2012/03/01/gIQACehklR_story.html

ICC issues Sudan defence minister warrant over Darfur

Sudan's Defence Minister Abdelrahim Mohamed Hussein. Photo: September 2011Abdelrahim Mohamed Hussein also served as Sudan’s interior minister
The International Criminal Court has issued an arrest warrant for Sudan’s Defence Minister Abdelrahim Mohamed Hussein for alleged crimes in Darfur.

The court said there were sufficient grounds to hold him responsible for 20 counts of crimes against humanity and 21 counts of war crimes.

In December, a senior Sudanese official dismissed the request for the warrant as “ridiculous”.

The Hague-based ICC has already indicted Sudan’s president.

Omar al-Bashir denies the charges of genocide, crimes against humanity and war rimes in Darfur, saying they are politically motivated.

The UN estimates that more than 300,000 people have died in Darfur, mostly from disease, since rebels took up arms in 2003.

The government in Khartoum puts the figure at about 12,000 deaths, and says the number of casualties has been exaggerated.

‘Counter-insurgency campaign’

ICC prosecutor Luis Moreno-Ocampo asked the judges for the warrant in December, saying Mr Hussein was among those who bore the “greatest criminal responsibility” for atrocities in Sudan’s Darfur region from August 2003 to March 2004.

map

The mainly Arab Janjaweed militia is accused of carrying out a policy of ethnic cleansing and genocide against Darfur’s black African population after rebels took up arms in 2003, accusing the government of ignoring the region.

According to the ICC, attacks followed a pattern, with Sudan’s military surrounding a village, the air force bombing it and then soldiers and Janjaweed fighters going in on foot, killing, raping and looting.

The ICC said in a statement that Mr Hussein should be prosecuted for crimes against humanity, including persecution and torture, and war crimes including murder and rape.

The court said the crimes were allegedly committed against the Fur population in the towns of Kodoom, Bindisi, Mukjar and Arawala by the Sudanese armed forces and Janjaweed militia during a counter-insurgency campaign against Darfuri rebels.

“The plan of the counter-insurgency campaign was allegedly formulated at the highest levels of the government of the Republic of the Sudan and had allegedly as a core component an unlawful attack on that part of the civilian population perceived by the government as being close to the rebel groups,” it said.

At the time, Mr Hussein was both Sudan’s interior minister and its representative in Darfur.

Together with President Bashir, the court has also indicted another former Interior Minister Ahmad Muhammad Harun and Ali Muhammad Ali Abd-Al-Rahman, a suspected leader of the Janjaweed militia, over alleged atrocities in Darfur.

The ICC says that Mr Harun reported directly to Mr Hussein. They all deny the charges and refuse to surrender.

The Hague-based court has also indicted two Darfur rebels, who are accused of attacking African Union peacekeepers in Darfur. The suspects surrendered to the court in 2010.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-17226952

Sudanese Defense Minister Issued Arrest Warrant For Crimes Against Humanity

Bernama – ‎
THE HAGUE, March 2 (Bernama) — The International Criminal Court (ICC) issued a warrant of arrest against Sudanese Defense Minister Abdel Raheem Muhammad Hussein yesterday. The Hague-based ICC Chamber believes Hussein is responsible for 20 counts of 
New York Times – ‎‎
The International Criminal Court issued an arrest warrant on Thursday for the Sudanese defense minister, Abdel Rahim Muhammad Hussein, left, as part of investigations into atrocities in Darfur. The court said in a statement at The Hague that there were 
Washington Post – ‎
JUBA, SOUTH Sudan — South Sudanese officials said Thursday that Sudanese troops were massing near the disputed border and that Sudan’s armed forces had bombed two oil wells in South Sudan. A spokesman for South Sudan’s armed forces said two Sudanese 
The Nation, Pakistan – ‎
THE HAGUE – The International Criminal Court said on Thursday it has issued an arrest warrant for Sudan’s defence minister for crimes against the civilian population in Darfur. “The ICC issues a warrant of arrest for the Sudanese Minister Abdelrahim 
Chicago Tribune – ‎‎
* Arrest warrant issued for Abdel Raheem Muhammad Hussein * Faces 41 counts of crimes against humanity, war crimes * Sudan “not concerned” with the ICC decision -official * Hussein coordinated and armed militia -court (Adds comments from Sudanese 
Chicago Tribune – ‎
AMSTERDAM (Reuters) – The International Criminal Court issued an arrest warrant on Thursday for Sudanese Defense Minister Abdel Raheem Muhammad Hussein as part of investigations into atrocities in Darfur. Hussein is the latest of several senior 
Voice of America (blog) – ‎‎
The International Criminal Court has issued an arrest warrant for Sudan’s defense minister, Abdel Raheem Muhammed Hussein, for his alleged crimes in the conflict in Sudan’s Darfur region. The court said Thursday that Hussein is wanted on 41 counts of 
The Daily Star – ‎
By Mike Corder THE HAGUE, Netherlands: The International Criminal Court issued an arrest warrant Thursday for Sudan’s defense minister, the third senior regime official sought by the court for alleged involvement in atrocities in Darfur.
BBC News – ‎‎
The International Criminal Court has issued an arrest warrant for Sudan’s Defence Minister Abdelrahim Mohamed Hussein for alleged crimes in Darfur. The court said there were sufficient grounds to hold him responsible for 20 counts of crimes against 
Washington Post – ‎
THE HAGUE, Netherlands — The International Criminal Court issued an arrest warrant Thursday for Sudan’s defense minister, the third senior regime official sought by the court for alleged involvement in atrocities in Darfur. The court announced it wants 
South Sudanese Oil Fields In Unity State Bombed
Oye! Times
Dr. Barnaba Marial BenjaminAccording to the Minster of Information and Communication Dr. Barnaba Marial Benjamin, two oil fields have been hit by a bomb in Pariang County, 74 kilometres inside the territory of South Sudan’s Unity State; breaking the 
IRC begins emergency assistance for women and girls fleeing into South Sudan
Rescue
YIDA, South Sudan – The International Rescue Committee is launching emergency health and protection programs for vulnerable women and girls who have fled to South Sudan to escape flaring violence across the border in Sudan’s Nuba Mountain region.
 
