By Wenne Madyt Dengs, Juba, South Sudan

July 7, 2015 (SSB)  —-  Although distance learning offers more people an opportunity to attain higher education, it is not all advantages and benefits. Distance learning has costs, requires compromises and self-motivation is essential for success.

It would be a great shame for young nation like South Sudan to have thousands of students who graduated via distance education system. South Sudan will lack Medical Doctors and Engineers! Distance learning does not always offer all the necessary courses online. Students pursuing a specific certificate or degree program may not have all the necessary courses available through distance learning so it is not suited for all subjects. For example, you can study a history lesson completely online but you cannot perform nursing clinically online. For some courses, physical classroom attendance will be mandatory to complete the course.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Baping Association for Development (BADE): A Fundraiser to Build a Secondary School in South Sudan

Baping Association for Development (BADE)

Baping Association for Development (BADE)

  

July 7, 2015 (SSB)  —-  Friends, we are writing on behalf of the Baping Association for Development (BADE) and the entire community of Dachuek in the United States to invite you and your family to participate in our planned fundraiser, aimed at building a secondary school in our village back in South Sudan.

The fundraiser will be held on Saturday, August 15, 2015 at the Autism Center of Nebraska, located at 9012 Q Street. Omaha, NE 68127. Start time will be 2:00 pm till 1:00 am. A final community meeting will be held on Sunday August 16, 2015, at Messiah Lutheran Church.

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By Ajo Noel Julious, Juba, South Sudan

July 6, 2015 (SSB)   —-   The other day I was at my favorite tea spot by the roadside at Mahata Yei, sipping hot kerekede – hibiscus tea – as speeding bikers and motor vehicles moved by. In local, Juba Arabic, this location is famously known as BARLAMAN – or Parliament in English. It earned this name because both employed and unemployed youth love coming to discussion politics of the day every evening after work. Of course for those who know it, BARLAMAN has history that dates back to the days of the liberation with its ancient spot in Yei town, then known as DNC. Today there are many Ministers and Honorable Members of Parliament in both State and Federal government who pride themselves on having been members of the BARLAMAN. It moved to Juba when the CPA was signed and all these promising young men came to the city and continued it.

As I sat there drinking my hibiscus tea with the traffic throwing dust on us, the discussion intensified around Transitional Justice, Judicial reforms and what really needs to be done and how we should go about it. “It is common knowledge that the Judiciary is understaffed, poorly financed and corrupt. Young well-educated lawyers like you must rescue us,” one of my colleagues asserted. We all know that South Sudan needs Justice but this can only be achieved when we have genuinely reformed our judiciary and enhanced its capabilities. I have had a cocktail of ideas swarming my mind on how I can contribute to make a difference in this search for judicial reform and Justice. So, in the interest of bringing BARLAMAN and its important debates to the public, I’d like to share my thoughts on where to begin with judicial reform in South Sudan.

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By Sunday de John

July 5, 2015 (SSB) —- A country floating on political sentiments like South Sudan, characterised by political anarchy and specious political groups basing on tenets of tribal jingoism is destined to achieve, if any, very little success.

With continued grooming of warlords and dishonourable political chitchats, there is a glimpse of hope for a prosperous nation. It hurts a lot for a country as young as South Sudan to be this deeply submerged in unending politico-social turmoil where innocent civilians are penalized for crimes they have not committed.

With unending death, tortured mental state, physical harm and a tangible anxiety, it becomes unbearable to an innocent victim to acknowledge that a country acclaimed in the national anthem, one theoretically depicted to be a land of great abundance exist in this continent. Read the rest of this entry »


Reporting by Thomas Jenay Dual, Old Fangak, Phow State

July 6, 2015 (SSB)  —  The Thiang Nuer Community have successfully organized on 3th of July, 2015 in Phow state, Old Fangak, celebrated and welcomed their newly created Fangak South County and the appointment of Mr. Isaac Tut Machar Biet as its first Commissioner.

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By Garang Atem Ayiik, Juba, South Sudan

salary

salary

Introduction

July 5, 2015 (SSB)  —  In democratic societies, budget has become a very important tool through which the government identify macroeconomic risks, identify priorities and suggest how to address identified macroeconomic and budget risks.

Budget can be define as process in which private and public entities estimates their resources envelops, and identify activities to be financed in accordance with defined objectives and developed oversight functions to reduce revenue leakages or unnecessary expenditures.

To ensure comparability, budget is done annually to allow year-on- year comparison, for South Sudan budget cycle is July-June; in most countries budget is a people-centered exercise, in South Sudan, budget was presented on 1st July 2015 which theoretically, is the effective date leaving no room for public participation either by legislative function and public.

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South Sudan Fundamentally Divisive and Unnecessary Ideas

Luk Rick, Australia

July 5, 2015 (SSB)  —  Many in South Sudanese society wanted to do a very good behavioural, however why must this be attributable to a flag or identity? It’s at best a very unclear concept that is too easily misused by those in power today. The best in us is brought out on an individual independent not for Southern Sudanese citizen, the human level is too low in term of value, trying to attribute people to rallying cry of look at the regime in Juba because no security for them, no one value them, aren’t we wonderful and smart and cultured and right is usually only done by those who wish to achieve their own power rather the power of nations, usually selfishness ends as at its core it take for granted that there is some sort of superiority.

I’m great to you’re not the only way those group identity is not good for us would be for larger community concepts such as humanity or living beings on South Sudan, today global world it has no place in the betterment of those corrupted people in our country.

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