South Sudan to disarm cattle gunmen in Jonglei state
BBC News
South Sudan, which gained independence from Sudan last year, is awash with small arms after decades of civil war that ended in 2005. News of the disarmament programme came as South Sudan accused Sudan of bombing an oil installation in its territory.

Cyber Internet breakdown, South Sudan searches alternatives
GroundReport
by JosephEdward March 01, 2012 The cyber internet cable that connect East Africa to the rest of the world breakdown ten days back, the breakdown has brought thousands of the business to standstill, South Sudanese internet users search alternative to 
South Sudan Accuses Sudan of Bombing Oil Fields
Voice of America
March 01, 2012 South Sudan Accuses Sudan of Bombing Oil Fields Hannah McNeish | Juba,South Sudan Newly independent South Sudan says that its former civil war foe Sudan has bombed its oil fields. The new nation recently shut down oil production on 
South Sudan army officers receive UN-led human rights training
UN News Centre
South Sudanese army officers received training on human rights, democracy and the rule of law, among other subjects, during a session led by the United Nations peacekeeping mission in the country (UNMISS). The three-day training session aimed to boost 

UN News Centre
Water for Sudan
Brighton-Pittsford Post
A young boy in South Sudan drinks from a well. As of May 2011, Water for South Sudan has drilled 104 borehole wells. By Alysa Stryker, staff writer Picture waking each day to a temperature of 120 degrees. You’re dehydrated, sore and worn.
South Sudan Accuses North of Bombing Oil Wells
Voice of America (blog)
Officials in South Sudan have accused neighboring Sudan of bombing oil wells, the latest sign of rising tension between the countries. Several officials, including government spokesman Barnaba Marial Benjamin, say Sudanese warplanes dropped bombs 

S. Sudan says Sudan bombed 2 oil wells in South
Boston.com
JUBA, Sudan—South Sudanese officials say that Sudanese armed forces bombed two oil wells inside South Sudan and Sudanese troops are massing near the disputed border. The spokesman for South Sudan’s armed forces said Thursday that two Sudanese planes 

This Year in Sudan and South Sudan: CSIS Briefing with Jok Madut Jok and John Ryle
Lawfare (blog)
by Kenneth Anderson Sudan and newly-independent South Sudan have featured in many news stories over the last several years; a headline in today’s Washington Post, for example, reads “South Sudan: Sudan bombed 2 oil wells in South Sudan
South Sudan: Country’s Experiment in Gandhi Diplomacy
AllAfrica.com
By Simon Allison, 1 March 2012 South Sudan’s oil fields have been eerily quiet for nearly a month, ever since the government ordered a complete halt to oil production in Africa’s newest country, also one of Africa’s poorest. It is effectively a hunger 

Environmental Sustainability for Development
AllAfrica.com
By Jacob K. Lupai, 1 March 2012 In his address to the First Joint Sitting of the National Legislature and to the Nation on the 8th August 2011 the President of Republic of South Sudan, Salva Kiir Mayardit, said that we have got more daunting tasks in 

Sudan Complains of JEM Role in Abiad Lake Attack, from South Sudan
Inner City Press
By Matthew Russell Lee UNITED NATIONS, March 1 — With Sudan emboldened by a February 27 closed door briefing of the UN Security Council by Thabo Mbeki that several Council members tell Inner City Press was either “anti South Sudan” or “more balanced” 
South Sudan accuses Khartoum of air strikes
The Daily Star
JUBA: Sudanese fighter jets have bombed oil and water wells deep inside South Sudan and its ground troops have crossed into contested oil-rich border regions, South Sudan officials said Thursday. “They have flown into our territory 74 kilometres (46 

Mothers in South Sudan reject polio vaccination
AfricaNews
Some mothers in South Sudan told polio house to house vaccinators that their children had been surviving without vaccination, so no need for that exercise. “Some mothers are blocking out vaccinators from reaching their children,” the supervisor of 

JobsLivelihoods Technical Coordinator – South Sudan
Reuters AlertNet
Leads the development strategy for South Sudan agriculture and livelihoods activities, with emphasis on response to perceived needs indicated by communities and beneficiaries. Plans and implements emergency interventions in beneficiary communities as 
South Sudan Hails Country’s Support
AllAfrica.com
SOUTH Sudanese Minister for National Security General Oyay D Ajak yesterday met President Mugabe at Zanu-PF Headquarters and expressed his country’s appreciation of the support it is receiving from Zimbabwe. Gen Ajak was leading a delegation of five 
South Sudan Passport, Nationality & Birth Certificate: What should be done?
Borglobe
By Akolde N. Jinub, Juba, South Sudan After independent in July 2011 and establishment of the first cabinet in a sovereign state, so much was expected from the Republic of South Sudanexperienced ministers, their deputies, Under Secretaries and 
South Sudan: Oil and financial crisis
Sudan Tribune
By Aldo Ajou Deng Akuey February 29, 2012 — The Republic of South Sudan is currently facing a financial crisis that has been provoked by the closure of the pipeline. While I full support the Government on their decision to close the pipeline and I 
Jau is part of South Sudan territory, minister says
Sudan Tribune
February 29, 2012 (JUBA)- Juba on Tuesday refuted Khartoum’s reports that Jau lies north of their shared international border, and that South Sudan was involved in clashes there on Sunday, between insurgents and the Sudan Armed Forces (SAF).

South Sudan oil shutdown leads to massive job losses
Africa Review
Pipes lay idle in Palaug oilfields in Upper Nile state of South Sudan after the shutdown of oil production over a dispute with Sudan. Fears of job losses are rife. MACHEL AMOS | AFRICA REVIEW | By MACHEL AMOS in JubaPosted Thursday, March 1 2012 at 

US ambassador to South Sudan reaches Unity state in countrywide tour
Sudan Tribune
By Bonifacio Taban Kuich February 29, 2012 (BENTIU) – US ambassador to South Sudan, Susan Page met with Unity state governor, Taban Deng Gai on Wednesday to discuss the situation in the state. “I’m trying to get around all the ten states to visits and 
S. Sudan seeks over US$90 million for 2014 census
Sudan Tribune
By Ngor Arol Garang February 29, 2012 (JUBA) — South Sudan announced it was seeking US$99 million in funding to conduct a census, which has been encountering challenges which may prevent the exercise planned for 2014 taking place.
 

Sudan-UN Joint Assessment Reveals Humanitarian Situation in South Kordofan is 
MarketWatch (press release)
Sudan continues to call on South Sudan to recognize its negative role in this crisis and cease its support to the rebels. And in order for the US and those pushing for an intervention to play a constructive role, they must look at the facts on the 

Sudan-UN Joint Assessment Reveals Humanitarian Situation in South Kordofan is 
Sacramento Bee
By Embassy of the Republic of the Sudan WASHINGTON, Feb. 24, 2012 — /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — The humanitarian situation in South Kordofan that has garnered international concern, and which some have now exploited to push an agenda of intervention, 

South Sudan expels Chinese oil firm boss
Mmegi Online
JUBA: The world’s newest nation has expelled its first person – the head of South Sudan’s biggest oil company, the Chinese and Malaysian-owned Petrodar. The Chinese national, Liu Yingcai, was asked to leave following an investigation into Khartoum’s 

Sudan’s survey says South Kordofan’s humanitarian situation “normal”
Sudan Tribune
February 23, 2012 (KHARTOUM) – A survey conducted by government and international groups inSudan’s war-battered state of South Kordofan has shown “good” levels of food security and “normal” humanitarian conditions, an official said on Monday as UN 
Nation, Uganda Border Opens After Drivers’ Protests
AllAfrica.com
By Dhieu Williams, 24 February 2012 Juba — South Sudan Nimule and Uganda border of Attiak has been opened yesterday following two days closure by drivers from Tanzania, Uganda, Kenya, Somalia who protested overloaded charges of taxes imposed on them 
Analysis: South Sudan future dicey after oil money loss
Reuters
By Ulf Laessing and Hereward Holland | JUBA (Reuters) – In an air-conditioned Toyota showroom packed with half a dozen off-road vehicles in South Sudan’s capital, dealer Desmond McCue is wondering whether the shutdown of the country’s oil production 

South Sudan: US Congressman to Discuss Recent Visit to Yida Refugee Camp
AllAfrica.com
Washington, DC — Frank Wolf (R-VA), a longtime advocate for Sudan and co-chairman of the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission, just returned from a trip to the world’s newest country, South Sudan, where he visited a refugee camp in Yida filled with men, 

MSF Projects in South Sudan in 2011–12
Doctors Without Borders
MSF has been working in the region that today constitutes the Republic of South Sudan since 1983. In 2011, MSF responded to several emergencies, including large-scale displacement, refugee influxes, inter-communal fighting, alarming nutrition